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1.
Arq. bras. oftalmol ; 83(2): 153-156, Mar.-Apr. 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1088973

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT A 45-year-old man presented with a 3-month history of a mass located in the caruncle of his right eye. An incisional biopsy had been performed one month prior by another specialist, and the histopathology report showed basal cell carcinoma. The mass was completely excised with a 2 mm safety margin, and the large conjunctival defect was reconstructed with one sheet of amniotic membrane allograft. A histological diagnosis of pilomatrix carcinoma was established. To prevent recurrence after surgery, we added bevacizumab (25 mg/mL, 1.25 mg/mL per drop) eye drops four times per day for three months. At the one-year follow-up, the patient showed no evidence of local recurrence or distant metastasis after initial excision and remains under close follow-up. Pilomatrix carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a caruncular mass.


RESUMO Um homem de 45 anos apresentou história de massa na carúncula no olho direito durante 3 meses. Uma biópsia incisional foi realizada 1 mês antes por outro especialista e o laudo histopatológico mostrava carcinoma basocelular. A massa foi completamente excisada, com uma margem de segurança de 2 mm, e a grande lesão conjuntival foi reconstruída com uma folha de aloenxerto de membrana amniótica. Foi estabelecido um diagnóstico histológico de carcinoma pilomatricial. Para evitar a recorrência após a cirurgia, adicionamos colírio de bevacizumabe (25 mg/mL, 1,25 mg/mL por gota) quatro vezes ao dia durante três meses. No seguimento de 1 ano, o paciente não apresentou evidência de recidiva local ou metástase distante após a excisão inicial e continua sob acompanhamento próximo. O carcinoma pilomatricial deve ser considerado no diagnóstico diferencial de uma massa caruncular.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Carcinoma, Basal Cell/pathology , Pilomatrixoma/pathology , Conjunctival Neoplasms/pathology , Lacrimal Apparatus Diseases/pathology , Biopsy , Carcinoma, Basal Cell/surgery , Pilomatrixoma/surgery , Conjunctival Neoplasms/surgery , Hair Follicle/pathology , Hair Diseases/pathology , Lacrimal Apparatus Diseases/surgery
3.
An. bras. dermatol ; 95(2): 217-220, Mar.-Apr. 2020. graf
Article in English | ColecionaSUS, LILACS, ColecionaSUS | ID: biblio-1130854

ABSTRACT

Abstract Melanonychia is the change in the coloration of the nail plate resulting from the deposition of melanin. Among its causes are melanocytic hyperplasia, melanocytic activation and nail melanoma. Subungual follicular inclusions are histological findings of unknown etiology, possibly related to trauma. We present three cases of melanonychia of different etiologies with subungual follicular inclusions, an association that has not been well described and with an indefinite pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adult , Hair Follicle/pathology , Melanosis/pathology , Nail Diseases/pathology , Ultrasonography , Hair Follicle/diagnostic imaging , Dermoscopy , Melanosis/diagnostic imaging , Middle Aged , Nail Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Nails/pathology
4.
An. bras. dermatol ; 95(2): 238-240, Mar.-Apr. 2020. graf
Article in English | ColecionaSUS, LILACS, ColecionaSUS | ID: biblio-1130853

ABSTRACT

Abstract Some epidermal alterations in measles has been described, such as keratinocytes apoptotic, parakeratosis, giant-cell formation, intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions, dyskeratosis, spongiosis, and intracellular edema. The authors report for the first time in human a case of measles with the presence of multinucleated giant cells in the hair follicle and dyskeratosis in acrosyringium.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Child , Hair Follicle/pathology , Epidermis/pathology , Measles/pathology , Parakeratosis/pathology , Biopsy , Giant Cells/pathology , Keratinocytes/pathology
6.
An. bras. dermatol ; 94(5): 608-611, Sept.-Oct. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1054872

ABSTRACT

Abstract Dissecting cellulitis is an inflammatory, chronic, and recurrent disease of the hair follicles that mainly affects young Afro-descendent men. Trichoscopy is a method of great diagnostic value for disorders of the scalp. Clinical and trichoscopic findings of dissecting cellulitis are heterogeneous and may present features common to non-cicatricial and scarring alopecia. This article presents the trichoscopic findings of dissecting cellulitis that help in the diagnosis and consequent institution of the appropriate therapy and better prognosis of the disease.


Subject(s)
Humans , Scalp Dermatoses/diagnostic imaging , Cellulitis/pathology , Cellulitis/diagnostic imaging , Hair Follicle/pathology , Hair Follicle/diagnostic imaging , Dermoscopy/methods , Scalp Dermatoses/pathology , Skin Diseases, Genetic/pathology , Skin Diseases, Genetic/diagnostic imaging , Erythema/diagnosis , Erythema/pathology , Hair/pathology , Hair/diagnostic imaging
8.
An. bras. dermatol ; 94(4): 416-421, July-Aug. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1038289

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Background: Frontal fibrosing alopecia is a condition of unknown origin, histologically similar to classic lichen planopilaris and generally observed in postmenopausal women with alopecia of the frontal-temporal hairline. Objectives: To describe the clinical, dermatoscopic, and histopathological characteristics and the treatment used in patients who have frontal fibrosing alopecia at the Alopecia Outpatient Clinic in a university hospital. Methods: Retrospective descriptive study performed by reviewing medical charts and biopsies of the scalp. Results: Sixteen patients were analyzed, all of them female, 93.75% of them postmenopausal, and 56.25% brown-skinned. All had frontal alopecia (100%), followed by temporal alopecia (87.5%) and madarosis (87.5%). On dermatoscopy, perifollicular erythema and tubular scales were found as a sign of disease activity. Of the patients, 68.75% had associated autoimmune diseases, including lupus, thyroid disease and vitiligo. Of the 13 biopsies from 8 patients, 10 showed microscopic aspects compatible with frontal fibrosing alopecia. Laboratory tests did not show major abnormalities and minoxidil was the most used treatment. Study limitation: Data collection limited by the study's retrospective design associated to flaws while filling in the medical charts and absence in standards to the collection and processing of the pathology and histopathological examination. Conclusions: A demographical, clinical, and histopathological description of 16 patients diagnosed with frontal fibrosing alopecia, which remains a challenging disease, of unknown origin, and frequently associated with autoimmune diseases. This study reinforces literary findings. However, more research is needed to establish the pathogenesis and effective treatments.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alopecia/pathology , Scalp/pathology , Biopsy , Fibrosis , Retrospective Studies , Hair Follicle/pathology , Dermoscopy/methods , Alopecia/drug therapy , Hospitals, University
11.
An. bras. dermatol ; 93(4): 579-581, July-Aug. 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-949920

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Trichilemmal carcinoma is a rare adnexal neoplasia with histologic features reminiscent of the outer root sheath of hair follicles. The clinical presentation of trichilemmal carcinoma is variable, as it may mimic basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas, thus requiring histologic diagnosis. We report the case of a patient with aggressive trichilemmal carcinoma in the auricle.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Aged, 80 and over , Skin Neoplasms/pathology , Carcinoma, Skin Appendage/pathology , Hair Follicle/pathology , Ear Auricle/pathology , Skin Neoplasms/surgery , Carcinoma, Skin Appendage/surgery , Ear Auricle/surgery
13.
An. acad. bras. ciênc ; 89(4): 2707-2717, Oct.-Dec. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-886861

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT 6-Gingerol is the major active constituent of ginger. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effects of 6-Gingerol on hair growth. Mice were randomly divided into five groups; after hair depilation (day 0), mice were treated with saline, or different concentrations of 6-Gingerol for 11 days. The histomorphological characteristics of the growing hair follicles were examined after hematoxylin and eosin staining. The results indicated that 6-Gingerol significantly suppressed hair growth compared with that in the control group. And choose the concentration of 6-Gingerol at 1 mg/mL to treated with mice. Moreover, 6-Gingerol (1 mg/mL) significantly reduced hair re-growth ratio, hair follicle number, and hair follicle length, which were associated with increased expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Furthermore, the growth factors, such as EGF, KGF, VEGF, IGF-1 and TGF-β participate in the hair follicle cycle regulation and regulate hair growth. We then measured the concentrations of them using ELISA assays, and the results showed that 6-Gingerol decreased EGF, KGF, VEGF, and IGF-1 concentrations, and increased TGF-β concentration. Thus, this study showed that 6-Gingerol might act as a hair growth suppressive drug via induction of MMP2 and MMP9 expression, which could interfere with the hair cycle.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Female , Rabbits , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Catechols/pharmacology , Hair Follicle/drug effects , Matrix Metalloproteinase 2/biosynthesis , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/biosynthesis , Fatty Alcohols/pharmacology , Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/biosynthesis , Random Allocation , Enzyme Induction , Transforming Growth Factor beta/biosynthesis , Hair Follicle/pathology , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/biosynthesis , Fibroblast Growth Factor 7/biosynthesis , Mice, Inbred C57BL
14.
An. bras. dermatol ; 92(4): 562-564, July-Aug. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-886988

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Winer's dilated pore is an infrequent appendageal tumor characterized by a giant comedone on the face, neck, and upper trunk in adults. We report a 57-year-old woman who developed multiple asymptomatic black papules on both labia majora. Histopathology showed grouped dilated follicles lined by keratinizing squamous epithelium in the superficial dermis. The superficial lining epithelium and interfollicular epidermis were atrophic, while the deep epithelium showed mild proliferation and melanin pigmentation with a few short projections extending into the surrounding dermis. We diagnosed multiple Winer's dilated pores based on late-onset lesions and pathological features. This patient may represent the first case of multiple vulvar Winer's dilated pores. We suggest that electrocautery may be effective for treating this type of superficial entity.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Skin Neoplasms/diagnosis , Vulvar Neoplasms/diagnosis , Hair Follicle/pathology , Nevus/pathology , Skin Neoplasms/pathology , Vulvar Neoplasms/pathology , Postmenopause , Cysts/pathology , Diagnosis, Differential , Hair Diseases/diagnosis
15.
An. bras. dermatol ; 92(4): 543-545, July-Aug. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-886991

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Lichen planopilaris is a disease that appears with lymphocytic cicatricial alopecia. It is considered a follicular variant of lichen planus. The examination of affected areas shows alopecia with perifollicular erythema and scaling, revealing a predilection for hair follicles. The involvement of children is uncommon, with few reports in this population in the literature. This study presents a clinical case of a male patient of 15 years of age with characteristic lesions of lichen planopilaris.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adolescent , Scalp/pathology , Alopecia/pathology , Lichen Planus/pathology , Biopsy , Hair Follicle/pathology , Dermoscopy , Hair/diagnostic imaging
16.
An. bras. dermatol ; 92(3): 430-431, May-June 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1038249

ABSTRACT

Abstract The etiopathogenesis of female pattern hair loss is still poorly understood. In addition to genetic and hormonal elements, environmental factors could be involved. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is expressed in keratinocytes and can be activated by environmental pollutants leading to alterations in the cell cycle, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here we demonstrate the overexpression of nuclear aryl hydrocarbon receptors in miniaturized hair follicles in female pattern hair loss.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/metabolism , Hair Follicle/metabolism , Alopecia/metabolism , Up-Regulation , Hair Follicle/pathology , Hair Follicle/chemistry , Alopecia/pathology
17.
An. bras. dermatol ; 92(5,supl.1): 121-125, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-887098

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Porokeratotic eccrine and hair follicle nevus is a very rare non-hereditary disorder of keratinization with eccrine and hair follicle involvement with only 9 cases described in the literature. In 2009 the term porokeratotic anexial ostial nevus was proposed to comprehend porokeratotic eccrine and hair follicle nevus and a related and more common process without follicular involvement: porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus Recent findings suggest that both entities may be produced by a mutation in GJB2 gene, which is associated to KID syndrome. Herein we report 2 cases of porokeratotic eccrine and hair follicle nevus and review the existing cases in the Spanish and English literature.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Infant, Newborn , Adult , Sweat Gland Diseases/pathology , Porokeratosis/pathology , Hair Follicle/pathology , Eccrine Glands/pathology , Hamartoma/pathology , Nevus/pathology , Parakeratosis/pathology , Biopsy , Rare Diseases , Hair Diseases/pathology
18.
An. bras. dermatol ; 91(5,supl.1): 14-16, Sept.-Oct. 2016. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-837955

ABSTRACT

Abstract Frontal fibrosing alopecia is a distinctive form of scarring alopecia considered to be a clinical variant of lichen planopilaris. It predominantly occurs in postmenopausal women and has a slowly progressive course. It was first described by Kossard in 1994. Since then the number of reported cases has increased significantly. Coexistence of frontal fibrosing alopecia and autoimmune disorders - such as discoid erythematosus lupus and Sjögren's syndrome - may suggest a common pathogenic background among the diseases.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Sjogren's Syndrome/complications , Alopecia/complications , Fibrosis , Lupus Erythematosus, Discoid/complications , Lupus Erythematosus, Discoid/pathology , Hair Follicle/pathology , Dermis/pathology , Alopecia/immunology , Alopecia/pathology , Lichen Planus/immunology , Lichen Planus/pathology
19.
An. bras. dermatol ; 91(5,supl.1): 64-65, Sept.-Oct. 2016. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-837964

ABSTRACT

Abstract Inducible urticaria is a heterogeneous subgroup of chronic urticarias caused by a wide variety of environmental stimuli, such as exercise, cold, heat, pressure, sunlight, vibration, and water. A new term, follicular traction urticaria, was suggested as an unusual form of inducible urticarias. We report a patient who was diagnosed with follicular traction urticaria.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Urticaria/etiology , Urticaria/pathology , Hair Follicle/pathology , Hair Removal/adverse effects , Time Factors , Chronic Disease
20.
An. bras. dermatol ; 90(6): 814-821, Nov.-Dec. 2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-769513

ABSTRACT

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Permanent alopecia after bone marrow transplantation is rare, but more and more cases have been described, typically involving high doses of chemotherapeutic agents used in the conditioning regimen for the transplant. Busulfan, classically described in cases of irreversible alopecia, remains associated in recent cases. The pathogenesis involved in hair loss is not clear and there are few studies available. In addition to chemotherapeutic agents, another factor that has been implicated as a cause is chronic graft-versus-host disease. However, there are no histopathological criteria for defining this diagnosis yet. OBJECTIVE: the study aims to evaluate clinical and histological aspects in cases of permanent alopecia after bone marrow transplantation, identifying features of permanent alopecia induced by myeloablative chemotherapy and alopecia as a manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease. METHODS: data were collected from medical records of 7 patients, with description of the clinical features and review of slides and paraffin blocks of biopsies. RESULTS: Two distinct histological patterns were found: one similar to androgenetic alopecia, non-scarring pattern, and other similar to lichen planopilaris, scarring alopecia. CONCLUSION: The first pattern corroborates the literature cases of permanent alopecia induced by chemotherapeutic agents, and the second is compatible with manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease on scalp, that has never been described yet. The results contribute to the elucidation of the factors involved in these cases, including the development of therapeutic methods.


Subject(s)
Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Alopecia/chemically induced , Alopecia/pathology , Bone Marrow Transplantation/adverse effects , Busulfan/adverse effects , Graft vs Host Disease/complications , Myeloablative Agonists/adverse effects , Biopsy , Chronic Disease , Hair Follicle/pathology , Retrospective Studies , Scalp/pathology , Time Factors
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