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1.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 115: e190347, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, SES-SP | ID: biblio-1135231

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is considered a promising live bacterial delivery system. However, several proposals for rBCG vaccines have not progressed, mainly due to the limitations of the available expression systems. OBJECTIVES To obtain a set of mycobacterial vectors using a range of promoters with different strengths based on a standard backbone, previously shown to be stable. METHODS Mycobacterial expression vectors based on the pLA71 vector as backbone, were obtained inserting different promoters (PAN, PαAg, PHsp60, PBlaF* and PL5) and the green fluorescence protein (GFP) as reporter gene, to evaluate features such as their relative strengths, and the in vitro (inside macrophages) and in vivo stability. FINDINGS The relative fluorescence observed with the different vectors showed increasing strength of the promoters: PAN was the weakest in both Mycobacterium smegmatis and BCG and PBlaF* was higher than PHsp60 in BCG. The relative fluorescence observed in a macrophage cell line showed that PBlaF* and PHsp60 were comparable. It was not possible to obtain strains transformed with the extrachromosomal expression vector containing the PL5 in either species. MAIN CONCLUSION We have obtained a set of potentially stable mycobacterial vectors with a arrange of expression levels, to be used in the development of rBCG vaccines.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Mice , BCG Vaccine/immunology , Mycobacterium smegmatis/immunology , Green Fluorescent Proteins/immunology , Escherichia coli/immunology , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Mycobacterium bovis/immunology , Escherichia coli/genetics , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Mice, Inbred BALB C
2.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 112(2): 123-130, Feb. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-841767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Bovine tuberculosis (TB) is a zoonotic disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis, responsible for causing major losses in livestock. A cost effective alternative to control the disease could be herd vaccination. The bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has a limited efficacy against bovine TB, but can improved by over-expression of protective antigens. The M. bovis antigen 85B demonstrates ability to induce protective immune response against bovine TB in animal models. However, current systems for the construction of recombinant BCG expressing multiple copies of the gene result in strains of low genetic stability that rapidly lose the plasmid in vivo. Employing antibiotic resistance as selective markers, these systems also compromise vaccine safety. We previously reported the construction of a stable BCG expression system using auxotrophic complementation as a selectable marker. OBJECTIVES The fundamental aim of this study was to construct strains of M. bovis BCG Pasteur and the auxotrophic M. bovis BCG ΔleuD expressing Ag85B and determine their stability in vivo. METHODS Employing the auxotrophic system, we constructed rBCG strains that expressed M. bovis Ag85B and compared their stability with a conventional BCG strain in mice. Stability was measured in terms of bacterial growth on the selective medium and retention of antigen expression. FINDINGS The auxotrophic complementation system was highly stable after 18 weeks, even during in vivo growth, as the selective pressure and expression of antigen were maintained comparing to the conventional vector. MAIN CONCLUSION The Ag85B continuous expression within the host may generate a stronger and long-lasting immune response compared to conventional systems.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Mice , Plasmids/genetics , Plasmids/immunology , BCG Vaccine/genetics , BCG Vaccine/immunology , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Mycobacterium bovis/genetics , Mycobacterium bovis/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Antigens, Bacterial/metabolism , Escherichia coli/genetics , Genetic Vectors , Mice, Inbred BALB C
3.
Arch. endocrinol. metab. (Online) ; 59(3): 210-214, 06/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-751317

ABSTRACT

Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic expression of adipokines in the adipocytes of monosodium glutamate (MSG)-treated obese rats submitted to physical activity.Materials and methods Obesity was induced by neonatal MSG administration. Exercised rats (MSG and control) were subjected to swim training for 30 min for 10 weeks, whereas their respective controls remained sedentary. Total RNA was obtained from sections of the mesenteric adipose tissue of the rats. mRNA levels of adiponectin (Adipoq), tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnf), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (Ppara), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg) adipokines were quantified by quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR).Results In the exercise-trained control group, the expression of Adipoq increased compared to the sedentary control, which was not observed in the MSG-obese rats. Increased levels of Tnf in MSG-obese rats were not reversed by the swim training. The expression of Ppara was higher in sedentary MSG-obese rats compared to the sedentary control. Swimming increased this adipokine expression in the exercise-trained control rats compared to the sedentary ones. mRNA levels of Pparg were higher in the sedentary MSG-rats compared to the sedentary control; however, the exercise did not influenced its expression in the groups analyzed.Conclusions In conclusion, regular physical activity was not capable to correct the expression of proinflammatory adipokines in MSG-obese rat adipocytes.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Molecular Mimicry/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factors , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Vaccines/chemistry , Vaccines/immunology , Adjuvants, Immunologic/chemistry , /immunology , /chemistry , /metabolism , Cancer Vaccines/chemistry , Cancer Vaccines/immunology , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Immunotherapy , Ligands , Lentivirus/genetics , Lentivirus/immunology , Macaca mulatta , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/therapy , Protein Multimerization , TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand/chemistry , Toll-Like Receptors/agonists , Tumor Necrosis Factors/chemistry , Vaccines, Synthetic/chemistry , Viral Matrix Proteins/immunology
4.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 45(12): 1102-1111, Dec. 2012. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-659651

ABSTRACT

Vaccines were initially developed on an empirical basis, relying mostly on attenuation or inactivation of pathogens. Advances in immunology, molecular biology, biochemistry, genomics, and proteomics have added new perspectives to the vaccinology field. The use of recombinant proteins allows the targeting of immune responses focused against few protective antigens. There are a variety of expression systems with different advantages, allowing the production of large quantities of proteins depending on the required characteristics. Live recombinant bacteria or viral vectors effectively stimulate the immune system as in natural infections and have intrinsic adjuvant properties. DNA vaccines, which consist of non-replicating plasmids, can induce strong long-term cellular immune responses. Prime-boost strategies combine different antigen delivery systems to broaden the immune response. In general, all of these strategies have shown advantages and disadvantages, and their use will depend on the knowledge of the mechanisms of infection of the target pathogen and of the immune response required for protection. In this review, we discuss some of the major breakthroughs that have been achieved using recombinant vaccine technologies, as well as new approaches and strategies for vaccine development, including potential shortcomings and risks.


Subject(s)
Humans , Bacterial Vaccines/immunology , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Biotechnology
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-13091

ABSTRACT

Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are versatile and useful tools for transferring genes into cells that are capable of stimulating a specific immune response to their expressed antigens. In this work, two HSV-1-derived amplicon vectors were generated. One of these expressed the full-length glycoprotein D (gD) of bovine herpesvirus 1 while the second expressed the truncated form of gD (gDtr) which lacked the trans-membrane region. After evaluating gD expression in the infected cells, the ability of both vectors to induce a specific gD immune response was tested in BALB/c mice that were intramuscularly immunized. Specific serum antibody responses were detected in mice inoculated with both vectors, and the response against truncated gD was higher than the response against full-length gD. These results reinforce previous findings that HSV-1 amplicon vectors can potentially deliver antigens to animals and highlight the prospective use of these vectors for treating infectious bovine rhinotracheitis disease.


Subject(s)
Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Blotting, Western/veterinary , Cattle , Female , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Herpesvirus 1, Bovine/genetics , Herpesvirus 1, Human/genetics , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Immunization/methods , Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis/immunology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Neutralization Tests/veterinary , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Vaccines/immunology
6.
Biol. Res ; 43(1): 13-18, 2010. ilus, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-548025

ABSTRACT

Mycobacterium bovis BCG has been proposed as an effective live vector for multivalent vaccines. The development of mycobacterial genetic systems to express foreign antigens and the adjuvanticity of BCG are the basis for the potential use of this attenuated mycobacterium as a recombinant vaccine vector. Stable plasmid vectors without antibiotic resistance markers are needed for heterologous antigen expression in BCG. Our group recently described the construction of a BCG expression system using auxotrophic complementation as a selectable marker. In this work, LipL32 and LigAni antigens of Leptospira interrogans were cloned and expressed in M. bovis BCG Pasteur and in the auxotrophic M. bovis BCG ΔleuD strains under the control of the M. leprae 18kDa promoter. Stability of the plasmids during in vitro growth and after inoculation of the recombinant BCG strains in hamsters was compared. The auxotrophic complementation system was highly stable, even during in vivo growth, as the selective pressure was maintained, whereas the conventional vector was unstable in the absence of selective pressure. These results confirm the usefulness of the new expression system, which represents a huge improvement over previously described expression systems for the development of BCG into an effective vaccine vector.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cricetinae , BCG Vaccine/immunology , Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins/genetics , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Leptospira interrogans/genetics , Mycobacterium bovis/genetics , Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins/immunology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Leptospira interrogans/immunology , Lipoproteins/genetics , Lipoproteins/immunology , Mycobacterium bovis/immunology , Plasmids/genetics , Plasmids/immunology
7.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 38(4): 509-522, Apr. 2005. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-398189

ABSTRACT

Vaccine approaches to infectious diseases are widely applied and appreciated. Amongst them, vectors based on recombinant viruses have shown great promise and play an important role in the development of new vaccines. Many viruses have been investigated for their ability to express proteins from foreign pathogens and induce specific immunological responses against these antigens in vivo. Generally, gene-based vaccines can stimulate potent humoral and cellular immune responses and viral vectors might be an effective strategy for both the delivery of antigen-encoding genes and the facilitation and enhancement of antigen presentation. In order to be utilized as a vaccine carrier, the ideal viral vector should be safe and enable efficient presentation of required pathogen-specific antigens to the immune system. It should also exhibit low intrinsic immunogenicity to allow for its re-administration in order to boost relevant specific immune responses. Furthermore, the vector system must meet criteria that enable its production on a large-scale basis. Several viral vaccine vectors have thus emerged to date, all of them having relative advantages and limits depending on the proposed application, and thus far none of them have proven to be ideal vaccine carriers. In this review we describe the potential, as well as some of the foreseeable obstacles associated with viral vaccine vectors and their use in preventive medicine.


Subject(s)
Humans , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Adenoviridae/immunology , Alphavirus/immunology , Herpesviridae/immunology , Poliovirus/immunology , Poxviridae/immunology , Recombination, Genetic , Viral Vaccines/genetics , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/immunology
8.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 100(1): 79-84, Feb. 2005. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-398121

ABSTRACT

The human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic is of unprecedented gravity and is spreading rapidly, notably in the most disadvantaged regions of the world. The search for a preventive vaccine is thus an absolute priority. For over 10 years the French National Agency for AIDS research (ANRS) has been committed to an original program combining basic science and clinical research. The HIV preventive vaccine research program run by the ANRS covers upstream research for the definition of immunogens, animal models, and clinical research to evaluate candidate vaccines. Most researchers in 2004 believe that it should be possible to obtain partial vaccine protection through the induction of a strong and multiepitopic cellular response. Since 1992, the ANRS has set up 15 phases I and II clinical trials in order to evaluate the safety and the capacity of the candidate vaccines for inducing cellular immune responses. The tested candidate vaccines were increasingly complex recombinant canarypox viruses (Alvac) containing sequences coding for certain viral proteins, utilized alone or combined with other immunogens (whole or truncated envelope proteins). ANRS has also been developing an original strategy based on the utilization of lipopeptides. These comprise synthetic fragments of viral proteins associated with lipids that facilitate the induction of a cellular immune response. These approaches promptly allowed the assessment of a prime-boost strategy combining a viral vector and lipopeptides.


Subject(s)
Humans , AIDS Vaccines , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/prevention & control , HIV-1 , Lipoproteins/immunology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/immunology , Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Canarypox virus/immunology , France , Genetic Vectors/immunology
9.
São Paulo; s.n; 2001. 126 p. ilus, tab, graf.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-313761

ABSTRACT

As linhagens celulares ST1 e P7 (ARMELIN E ARMELIN, 1983), isoladas no laboratório a partir da linhagem C6 de glioma de rato, constituem modelos interessantes para o estudo de ação de glicocorticóides por mostrarem, respectivamente, hiperesponsividade e resistência ao tratamento com o hormônio quando observados morfologia, tempo de dobramento, densidade de saturação, crescimento em suspensão de agarose e tumorigenicidade em camundos "nude". Em trabalhos anteriores, foram isoladas de bibliotecas de cDNA de células ST1, através de hibridização diferencial, seqüências correspondentes a metalotioneína 1, metalotioneína 2, glicoproteína "alfa"-1 ácida e pelo menos um transcrito de um retrovírus endógeno


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , DNA , Gene Library , Glioma , Hormones/biosynthesis , Hormones/genetics , Hormones/metabolism , In Vitro Techniques , Molecular Biology , Neuroglia , Genetic Vectors/physiology , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Genetic Vectors/metabolism , Adrenal Cortex Hormones , Sequence Analysis, DNA/methods , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Blotting, Northern , Cell Line , Electrophoresis, Agar Gel , Orosomucoid
10.
São Paulo; s.n; 2001. 132 p. ilus, tab, graf.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-313771

ABSTRACT

A proteína recombinante B13 contém repetições seriadas de 12 aminoácidos e corresponde a uma região do antígeno imunodominante de 140-116 KDa encontrado na superfície da forma tripomastigota de T. cruzi (cepa Y). A proteína B13 apresenta elevada sensibilidade e especificidade no diagnóstico sorológico da Doença de Chagas. A análise da distribuição de subclasses de IgG anti-B13 em soros de pacientes chagásicos cardiopatas (SCC) e de assintomáticas (SCI) mostrou o mesmo padrão: IgG1¼IgG3>IgG2>IgG4. No entanto, a média da reatividade a B13 foi maior no grupo SCC do que no grupo SCI. Dados anteriores de nosso grupo indicam que a resposta de célula T a B13 é restrita ao grupo HLA de classe II...


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Antigens, Protozoan/physiology , Antigens, Protozoan/immunology , Antigens, Protozoan/metabolism , Chagas Disease/diagnosis , Chagas Disease/epidemiology , Chagas Disease/immunology , Chagas Disease/metabolism , In Vitro Techniques , Recombinant Proteins/biosynthesis , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Trypanosoma cruzi , Blotting, Western , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Serologic Tests/methods , Serologic Tests , Genetic Vectors/analysis , Genetic Vectors/immunology
11.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 30(2): 157-68, Feb. 1997. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-188422

ABSTRACT

The yellow fever (YF) virus is the prototype flavivirus. The use of molecular techniques has unraveled the basic mechanisms of viral genome structure and expression. Recent trends in flavivirus research include the use of infectious clone technology with which it is possible to recover virus from cloned cDNA. Using this technique, mutations can be introduced at any point of the viral genome and their resulting effect on virus phenotype can be assessed. This approach has opened new possibilities to study several biological viral features with special emphasis on the issue of virulence/attenuation of the YF virus. The feasibility of using YF virus 17D vaccine strain, for which infectious cDNA is available, as a vector for the expression of heterologous antigens is reviewed.


Subject(s)
Genetic Vectors/immunology , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Yellow fever virus/immunology , Yellow Fever/virology , Viral Vaccines/genetics , Yellow fever virus/genetics , Yellow fever virus/ultrastructure
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