Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 19 de 19
Filter
1.
Rev.chil.ortop.traumatol. ; 63(2): 139-144, ago.2022. ilus, graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1436786

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCCIÓN Haemophilus parainfluenzae (HP) es un cocobacilo gram negativo y un patógeno oportunista. Rara vez se asocia a infecciones vertebrales o musculoesqueléticas, y está muy poco reportado en la literatura. PRESENTACIÓN DELO CASO Una mujer de 45 años, sana, que presentaba un historial de dos semanas de lumbalgia progresiva, fiebre, coriza y congestión nasal, y que tenía discitis intervertebral causada por HP, confirmada por dos hemocultivos positivos y hallazgos progresivos de resonancia magnética (RM) de columna lumbar. Los hallazgos de la RM fueron atípicos, y consistían en un absceso del psoas y pequeñas colecciones de líquido epidural e intraespinal anterior asociadas con espondilodiscitis. El diagnóstico inicial se retrasó debido a que la RM inicial no reveló hallazgos que sugirieran un proceso infeccioso. El tratamiento consistió en un ciclo prolongado de administración intravenosa seguida de antibióticos orales, lo que finalmente produjo una buena respuesta clínica. DISCUSIÓN Y CONCLUSIÓN El HP es un patógeno muy raro en la espondilodiscitis. No obstante, debe tenerse en cuenta, especialmente en pacientes que presentan lumbalgia y fiebre y/o bacteriemia por microorganismos gram negativos. El estudio inicial debe incluir una RM de la columna con contraste. Aunque es poco común, la espondilodiscitis y un absceso del psoas pueden presentarse concomitantemente. Los antibióticos prolongados son el pilar del tratamiento.


INTRODUCTION Haemophilus parainfluenzae (HP) is a gram-negative coccobacillus and an opportunistic pathogen. It is rarely associated with spinal- and musculoskeletal-site infections, and very little reported in the literature. CASE PRESENTATION An otherwise healthy, 45-year-old woman who presented with a two-week history of progressive low back pain, fever, coryza and nasal congestion, was found to have intervertebral discitis caused by HP, confirmed by two positive blood cultures and progressive lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The MRI findings were atypical, consisting of a psoas abscess and small anterior epidural and intraspinal fluid collections associated with spondylodiscitis. The initial diagnosis was delayed because the initial MRI failed to reveal findings suggestive of an infectious process. The treatment consisted of a long course of intravenous followed by oral antibiotics, ultimately yielding a good clinical response. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a very rare pathogen in spondylodiscitis. Nonetheless, it should be considered, especially in patients presenting with low back pain and fever and/or gram negative bacteremia. The initial work-up should include contrast-enhanced MRI of the spine. Although rare, spondylodiscitis and a psoas abscess can present concomitantly. Prolonged antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Haemophilus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods
2.
Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Research ; : 412-429, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-811069

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Different characteristics of airway microbiome in asthmatics may lead to differential immune responses, which in turn cause eosinophilic or neutrophilic airway inflammation. However, the relationships among these factors have yet to be fully elucidated.METHODS: Microbes in induced sputum samples were subjected to sequence analysis of 16S rRNA. Airway inflammatory phenotypes were defined as neutrophils (>60%) and eosinophils (>3%), and inflammation endotypes were defined by levels of T helper (Th) 1 (interferon-γ), Th2 (interleukin [IL]-5 and IL-13), Th-17 (IL-17), and innate Th2 (IL-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) cytokines, inflammasomes (IL-1β), epithelial activation markers (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IL-8), and Inflammation (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α) cytokines in sputum supernatants was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.RESULTS: The numbers of operational taxonomic units were significantly higher in the mixed (n = 21) and neutrophilic (n = 23) inflammation groups than in the paucigranulocytic inflammation group (n = 19; p < 0.05). At the species level, Granulicatella adiacens, Streptococcus parasanguinis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Veillonella rogosae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, and Neisseria perflava levels were significantly higher in the eosinophilic inflammation group (n = 20), whereas JYGU_s levels were significantly higher in the neutrophilic inflammation group compared to the other subtypes (P < 0.05). Additionally, IL-5 and IL-13 concentrations were correlated with the percentage of eosinophils (P < 0.05) and IL-13 levels were positively correlated with the read counts of Porphyromonas pasteri and V. rogosae (P < 0.05). IL-1β concentrations were correlated with the percentage of neutrophils (P < 0.05). had a tendency to be positively correlated with the read count of JYGU_s (P = 0.095), and was negatively correlated with that of S. pneumoniae (P < 0.05).CONCLUSIONS: Difference of microbial patterns in airways may induce distinctive endotypes of asthma, which is responsible for the neutrophilic or eosinophilic inflammation in asthma.


Subject(s)
Asthma , Colony-Stimulating Factors , Cytokines , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Eosinophils , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Inflammasomes , Inflammation , Interleukin-13 , Interleukin-33 , Interleukin-5 , Microbiota , Necrosis , Neisseria , Neutrophils , Phenotype , Pneumonia , Porphyromonas , Sequence Analysis , Sputum , Streptococcus , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Veillonella
3.
International Journal of Oral Biology ; : 199-208, 2016.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-44705

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to identify the non-Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans bacteria grown on the tryptic soy-serum-bacitracin-vancomycin (TSBV) medium, an A. actinomycetemcomitans selective medium. A total of 82 unidentified bacterial isolates from the oral cavities of a Korean population were kindly provide by the Korean Collection for Oral Microbiology. All the clinical isolates were grown on TSBV medium and bacterial DNA purified from each isolate was subjected to PCR with universal primers specific for bacterial 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNAs) sequence. The each bacterial 16S rDNA was amplified by PCR and the nucleotide sequences of it was determined by the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. They were identified by 16S rDNA sequence comparison method at the specie-level. The data showed that Neisseria spp. (42 strains), Fusobacterium spp. (10 strains), Capnocytophaga spp. (8 strains), Propionibacterium acnes (5 strains), Aggregatibacter aprophilus (4 strains), Campylobacter spp. (5 strains), Veillonella dispar (3 strains), Streptococcus sp. (1 strain), Haemophilus parainfluenzae (1 strain), Leptotrichia wadei (1 strain), Morococcus sp./Neisseria sp. (1 strain), and Staphylococcus sp. (1 strain) were identified. These results could be used to develop a new A. actinomycetemcomitans-selective medium which is more effective than the TSBV medium in future studies.


Subject(s)
Aggregatibacter , Bacteria , Base Sequence , Campylobacter , Capnocytophaga , DNA, Bacterial , DNA, Ribosomal , Fusobacterium , Genes, rRNA , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Leptotrichia , Methods , Neisseria , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Propionibacterium acnes , Staphylococcus , Streptococcus , Veillonella
4.
Chinese Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics ; (12): 1193-1199, 2015.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-279942

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the distribution of pathogens of children with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) from the Chongqing area.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Nasopharyngeal specimens and blood specimens of 1 613 children with CAP were collected between January 2014 and December 2014 for bacterial culture and detection of 7 respiratory viruses and antibodies against Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP).</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The overall positive rate of bacteria was 50.22% (810 cases). Hemophilus parainfluenzae (40.8%), Streptococcus pneumonia (29.7%) and Moraxelle catarrhalis (7.3%) were the predominant ones. Among the viruses, the top detected virus was respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, 58.3%), followed by parainfluenza virus type3 (17.4%) and adenovirus (14.3%). A total of 481 cases (29.82%) were MP-positive. The co-infection rate was 32.18% (519 cases), and the mixed infections of bacteria and viruses were common (47.4%).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>RSV and Hemophilus parainfluenzae are the major pathogens of CAP in children from the Chongqing area. MP is also an important pathogen. The co-infection of bacteria and viruses is prevalent.</p>


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Community-Acquired Infections , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Hospitalization , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , Pneumonia , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
5.
Korean Journal of Medicine ; : 589-592, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-140481

ABSTRACT

Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae (H. parainfluenzae) is very rare. Here, we report a case of H. parainfluenzae PVE that developed following the Bentall procedure complicated by a pseudoaneurysm and cerebral emboli. A diagnosis was delayed in this case because of the slow-growing nature of the organism and the unusual clinical presentation.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, False , Diagnosis , Endocarditis , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Intracranial Embolism , Paramyxoviridae Infections
6.
Korean Journal of Medicine ; : 589-592, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-140480

ABSTRACT

Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae (H. parainfluenzae) is very rare. Here, we report a case of H. parainfluenzae PVE that developed following the Bentall procedure complicated by a pseudoaneurysm and cerebral emboli. A diagnosis was delayed in this case because of the slow-growing nature of the organism and the unusual clinical presentation.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, False , Diagnosis , Endocarditis , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Intracranial Embolism , Paramyxoviridae Infections
7.
International Journal of Oral Biology ; : 215-220, 2014.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-116981

ABSTRACT

Toothbrushes play an essential role in oral hygiene. However, they can be significant in microbial transmission and can increase the risk of infection, since they can serve as a reservoir for microorganisms in healthy, oral-diseased and medically ill adults. This study was conducted to evaluate toothbrush contamination in six toothbrushes donated from four people. Two participants each supplied two toothbrushes - one used in the bathroom and one used in the workplace. The other two people each donated two toothbrushes used in the workplace. Polymerase chain reaction was used to construct a 16S rRNA clone library. Sequences of cloned DNA were compared with those from the reference organisms provided by GenBank. A total 120 clones, representing 20 clones for each toothbrush, were analyzed. They are composed of six pylum, 46 genera and 79 species. The most dominant species were Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus parasanguinis and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. Enterobacter and Escherichia were recovered from toothbrushes used domestically. Toothbrushes used in the workplace did not contain Enterobacteria.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Bacteria , Clone Cells , Databases, Nucleic Acid , DNA , Enterobacter , Enterobacteriaceae , Escherichia , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Oral Hygiene , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Streptococcus , Streptococcus oralis
8.
Biomedical and Environmental Sciences ; (12): 367-371, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-235546

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To establish multiplex PCR-based assays for detecting H.influenzae and H.parainfluenzae. And the PCR-based assays were applied to detect the carriage rates of H.influenzae and H.parainfluenzae in nasopharyngeal swab specimens which were collected from healthy children.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Multiplex primers for species-specific PCR were designed by using DNAstar soft based on the sequences of 16S rRNA genes from genus Haemophilus to detect H.influenzae and H.parainfluenzae.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The sensitivity of the 16S rRNA PCR assay for detecting H.influenzae and H.parainfluenzae was 97.53% and 100% respectively, and the specificity was 95.89% and 96.63% respectively. Youden's Index on the ability to detect H.influenzae and H.parainfluenzae was 0.9342 and 0.9663 respectively. 666 nasopharyngeal swab specimens were collected from healthy children. The detection rates of H.influenzae and H.parainfluenzae were 14.11% and 16.07% respectively by using isolation and culture methods. The detection rates of H.influenzae and H.parainfluenzae were 43.54% and 57.96% respectively by 16S rRNA PCR assays. The carriage rates of serotypes a, b, c, d, e, f and non-typeable isolates were 0% (0/666), 0.15% (1/666), 1.20% (8/666), 0.15% (1/666), 1.20% (8/666), 1.80% (12/666), 95.50% (636/666) respectively.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The multiplex PCR assays were very rapid, reliable and feasible methods for detection of H.influenzae and H.parainfluenzae in pharyngeal swab specimens which were compared to conventional isolation and culture methods. 95.5% of H.influenzae strains in healthy children were nontypeable. The encapsulated or typable strains were mainly three serotypes which was c, e, and f serotype.</p>


Subject(s)
Humans , Haemophilus influenzae , Classification , Genetics , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Classification , Genetics , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction , Methods , Nasopharynx , Microbiology , RNA, Bacterial , Genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S , Genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity
9.
Laboratory Medicine Online ; : 111-115, 2012.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-33900

ABSTRACT

The HACEK group of microorganisms is responsible for approximately 3-6% of endocarditis cases and is a major cause of culture-negative endocarditis. Here, we report a case of Haemophilus parainfluenzae infective endocarditis that was diagnosed by direct PCR sequencing of 16S rRNA from resected vegetation. A healthy 26-yr-old man was admitted to the emergency room (ER) on March 27, 2011 because of intermittent high fever. The patient was prescribed cefpodoxime for 5 days at the ER. Six and 11 sets of blood cultures were performed at the ER and in a general ward, respectively, using BACTEC Plus Aerobic/F (Becton-Dickinson, USA) and Lytic Anaerobic/F Plus (BD) together. Echocardiography revealed a large vegetation at the posterior mitral valve leaflet. After performing mitral valvoplasty on hospital day (HD) 11, the vegetation tissue was cultured in thioglycolate broth, blood agar, Brucella agar, and MacConkey agar for 7 days, but no organism was grown. Direct PCR sequencing of 16S rRNA of the tissue revealed the presence of H. parainfluenzae. In the 17 sets of blood cultures, bacterial growth was detected in only 2 aerobic bottles of 5 sets taken at HD 9 after 10-day and 14-day incubation. The organism was identified as H. parainfluenzae by using the VITEK NHI card (bioMerieux, France). Direct PCR sequencing of vegetation could be useful in diagnosing bacterial pathogens in infective endocarditis patients, especially in culture-negative cases.


Subject(s)
Humans , Agar , Brucella , Ceftizoxime , Echocardiography , Emergencies , Endocarditis , Fever , Haemophilus , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Mitral Valve , Paramyxoviridae Infections , Patients' Rooms , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sequence Analysis, RNA
10.
Korean Journal of Clinical Microbiology ; : 139-142, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-127539

ABSTRACT

Blood culture-negative infective endocarditis (CNE) can be a diagnostic dilemma. Herein, we report a case of CNE caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae identified only via 16S rRNA sequence analysis directly from valve tissue. A 17-year-old boy presented with high spiking fever for one month. Pansystolic murmur (Grade III) and vegetation (0.65x0.26 cm and 0.62x0.55 cm) on the anterior mitral valve leaflet via transesophageal echocardiogram suggested the diagnosis of infective endocarditis (IE). However, blood culture performed on admission was negative even after 2 weeks of incubation. Gram stain and culture of a direct tissue specimen failed to identify causative microorganism, while 16S rRNA gene sequences (548 bp) showed 100% identity with those of Haemophilus parainfluenzae (GenBank: FJ939586.1). The 16S rRNA sequence analysis with a direct tissue specimen might be useful in cases of CNE.


Subject(s)
Endocarditis , Fever , Genes, rRNA , Haemophilus , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Mitral Valve , Sequence Analysis
11.
Rev. méd. Chile ; 139(2): 215-217, feb. 2011. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-595289

ABSTRACT

We report a 48-year-old male admitted to hospital due to a severe alcoholic pancreatitis. At four weeks of evolution of the acute episode, an abdominal CAT scan showed a fluid collection of 20 cm diameter located in the pancreatic tail and 2 small collections in the head. The patient received several antimicrobials and during the seventh week of evolution, while receiving vancomycin, presented fever. A fine needle aspiration of the cyst revealed the presence of Haemophilus parainfluenzae biotype VIII. The patient was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and a laparoscopic cysto-gastrostomy, with a good clinical response.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Haemophilus Infections , Haemophilus parainfluenzae/isolation & purification , Pancreatic Pseudocyst/microbiology , Amoxicillin-Potassium Clavulanate Combination/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Haemophilus Infections/drug therapy , Pancreatic Pseudocyst , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
12.
Infection and Chemotherapy ; : 270-274, 2011.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-9926

ABSTRACT

Haemophilus parainfluenzae, one of the member of the HACEK group of gram-negative oropharyngeal species, is a rare cause of subacute native valve endocarditis. Infective endocarditis caused by H. parainfluenzae appears to carry a high incidence rate of cerebral embolism, often making the timing of surgical intervention difficult. A 52-year-old male was diagnosed with acute endocarditis caused by H. parainfluenzae complicated with acute cerebral infarctions. After institution of antibiotic therapy, this patient was mechanically ventilated because of the sudden onset of dyspnea. Repeated two-dimensional echocardiography demonstrated rate-dependent mitral stenosis without interval change of vegetations on the mitral valve. Making a decision regarding the timing of surgical intervention was difficult because of a fear of clinical deterioration after early valve replacement.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Cerebral Infarction , Dyspnea , Echocardiography , Endocarditis , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Haemophilus , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Incidence , Intracranial Embolism , Mitral Valve , Mitral Valve Stenosis , Paramyxoviridae Infections
13.
Korean Journal of Clinical Microbiology ; : 78-81, 2009.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-146055

ABSTRACT

The HACEK group of bacteria (Haemophilus parainfluenzae, H. aphrophilus, H. paraphrophilus, Actinobacilus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corodens, and Kingella kingae) are the normal flora of the upper respiratory tract and oropharynx. The organisms infect abnormal cardiac valves, causing subacute native endocarditis or prosthetic valve endocarditis more than one year after valve surgery. Haemophilus species are responsible for only 0.5~1% of all infective endocarditis cases. Embolization occurs in 60% and the mortality rate ranges from 16~45% of cases of infective endocarditis caused by H. parainfluenzae. We experienced a case of infective endocarditis due to H. parainfluenzae in a 37-year-old male admitted with high fever, chills, nausea & vomiting, chest discomfort, and blurred vision. The organism was isolated from a blood culture and was identified as H. parainfluenzae by factor V requirement, negativity at urea, positivity at ornithine decarboxylase, and acid production from glucose and maltose. The patient was treated with antibiotics and symptoms and signs were improved


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Male , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Bacteria , Cardiobacterium , Chills , Eikenella , Endocarditis , Factor V , Fever , Glucose , Haemophilus , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Heart Valves , Kingella , Maltose , Nausea , Ornithine Decarboxylase , Oropharynx , Paramyxoviridae Infections , Respiratory System , Thorax , Urea , Vision, Ocular , Vomiting
14.
Journal of Laboratory Medicine and Quality Assurance ; : 13-27, 2009.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-54352

ABSTRACT

Two trials of external quality assessment for clinical microbiology laboratories were performed in 2008. A total of 16 specimens were distributed. Eight specimens were distributed to 330 laboratories with 319 (96.7%) returns in Trial I, and 8 specimens to 335 laboratories with 319 returns (95.2%) in Trial II. Two slide specimens for mycobacterium stain (AFB) were distributed in Trial I and II. The acceptable percentages of Gram stain were relatively good for both stainability and morphology except for Acinetobacter baumannii. The acceptable percentages of bacterial identification (correct answers to species level) on Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria meningitidis, Serratia marcescens, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae and Candida albicans (Trial I) were 97.4%, 99.2%, 55.6%, 97.0%, 79.2%, and 92.0%, respectively. The acceptable percentages of bacterial identification on A. baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Trial II) were 92.0%, 90.8%, 4.5%, 53.1%, 74.8% and 94.3%, respectively. The acceptable percentages for antimicrobial susceptibility tests on K. pneumoniae and S. aureus (Trial I), and A. baumannii and E. faecalis, (Trial II) were relatively good compared to data of the last year. The acceptable percentages for AFB stain in Trial I and II were relatively high. In summary, the acceptable percentages of bacterial stain and identification were relatively good except some cases with poor specimen quality. However, it is still necessary that the quality assurance of the individual laboratories should be improved for antimicrobial susceptibility tests, and the selection of the most appropriate antimicrobial agents to test should be also considered.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter baumannii , Anti-Infective Agents , Candida albicans , Enterococcus faecalis , Erysipelothrix , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Korea , Mycobacterium , Neisseria meningitidis , Pneumonia , Serratia marcescens , Staphylococcus aureus , Streptococcus pyogenes , Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
15.
Chinese Journal of Epidemiology ; (12): 503-506, 2007.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-294304

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>The purpose of this study was to observe the bacterial infections of respiratory tract in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>130 patients with AECOPD in outpatient department, emergency room or in wards were studied prospectively. Patients were divided into different groups according to both Anthonisen's classification and their lung function status. Sputum were cultured together with bacteria positive rate and types of AECOPD as well as the damage degree of lung function were analyzed.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Of 130 sputum samples, 50 showed positive through culture (38.5%) and 60 strains of pathogens were isolated. Predominant pathogens isolated would include Haemophilus parainfluenzae (20/60), Streptococcus pneumoniae (5/60) and Haemophilus influenzae (10/60). Positive rate of bacterial culture in type 1 AECOPD was 55.0%, higher than those of type 2 (38.3%) and type 3 (18.5%)(P = 0.01) and was increasing with the decrease of lung function of patients with AECOPD (P < 0.02).</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Positive rate of bacterial culture in patients of type 1 AECOPD was the highest one. Haemophilus parainfluenzae was one of the most important pathogens in AECOPD. There seemed a correlation between positive result of bacterial culture and the severity of COPD.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Bacterial Infections , Epidemiology , Microbiology , Haemophilus influenzae , Virulence , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Virulence , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Epidemiology , Microbiology , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Virulence
16.
Pakistan Journal of Pathology. 2005; 16 (1): 14-16
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-74097

ABSTRACT

The objective of the study was to determine the bacterial spectrum and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacteria causing community-acquired pneumonia in Rawalpindi. Laboratory based, non-interventional descriptive study In vitro activity of various antimicrobials was tested against isolates from 510 specimens including sputum, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and tracheal aspirates. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by the modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion technique using standard antibiotic sensitivity disks and the results were interpreted according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards criteria. Minimal inhibitory concentration of penicillin was determined by agar dilution method in all cases where the inhibition zone diameter was 19 mm or less. Bacterial pathogens were isolated from 88 specimens. These included Haemophilus influenzae [73%], Moraxella catarrhalis [12%], Streptococcus pneumoniae [10%] and Haemophilus parainfluenzae [5%]. Isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were generally sensitive to co-amoxiclav [88%] and ceftriaxone [97] where as 33% were resistant to chloramphenicol. All the isolates of M. catarrhalis were sensitive to co-amoxiclav. One isolate of S pneumoniae was resistant to penicillin, while 2 showed relative resistance. H. parainfluenzae was generally sensitive to most of the antibiotics. In our setup co-amoxiclav can be given as empirical treatment for community-acquired bacterial pneumonias


Subject(s)
Pneumonia, Bacterial/microbiology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Haemophilus influenzae , Moraxella catarrhalis , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Amoxicillin-Potassium Clavulanate Combination , Ceftriaxone , Chloramphenicol
18.
Infection and Chemotherapy ; : 345-349, 2003.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-722366

ABSTRACT

HACEK organisms are the normal flora of upper respiratory tract and orophaynx. They infect abnormal cardiac valves, causing subacute native valve endocarditis or prosthetic valve endocarditis more than one year after valve surgery. Haemophilus species are responsible for only 0.5-1% of all infectious endocarditis cases. Embolization occurs in 60% and the mortality rate ranges from 16-45% of cases of infective endocarditis caused by H. parainfluenzae. We report two cases of H. parainfluenzae endocarditis, one of them is a 25-year-old male with tricuspid valve vegetations complicated with pulmonary embolism and the other is a 22-year-old female presented with heart failure.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Endocarditis , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Haemophilus , Heart Failure , Heart Valves , Mortality , Paramyxoviridae Infections , Pulmonary Embolism , Respiratory System , Tricuspid Valve
19.
Infection and Chemotherapy ; : 345-349, 2003.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-721861

ABSTRACT

HACEK organisms are the normal flora of upper respiratory tract and orophaynx. They infect abnormal cardiac valves, causing subacute native valve endocarditis or prosthetic valve endocarditis more than one year after valve surgery. Haemophilus species are responsible for only 0.5-1% of all infectious endocarditis cases. Embolization occurs in 60% and the mortality rate ranges from 16-45% of cases of infective endocarditis caused by H. parainfluenzae. We report two cases of H. parainfluenzae endocarditis, one of them is a 25-year-old male with tricuspid valve vegetations complicated with pulmonary embolism and the other is a 22-year-old female presented with heart failure.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Endocarditis , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Haemophilus , Heart Failure , Heart Valves , Mortality , Paramyxoviridae Infections , Pulmonary Embolism , Respiratory System , Tricuspid Valve
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL