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1.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 938-943, 2020.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880296

ABSTRACT

With the continuous improvement of living conditions, increasing attention is being drawn to the genitourinary health of males, which has boomed the development of uroandrology in recent years. Refractory hemospermia, infertility, and perineal pain are commonly seen in some male patients, and mainly relied on medical imaging for diagnosis in the past, which, however, has a high pseudopositive rate and cannot give an etiological explanation. Patients with these diseases often adopt conservative treatments such as medication and physiotherapy, often with poor prognosis, and those suffering frequent recurrence used to be treated by transurethral resection, laparoscopic surgery or open surgery, which are now rarely employed due to their high rate of postoperative complications, slow recovery, and easy recurrence. In recent years, transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy has gained a wide application in the diagnosis and treatment of the above-mentioned uroandrological diseases and shown its advantages of high clinical effectiveness and low incidence of complications. The review updates on the indications, methods, skills and clinical application of transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy.


Subject(s)
Andrology/trends , Hemospermia , Humans , Male , Postoperative Complications , Recurrence , Seminal Vesicles/surgery , Treatment Outcome
2.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 236-240, 2018.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-689770

ABSTRACT

<p><b>Objective</b>To investigate the diagnosis and treatment of ejaculatory duct cyst.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>This study included 2 male patients present at the hospital for hemospermia and abnormal sensation in the perineal region in July and August 2014. Both underwent transrectal ultrasonography, routine semen examination, CT, MRI, cystoscopy, and vesiculography before transurethral fenestration of the cysts and pathological examination of the cyst wall specimens. Analyses were made on the clinical presentations, imaging features, pathological characteristics, differential diagnosis and treatment of ejaculatory duct cyst and relevant literature was reviewed.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The cyst wall was mainly composed of smooth muscle, the inner wall lined with pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelia, and with positive expressions of CD10 and Muc6 proteins on immunohistochemical staining, which indicated renal iatrogenic ejaculatory duct cyst. The patients were followed up for 18 and 20 months, respectively. All symptoms disappeared and no recurrence occurred after surgery. Routine semen examination for the two patients showed the semen volumes to be 3.5 and 3.1 ml, sperm concentrations 35 and 32 ×10⁶/ml, grade a sperm 32.0 and 26.0%, grade b sperm 18.0 and 31.0%, and semen liquidation time 30 and 34 minutes, respectively.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Pelvic cystic masses can be detected by transrectal ultrasonography, CT and MRI, but definite diagnosis relies on vesiculography, pathological examination and immunohistochemical staining. Transurethral fenestration is safe and effective for the treatment of ejaculation duct cyst.</p>


Subject(s)
Cysts , Diagnostic Imaging , Pathology , General Surgery , Ejaculation , Ejaculatory Ducts , Diagnostic Imaging , Pathology , General Surgery , Genital Diseases, Male , Diagnostic Imaging , Pathology , General Surgery , Hemospermia , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Semen , Semen Analysis , Sperm Count , Spermatozoa , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Ultrasonography
3.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 525-528, 2018.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-689697

ABSTRACT

<p><b>Objective</b>To explore the practicability and safety of the F4.8 visual miniature nephroscope in the diagnosis and treatment of hematospermia.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>This study included 12 cases of refractory hematospermia accompanied by perineal or lower abdominal pain and discomfort. All the patients failed to respond to two months of systemic anti-inflammatory medication and local physiotherapy. Seminal vesicle tumor and tuberculosis were excluded preoperatively by rectal seminal vesicle ultrasonography, MRI or CT. Under epidural anesthesia, microscopic examination was performed with the F4.8 miniature nephroscope through the urethra and ejaculatory duct orifice into the seminal vesicle cavity, the blood clots washed out with normal saline, the seminal vesicle stones extracted by holmium laser lithotripsy and with the reticular basket, the seminal vesicle polyps removed by holmium laser ablation and vaporization, and the seminal vesicle cavity rinsed with diluted iodophor after operation.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Of the 10 patients subjected to bilateral seminal vesiculoscopy, 3 with unilateral and 2 with bilateral seminal vesicle stones were treated by holmium laser lithotripsy, saline flushing and reticular-basket removal, 2 with seminal vesicle polyps by holmium laser ablation and vaporization, and the other 3 with blood clots in the seminal vesicle cavity by saline flushing for complete clearance. The 2 patients subjected to unilateral seminal vesiculoscopy both received flushing of the seminal vesicle cavity for clearance of the blood clots. The operations lasted 10-55 (25 ± 6) minutes. There were no such intra- or post-operative complications as rectal injury, peripheral organ injury, and external urethral sphincter injury. The urethral catheter was removed at 24 hours, anti-infection medication withdrawn at 72 hours, and regular sex achieved at 2 weeks postoperatively. The patients were followed up for 6-20 (7 ± 2.3) months, during which hematospermia and related symptoms disappeared in 10 cases at 3 months and recurrence was observed in the other 2 at 4 months after surgery but improved after antibiotic medication.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>The F4.8 visual miniature nephroscope can be applied to the examination of the seminal vesicle cavity and treatment of seminal vesicle stones and polyps, with the advantages of minimal invasiveness, safety and reliability.</p>


Subject(s)
Calculi , Diagnostic Imaging , General Surgery , Ejaculatory Ducts , Endoscopes , Endoscopy , Genital Neoplasms, Male , Hemospermia , Diagnosis , Therapeutics , Holmium , Humans , Lasers, Solid-State , Lithotripsy , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Natural Orifice Endoscopic Surgery , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Postoperative Complications , Reproducibility of Results , Seminal Vesicles , Diagnostic Imaging , Urethra
4.
Rev. chil. urol ; 83(3): 27-30, 2018. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-963944

ABSTRACT

RESUMEN La patología tumoral de las vesículas seminales es extremadamente poco frecuente. Sólo existen reportes de series de casos que no logran ser más de 150 en todo el mundo. Por lo mismo, no existen pautas de recomendación para el diagnóstico y tratamiento. A propósito de 2 casos de tumores de vesículas seminales ocurridos en un período de 12 meses en nuestro centro, hemos decidido realizar una revisión de la literatura actual sobre el estudio y manejo de esta patología poco frecuente. La sintomatología es inespecífica, y su diagnóstico comprende una combinación de test sanguíneos, imagenológicos e histopatológicos en su mayoría para descartar otras neoplasias. El tratamiento es multimodal el cual incluye resección quirúrgica donde la vía laparoscópica es el patrón de oro, asociado a adyuvancia con hormonoterapia y/o radioterapia. Su pronóstico es pobre debido al diagnóstico en etapas avanzadas, por lo que se requiere un alto índice de sospecha diagnóstica para lograr realizar un tratamiento oportuno.(AU)


Abstract The tumor pathology of the seminal vesicles is extremely rare. There are only reports of series of cases that fail to be more than 150 worldwide. For this reason, there are no recommendation guidelines for diagnosis and treatment. With regard to 2 cases of seminal vesicle tumors that occurred in a period of 12 months in our center, we decided to review the current literature on the study and management of this rare pathology. The symptomatology is non-specific, and its diagnosis includes a combination of blood, imaging and histopathological tests, mostly to rule out other neoplasms. The treatment is multimodal, which includes surgical resection where the laparoscopic approach is the gold standard, associated with adjuvance with hormone therapy and / or radiotherapy. Its prognosis is poor due to the diagnosis in advanced stages, which is why a high index of diagnostic suspicion is required to achieve an opportune treatment.(AU)


Subject(s)
Male , Seminal Vesicles , Adenocarcinoma , Laparoscopy , Hemospermia
5.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 122-127, 2018.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-775209

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To investigate the success rate and safety of percutaneous vasoseminal vesiculography with the disposable vasographic interventional therapy kit (VITK).@*METHODS@#This study included ninety-six 19-65 (mean 43) years old male patients with infertility, hematospermia, seminal vesicle cyst, ejaculatory duct cyst, ejaculatory dysfunction, or vas deferens injury, with disease courses varying from 1 month to 7 years. With an open, multi-centered, single-group, self-controlled design and using the disposable VITK, we treated the patients by percutaneous vasoseminal vesiculography via injection of contrast medium into the vas deferens cavity under local anesthesia.@*RESULTS@#Percutaneous vasoseminal vesiculography was successfully performed in 92 (97.87%) of the patients, which revealed abnormal seminal ducts in 51 cases (54.3%). Among the 28 infertile patients, 3 were found with bilateral and 5 with unilateral vas deferens obstruction. Vesiculitis was detected in 36 (81.8%) of the 44 hematospermia patients and bilateral vas deferens abnormality in 5 (38.5%) of the 13 patients with ejaculatory dysfunction. Transectional damage was observed in 2 patients with vas deferens injury induced by bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Three cases of seminal vesicle cyst and 4 cases of ejaculatory cyst were definitely diagnosed by vasoseminal vesiculography.@*CONCLUSIONS@#The disposable vasographic interventional therapy kit, with the advantages of simple operation and high safety, deserves a wide clinical application in vasoseminal vesiculography.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Contrast Media , Cysts , Diagnostic Imaging , Ejaculatory Ducts , Diagnostic Imaging , Genital Diseases, Male , Diagnostic Imaging , Hemospermia , Diagnostic Imaging , Hernia, Inguinal , General Surgery , Humans , Infertility, Male , Diagnostic Imaging , Injections , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications , Diagnostic Imaging , Radiography , Methods , Seminal Vesicles , Diagnostic Imaging , Vas Deferens , Diagnostic Imaging , Wounds and Injuries , Young Adult
6.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 128-132, 2018.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-775208

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To explore the etiological factors for calculus-associated seminal vesiculitis by analyzing the composition of seminal vesicle calculus samples.@*METHODS@#This retrospective study included 6 cases of recurrent hematospermia diagnosed with seminal vesicle calculus by non-contrast pelvic CT. The patients were aged 28 to 69 years, with persistent or recurrent hematospermia for 3 months to 6 years, and 5 of them with a history of acute urethritis. All the patients underwent seminal vesiculoscopy, which confirmed calculus-associated seminal vesiculitis. The calculus samples were obtained with a spiral dislodge and their composition was determined with a second-generation infrared calculus composition analyzer. The patients were followed up for 2 to 12 weeks postoperatively, during which non-contrast pelvic CT was employed for observation of recurrent calculus in the reproductive tract.@*RESULTS@#Pelvic CT scanning indicated recurrence of seminal vesicle calculus in 3 cases at 12 weeks postoperatively, of which, 2 were accompanied with recurrent hematospermia, both observed at 4 weeks after operation. As for the composition of the calculus, the infrared calculus composition analyzer revealed struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate) in 5 cases and a mixture of calcium oxalate dihydrate, calcium oxalate monohydrate, and carbonate apatite in the other one.@*CONCLUSIONS@#Seminal vesicle calculi are most commonly composed of struvite, and infection is the main etiological factor for calculus-associated seminal vesiculitis.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Apatites , Calcium Oxalate , Calculi , Chemistry , Diagnostic Imaging , Genital Diseases, Male , Diagnostic Imaging , Hemospermia , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Period , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Seminal Vesicles , Diagnostic Imaging , Struvite , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Urethritis
7.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(6): 1136-1143, Nov.-Dec. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-892922

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: We evaluated the correlation between prostate calculi and hematospermia in patients undergoing prostate biopsy, and its impact on sexual activity of patients. Materials and Methods: A single-center prospective randomized study of 212 patients referred for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSBx) was performed. All patients were divided into two groups: Group A (GA), 106 patients with moderate/marked presence of prostatic calculi visualized by TRUS; Group B (GB), 106 patients with absence/scarce of prostatic calcifications. Patients were handed questionnaires to obtain a validated data on the duration and impact of hematospermia on sexual activity. The anxiety scores were recorded using a visual analogue scale. Results: No significant difference was noted between the two groups when comparing age, preoperative PSA level, prostate volume, and biopsy number, except for digital rectal examination (DRE) findings. Post-biopsy results of patients included in GA revealed that the complication of hematospermia was present in 65.1%, while in GB was present in 39.7% (p<0.001). On multivariate analysis for identifying significant preoperative predictors of hematospermia, which included variables of age, PSA, prostate volume, and prostate cancer were not shown to be significant predictors of hematospermia, except DRE and prostate calculi (p<0.001). The mean anxiety score was 3.7±2.8 in GA and 2.3±1.9 in GB, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions: Prostatic calculi are an independent predictive factor of severe hematospermia after TRUSBx on the basis of multivariate analysis, but don't affect the positive rate of prostate cancer. Patients should be adequately counselled before TRUSBx to avoid undue anxiety and alterations in sexual activity.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Diseases/pathology , Calculi/pathology , Hemospermia/etiology , Prostatic Diseases/complications , Prostatic Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Biopsy/methods , Calculi/complications , Calculi/diagnostic imaging , Prospective Studies , Prostate-Specific Antigen/blood , Coitus , Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration , Image-Guided Biopsy , Middle Aged
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-629517

ABSTRACT

Abstract Hematospermia is a distressing disorder in sexually active men resulting in great concern to the patient. We report an unusual case of hematospermia with an atypical presentation, involving a 54-year-old man presented with acute urinary retention after sexual intercourse. Although the causes are widely known, arteriovenous malformation as the cause of this disorder has not much been reported in the literature. Transcatheter embolization of internal pudendal artery is a promising option for hematospermia caused by arterial fistula or bleeding.


Subject(s)
Hemospermia
9.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 337-342, 2017.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-812763

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To compare three different pathways for transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy (SVS) and investigate the reliability and efficiency of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided SVS (TRUS-SVS).@*METHODS@#We retrospectively analyzed 90 cases of seminal vesiculoscopy conducted directly through the ejaculatory duct or prostatic utricle or under the guide of TRUS. We compared the success rate and complications among the three approaches.@*RESULTS@#Operations were successfully performed in 87 (96.67%) of the 90 cases, 30 through the ejaculatory duct, 37 via the prostatic utricle, and 20 under the guide of TRUS, the operation time ranging from 25 to 75 minutes. Sperm was detected from the seminal vesicle fluid in (92.06%) of the azoospermia patients (58/63) during the surgery and in 77.78% of them (49/63) in semen analysis at 1 week postoperatively. Fifteen hematospermia and 12 spermatocystitis patients were cured. Postoperative follow-up found 20 cases of water-like semen and 3 cases of orchiepididymitis, but no such complications as retrograde ejaculation, incontinence, or rectourethral fistula.@*CONCLUSIONS@#Transejaculatory duct and transprostatic utricle pathways are two common approaches to SVS, while TRUS-SVS may achieve a higher success rate and avoid injury of both the prostate and the rectum.


Subject(s)
Azoospermia , Diagnostic Imaging , Ejaculatory Ducts , Diagnostic Imaging , Epididymitis , Diagnostic Imaging , Genital Diseases, Male , Hemospermia , Diagnostic Imaging , Humans , Male , Operative Time , Prostate , Diagnostic Imaging , Rectum , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Semen , Semen Analysis , Seminal Vesicles , Diagnostic Imaging , Spermatozoa , Ultrasonography , Methods
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-94568

ABSTRACT

Cystic enlargement of prostatic utricle, a vestigial remnant of mullerian duct, is a rare condition in males. The prostatic utricle distends with urine during voiding and then passively drains. Poor emptying leads to urine retention and stasis. Stone formation may result from obstruction. Patients present clinically with chronic urinary tract infection, hematuria, urethral discharge, epididymitis, and voiding dysfunction. We present a case of multiple stones in the enlarged prostatic utricle associated with hemospermia.


Subject(s)
Epididymitis , Hematuria , Hemospermia , Humans , Male , Prostate , Saccule and Utricle , Urinary Tract Infections
11.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 225-228, 2016.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-304724

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the clinical application value of 8.5/11.5 F transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of refractory hematospermia.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>We retrospectively analyzed 78 cases of refractory hematospermia diagnosed and treated by 8.5/11.5 F transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy from June 2012 to June 2014. The patients underwent serum PSA examination, transrectal ultrasonography, seminal vesicle ultrasonography, and pelvis CT or MRI before surgery, and all received transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy under the 8.5/11.5 F rigid ureteroscope.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Operations were all successfully accomplished, which revealed abnormal opening of the ejaculatory duct in 5 cases, mucosal inflammatory hyperemia in the prostatic utricle and seminal vesicle in 78, dark red mucilage substance in the seminal vesicle in 34, seminal vesicle stones in 19, small polyp in the seminal vesicle in 2, and ejaculatory duct or seminal vesicle cyst in 4. All the patients received symptomatic treatment during the surgery. After surgery, hematouria was found in 13 cases, which disappeared within 2 weeks, pelvic hematoma in 1 case, which was cured by conservative treatment within 3 months, and epididymitis in 2 cases, which was controlled by anti-infection treatment. Hematospermia recurred in 3 cases during the 1-year postoperative follow-up.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>8.5/11.5 F transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy, with its advantages of easy operation, wide field of vision, large channel for operation, and few complications, deserves general clinical application in the diagnosis and treatment of refractory hematospermia.</p>


Subject(s)
Calculi , Ejaculatory Ducts , Endoscopy , Methods , Epididymitis , Hemospermia , Diagnosis , Therapeutics , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Postoperative Period , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Seminal Vesicles , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Urethra
12.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 511-515, 2016.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-304709

ABSTRACT

<p><b>Objective</b>To evaluate the effect of ejaculatory duct dilation combined with seminal vesicle clysis in the treatment of refractory hematospermia.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Using ureteroscopy, we treated 32 patients with refractory hematospermia by transurethral dilation of the ejaculatory duct combined with clysis of the seminal vesicle with diluent gentamicin.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The operation was successfully accomplished in 31 cases, with the mean operation time of 32 (26-47) minutes. The patients were followed up for 6-39 (mean 23.6) months. No complications, such as urinary incontinence and retrograde ejaculation, were found after operation. Hematospermia completely disappeared in 27 cases, was relieved in 1, and recurred in 3 after 3 months postoperatively. Those with erectile dysfunction or mental anxiety symptoms showed significantly decreased scores of IIEF-Erectile Function (IIEF-EF) and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Ejaculatory duct dilation combined with seminal vesicle clysis under the ureteroscope, with its the advantages of high effectiveness and safety, minimal invasiveness, few complications, and easy operation, deserves general clinical application in the treatment of refractory hematospermia.</p>


Subject(s)
Dilatation , Ejaculatory Ducts , General Surgery , Genital Diseases, Male , Hemospermia , General Surgery , Humans , Male , Postoperative Period , Recurrence , Seminal Vesicles , General Surgery , Ureteroscopy
13.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 630-634, 2016.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-304699

ABSTRACT

<p><b>Objective</b>To summarize the experience in the diagnosis and treatment of refractory hematospermia and ejaculatory duct obstruction by seminal vesiculoscopy.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data about 42 cases of refractory hematospermia and 6 cases of ejaculatory duct obstruction with azoospermia. We investigated the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of the diseases.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>All the patients underwent pelvic MRI and seminal vesiculoscopy. MRI for the 42 refractory hematospermia patients showed that 21 (50.0%) had cystic dilatation in the uni- or bilateral seminal vesicles, 25 (59.5%) had abnormal internal signal intensity in the uni- or bilateral seminal vesicles, 12 (28.6%) had both the problems above, and 4 (9.52%) had no obvious abnormality in the seminal vesicle area. The bilateral seminal vesicles were <1 cm in width in 3 of the 6 cases of ejaculatory duct obstruction, and obviously enlarged in the other 3, but without abnormal internal signals. No recurrence was found during the 3-36 months follow-up.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>The history and physical examination play important roles in the diagnosis of refractory hemospermia, and MRI is more valuable than TRUS in the diagnosis of seminal vesicle diseases. Seminal vesiculoscopy is an effective option for the management of persistent hematospermia and ejaculatory duct obstruction.</p>


Subject(s)
Azoospermia , Ejaculatory Ducts , Diagnostic Imaging , Endoscopy , Methods , Hemospermia , Diagnostic Imaging , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Seminal Vesicles , Diagnostic Imaging
14.
Urology Annals. 2015; 7 (1): 107-108
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-154920

ABSTRACT

Extra-gonadal yolk sac tumors [YSTs] are rare and generally associated with poor outcomes. Involvement of the seminal vesicles is extremely rare with only one previously described case. We report a case of a primary YST of the seminal vesicles and discuss the management strategy


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Seminal Vesicles , Hemospermia/etiology
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-20265

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: While hematospermia is mainly caused by genitourinary inflammatory disorders, very few studies have been published on prostatitis-associated hematospermia (PAH) diagnosed using robust prostatitis evaluation methods. Therefore, we have evaluated the incidence of PAH by using systematic methods for evaluating prostatitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated 37 hematospermia patients from a single hospital over the last five years. We classified the patients into PAH versus hematospermia without any evidence of prostatitis (HWP) by using a NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index questionnaire and expressed prostatic secretion studies. RESULTS: The mean age was 55.89+/-14.87 years, and the patients were grouped into two groups: one group had 12 HWP patients and the other 25 PAH patients. PAH patients were further sub-classified: chronic bacterial prostatitis (3 patients), chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (10 patients), prostadynia (7 patients), and asymptomatic prostatitis (5 patients). We found Enterococcus faecalis in the three chronic bacterial prostatitis patients. We could not find any statistically significant difference between the PAH and the HWP groups in terms of the age interval, serum prostate-specific antigen level, and prostate volume. Even though there was no statistically significant difference in the items about urination between the two groups, we found a statistically significant difference in the quality of life (QoL) impact for the patients in this study. CONCLUSIONS: Two-thirds of the hematospermia patients were associated with some evidence of prostatitis. Further, the patients with PAH revealed poor QoL compared with the patients with HWP. Therefore, we must evaluate the presence of prostatitis in hematospermia patients and alleviate the prostatitis-associated symptoms to improve their QoL.


Subject(s)
Enterococcus faecalis , Hemospermia , Humans , Incidence , Prostate , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Prostatitis , Quality of Life , Urination
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-55349

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine whether it is necessary to analyze the semen of varicocele patients in their early 20s who are not complaining of infertility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data was collected retrospectively from 128 men with varicocele with no complaint of infertility, but with complaints of pain/discomfort or a mass/swelling during a 4-year period beginning in January 2009. The varicocele cases were matched 4 : 1 by age to 32 hemospermia controls. RESULTS: The median patient age was 22.0 years in the case group and 24.0 years in the control group. The median values of the percentage of normal motility, normal morphology, and density in the case group were 42.5%, 40.0%, and 51.0x10(6)/mL, respectively. The median serum testosterone level was 4.2 ng/mL and 7.0% of the total patients had low serum testosterone levels in the case group. The number of patients with asthenospermia (17.2%), oligospermia (10.9%), and teratospermia (5.5%), and those with at least one abnormal semen parameter (19.5%) was significantly higher in the case group than the control group. The median values of the motility, morphology, and density of the case group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The multivariate analysis showed that patient characteristics (age, presence of pain, duration of symptoms, and grade of varicocele) cannot help to predict abnormal semen parameters (asthenospermia, oligospermia, teratospermia, or cases of at least 1 abnormal semen parameter) or serum testosterone levels <3.0 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: Semen analysis is required as a screening test for semen abnormalities regardless of the chief complaint in varicocele patients in their early 20s.


Subject(s)
Hemospermia , Humans , Infertility , Infertility, Male , Male , Mass Screening , Multivariate Analysis , Oligospermia , Retrospective Studies , Semen , Semen Analysis , Testosterone , Varicocele
17.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 334-337, 2014.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-309711

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To determine the exact location of the opening of the ejaculatory duct in men and provide some basic anatomical evidence for seminal vesiculoscopy and the treatment of ejaculatory duct obstruction.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>We performed ureterocystoscopy for 21 male patients aged 26 - 47 years with hematuria (n = 12), hematospermia (n = 2), glandular cystitis (n = 6), and anejaculation after radical resection of rectal carcinoma (n = 1), and meanwhile, with the consent of the patients, massaged the prostate and ejaculatory duct and observed the outlet of the expelled fluid. Under the microscope, we described the fluid samples with sperm as the expulsion from the ejaculatory duct.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Ureterocystoscopy showed that the exact anatomical sites of the expulsion of prostatic fluid and semen in the patients were the side and lower side of the prostatic utricle opening above the verumontanum and the ventral side of the verumontanum. Quantities of sperm were found in the expulsion fluid of 13 of the patients, and no expulsion, including semen, was seen from the prostatic utricle opening.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Anatomically, the ejaculatory duct openings of males are located at the two sides of the verumontanum adjacent to the opening of the prostatic utricle, rather than in the prostatic utricle above the verumontanum.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Cystoscopes , Ejaculation , Physiology , Ejaculatory Ducts , Physiology , Endoscopy , Methods , Hematuria , Hemospermia , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications , Prostate , Physiology , Rectal Neoplasms , General Surgery , Semen , Bodily Secretions , Spermatozoa
18.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 536-538, 2014.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-309676

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy (TUSV) combined with finasteride in the treatment of recurrent hemospermia.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>This study included 32 patients with recurrent hematospermia, with the disease course of 3 months to 4 years. After administration of finasteride at 5 mg/d for 2 weeks, the patients underwent TUSV for both exploration of the causes and treatment, followed by medication with finasteride at the same dose for another 2 weeks. Postoperative follow-up was conducted for observation of the outcomes and complications.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>TUSV was successfully accomplished in all the 32 cases, which revealed 16 cases of seminal vesiculitis, 10 seminal calculi, 1 seminal vesicle cyst, 2 seminal vesicle polyps, and 3 seminal vesicle abscess. The operative time was 20 to 51 (31.0 +/- 5.2) minutes. Postoperative complications included 1 case of acute epididymitis and 3 cases of breast discomfort within the first 4 weeks. No incontinence, urethral stricture, rectal injury, retrograde ejaculation, and sexual dysfunction occurred postoperatively. All the patients but 1 were followed up for 6 months to 2 years. Twenty-nine of the cases were cured, and 2 experienced recurrence.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy combined with finasteride is safe and effective for the treatment of recurrent hemospermia.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Endoscopy , Methods , Finasteride , Therapeutic Uses , Follow-Up Studies , Hemospermia , Therapeutics , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
19.
Korean Journal of Urology ; : 213-219, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-82587

ABSTRACT

The key enzyme in the androgen synthesis and androgen receptor pathways is 5alpha-reductase (5-AR), which occurs as three isoenzymes. Types I and II 5-ARs the most important clinically, and two different 5-AR inhibitors (5-ARIs), finasteride and dutasteride, have been developed. Several urology associations have recommended and upgraded the use of 5-ARIs for an enlarged prostate with lower urinary tract symptoms. In the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial and the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events Trial, 5-ARIs reduced the incidence of low-grade prostate cancer. However, despite the documented reductions in the overall incidence of prostate cancer, 5-ARIs are at the center of a dispute. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the American Urology Association (AUA) presented clinical guidelines for the use of 5-ARIs for chemoprevention of prostate cancer in 2008. However, ASCO/AUA has eliminated these from the main "Clinical Guidelines" in 2012, because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration denied a supplemental New Drug Application for the use of dutasteride for prostate cancer chemoprevention. The 5-ARIs can also be used to manage hemospermia and prostatic hematuria, and to prevent intraoperative bleeding, although there is insufficient evidence for a standard strategy. This review summarizes the current use of 5-ARIs for prostate disease, including benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer, prostate-related bleeding, and hemospermia.


Subject(s)
Azasteroids , Chemoprevention , Disease Management , Dissent and Disputes , Finasteride , Hematuria , Hemorrhage , Hemospermia , Hyperplasia , Incidence , Isoenzymes , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Medical Oncology , Prostate , Prostatic Hyperplasia , Prostatic Neoplasms , Receptors, Androgen , United States Food and Drug Administration , Urology , Dutasteride
20.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 531-534, 2013.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-350866

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the feasibility and effect of transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of refractory or recurrent hemospermia.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>We retrospectively analyzed 162 cases of refractory or recurrent hemospermia examined and treated by transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy. The patients ranged in age from 19 to 76 years and had a hemospermia history of 3 months to 11 years, admitted due to poor therapeutic results or recurrence after 4 weeks of antibiotic medication. All the patients underwent serum PSA examination, transrectal ultrasonography, seminal vesicle ultrasonography and pelvis CT or MRI before surgery.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Wine- or magenta-colored colloid and inflammation were found in one or both sides of the seminal vesicle in all the cases. Pathological biopsy revealed chronic inflammatory mucosa of the seminal vesicle in all the patients, and even calculi in the ejaculatory duct or seminal vesicle in 15 cases. Postoperative follow-up averaged 21.7 (12 -29) months. Hemospermia disappeared or was alleviated in 150 (92.64%) of the cases after 1-15 ejaculations, in which 7 experienced recurrence 3 months later. Four cases failed to respond, and 1 developed acute bilateral epididymitis after surgery. No such complications as retrograde ejaculation, urinary incontinence or rectal injury were observed postoperatively.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Transurethral seminal vesiculoscopy is a safe, effective and feasible new method for the treatment of refractory or recrudescent hemospermia.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Feasibility Studies , Hemospermia , Diagnosis , General Surgery , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Seminal Vesicles , General Surgery , Treatment Outcome , Ureteroscopy , Methods , Young Adult
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