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1.
Asia Pacific Allergy ; (4): e2-2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-750172

ABSTRACT

We previously described a rare case of anaphylaxis presumably induced by carminic acid in cochineal dye used as a food additive. In this study, highly pure carminic acid was added to an albumin-containing buffer at various concentrations, followed by serial dilution. Varying the mixing ratio of carminic acid and albumin affected the extent of histamine release from passively sensitized basophils. Similar basophil histamine release occurred with carminic acid-globulin solutions. These results provide experimental evidence indicating that basophil activation is dependent on hapten (carminic acid) and carrier (protein) interaction.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , Basophils , Carmine , Food Additives , Histamine Release , Hypersensitivity , In Vitro Techniques
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762150

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to systemically review literature relating to factors that could potentially predict a favorable response to cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment for chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). METHODS: A systematic literature review was done according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis recommendations. RESULTS: A total of 13 studies (404 patients with CSU and 200 healthy patients) were included. There were only 1 randomized controlled trial (RCT) and 12 non-RCTs. Our systematic review showed that positive autologous serum skin test results, positive baseline basophil histamine release assays, positive baseline basophil activation test responses, elevated baseline plasma D-dimer levels, elevated baseline serum interleukin (IL)-2, IL-5, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, and low baseline serum IgE levels might assist in predicting favorable CsA responses in CSU patients. Decreased plasma D-dimer levels; and decreased serum IL-2, IL-5, and TNF-α levels were reported to be correlated with clinical improvement after CsA treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Since most positive results were from non-RCT articles and some data were still inconsistent, this systematic review identified no reliable practical biomarker for predicting CsA treatment response in patients with CSU. There were no positive predictors with good consistency and mechanical plausibility.


Subject(s)
Basophils , Cyclosporine , Histamine Release , Humans , Immunoglobulin E , Interleukin-2 , Interleukin-5 , Interleukins , Plasma , Skin Tests , Treatment Outcome , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Urticaria
3.
Anatomy & Cell Biology ; : 124-134, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-21762

ABSTRACT

Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia, the aberrant production of the Th2 cytokines, and eosinophil infiltration into the lungs. In this study, we examined the effects of baicalein, wogonin, and Scutellaria baicalensis ethanol extract on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma by evaluating Th1/Th2 cytokine levels, histopathologic analysis, and compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis and mast cell activation, focusing on the histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. Baicalein, wogonin, and S. baicalensis ethanol extract also decreased the number of inflammatory cells especially eosinophils and downregulated peribronchial and perivascular inflammation in the lungs of mice challenged by OVA. Baicalein, wogonin, and S. baicalensis ethanol extract significantly reduced the levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-5 and the production of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1, and upregulated the level of interferon-γ and OVA-specific IgG2a. In addition, oral administration of baicalein, wogonin, and S. baicalensis ethanol extract inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis and plasma histamine release in mice. Moreover, baicalein, wogonin, and S. baicalensis ethanol extract suppressed compound 48/80-induced mast cell degranulation and histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. Conclusively, baicalein and wogonin as major flavonoids of S. baicalensis may have therapeutic potential for allergic asthma through modulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine imbalance and histamine release from mast cells.


Subject(s)
Administration, Oral , Anaphylaxis , Animals , Asthma , Cytokines , Eosinophils , Ethanol , Flavonoids , Goblet Cells , Histamine Release , Histamine , Hyperplasia , Immunoglobulin E , Immunoglobulin G , Inflammation , Interleukin-4 , Interleukin-5 , Interleukins , Lung , Mast Cells , Mice , Ovalbumin , Ovum , Plasma , Rats , Scutellaria baicalensis , Scutellaria , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-90242

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Hypersensitivity to fungi is associated with rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma. For some fungi, such as Alternaria alternata (A. alternata), the symptoms of asthma are persistent, increasing disease severity and the risk of fatal outcomes. There are a large number of species of fungi but knowledge of them remains limited. This, together with the difficulties in obtaining adequate standardized extracts, means that there remain significant challenges in the diagnosis and immunotherapy of allergy associated with fungi. The type of indoor fungi related to asthma/allergy varies according to geographic, climatic, and seasonal factors, making their study difficult. The aim of this study was to determine hypersensitivity to indoor fungi in a population from Cuenca, Spain. METHODS: Thirty-five patients with symptoms compatible with rhinitis or asthma who showed clear worsening of their symptoms in their homes or workplace were included. In vivo and in vitro tests were made with a battery of fungal allergens, including the species isolated in the home or workplace. RESULTS: Ulocladium botrytis (U. botrytis) and A. alternata were the most representative species as a source of home sensitization. These species showed very high concordance in skin tests, specific IgE, and histamine release. The allergen Alt a 1, which was recognized in all patients, was detected in A. alternata, U. botrytis, and Stemphylium botryosum (S. botryosum). CONCLUSIONS: U. botrytis and A. alternata were the most representative species as a source of home sensitization. Alt a 1 was recognized in all patients and may be considered a non-species-specific allergen that could be used as a diagnostic source of sensitization to some species of the Pleosporaceae family.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Alternaria , Asthma , Botrytis , Diagnosis , Fatal Outcome , Fungi , Histamine Release , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Immunotherapy , In Vitro Techniques , Rhinitis , Seasons , Skin Tests , Spain
5.
Natural Product Sciences ; : 122-127, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-182831

ABSTRACT

Gastrodia elata Blume is a well-known kind of natural products used as a folk medicine for thousands of years. However, anti-atopic dermatitis-like effects of G. elata Blume had not been evaluated until now. The aim of the present study is to investigate the protective effects of water extract from the roots of G. elata Blume (GE) on 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions using balb/c mice. Combination treatment of GE (at a dose of 12.5 mg/kg body weight by administrated per os + 0.5 mg/cm2 as ointment to apply on ear and dorsal skin) was significantly inhibited spleen weight, ear thickness, levels of serum immunoglobulin E and number of mast cells, compared with that of 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene-included groups without GE. Furthermore, combination application by oral administration plus by ointment of GE significantly inhibited the histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. These results suggest that combination treatment of oral administration plus ointment form of GE could be helpful as a potentially natural pharmaceutical treatment on atopic-like dermatitis.


Subject(s)
Administration, Oral , Animals , Biological Products , Body Weight , Dermatitis , Dermatitis, Atopic , Ear , Gastrodia , Histamine Release , Immunoglobulin E , Immunoglobulins , Mast Cells , Medicine, Traditional , Mice , Rats , Skin , Spleen , Water
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-89920

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The production of camel heavy-chain antihuman IgE (huIgE) that has the potential to block IgE-FcepsilonRI interaction and histamine release by basophils. METHODS: Camels were immunized with a synthetic loop peptide (SLP) designed in a multiple antigen peptide system (MAPS) forming SLP-MAPS immunogen. Camel polyclonal antibodies (PCAs) were produced, purified, characterized using Protein A & G, ELISA, and SDS-PAGE, and tested for their potency to block passive sensitization and histamine release of human basophils using flow cytometry (FCM) and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: FCM data indicated that camel conventional (IgG1) and heavy chain antibodies (HCAbs; IgG2, and IgG3) had blocking activities of 43.9%, 72%, and 96.6%, respectively. Moreover, both IgG2 and IgG3 achieved remarkable inhibition rates of 93.98% and 97.05% in histamine release, respectively, whereas the IgG1inhibiting activity was 60.05%. CONCLUSIONS: Camel PCAs produced against SLP-MAPS were capable of blocking the IgE-receptor interaction and the release of histamine by basophils with superiority to HCAbs. These findings may pave the way toward the possible use of camel anti-huIgE HCAbs as blocking antibodies in the treatment of IgE-mediated allergy and asthma.


Subject(s)
Antibodies , Antibodies, Blocking , Asthma , Basophils , Camelus , Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Flow Cytometry , Histamine Release , Histamine , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Immunoglobulin G , Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis , Staphylococcal Protein A
7.
Anatomy & Cell Biology ; : 225-234, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-208412

ABSTRACT

Mast cells are known as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic responses, but role of mast cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered controversial. In this study, we investigated role of mast cell in trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced CHS. The mice were sensitized to TMA on the back and repeatedly challenged with TMA on the left ear at 1-week intervals. The ear after challenge showed biphasic responses. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of early and late phase reactions in proportion to the frequency of TMA challenges in C57BL/6 mice. In late phase reaction, peak of ear response by single challenge showed at 24 hours after challenge, but the peak by repeat challenges at 8 hours after the last challenge. Number of mast cells and eosinophils per unit area increased in proportion to frequency of TMA challenges. However, mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-Kit(W)/Kit(W-v) mice developed the late phase reaction without the early phase reaction. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of ear response and the infiltration of eosinophils. The magnitude of these responses observed according to the frequency of the TMA challenge in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-Kit(W)/Kit(W-v) mice was significantly lower than that in C57BL/6 mice. Also TMA elicited mast cell degranulation and histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusively, TMA induces the early and late phase reactions in CHS, and mast cells may be required for TMA-induced CHS.


Subject(s)
Animals , Dermatitis, Contact , Ear , Eosinophils , Histamine Release , Mast Cells , Mice , Rats
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-164127

ABSTRACT

Factors that can induce the release of histamine from basophils have been studied for more than 30 years. A protein termed histamine-releasing factor (HRF) was purified and molecularly cloned in 1995. HRF can stimulate histamine release and IL-4 and IL-13 production from IgE-sensitized basophils and mast cells. HRF-like activities were found in bodily fluids during the late phase of allergic reactions, implicating HRF in allergic diseases. However, definitive evidence for the role of HRF in allergic diseases has remained elusive. On the other hand, we found effects of monomeric IgE on the survival and activation of mast cells without the involvement of a specific antigen, as well as heterogeneity of IgEs in their ability to cause such effects. The latter property of IgE molecules seemed to be similar to the heterogeneity of IgEs in their ability to prime basophils in response to HRF. This similarity led to our recent finding that ~30% of IgE molecules can bind to HRF via their Fab interactions with two binding sites within the HRF molecule. The use of peptide inhibitors that block HRF-IgE interactions revealed an essential role of HRF to promote skin hypersensitivity and airway inflammation. This review summarizes this and more recent findings and provides a perspective on how they impact our understanding of allergy pathogenesis and potentially change the treatment of allergic diseases.


Subject(s)
Asthma , Basophils , Binding Sites , Clone Cells , Hand , Histamine , Histamine Release , Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Immunoglobulins , Inflammation , Interleukin-13 , Interleukin-4 , Mast Cells , Population Characteristics , Skin
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-164114

ABSTRACT

Codeine is widely prescribed in clinical settings for the relief of pain and non-productive coughs. Common adverse drug reactions to codeine include constipation, euphoria, nausea, and drowsiness. However, there have been few reports of serious adverse reactions after codeine ingestion in adults. Here, we present a case of severe anaphylaxis after oral ingestion of a therapeutic dose of codeine. A 30-year-old Korean woman complained of the sudden onset of dyspnea, urticaria, chest tightness, and dizziness 10 minutes after taking a 10-mg dose of codeine to treat a chronic cough following a viral infection. She had previously experienced episodes of asthma exacerbation following upper respiratory infections, and had non-atopic rhinitis and a food allergy to seafood. A skin prick test showed a positive response to 1-10 mg/mL of codeine extract, with a mean wheal size of 3.5 mm, while negative results were obtained in 3 healthy adult controls. A basophil histamine release test showed a notable dose-dependent increase in histamine following serial incubations with codeine phosphate, while there were minimal changes in the healthy controls. Following a CYP2D6 genotype analysis, the patient was found to have the CYP2D6*1/*10 allele, indicating she was an intermediate metabolizer. An open label oral challenge test was positive. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient presenting with severe anaphylaxis after the ingestion of a therapeutic dose of codeine, which may be mediated by the direct release of histamine by basophils following exposure to codeine.


Subject(s)
Adult , Alleles , Anaphylaxis , Asthma , Basophil Degranulation Test , Basophils , Codeine , Constipation , Cough , Cytochrome P-450 CYP2D6 , Dizziness , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Dyspnea , Eating , Euphoria , Female , Food Hypersensitivity , Genotype , Histamine , Histamine Release , Humans , Nausea , Respiratory Tract Infections , Rhinitis , Seafood , Skin , Sleep Stages , Thorax , Urticaria
10.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-90224

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of olopatadine and ketotifen to stabilize mast cells using human umbilical cord blood-derived mast cells (hCBMCs). METHODS: Using cultured hCBMCs, we divided the cells into the Ketotifen fumarate treatment group, the Olopatadine hydrochloride treatment group, the positive control group, and the negative control group. The histamine release inhibition rate was then observed. RESULTS: Ketotifen and olopatadine both showed the highest inhibition rate of histamine release at a concentration of 10(-3.5)M (Ketotifen, 48% and Olopatadine, 62%). The histamine release inhibition rate of olopatadine was 28% at a concentration of 10(-5.5)M, but ketotifen demonstrated a low histamine release inhibition rate at the same concentration. Ketotifen and olopatadine showed no histamine release inhibition at concentrations of 10(-2)~10(-2.5)M, and 10(-6)M. CONCLUSIONS: Ketotifen and olopatadine demonstrated histamine inhibition in the concentration range of 10(-3) to 10(-5)M. Olopatadine showed a slightly stronger response than ketotifen in the inhibition of histamine release.


Subject(s)
Histamine , Histamine Release , Humans , Ketotifen , Mast Cells , Umbilical Cord , Olopatadine Hydrochloride
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-727670

ABSTRACT

To investigate the underlying mechanisms of C18 fatty acids (stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid) on mast cells, we measured the effect of C18 fatty acids on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and histamine release in RBL-2H3 mast cells. Stearic acid rapidly increased initial peak of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, whereas linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid gradually increased this mobilization. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, stearic acid (100 microM) did not cause any increase of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Both linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid increased intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, but the increase was smaller than that in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. These results suggest that C18 fatty acid-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization is mainly dependent on extracellular Ca2+ influx. Verapamil dose-dependently inhibited stearic acid-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, but did not affect both linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. These data suggest that the underlying mechanism of stearic acid, linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization may differ. Linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid significantly increased histamine release. Linoleic acid (C18:2: omega-6)-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and histamine release were more prominent than alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3: omega-3). These data support the view that the intake of more alpha-linolenic acid than linoleic acid is useful in preventing inflammation.


Subject(s)
alpha-Linolenic Acid , Fatty Acids , Histamine Release , Inflammation , Linoleic Acid , Mast Cells , Oleic Acid , Verapamil
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-133311

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The mast cell plays a pivotal role in the human immune response. Crosslinking of 2 IgE molecules bound to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonRI) on the surface of the mast cell results in mast cell degranulation and the release of several proinflammatory mediators. Patients with type-I allergy have increased levels of IgE in the blood compared to healthy individuals. METHODS: In a 6-week culture system of stem cells to human mast cells we investigated the effect of the concentration of IgE. The mast cells were cultured with different concentrations of IgE for the last 10 days of the maturation period. It was observed how the IgE concentration affects the histamine release, FcepsilonRI density on the mast cell surface and the concentration of other mediators. RESULTS: A clear correlation between IgE concentration in culture medium and the release of histamine upon activation was observed. It showed a bell-shaped dose response curve, with maximal response around an IgE-concentration of 250 ng/mL. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the mast cells and surface density of FcepsilonRI on mast cell surface was also influenced by the IgE concentration in the culture medium. CONCLUSIONS: IgE in the culture medium during the last 10 days of mast cell maturation influences the release of the preformed mediator histamine after mast cell activation and the density of FcepsilonRI on the mast cell surface. The release of the de novo synthetized mediator prostaglandin D2 and the expression of chymase and tryptase are not influenced by IgE in culture medium.


Subject(s)
Chymases , Histamine , Histamine Release , Humans , Hygiene Hypothesis , Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Mast Cells , Prostaglandin D2 , Stem Cells , Tryptases
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-133310

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The mast cell plays a pivotal role in the human immune response. Crosslinking of 2 IgE molecules bound to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonRI) on the surface of the mast cell results in mast cell degranulation and the release of several proinflammatory mediators. Patients with type-I allergy have increased levels of IgE in the blood compared to healthy individuals. METHODS: In a 6-week culture system of stem cells to human mast cells we investigated the effect of the concentration of IgE. The mast cells were cultured with different concentrations of IgE for the last 10 days of the maturation period. It was observed how the IgE concentration affects the histamine release, FcepsilonRI density on the mast cell surface and the concentration of other mediators. RESULTS: A clear correlation between IgE concentration in culture medium and the release of histamine upon activation was observed. It showed a bell-shaped dose response curve, with maximal response around an IgE-concentration of 250 ng/mL. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the mast cells and surface density of FcepsilonRI on mast cell surface was also influenced by the IgE concentration in the culture medium. CONCLUSIONS: IgE in the culture medium during the last 10 days of mast cell maturation influences the release of the preformed mediator histamine after mast cell activation and the density of FcepsilonRI on the mast cell surface. The release of the de novo synthetized mediator prostaglandin D2 and the expression of chymase and tryptase are not influenced by IgE in culture medium.


Subject(s)
Chymases , Histamine , Histamine Release , Humans , Hygiene Hypothesis , Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Mast Cells , Prostaglandin D2 , Stem Cells , Tryptases
14.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-338006

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To explore a new experimental method for screening of allergens in post-market traditional Chinese medicine injections by confirming allergens in Huachansu injection.</p><p><b>METHOD</b>First of all, the serum of patients allergic to Huachansu injection were collected, at the same time, the dubious allergen was conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) by EDC coupling procedure to form complete antigen (BNP-BSA), which makes it possible to reproduce the allergic reaction of Huachansu injection in vitro. The histamine liberation ratio, the level of TNF-alpha and Histamine released from RBL-2H3 mast cell were detected; the above data were compared with those obtained in vivo.</p><p><b>RESULT</b>The difference of the histamine liberation ratio, the levels of TNF-alpha and histamine of the resibufogenin-BSA group, group of patients allergic to Huachansu injection were not significant compared with those of normal control group. However, there were significant difference in those data among the cinobufagin-BSA group, the blank control and normal control group (P<0.05).</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The allergen in the serum collected from patients allergic to Huachansu injection is resibufogenin.</p>


Subject(s)
Allergens , Allergy and Immunology , Amphibian Venoms , Allergy and Immunology , Animals , Anura , Bufanolides , Allergy and Immunology , Drug Hypersensitivity , Allergy and Immunology , Histamine Release , Humans , Mast Cells , Allergy and Immunology , Medicine, Chinese Traditional
15.
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica ; (12): 34-38, 2012.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-323084

ABSTRACT

This study is to investigate the anti-allergic effect of anthocyanidin and to explore its possible mechanism. The experiments of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction (PCA) and colorimetry were used to determine the effect of anthocyanidin on degranulation of mast cells in vivo. For in vitro study, various concentrations of anthocyanidin (100, 50 and 25 micromol x L(-1)) were added to the culture medium of mast cells cultured with 100 microg x L(-1) of dinitrophenyl (DNP) specific IgE overnight. The azelastine (100 micromol x L(-1)) was selected as the positive control. The antigen (DNP-human serum albumin, DNP-HAS)-induced release of degranulation was measured by enzymatic assay, histamine was determined by EIA, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were measured by Western blotting, separately. In addition, the effects of anthocyanidin on phosphorylation of NF-kappaB, p38MAPK and Akt were observed by Western blotting. The results showed that treatments with anthocyanidin (100 and 50 mg x kg(-1)) were followed by a decrease in PCA of rats. Anthocyanidin (100 and 50 micromol x L(-1)) obviously suppressed the degranulation from mast cells, whereas results from anthocyanidin (100 and 50 micromol x L(-1)) group indicated significant inhibitory effect on histamine, the calcium uptake, TNF-alpha, IL-6, phosphorylation of NF-kappaB, p38MAPK and Akt of mast cells induced by antigen. Anthocyanidin may suppress the anaphylactic reaction by inhibiting the action of mast cells. NF-kappaB, p38MAPK and Akt at least in part contribute to this event.


Subject(s)
Animals , Anthocyanins , Pharmacology , Anti-Allergic Agents , Pharmacology , Calcium , Metabolism , Cell Degranulation , Histamine Release , Immunoglobulin E , Allergy and Immunology , Interleukin-6 , Metabolism , Male , Mast Cells , Allergy and Immunology , Metabolism , Physiology , Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt , Metabolism , Random Allocation , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Signal Transduction , Transcription Factor RelA , Metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Metabolism , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases , Metabolism
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-170974

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin (Siglec) is an immune inhibitory receptor that plays a role in the negative regulation of the activation of immune cells. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of anti-Siglec-F on plasma and urinary histamine levels in ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged urinary bladder in mice. METHODS: Thirty BALB/c mice were used. In group I (control group, n=5), mice were sensitized with OVA and challenged with saline. In group II (OVA challenge group, n=5), OVA was used for intraperitoneal sensitization and intravesical challenge. The challenged mice in group III (control immunoglobulin G [IgG] group, n=5) and those in group IV (anti-Siglec-F group, n=5) were intraperitoneally pretreated with rabbit control IgG or anti-Siglec-F antibody, respectively. In groups V (N-acetylcysteine [NAC] in OVA challenge group, n=5) and VI (control NAC only, n=5), mice were pretreated with NAC. RESULTS: Urinary histamine concentrations were significantly higher 7 days after intravesical OVA challenge (P<0.01), whereas plasma histamine levels were not. Pretreatment with anti-Siglec-F antibody significantly prevented the increase in urinary histamine release (P<0.05), whereas pretreatment with the IgG antibody control did not. Also, pretreatment of the OVA challenge group with NAC did not affect the histamine concentration in either urine or plasma. CONCLUSIONS: Systemic anti-Siglec-F treatment showed anti-allergic effects at least on local histamine release, particularly in the lower urinary bladder.


Subject(s)
Animals , Histamine , Histamine Release , Immunoglobulin G , Mice , Ovalbumin , Ovum , Plasma , Reactive Oxygen Species , Sialic Acid Binding Immunoglobulin-like Lectins , Urinary Bladder
17.
Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2011; 24 (3): 359-367
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-129863

ABSTRACT

Aegeline or 7V-[2-hydroxy-2[4-methoxyphenyl] ethyl]-3-phenyl-2-propenamide is a main alkaloid isolated from Aegle marmelos Correa collected in Yogyakarta Indonesia. In our study, we investigated the effects of aegeline on the histamine release from mast cell. The study was performed by using [1] rat basophilic leukemia [RBL-2H3] cell line, and [2] rat peritoneal mast cells [RPMCs]. DNP[2]4-BSA, thapsigargin, ionomycin, compound 48/80 and PMA were used as inducers for histamine release from mast cell. In our study, aegeline inhibited the histamine release from RBL-2H3 cells induced by DNP24-BSA. Indeed, aegeline showed strong inhibition when RBL-2H3 cells induced by Ca[2+] stimulants such as thapsigargin and ionomycin. Aegeline is suggested to influence the intracellular Ca[2+] pool only since could not inhibit the [45]Ca[2+] influx into RBL-2H3 cells. Aegeline showed weak inhibitory effects on the histamine release from RPMCs, even though still succeed to inhibit when the histamine release induced by thapsigargin. These findings indicate that aegeline altered the signaling pathway related to the intracellular Ca[2+] pool in which thapsigargin acts. Based on the results, the inhibitory effects ofaegeYme on the histamine release from mast cells depended on the type of mast cell and also involved some mechanisms related to intracellular Ca[2+] signaling events via the same target of the action of thapsigargin or downstream process of intracellular Ca[2+] signaling in mast cells


Subject(s)
Animals, Laboratory , Male , Histamine Release/drug effects , Mast Cells/drug effects , Amides/pharmacology , Herb-Drug Interactions , Rats, Wistar , Cell Line, Tumor , Dinitrophenols/pharmacology , Ionomycin/pharmacology , Mast Cells/metabolism , Thapsigargin/pharmacology
18.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-354168

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the effect of Qingkailing injection (QKLI) on complement and RBL-2 H3 cells in virto.</p><p><b>METHOD</b>The mixture of human serums and QKLI were incubated for 30 min in vitro and then the content of SC5 b-9 in the mixture was determined by ELISA. RBL-2 H3 cells were cultured and treated by QKLI. Beta-heosaminidase release rate was measured by coloration method. The content of histamine in supernatant was tested by ELISA.</p><p><b>RESULT</b>The QKLI can reduce the content of SC5 b-9 (P<0.05) and promote the release of beta-heosaminidase and histamine significantly (P<0.05).</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>QKLI didn't induce the complement activation, but induced the release of beta-heosaminidase and histamine directly. Therefore, the clinical adverse reactions of QKLI in clinic may be pseudoallergy which had no relation with the activation of complement system.</p>


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Animals , Cell Degranulation , Cell Line, Tumor , Chemistry, Pharmaceutical , Complement System Proteins , Metabolism , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Chemistry , Pharmacology , Hexosaminidases , Bodily Secretions , Histamine Release , Humans , Injections , Rats , Young Adult
19.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-252974

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To provide evidences for evaluating the role of chlorogenic acid (CA) on the adverse reaction of traditional Chinese medicine injection and promoting clinical rational usage of CA, the effect of CA and chlorogenic acid-HSA(CA-HSA) on the degranulation in mast cell RBL-2H3 were compared and the allergenic effect and its mechanism were investigated.</p><p><b>METHOD</b>The unsensitized and sensitized RBL-2H3 cells were used. The releasing rate of histamine and beta-hexosaminidase was detected by colormetric assays. The degranulating rate was detected by neutral red staining and Annexin V positive cell rate was detected by flow cytometry.</p><p><b>RESULT</b>CA and CA-HSA could not induce degranulation in unsensitized RBL-2H3 cells. CA and CA-HSA could significantly increase the release of histamine and beta-hexosaminidase, degranulating rate and Annexin V positive cell rate.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>CA has strong allergenicity after combination with serum proteins. As an active ingredient of Shuanghuanglian injection, CA is a kind of possible allergen which caused hypersensitivity reactions induced by Shuanghuanglian injection.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Cell Degranulation , Cell Line , Chlorogenic Acid , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Histamine Release , Mast Cells , Cell Biology , Bodily Secretions , Rats , beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidases , Bodily Secretions
20.
Indian J Biochem Biophys ; 2010 Apr; 47(2): 90-95
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-135249

ABSTRACT

The mast cell-mediated allergic reactions are involved in many allergic diseases, such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and sinusitis. Stimulation of mast cells initiates the process of degranulation, resulting in the release of mediators such as histamine and an array of inflammatory cytokines. In this report, we investigated the effect of gossypin (a biflavonoid) and suramin (a synthetic polysulphonated naphtylurea) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model, and studied the possible mechanism of their action. Both gossypin and suramin inhibited (P<0.001) compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis reactions, antiprurities (P<0.001) and reduced the histamine release in rats. Further, both showed significant (P<0.001) protection against rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Thus, our findings provide evidence that gossypin and suramin inhibit mast cell-derived allergic reactions.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , Anaphylaxis/drug therapy , Anaphylaxis/immunology , Animals , Anti-Allergic Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Allergic Agents/therapeutic use , Antipruritics/pharmacology , Antipruritics/therapeutic use , Ascitic Fluid/drug effects , Ascitic Fluid/metabolism , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Disease Models, Animal , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Flavonoids/therapeutic use , Histamine Release/drug effects , Histamine Release/immunology , Hypersensitivity/blood , Hypersensitivity/drug therapy , Hypersensitivity/immunology , Hypersensitivity/metabolism , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/immunology , Mast Cells/metabolism , Mice , Nitrogen Oxides/blood , Nitrogen Oxides/metabolism , Rats , Suramin/pharmacology , Suramin/therapeutic use , p-Methoxy-N-methylphenethylamine/pharmacology
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