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1.
Prensa méd. argent ; 107(2): 66-79, 20210000.
Article in English | LILACS, BINACIS | ID: biblio-1361343

ABSTRACT

Introducción: Se han analizado terapias ayurvédicas y prácticas médicas para un grupo de pacientes en Japón. La característica del tratamiento ayurvédico es una desintoxicación con una gran cantidad de tratamiento con aceite mediante un masaje con aceite en la superficie del cuerpo y una terapia de purificación con ghee o aceite de hierbas especialmente preparado. Los cambios de la microbiota intestinal durante estos tratamientos no han sido bien estudiados. Mé- LA PRENSA MÉDICA ARGENTINA Ayurveda Treatment (Virechana and Basti) and Changes of Intestinal Microbiota at Phyla and Species Level 79 V.107/Nº 2 todo: Los participantes fueron reclutados de la Clínica Hatai Ayurveda en Tokio. La terapia de Virechana, una terapia de purificación o la terapia de Basti (decocción y enema de aceite) se llevó a cabo en 13 pacientes con diversas manifestaciones. Todos los participantes proporcionaron el detalle de su estilo de vida, hábitos dietéticos, enfermedades pasadas y presentes mediante el cuestionario, y se registró la condición precisa durante la admisión al final del campamento. Se tomaron muestras fecales a la entrada, durante el tratamiento, al alta y tres semanas después para analizar la microbiota intestinal por el gen seqyebcubg 16srRNA. Resultados: el peso corporal disminuyó aproximadamente un 5% con la terapia de Virechana, mientras que no ocurrió con Basti, pero la grasa corporal aumentó un 4% (2,2 kg) en promedio en ambos grupos. Varias manifestaciones clínicas de los participantes mejoraron, especialmente en una erupción cutánea y un cambio atópico. El paciente deprimido también remitió mejoras en sus ganas de vivir. En su mayoría son vegetarianos y tenían más Bacteroides (48.09 ± 7.51%), Firmicutes (38.27 ± 10.82%) y Actinobacteria (3.30 ± 3.58%) que los omnívoros que tenían más Proteobacteria (10.73 ± 4.75%), Fusobacteria (2.40 ± 6.25%) y cianobacterias (0,09 ± 0,24%). Cuando los grupos se dividieron por el consumo de aceite, los usuarios de ghee mostraron más Fusobacterium y menos Firmicutes y Actinobacteria. La terapia con Virechana provocó cambios notables en la microbiota después del pretratamiento, como la disminución de Firmicutes y el aumento de Proteobacterias. A nivel género-especie, destacan el aumento de Enterobacteriaceae y la pérdida de Akkermansia municiphila. Niruha Basti y Matra Basti disminuyeron Firmicutes y aumentaron Proteobacteria (p = 0.096). Fusobacterium también aumentó. Después del alta, la Proteobateria se mantuvo alta, pero Firmicutes regresó al 30% en promedio, oscilando entre el 25% y el 50%. Tres semanas después, la variedad aumentó con Fusobacterium, Verrucomicrobia, Tenericutes y Lentisphaerae. La variedad de especies también aumentó tres semanas después. Conclusión: Varias quejas de los participantes mejoraron por el tratamiento ayurvédico con una gran cantidad de tratamiento de aceite por masaje de aceite de superficie corporal y terapia de purga. Causó cambios en la microbiota intestinal y los metabolitos bacterianos pueden afectar las lesiones cutáneas y la salud mental como la sensación depresiva


Subject(s)
Humans , Therapeutics/methods , Body Weight Changes , Herbal Medicine , Feces/microbiology , Ghee , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Massage/methods , Medicine, Ayurvedic
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-922113

ABSTRACT

The decline in birth rates has become a very serious problem in various parts of the world. Many countries have implemented national programs for increasing birth rates, one of which involves the use of traditional medicine as an alternative solution. Among the fast-growing traditional medicines, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and traditional Indonesian medicine (TIM) have attracted a lot of demand globally. Here, we analyzed and compared the herbal medicines from TCM and TIM that must be avoided by pregnant women for preventing miscarriage and maintaining safety during pregnancy and the postpartum period. This review uses data from official reports from the respective government and national and international electronic databases for analysis. Although TCM and TIM have their own characteristics of treatment, they also have some similarities in concept and treatment, especially those related to herbal medicines. This review can be used as a reference base to help pregnant women consume herbal medicines at appropriate conditions and doses.


Subject(s)
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Indonesia , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Plants, Medicinal , Pregnancy
3.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-888177

ABSTRACT

In this study, we studied the solubility and permeability of matrine, oxymatrine, sophoridine, and oxysophocarpine, four alkaloids in the Mongolian herbal medicine Sophorae Flavescentis Radix, and evaluated the absorption mechanism with the Caco-2 cell model, so as to provide a basis for the new drug development and efficacy evaluation of Sophorae Flavescentis Radix. The results showed that all the four alkaloids had high solubility and high permeability and can be well absorbed, belonging to the class-I drugs of Biopharmaceutical Classification System(BCS). The absorption(AP→BL) and excretion(BL→AP) of matrine and oxymatrine were not affected by the concentration while the absorption depended on P-gp protein. The absorption(AP→BL) and excretion(BL→AP) of sophoridine and oxysophocarpine were positively related to the concentration and time, and the absorption process was independent from P-gp protein. The results provide scientific reference and an experimental basis for the development of Mongolian medical prescriptions containing Sophorae Flavescentis Radix.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids , Biological Products , Caco-2 Cells , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Sophora
4.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887484

ABSTRACT

This paper introduces the specific clinical experience of professor


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Points , Acupuncture Therapy , Facial Paralysis/drug therapy , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Moxibustion
5.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-879166

ABSTRACT

In this article, the essence of innovative drug category 1.2 extracts and preparations in the new version of the New Drug Registration Category of traditional Chinese medicines(TCM) was analyzed by combing through the history of provisions on drug registration and comparing with other categories of drugs. After analyzing the characteristics of this type of preparations, the author concluded that the quality control objectives of category 1.2 extract should focus on ensuring the quality consistency of the active ingredients/components in batches, so as to guarantee the consistency of drug quality and efficacy. With reference to the relevant technical requirements for herbal medicinal products in European Medicines Agency(EMA) and botanicals in Food and Drug Administration(FDA),the key points in quality control of the extract should include the content and composition of the therapeutic constituents, the type and content of the concomitants, and the influence of exogenous contaminants on drug safety.


Subject(s)
Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Herbal Medicine , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Plant Extracts , Quality Control
6.
Electron. j. biotechnol ; 45: 38-45, May 15, 2020. ilus, graf, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1177420

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Taraxacum species (commonly known as dandelion) used as herbal medicine have been reported to exhibit an antiproliferative effect on hepatoma cells and antitumor activity in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Although several investigations have demonstrated the safety of Taraxacum officinale, the safety of tissue-cultured plants of T. formosanum has not been assessed so far. Therefore, the present study examines the safety of the water extract of the entire plant of tissue cultured T. formosanum based on acute and subacute toxicity tests in rats, as well as the Ames tests. RESULTS: No death or toxicity symptoms were observed in the acute and subacute tests. The results of the acute test revealed that the LD50 (50% of lethal dose) value of the T. formosanum water extract for rats exceeded 5 g/kg bw. No abnormal changes in the body weight, weekly food consumption, organ weight, or hematological, biochemical, and morphological parameters were observed in the subacute toxicity test. Thus, the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of T. formosanum water extract was estimated to be higher than 2.0 g/kg. Finally, the results of the Ames test revealed that T. formosanum water extract was not genotoxic at any tested concentration to any of five Salmonella strains. CONCLUSIONS: The water extract of tissue-cultured T. formosanum was non-toxic to rats in acute and subacute tests and exhibited no genotoxicity to five Salmonella strains.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Plant Extracts/toxicity , Taraxacum/toxicity , Tissue Culture Techniques/methods , Safety , Flavonoids/analysis , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Urinalysis , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Phenol/analysis , Acute Toxicity , Herbal Medicine , Taraxacum/chemistry , Serum , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Toxicity Tests, Subacute , Mutagenicity Tests
8.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-878776

ABSTRACT

Pyrrolizidine alkaloids(PAs) are a group of naturally occurring alkaloids with a pyrrolizidine skeleton which can be found in about 3% of the world's flowering plants. It is notorious that PAs are cause the hepatoxic and genotoxic-carcinogenic effects by taking PA-containing herbs, food and dietary supplements. In order to control the poisoning caused by PAs, European Medicines Agency has set a limit of intake of PAs from herbal medicinal products at 0.007 μg of 1,2-unsaturated PAs/kg body weight. Nonetheless, a systematic overview of the amount of PAs in the herb has not been provided. Therefore, this paper is to systematically review the current status of PAs content analysis of herbal medicines and foods reported in the literature, and to provide theoretical and experimental support for the safety risk assessment and control of PAs in Chinese herbal medicines.


Subject(s)
Food , Herbal Medicine , Phytotherapy , Plants, Medicinal , Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids/toxicity
9.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-826700

ABSTRACT

Professor believes that infantile cerebral palsy is located in the brain and closely related to the kidney. The clinical treatment should focus on the brain theory and root at the kidney. In pathogenesis, infantile spastic cerebral palsy refers to flaccidity of and spasticity of . The principle of treatment should be balancing and , promoting the circulation of the governor vessel and regulating the spirit/mind. In clinical treatment, the comprehensive therapy of acupuncture and herbal medicine is adopted. In acupuncture, the acupoints on the head and the face are dominant and the body acupoints are selected rigorously and precisely. The herbal formula with and is used and taken orally with warm water. In acupoint application treatment, and are the main herbal medicines for the external application at Shenque (CV 8) and Baihui (GV 20). All of the above therapies are used in combination to co-achieve the effect of regaining consciousness, opening orifices and benefiting the intelligence. The clinical therapeutic effect of this comprehensive therapy is significant.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Points , Acupuncture Therapy , Cerebral Palsy , Therapeutics , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Plant Preparations , Therapeutic Uses
10.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-773201

ABSTRACT

The Silk Road and the Maritime Silk Road were the important accesses for the exchanges of herbal medicine between the primary traditional medical systems in the ancient world,which also are the strategic links between the areas with herbal medicine widely used and the most active markets for herbs at present. This article focuses on the foreign medicinal resources introduced to traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) in China. As new resources of Chinese Materia Medica( CMM),the four basic conditions should be required,which are the clear origin,the safety and effectiveness in clinical,the efficacy and properties described with theory of TCM.Medicinal property is the key scientific problem of foreign medicinal resources introduced to TCM. The research strategies include three aspects. Medicinal properties of foreign medicinal resources will be deduced and analyzed across multiple medical systems by solving the difference depending on finding the similarities of traditional medical systems. The medicinal properties-efficacies of foreign medicinal resources will be identified by identifying Xiang and selecting similar CMM. And Xiang-properties-efficacies of foreign medicinal resources will be researched under formulae environment using medicinal properties.


Subject(s)
China , Herbal Medicine , Materia Medica , Medicine, Chinese Traditional
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739662

ABSTRACT

Depression is a major mood disorder. Abnormal expression of glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) is associated with depression. Schisantherin B (STB) is one bioactive of lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill which has been commonly used as a traditional herbal medicine for thousands of years. This paper was designed to investigate the effects of STB on depressive mice induced by forced swimming test (FST). Additionally, we also assessed the impairment of FST on cognitive function in mice with different ages. FST and open field test (OFT) were used for assessing depressive symptoms, and Y-maze was used for evaluating cognition processes. Our study showed that STB acting as an antidepressant, which increased GLT-1 levels by promoting PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. Although the damage is reversible, short-term learning and memory impairment caused by FST test is more serious in the aged mice, and STB also exerts cognition improvement ability in the meanwhile. Our findings suggested that STB might be a promising therapeutic agent of depression by regulating the GLT-1 restoration as well as activating PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cognition , Cognition Disorders , Depression , Glutamic Acid , Herbal Medicine , Learning , Lignans , Memory , Mice , Mood Disorders , Physical Exertion , Schisandra
12.
Journal of Liver Cancer ; : 55-58, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765704

ABSTRACT

In patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver cirrhosis (LC) accompanied by hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, hepatic failure often leads to debility. Here, we report about a 63-year-old man with alcoholic LC who was referred to our hospital with jaundice and abdominal distension 10 days earlier. Abdominal computed tomography showed necrotic HCC accompanied by left lobe shrinkage without tumor progression. Laboratory and imaging findings revealed no acute infection focus. The patient reported no herbal medicine or alcohol consumption, and there was no evidence of acute viral hepatitis. One month later, HEV immunoglobulin M positivity was confirmed, and deterioration of liver function due to HEV infection was suspected. The patient often ate raw oysters and sashimi, as well as boar meat, which is a well-known risk food for HEV infection. His umbilical hernia deteriorated due to tense ascites and infection by skin abrasion. The patient progressed to hepatorenal syndrome and eventually died. Liver function preservation is important when treating HCC patients. Therefore, clinicians should pay more attention to the prevention of HEV and others causes of direct liver injury.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking , Alcoholics , Ascites , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Hepatitis E virus , Hepatitis E , Hepatitis , Hepatorenal Syndrome , Herbal Medicine , Hernia, Umbilical , Humans , Immunoglobulin M , Jaundice , Liver , Liver Cirrhosis , Liver Failure , Meat , Middle Aged , Ostreidae , Skin , Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
13.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759916

ABSTRACT

This study aims to examine how traditional medicine doctors (醫生) of the Japanese colonial period in Korea treated patients and their own diseases with traditional medicine (漢方) and Western medicine (洋方) by analyzing Clinical Cases (治案) and A Diary of Jaundice Treatment (治疸日記) of Kim Gwangjin (金光鎭, 1885–1940). Through this inquiry, this study aims to reveal that the Japanese colonial period was a time when the traditional medicine and the Western medicine coexisted, and that this period cannot be simply defined as a dualism between “Western medicine, Japanese colonial government” versus “traditional medicine, governed public.” Kim Gwangjin's main method of medical treatment was traditional medicine. Clinical Cases include over 60 treatment cases, and they illustrate that he was a typical doctor at the time using traditional medical knowledge. In addition, Kim wrote A Diary of Jaundice Treatment from January 1939 to July 1940, a month before his death. The disease that led to his death was jaundice. He examined the changes in his abdomen every day, and recorded the changes in edema in upper extremities and testicles, urine and feces. While the treatment that Kim used in the early stages of jaundice were herbal medicines, he was not confined to the boundaries of the traditional medicine as he studied Western medicine to obtain a license of traditional medicine doctor from Japanese colonial government. He took a urine test to confirm whether his illness was jaundice or kidney disease and had X-ray imaging to check for pleurisy at a Western medical hospital in Daegu. Furthermore, he received a procedure to artificially drain bile, took a medicine to excrete bile into the feces, and had injection to treat neuralgia. Mostly, it was diarrhea that bothered Kim, who had been suffering from jaundice. Preventing diarrhea led to edema, and removing edema led to diarrhea again. He managed his symptoms by stopping the herbal medicine treatments and going on a raw food diet. Around this time, Kim relied the most on Ejisan (エヂ散). Ejisan was a type of new medicine mixed with traditional medicine and Western medicine that had the effect of treating edema and digestive disorders. Kim personally manufactured and took the drug until a month before his death, praising it as a necessary drug to treat jaundice. Kim was a traditional medical doctor during the Japanese colonial period. He also had the conventional wisdom that Western medicine was excellent in treating surgical diseases but not effective in internal medicine. However, he used both traditional medicine and Western medicine to treat symptoms of jaundice that have not been treated well and created a new medicine called Ejisan, which combined the two types of medicines. For him, Western medicine was a new medicine that improved the wrong aspects of traditional medicine or the old medicine, but there was still a realm of traditional medicine that Western medicine could not intervene. Furthermore, he published a new theory of traditional medicine called the Principle of Up and Down (升降論), which incorporates some Western medical knowledge. The Japanese colonial government required traditional medicine doctors to study Western medicine, and traditional medicine doctors had to learn Western medicine in order to survive. In the meantime, traditional medicine doctors such as Kim have brought about new changes by integrating the two medical treatments in the clinical field. The Japanese colonial government planned the demise of traditional medicine by forcing traditional medicine doctors to study the Western medicine, but the unexpected achievement brought about by traditional medicine doctors, who survived longer than the Japanese Empire and the colonial government, was an attempt to integrate Eastern and Western medicine.


Subject(s)
Abdomen , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Bile , Diarrhea , Diet , Edema , Feces , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Internal Medicine , Jaundice , Kidney Diseases , Korea , Licensure , Medicine, Traditional , Methods , Neuralgia , Pleurisy , Raw Foods , Testis , Upper Extremity
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759788

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many researchers have sought to identify safe, natural herbal extracts that exert an anti-melanogenesis effect. Cinnamomi cortex has been widely used as a herbal medicine in Asia and Europe. OBJECTIVE: To confirm the inhibitory effects of Cinnamomi cortex extract against melanogenesis and inflammation and to elucidate the underlying mechanism of these actions. METHODS: Effects of Cinnamomi cortex extract on melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in B16F10 melanoma cells were evaluated using an ELISA reader. Tyrosinase and MITF protein expression was determined using western blotting. Nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 cells was measured using Griess reaction. PGE₂ was assayed with an ELISA kit. RESULTS: Cinnamomi cortex extracts inhibited melanin synthesis, tyrosinase activity, and MITF and tyrosinase expression through regulation of the ERK and CREB genes in α-MSH-induced B16 melanoma cells. In addition, Cinnamomi cortex extracts inhibited the expression of NO, PGE₂, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 cells. CONCLUSION: We suggest that Cinnamomi cortex may be a potentially useful agent for treating inflammatory skin diseases such as hyperpigmentation based on its inhibitory effects against melanin synthesis and inflammation response in vitro.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents , Asia , Blotting, Western , Cytokines , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Europe , Herbal Medicine , Hyperpigmentation , In Vitro Techniques , Inflammation , Melanins , Melanoma , Melanoma, Experimental , Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor , Monophenol Monooxygenase , Nitric Oxide , Skin Diseases
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759744

ABSTRACT

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic, relapsing skin disorder, and many patients with atopic dermatitis use complementary and alternative medicine instead of consulting a certified dermatologist. Herein, we report the case of a 38-year-old woman with severe eczema herpeticum who had been treated with herbal medicine and acupuncture for her atopic dermatitis. Herbal medicine and acupuncture are the most frequent types of alternative medicine that Korean patients rely on. However, the effectiveness of these treatments in atopic dermatitis remains unclear as there is a great lack of scientific evidence supporting it. As atopic dermatitis can cause potentially fatal secondary infections such as eczema herpeticum, dermatologists should put great effort into communicating with and educating the patients and in guiding them to choose the most appropriate treatment plan for managing their atopic dermatitis.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture , Adult , Coinfection , Complementary Therapies , Dermatitis, Atopic , Eczema , Female , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Kaposi Varicelliform Eruption , Skin
16.
Annals of Dermatology ; : 414-419, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762357

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Herbs have been used worldwide as complementary and alternative medicines. In Korea, herbs for medical purpose are strictly controlled by the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA). But it does not provide standards for metal antigens. OBJECTIVE: This study conducted to identify the metal contents of Korean herbs and herbal products and to give information on counselling metal allergic patient. METHODS: The concentration of three metal allergens with high antigenicity, cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) was quantitatively determined using inductively coupled plasma with a mass spectrometer after nitric acid (HNO₃) digestion. The herbal objects are as follows: 1) ten kinds of herb plants, 2) ten herbal products sold in Korean drugstores, and 3) ten herbal extracts prescribed by Korean herbal doctors. RESULTS: In 30 samples, Ni and Cr were detected in all items. Co was not detected in two drugstore products. CONCLUSION: Although the levels of metal detected in this study were very low relative to international guidelines and KFDA regulations, the herbal preparations contained similar or higher metal levels than known metal-rich foods. It can cause problems when it added to the daily diet and cause deterioration of skin lesions of metal sensitized person.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Chromium , Cobalt , Complementary Therapies , Dermatitis , Diet , Digestion , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Korea , Metals , Nickel , Nitric Acid , Plant Preparations , Plasma , Skin , Social Control, Formal , United States Food and Drug Administration
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761932

ABSTRACT

A 60-year-old woman presented with polymorphic ventricular tachycardia secondary to hypokalemia, which necessitated dozens of DC cardioversions. She was not taking any other medication and denied any vomiting or diarrhea. Further investigation for hypokalemia suggested a hypermineralocorticoid state. Repeated inquiry prompted the patient to admit to taking herbal medicine containing licorice. She was treated with magnesium sulfate, potassium infusion, and intravenous lidocaine. A potassium-sparing diuretic was also prescribed. On the seventh day, the patient was discharged from the hospital with advice to discontinue taking herbal medicines containing licorice. She has been followed up at our outpatient clinic without further symptoms for 3 years. This case highlights the potential for cardiovascular complications associated with consumption of herbal medicines such as licorice. Clinicians should be aware that patients presenting to the emergency department with ventricular arrhythmia and uncertain hypokalemia should be questioned about licorice intake. Obtaining a detailed history from patients admitted to the hospital for electrical storm is essential.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities , Arrhythmias, Cardiac , Diarrhea , Electric Countershock , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Glycyrrhiza , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Hypokalemia , Lidocaine , Magnesium Sulfate , Middle Aged , Potassium , Tachycardia, Ventricular , Vomiting
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761884

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for erectile dysfunction (ED). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched six major English and Chinese databases included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing acupuncture alone or in combination for ED. Dichotomous data were presented as risk ratio (RR) and continuous data were presented as mean difference (MD) both with 95% confidence interval (CI). The Revman (v.5.3) was used for data analyses. Quality of evidence across studies was assessed by the online GRADEpro tool. RESULTS: We identified 22 RCTs, fourteen of them involving psychogenic ED. Most of the included RCTs had high or unclear risk of bias. There was no difference between electro-acupuncture and sham acupuncture with electrical stimulation on the rate of satisfaction and self-assessment (RR, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.71–3.16; 1 trial). Acupuncture combined with tadalafil appeared to have better effect on increasing cure rate (RR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.00–1.71; 2 trials), and International Index of Erectile Function-5 scores (MD, 5.38; 95% CI, 4.46–6.29; 2 trials). When acupuncture plus herbal medicine compared with herbal medicine alone, the combination therapy showed significant better improvement in erectile function (RR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.31–2.15; 7 trials). Only two trials reported facial red and dizziness cases, and needle sticking and pruritus cases in acupuncture group. CONCLUSIONS: Low quality evidence shows beneficial effect of acupuncture as adjunctive treatment for people mainly with psychogenic ED. Safety of acupuncture was insufficiently reported. The findings should be confirmed in large, rigorously designed and well-reported trials.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Bias , Dizziness , Electric Stimulation , Erectile Dysfunction , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Male , Needles , Odds Ratio , Pruritus , Self-Assessment , Statistics as Topic , Tadalafil
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-740563

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Barely sprout is a well-known oriental herbal medicine with a wide range of health benefits. Recent studies have provided scientific evidence of its therapeutic effects with expanded application. This study investigated anti-melanogenic effect of barley sprout water extract (BSE) in murine melanocyte B16F10. METHODS: Various concentrations (0, 50, 125, and 250 µg/mL) of BSE and arbutin (150 ppm) were applied to B16F10 stimulated with or without alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (100 nM) for 72 hours. The whitening potency of BSE was determined altered cellular melanin contents. Activity and expression of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) were also assayed. RESULTS: Experimental results revealed that treatment with BSE reduced cellular melanin production by approximately 40% compared to the control. Molecular findings supported that suppressed activity and expression of tyrosinase and MITF proteins by BSE were associated with declined cellular melanogenesis. Furthermore, anti-melanogenic effect of BSE (250 µg/mL) was similar to that of arbutin, a commonly used whitening agent. Lastly, polyphenols including p-coumaric, ferulic, and vanillic acids were identified in BSE using HPLC analyses. They might be potential active ingredients showing such melanogenesis-reducing effect. CONCLUSION: BSE was evident to possess favorable anti-melanogenic potency in an in vitro model. As a natural food sourced material, BSE could be an effective depigmentation agent with potential application in pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.


Subject(s)
Arbutin , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Herbal Medicine , Hordeum , In Vitro Techniques , Insurance Benefits , Melanins , Melanocytes , Melanoma , Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor , Monophenol Monooxygenase , Polyphenols , Therapeutic Uses , Vanillic Acid , Water
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-764302

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Baicalein is a bioactive flavone that is originally extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi. This plant has long served as Chinese herbal medicine in the management of multiple diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases. Although it has been revealed that baicalein inhibits experimental colitis in mice, the molecular mechanisms still remain largely unrecognized. METHODS: The experimental colitis was induced in mice by 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water. The mice were given baicalein (10 or 25 mg/kg) by gavage for 7 days before and after DSS administration. Expression of COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and molecules involved in NF-κB signaling, such as inhibitor of κBα (IκBα), pIκBα, p65, and phospho-p65 was examined by Western blot analysis in the tissue of the mouse colon. Activity of IκB kinase β (IKKβ) was assessed by measuring the relative amount of radioactive γ-phosphate of ATP transferred to the IκBα substrate protein. The expression and phosphorylation of STAT3 and its target gene cyclin D1 were also measured. RESULTS: Baicalein prominently mitigated the severity of DSS-induced colitis in mice. It inhibited the expression of COX-2 and iNOS. Moreover, baicalein attenuated activity and phosphorylation of IKKβ and subsequent degradation of IκBα. Baicalein suppressed the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65, resulting in a reduced DNA binding activity of NF-κB. Baicalein also suppressed the phosphorylation of STAT3 and expression of cyclin D1. Baicalein exhibited the synergistic effect on inhibition of COX-2 induced by DSS with curcumin, an ingredient of turmeric. CONCLUSIONS: Protective effects of baicalein on DSS-induced colitis are associated with suppression of NF-κB and STAT3 signaling pathways, which may contribute to its cancer preventive effects on colon carcinogenesis.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate , Animals , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Blotting, Western , Carcinogenesis , Colitis , Colon , Curcuma , Curcumin , Cyclin D1 , Cyclooxygenase 2 , Dextran Sulfate , Dextrans , DNA , Drinking Water , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Mice , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II , Phosphorylation , Phosphotransferases , Plants , Scutellaria baicalensis
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