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1.
J. oral res. (Impresa) ; 9(6): 490-499, dic. 31, 2020. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1178945

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of dentin surface treatment with 37% phosphoric acid or 17% ethylenedia-minetetraacetic acid (EDTA) before Internal Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide using the walking bleach technique. Material and Methods: This experimental in vitro study used 66 human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons, which were debrided, endodontically prepared, and pigmented with chromogens derived from blood decomposition. The samples were randomly divided into three groups (n=22). Group A: bleaching agent without dentin conditioning; group B: bleaching agent in dentin conditioned with phosphoric acid 37%; group C: bleaching agent in dentin conditioned with 17% EDTA. 4 applications of bleaching agent were used with a separation of 4 days between each session. The initial color (baseline) and after each application was determined by spectrophotometry, recording the CIE L*a*b* values and the total color variation between the initial parameters and the different evaluation times. Results: Data were statistically analyzed with the Wilcoxon test. This showed statistically significant differences for the total variation of the color between the study groups, with the control group in no case inferior to the rest. Conclusion: The application of 37% phosphoric acid increased the effectiveness of the bleaching agent when compared to 17% EDTA. However, these did not increase the effectiveness compared to the application of the bleaching agent without a previous dentin surface treatment.


Introducción: El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el efecto del tratamiento de superficie dentinaria con ácido fosfórico al 37% o EDTA al 17% previo al blanqueamiento Interno con peróxido de hidrógeno al 35% por medio de la técnica Walking Bleach. Material y Métodos:Para este estudio experimental in vitro, se utilizaron 66 premolares humanos extraídos por indicación ortodóncica, los cuales fueron desbridados, preparados endodónticamente, y pigmentados con cromógenos derivados de la descomposición sanguínea. Las muestras fueron divididas aleatoriamente en 3 grupos (n=22). Grupo A: agente blanqueador sin acondicionamiento dentinario, grupo B: agente blanqueador en dentina acondicionada con ácido fosfórico 37% y grupo C: agente blanqueador en dentina acondicionada con EDTA 17%. Se utilizaron 4 aplicaciones de agente blanqueador con una separación de 4 días entre cada sesión. El color inicial (baseline) y tras cada aplicación fue determinado mediante espectrofotometría, registrando los valores CIE L*a*b* y la variación total de color entre los parámetros iniciales y los diferentes tiempos de evaluación. Resultados: Los datos fueron analizados estadísticamente con la prueba de Wilcoxon, arrojando diferencias estadísticamente significativas para la variación total del color entre los grupos de estudio, siendo en ningún caso el grupo control inferior al resto. Conclusión: La aplicación de ácido fosfórico al 37% aumenta la eficacia del agente blanqueador al compararlo con el EDTA 17%, sin embargo, no aumentan la eficacia respecto a la aplicación del agente blanqueador sin un tratamiento de superficie dentinaria previo.


Subject(s)
Humans , Edetic Acid/chemistry , Color , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Dentin/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Spectrophotometry , Bicuspid , In Vitro Techniques , Chile , Epidemiology, Experimental
2.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190384, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1134801

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives This study evaluated if the use of a bioactive glass-ceramic-based gel, named Biosilicate (BS), before, after or mixed with bleaching gel, could influence the inflammation of the dental pulp tissue of rats' molars undergoing dental bleaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methodology The upper molars of Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus, albinus) were divided into Ble: bleached (35% H2O2, 30-min); Ble-BS: bleached and followed by BS-based gel application (20 min); BS-Ble: BS-based gel application and then bleaching; BS/7d-Ble: BS-based gel applications for 7 days and then bleaching; Ble+BS: blend of H2O2 with BS-based gel (1:1, 30-min); and control: placebo gel. After 2 and 30 days (n=10), the rats were euthanized for histological evaluation. The Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn statistical tests were performed (P<0.05). Results At 2 days, the Ble and Ble-BS groups had significant alterations in the pulp tissue, with an area of necrosis. The groups with the application of BS-based gel before H2O2 had moderate inflammation and partial disorganization in the occlusal third of the coronary pulp and were significantly different from the Ble in the middle and cervical thirds (P<0.05). The most favorable results were observed in the Ble+BS, which was similar to the control in all thirds of the coronary pulp (P>0.05). At 30 days, the pulp tissue was organized and the bleached groups presented tertiary dentin deposition. The Ble group had the highest deposition of tertiary dentin, followed by the Ble-BS, and both were different from control (P<0.05). Conclusion A single BS-based gel application beforehand or BS-based gel blended with a bleaching gel minimize the pulp damage induced by dental bleaching.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Pulpitis/prevention & control , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Glass/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Pulpitis/chemically induced , Pulpitis/pathology , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Wistar , Dental Pulp/pathology , Tooth Bleaching Agents/adverse effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/adverse effects , Molar
3.
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1135554

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effect of a resin coating material on the microleakage of Class V composite resin restorations with and without post-operative bleaching. Material and Methods: Eighty class V cavities (3×3×1.5 mm) were prepared and filled with Z250 XT composite resin in the buccal and lingual surfaces of 40 sound human molars. Then the samples were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=20) and treated as follows: Group A: applying a resin coating (G-Coat Plus) on the restoration, then bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide; Group B: Post-Operative bleaching without prior use of resin coating; Group C: applying resin coating agent, and no further bleaching; and Group D: no resin coating, no bleaching. The specimens were thermocycled and immersed in 1% methylene blue for 24 hours, then cut into sections bucco-lingually. The samples were scored regarding the amount of dye penetration under a stereomicroscope (x20). Data were analyzed with Chi-squared and Fisher exact tests (p<0.05). Results: The maximum gingival and occlusal microleakage was detected in group B, while the minimum was seen in group C. In all the groups, microleakage at gingival margins was higher than occlusal margins (p<0.001). Conclusion: Application of a resin coating is an effective method in reducing microleakage of the restorations before and after bleaching.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Composite Resins/chemistry , Dental Materials , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Molar , In Vitro Techniques/methods , Chi-Square Distribution , Statistics, Nonparametric , Iran/epidemiology
4.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180453, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1012522

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective This study was designed for the chemical activation of a 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bleaching gel to increase its whitening effectiveness and reduce its toxicity. Methodology First, the bleaching gel - associated or not with ferrous sulfate (FS), manganese chloride (MC), peroxidase (PR), or catalase (CT) - was applied (3x 15 min) to enamel/dentin discs adapted to artificial pulp chambers. Then, odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells were exposed for 1 h to the extracts (culture medium + components released from the product), for the assessment of viability (MTT assay) and oxidative stress (H2DCFDA). Residual H2O2 and bleaching effectiveness (DE) were also evaluated. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA complemented with Tukey's test (n=8. p<0.05). Results All chemically activated groups minimized MDPC-23 oxidative stress generation; however, significantly higher cell viability was detected for MC, PR, and CT than for plain 35% H2O2 gel. Nevertheless, FS, MC, PR, and CT reduced the amount of residual H2O2 and increased bleaching effectiveness. Conclusion Chemical activation of 35% H2O2 gel with MC, PR, and CT minimized residual H2O2 and pulp cell toxicity; but PR duplicated the whitening potential of the bleaching gel after a single 45-minute session.


Subject(s)
Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Bleaching Agents/toxicity , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Reference Values , Time Factors , Ferrous Compounds/chemistry , Catalase/chemistry , Cell Survival , Cells, Cultured , Chlorides/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Manganese Compounds/chemistry , Color , Peroxidase/chemistry , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Pulp/chemistry , Dental Pulp/diagnostic imaging , Dentin/drug effects , Dentin/chemistry , Odontoblasts/drug effects
5.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180233, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975899

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: To analyze color change, microhardness and chemical composition of enamel bleached with in-office bleaching agent with different desensitizing application protocols. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventeen polished anterior human enamel surfaces were obtained and randomly divided into nine groups (n = 13). After recording initial color, microhardness and chemical composition, the bleaching treatments were performed as G1: Signal Professional White Now POWDER&LIQUID FAST 38% Hydrogen peroxide(S); G2: S+Flor Opal/0.5% fluoride ion(F); G3: S+GC Tooth Mousse/Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste(TM); G4: S+UltraEZ/3% potassium nitrate&0.11% fluoride(U); G5: S+Signal Professional SENSITIVE PHASE 1/30% Nano-Hydroxyapatite (n-HAP) suspension(SP); G6: S-F mixture; G7: S-TM mixture; G8: S-U mixture; G9: S-SP mixture. Color, microhardness and chemical composition measurements were repeated after 1 and 14 days. The percentage of microhardness loss (PML) was calculated 1 and 14 days after bleaching. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, Welch ANOVA, Tukey and Dunnett T3 tests (p<0.05). Results: Color change was observed in all groups. The highest ΔE was observed at G7 after 1 day, and ΔE at G8 was the highest after 14 days (p<0.05). A decrease in microhardness was observed in all groups except G6 and G7 after 1 day. The microhardness of all groups increased after 14 days in comparison with 1 day after bleaching (p>0.05). PML was observed in all groups except G6 and G7 after bleaching and none of the groups showed PML after 14 days. No significant changes were observed after bleaching at Ca and P levels and Ca/P ratios at 1 or 14 days after bleaching (p>0.05). F mass increased only in G2 and G6, 1 day after bleaching (p<0.05). Conclusions: The use of desensitizing agents containing fluoride, CPP-ACP, potassium nitrate or n-HAP after in-office bleaching or mixed in bleaching agent did not inhibit the bleaching effect. However, they all recovered microhardness of enamel 14 days after in-office bleaching.


Subject(s)
Humans , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Dentin Desensitizing Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Reference Values , Saliva, Artificial/chemistry , Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission , Spectrophotometry , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Calcium Phosphates/chemistry , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Caseins/chemistry , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Potassium Compounds/chemistry , Color , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Hardness Tests , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Nitrates/chemistry
6.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180051, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975887

ABSTRACT

Abstract The efficacy of whitening toothpastes is questionable and controversial. Clinicians, patients and researchers have expressed concern with whitening toothpastes due to the risk of wearing the dental structure and the potential for disappointment if the advertised cosmetic results are not achieved. Objective: This study compared the whitening performance of toothpastes with different whitening technologies after initial and continued use. Material and Methods: Ninety bovine incisors were stained using a concentrated solution of black tea. They were randomly distributed into 6 groups, according to the toothpaste whitening technology: activated charcoal (B&W), blue covarine (WAD), hydrogen peroxide (LWA), microbeads (Oral B 3D White Perfection - 3DW) and optimized abrasives (XW4D). They were compared to a traditional toothpaste without a whitening agent (TA - control). Specimens underwent a brushing machine with controlled pressure, time and temperature. A calibrated examiner measured the color using a VITA-Classical scale before the first brushing cycle (T0), after the first brushing cycle (TI), and after a brushing cycle that simulates continuous use (TCU). Whitening performance was evaluated by the difference of shades (ΔSGU) between T0-TI and T0-TCU timepoints, using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's non-parametric test. The Wilcoxon test was used to evaluate the cumulative effect (α=0.05). Results: Statistically significant differences were observed between toothpastes in both TI and TCU (p<0.05). The time of use also had a significant effect (p<0.05). Conclusion: Only WAD and 3DW showed whitening performance after the first use (TI). The greatest whitening performance after continuous use was obtained by WAD, followed by LWA and 3DW. The use of conventional toothpaste (TA) promotes no tooth whitening. Clinical relevance: Microbead abrasives (3DW) and blue covarine (WAD) were the active technology tested that presented the best global tooth whitening performance.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Toothpastes/chemistry , Charcoal/chemistry , Isoindoles/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Metalloporphyrins/chemistry , Microspheres , Reference Values , Surface Properties , Time Factors , Tooth/drug effects , Toothbrushing/methods , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results
7.
Braz. dent. j ; 29(1): 88-92, Jan.-Feb. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-888729

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study evaluated the effects of tooth bleaching with high-concentration of hydrogen peroxide on alterations of translucency parameter (TP) and color of dentin and enamel. The crown of five human molars was sectioned into four slices parallel to buccal surface. The dentin of external slices containing buccal/ lingual enamel was fully removed with diamond bur; while these slices were used to assess alterations on enamel. Alterations on dentin were assessed into the center of internal slices. The color of specimens was measured over white and black backgrounds using a spectrophotometer (CieL*a*b) at baseline, allowing to calculate the TP by difference between the color measured over each background. Specimens were submitted to three 15-min applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide followed by their storage in water for one-week. Afterwards, the color measurements were repeated at both backgrounds. Color (∆L, ∆a, ∆b and ∆E) and translucency (∆TP) changes were calculated and data individually analyzed by T-test (α = 0.05). Influence of hard tissue and assessment time on each color parameter was also analyzed by 2-way repeated measure ANOVA (α = 0.05). Tooth bleaching resulted in increased lightness for the enamel, whereas no alteration on this parameter occurred for dentin. No difference between the tooth hard tissues was observed regards the other color parameters and ∆E. A slightly reduction on TP was observed only for the enamel. In conclusion, 35% hydrogen peroxide caused similar color and translucency changes on dentin and enamel.


Resumo Este estudo avaliou os efeitos do clareamento dental com peróxido de hidrogênio em alta concentração nas alterações do parâmetro de translucidez (PT) e cor da dentina e esmalte. A coroa de cinco molares humanos foi seccionada em quatro fatias paralelas à superfície vestibular. A dentina das fatias externas contendo esmalte vestibular/ lingual foi totalmente removida com ponta diamantada, sendo estas fatias usadas para verificar as alterações no esmalte. Alterações na dentina foram verificadas no centro das fatias internas. A cor das amostras foi mensurada sobre fundos preto e branco usando um espectrofotômetro (CieL*a*b) no início, permitindo calcular o PT pela diferença de cor medida sobre cada fundo. As amostras foram submetidas a três aplicações de 15 minutos de peróxido de hidrogênio a 35% seguido pelo seu armazenamento em água por uma semana. Após isto, as mensurações de cor foram repetidas em ambos os fundos. Mudanças de cor (∆L, ∆a, ∆b e ∆E) e translucidez (∆PT) foram calculadas e os dados analisados pelo Teste T (α = 0,05). A influência do tecido duro e do momento de avaliação em cada parâmetro de cor foi também analisado através de ANOVA de duas vias para medidas repetidas (α = 0,05). O clareamento dental resultou em maior luminosidade (∆L) para o esmalte, enquanto que nenhuma alteração neste parâmetro ocorreu para a dentina. Nenhuma diferença entre os tecidos duros dentais foi observada em relação aos outros parâmetros de cor e ∆E. Uma leve redução na PT foi observada apenas para o esmalte. Como conclusão, peróxido de hidrogênio a 35% causou similar alteração de cor e translucidez no esmalte e na dentina.


Subject(s)
Humans , Color , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Dentin/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry
8.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20170589, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-954496

ABSTRACT

Abstract High concentrations of hydrogen peroxide can cause adverse effects on composition and structure of teeth. However, the addition of calcium and fluoride in bleaching agents may reduce enamel demineralization. Objective: To evaluate chemical changes of sound and demineralized enamels submitted to high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide containing fluoride (F) or calcium (Ca). Material and Methods: Enamel blocks of bovine incisors with standard dimensions were obtained and half of them were submitted to pH-cycling to promote initial enamel caries lesions. Sound and demineralized enamel samples were divided into (n=10): (C) Control (no whitening treatment); (HP) 35% hydrogen peroxide; and two experimental groups: (HPF) 35% HP+0.2% F and (HPC) 35% HP+0.2% Ca. Experimental groups were submitted to two in-office bleaching sessions and agents were applied 3 times for 15 min to each session. The control group was kept in remineralizing solution at 37°C during the bleaching treatment. The surface mineral content of sound and demineralized enamels was determined through Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), Energy dispersive Micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μ-EDXRF); and the subsurface, through cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH). In addition, polarized light microscopy (PLM) images of enamel subsurface were observed. Results: According to three-way (FT-Raman and μ-EDXRF analyses) or two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (CSMH) and Tukey test (α=5%), the calcium or fluoride added to high-concentrated bleaching agents increased phosphate and carbonate concentrations on sound and demineralized enamels (p<0.05). However, HPC and HPF were unable to completely reverse the subsurface mineral loss promoted by bleaching on sound and demineralized enamels. The calcium/ phosphate (Ca/P) ratio of sound enamel decreased after HP treatment (p<0.001). Conclusion: Even though experimental bleaching agents with Ca or F reduced mineral loss for both sound and demineralized enamel surfaces, these agents were unable to reverse the enamel subsurface demineralization.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Calcium/chemistry , Tooth Demineralization/chemically induced , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Fluorides/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Phosphates/chemistry , Reference Values , Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission , Spectrum Analysis, Raman , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Materials Testing , Carbonates/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/adverse effects , Hardness Tests , Microscopy, Polarization
9.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 32: e25, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889489

ABSTRACT

Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effects, including surface morphological characteristics and chemical elemental properties, of different mouthwash formulations on enamel and dental restorative materials, simulating up to 6 months of daily use. Human enamel samples, hydroxyapatite, composite resin, and ceramic surfaces were exposed to 3 different mouthwashes according to label directions — Listerine® Cool Mint®, Listerine® Total Care, and Listerine® Whitening — versus control (hydroalcohol solution) to simulate daily use for up to 6 months. The samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectrophotometry (µ-Fourier transform infrared microscopy), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, and color analysis before and after exposure. No relevant changes were observed in the morphological characteristics of the surfaces using SEM techniques. The physical and chemical aspects of the enamel surfaces were evaluated using mid-infrared spectroscopy, and EDX fluorescence was used to evaluate the elemental aspects of each surface. There was no variation in the relative concentrations of calcium and phosphorus in enamel, silicon and barium in composite resin, and silicon and aluminum in the ceramic material before and after treatment. No relevant changes were detected in the biochemical and color properties of any specimen, except with Listerine® Whitening mouthwash, which demonstrated a whitening effect on enamel surfaces. Long-term exposure to low pH, alcohol-containing, and peroxide-containing mouthwash formulations caused no ultra-structural or chemical elemental changes in human enamel or dental restorative materials in vitro.


Subject(s)
Humans , Ceramics , Composite Resins , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Durapatite , Ethanol/chemistry , Ethanol/pharmacology , Mouthwashes/chemistry , Mouthwashes/pharmacology , Salicylates , Terpenes , Color , Colorimetry , Drug Combinations , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Immersion , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Oils, Volatile/chemistry , Reference Values , Reproducibility of Results , Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors
10.
Bauru; s.n; 2017. 131 p. tab, ilus, graf.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-880413

ABSTRACT

Introdução: A alteração de cor dos dentes apresenta-se como um dos fatores que mais concorrem para o desequilíbrio do sorriso, sendo o clareamento dental amplamente difundido e solicitado pelos pacientes. Objetivo: Este estudo in situ teve como objetivo avaliar as mudanças morfológicas e químicas do esmalte quando submetido a três agentes clareadores à base de peróxido de hidrogênio ativados com fonte de luz híbrida e um agente placebo (gel sem peróxido de hidrogênio), por meio do uso da espectrometria de energia dispersiva de raios-X (EDS). Metodologia: Fragmentos de terceiros molares humanos foram divididos em quatro grupos (n=12), para a realização de uma sessão de clareamento com cinco aplicações de oito minutos dos géis clareadores: Placebo (Plac); Lase Peroxide Flex 35% e 15% (DMC) (LPF35LH e LPF15LH); Gel experimental a 10% (DMC) (EXP10LHV), e foram fotocatalizados com luz híbrida: LED azul/laser de diodo (LH) (Whitening Lase II, DMC) ou LED violeta/laser de diodo (LHV) (luz experimental, DMC). Após o clareamento, os espécimes foram fixados a dispositivos intraorais usados pelos participantes durante 15 dias. A composição inorgânica e topografia da superfície de esmalte foram analisadas antes e após o clareamento, e depois de 3, 7 e 15 dias de exposição à saliva. Os valores elementares da composição foram analisados por ANOVA a um critério de medidas repetidas e teste de Tukey. Para a topografia os escores foram determinados por três examinadores previamente calibrados pelo teste Kappa e foi aplicado o teste estatístico de Friedman e Kruskal-Wallis, e as comparações individuais foram realizadas pelo teste de Dunn ( = 0,05). Resultados: De maneira geral, não houve alterações significativas na porcentagem elementar do esmalte nos diferentes períodos estudados. Ao analisar os dois principais elementos, o grupo LPF35HL obteve o menor valor de cálcio (Ca), possuindo diferença estatisticamente significante quando comparado com o grupo EXP10LHV, enquanto os valores de fosfato (P) permaneceram constantes. Morfologicamente somente o grupo EXP10LHV demostrou maior planificação da superfície quando comparado o período de 7 dias com 15 dias. Conclusão: Os diferentes protocolos clareadores empregados, demonstraram alterações pontuais na variação dos elementos químicos e na morfologia do esmalte dental ao longo do período de avaliação.(AU)


Introduction: The tooth color change is one of the factors that contributes most to the smile imbalance, and dental bleaching is widely diffused and requested by the patients. Objective: The aimed of this in situ study is to evaluate the morphological and chemical changes of the enamel when submitted to three activated hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents with hybrid light source and a placebo agent (gel without hydrogen peroxide), using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Methodology: Fragments of human third molars were divided into four groups (n = 12) to perform a bleaching session with five eight minute applications of bleaching gels: Placebo (Plac); Lase Peroxide Flex 35% and 15% (DMC) (LPF35LH and LPF15LH); 10% experimental gel (DMC) (EXP10LHV), and photocatalyzed with hybrid light: blue LED / diode laser (LH) (Whitening Lase II, DMC) or violet LED / diode laser (LHV). After bleaching, the specimens were fixed to intraoral devices used by participants for 15 days. The inorganic composition and topography of the enamel surface were analyzed before and after bleaching, and after 3, 7 and 15 days of exposure to saliva. The elementary values of the composition were analyzed by one-way ANOVA at a repeated measures and Tukey's test. For the topography the scores were determined by three examiners previously calibrated by the Kappa test and the Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis statistical test were applied, and the individual comparisons were performed by the Dunn test ( = 0.05). Results: In general, there were no significant changes in the elemental percentage of enamel in the different periods studied. When analyzing the two main elements, the LPF35HL group had the lowest calcium (Ca) value, which had a statistically significant difference when compared to the EXP10LHV group, while the phosphate (P) values remained constant. Morphologically, only the EXP10LHV group showed greater surface planning when compared to the period of 7 days with 15 days. Conclusion: The different bleaching protocols employed showed specific alterations in the variation of the chemical elements and the morphology of the dental enamel during the evaluation period.(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Analysis of Variance , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Microscopy, Electrochemical, Scanning , Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Titanium/chemistry
11.
Full dent. sci ; 7(26): 123-126, abr. 2016. ilus
Article in Portuguese | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-786857

ABSTRACT

O trauma dental decorrente de quedas, acidentes e atividades esportivas tem alta prevalência e pode impactar na qualidade de vida das crianças e suas famílias devido às alterações estéticas adversas. Este trabalho relata o caso clínico de paciente do sexo feminino, 3 anos de idade que procurou atendimento odontológico devido à fratura da coroa e descoloração do dente 51 após trauma. Clinicamente foi observada a presença de fístula e abcesso na região do dente. O dente foi submetido a tratamento endodôntico, seguido de clareamento interno/ externo com peróxido de hidrogênio a 35%. Após a finalização do clareamento, realizou-se a restauração da fratura permitindo o restabelecimento da estética e função. Um acompanhamento de 5 anos foi realizado até a erupção completa da coroa do dente 11. Neste período, não se observou alterações clínicas nem radiográficas do dente traumatizado, e o dente sucessor irrompeu sem nenhum comprometimento. Concluiu-se que o clareamento interno/ externo de dente decíduo seguido da restauração foi satisfatório para o restabelecimento da estética e função dentária da criança sem nenhuma alteração para o germe sucessor.


Dental trauma caused by falls, accidents and sports activities has high prevalence and may influence the quality of life of children and their family due to adverse cosmetic changes. This case report presents a three years old gril who refered to dental care due to crown fracture and discoloration of primary central incisor after trauma. Clinically, it was observed the presence of fistula and abscess in the tooth region. Endodontic treatment was done followed by internal/external bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide. The tooth was then restored providing aesthetics and function for the patient. There was a five years follow-up until full eruption of permanentÆs central incisorÆs crown. In this period, there were no clinical or radiographic changes on the traumatized tooth, and the successor tooth erupted without any impairment. It was concluded that the result of internal/external primary tooth bleaching followed by restoration, was satisfactory restoring aesthetics and function with no alteration to the successor tooth.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Child, Preschool , Tooth, Deciduous/anatomy & histology , Esthetics, Dental , Tooth Bleaching , Tooth Injuries , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Radiography, Dental/instrumentation
12.
J. appl. oral sci ; 24(1): 24-30, Jan.-Feb. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-777364

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Acid Etching, Dental/methods , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Tooth Wear/chemically induced , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Reference Values , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Toothbrushing , Materials Testing , Random Allocation , Analysis of Variance , Gels , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry
13.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 30(1): e69, 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952012

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study evaluated the effects of 10% alphatocopherol on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin. Fifty bovine incisors were selected, including 10 sound teeth that constituted the control group (G1 (C)). The remaining 40 teeth, which were endodontically treated, were divided into four groups (n = 10): G2 (CR), consisting of teeth immediately restored with composite resin; G3 (HP + CR), consisting of teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin; G4 (HP + SA + CR), which received treatment similar to that used for G3, but with 10% sodium ascorbate gel applied after the bleaching protocol; and G5 (HP + AT + CR), which was similar to G4 but included 10% alphatocopherol gel as an antioxidant. After 24 h, composite restorations were performed, and teeth were subjected to a fracture resistance test at a speed of 0.5 mm/min in an electromechanical testing machine. The axial force was applied with an angle of incidence of 135° relative to the long axis of the root. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p = 0.05). G1 exhibited the highest fracture resistance (p < 0.05). No significant differences among the other experimental groups were observed. The 10% sodium ascorbate and 10% alphatocopherol gels did not improve the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Tooth Fractures/prevention & control , Vitamins/chemistry , Tooth, Nonvital/drug therapy , alpha-Tocopherol/chemistry , Dental Restoration, Permanent/adverse effects , Ascorbic Acid/chemistry , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Composite Resins/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Gels , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry
14.
Bauru; s.n; 2016. 106 p. tab, ilus, graf.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-881838

ABSTRACT

Este estudo in vitro avaliou a influência do tempo de aplicação do bicarbonato de sódio a 10% na qualidade da união de um sistema adesivo universal unido ao esmalte bovino clareado por meio de testes de resistência de união (microtração imediata e após 6 meses) e grau de conversão na interface adesiva (espectroscopia micro-Raman). Cento e dez blocos de esmalte bovino (4x4 mm) foram planificados e distribuídos aleatoriamente em 5 grupos: C: controle, sem clareamento; B: clareamento com peróxido de hidrogênio 35% (HP); BS3: clareamento com HP seguido de tratamento com a solução de bicarbonato de sódio 10% (BS) por 3 min; BS5: clareamento com HP seguido de tratamento com BS por 5 min; BS10: clareamento com HP seguido de tratamento com BS por 10 min. O HP foi aplicado duas vezes (20 minutos cada, com exceção do grupo C) e em seguida as restaurações adesivas foram realizadas. Após 24 horas, 20 espécimes de cada grupo foram seccionados em palitos (1x1 mm) e submetidos ao teste de resistência de união (imediato e após 6 meses) em máquina de ensaios universal com velocidade de 0,5 mm/min (n=10). Os dados foram analisados por ANOVA a dois critérios (p <0,05). As médias das análises imediata e após 6 meses foram: C: 26,77 / 25,32; B: 26,42 / 26,42; BS3: 23,95 / 22,98; BS5: 23,65 / 26,64; BS10: 23,42 / 29,30. Nenhum dos fatores testados apresentou significância: tratamento (p=0,349) e tempo (p=0,234), não havendo interação entre estes (p=0,198). Falhas adesivas foram predominantes nos dois períodos de avaliação. Para a análise do grau de conversão, após 24 horas da restauração, 2 espécimes de cada grupo foram seccionados em fatias de 1mm, sendo apenas 3 fatias selecionadas. Os seguintes parâmetros foram utilizados: excitação dos espécimes com laser de argônio operando a 538 nm, espectro obtido a uma resolução ~4cm-1, sob uma região de espectro entre 1580-1660cm-1, verificando a altura dos picos 1608cm-1 e 1637cm-1. Os dados foram analisados por ANOVA a um critério (p <0,05) e as médias do grau de conversão foram: C: 71,10%; B: 72,11%; BS3: 73,98%; BS5: 69,25%; BS10: 70,56%. O fator de estudo tratamento não apresentou significância estatística (p=0,808). A adesão no esmalte clareado parece não ter sido afetada negativamente quando restaurações adesivas foram feitas imediatamente após o clareamento, independente da aplicação ou não da substância antioxidante. Mais estudos que avaliem a adesão em esmalte clareado, principalmente no que diz respeito ao grau de conversão e aos diferentes tipos de sistemas adesivos universais se fazem necessários para fins comparativos e para que possamos indicar seguramente as restaurações imediatas (quando necessárias) na prática clínica.(AU)


The present in vitro study evaluated the influence of the application time of 10% sodium bicarbonate in the adhesion quality of a universal adhesive system bonded to bleached enamel through microtensile bond strength testing (immediate and after 6 months) and the degree conversion (micro-Raman spectroscopy). One hundred and ten bovine enamel blocks (4x4mm) were flattened and randomly allocated into 5 groups: C: control, without bleaching; B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP); BS3: bleached and treated with 10% sodium bicarbonate solution (BS) for 3 min; BS5: bleached and treated with BS for 5 min; BS10: bleached and treated with BS for 10 min. HP was applied twice (20 minutes each, except in group C) and the adhesive restorations were performed. After 24 hours, 20 specimens from each group were sectioned into sticks (1x1 mm) and submitted to microtensile bond strength testing (immediately and after 6 months) in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min (n = 10). Data was analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p <0.05). The means of the immediate and 6 months analysis were: C 26.77 / 25.32; B: 26.42 / 26.42; BS3: 23.95 / 22.98; BS5: 23.65 / 26.64; BS10: 23.42 / 29.30. None of the tested factors showed significance: treatment (p = 0.349) and time (p = 0.234), with no interaction between them (p = 0.198). Adhesive failures were predominant in both evaluation periods. For the degree of conversion analysis, 2 specimens of each group were sectioned into 1 mm slices after 24 hours of the restorative procedure, and 3 slices were selected. The following parameters were used: excitation of specimens with argon laser operating at 538 nm, spectrum obtained at a resolution of ~4cm-1, under a spectrum region between 1580-1660cm-1, evaluating the height of the peaks at 1608cm-1 and 1637cm-1. Data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA (p <0.05). The means of degree of conversion were: C: 71.10%; B: 72.11%; BS3: 73.98%; BS5: 69.25%; BS10: 70.56%. The study factor "treatment" was not statistically significant (p = 0.808). The results of bonding to bleached enamel was not negatively affected when adhesive restorations were made immediately after bleaching, regardless of the application of the antioxidant substance. Further studies to evaluate the adhesion on bleached enamel, mainly with regard to the degree of conversion and different types of universal adhesive systems are needed for comparative purposes. Only after this, the immediate restoration (if necessary) in clinical practice can be safely and indicated.(AU)


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Sodium Bicarbonate/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Materials Testing , Phosphoric Acids/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Resin Cements/chemistry , Spectrum Analysis, Raman/methods , Surface Properties , Tensile Strength , Time Factors
15.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 30(1): e33, 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951972

ABSTRACT

Abstract The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of bleaching toothpastes, both conventional and those containing the new whitening agent Blue Covarine, on teeth previously bleached by conventional techniques (in-office and at-home). Squared bovine enamel/dentin blocks (6.0 x 6.0 x 2.0 mm) were randomly distributed in 6 groups (n = 15), according to the technique used to bleach them (in-office: HP35%; at-home: PC10%) and the type of bleaching toothpaste (none: control; Blue Covarine containing: BC; and without Blue Covarine: NBC). Experimental groups denominated HP35%, HP35%BC and HP35%NBC received in-office tooth bleaching before toothbrushing, and groups PC10%, PC10%BC and PC10%NBC were subjected to at-home tooth bleaching prior to toothbrushing. After bleaching treatment, groups HP35%BC, PC10%BC, HP35%NBC and PC10%NBC underwent daily tooth brushing in a brushing machine for 3 minutes (150 strokes/min, with a load of 375 g). Tooth color alteration was measured by reflectance spectroscopy (Vita EasyShade, Vident, Brea, CA, USA) at: T0 (baseline) - after in-office or at-home bleaching treatment; T1 - immediately after tooth brushing; T2 - 7 days and T3 - 14 days after tooth brushing. Data was analyzed by repeated measures mixed ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test, with a significance level of 5%. Statistically significant differences were found between different experimental groups, evaluation times and for the interaction between them (p < 0.001). Tooth brushing using either bleaching toothpaste (conventional or with Blue Covarine) showed no color alteration on teeth previously bleached by in-office and at-home tooth bleaching. The use of bleaching toothpastes on previously bleached teeth did not produce a color alteration.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Toothpastes/chemistry , Dentifrices/chemistry , Isoindoles/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Metalloporphyrins/chemistry , Reference Values , Surface Properties/radiation effects , Time Factors , Toothbrushing , Random Allocation , Single-Blind Method , Color , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Dentin/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry
16.
J. appl. oral sci ; 23(6): 609-613, Nov.-Dec. 2015. tab
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-769821

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home). Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15): C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE), luminosity (ΔL), green-red axis (Δa), and blue-yellow axis (Δb). The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments.


Subject(s)
Humans , Isoindoles/chemistry , Metalloporphyrins/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Toothpastes/chemistry , Analysis of Variance , Color , Colorimetry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Peroxides/chemistry , Reference Values , Reproducibility of Results , Single-Blind Method , Spectrophotometry , Statistics, Nonparametric , Time Factors , Toothbrushing , Urea/analogs & derivatives , Urea/chemistry
17.
Braz. dent. j ; 26(4): 378-383, July-Aug. 2015. tab, ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-756385

ABSTRACT

This study evaluated the color change, cytotoxicity and hydrogen peroxide (HP) diffusion caused by different home bleaching protocols: 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) for 3 or 1.5 h, 6% hydrogen peroxide for 1.5 h or 45 min. To quantify the peroxide penetration, disks of bovine teeth were placed in artificial pulp chambers (APCs) containing acetate buffer, which was collected for evaluation in a spectrophotometer. For analysis of cytotoxicity, specimens were adapted in APCs containing culture medium, which subsequently was applied on MDPC-23 odontoblast-like cells for 1 h. Cellular metabolism was evaluated by methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and the color change of the specimens was analyzed using the CIE L * a * b * system. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Fisher test (α=5%). The treatment with 10% CP for 3 h was the most effective, and 6% HP for 45 min produced the lowest color change. The groups 10% CP for 1.5 h and 6% HP for 45 min had the lowest trans-enamel dentinal HP penetration, and the 6% HP for 1.5 h had the highest. None of the protocols affected cellular metabolism and morphology. In conclusion, reduced peroxide exposure time reduced the bleaching result; higher HP diffusion did not mean higher effectiveness.

.

Este estudo avaliou a alteração de cor, a citotoxicidade e a difusão de peroxido de hidrogênio ocorridos em diferentes protocolos clareadores caseiros: peróxido de carbamida (PC) 10% por 3 ou 1,5 h; peróxido de hidrogênio (PH) 6% por 1,5 h ou 45 min. Para a quantificação da penetração do peróxido, discos de dentes bovinos foram posicionados em câmaras pulpares artificiais (CPAs) contendo solução tampão de acetato, que foi coletada para avaliação em espectrofotômetro. Para análise da citotoxicidade, os espécimes foram adaptados nas CPAs contendo meio de cultura, que posteriormente foi aplicado sobre células odontoblastóides MDPC-23 por 1 h. O metabolismo celular foi avaliado pelo teste MTT e a alteração de cor dos espécimes foi analisada pelo sistema CIE L*a*b*. Os dados foram submetidos a ANOVA e teste de Fisher (α=5). O tratamento com PC10% por 3 horas foi o mais efetivo, enquanto que o tratamento com PH 6% por 45 min produziu a menor alteração cromática. Os grupos PC 10% por 1,5 h e PH 6% por 45 min causaram a menor penetração trans-amelodentinária do peróxido, e PH 6% por 1,5 h, a maior difusão. Nenhum tratamento alterou o metabolismo celular. A redução do tempo de exposição aos peróxidos comprometeu o resultado clareador; maior penetração de peroxido não significa maior efetividade clareadora.

.


Subject(s)
Humans , Color , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Cell Line , Culture Media , Diffusion , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Spectrophotometry
18.
Braz. dent. j ; 26(2): 135-140, Mar-Apr/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-741208

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate the demineralization and hydrogen peroxide (HP) penetration in teeth with incipient lesions submitted to bleaching treatment. For analysis of HP penetration, sound and demineralized enamel/dentin discs were placed in artificial pulp chambers containing acetate buffer solution. After bleaching treatment, this solution was subjected for analysis of optical density by spectrophotometry and the disc surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and polarized light microscopy (PLM). The remaining discs were subjected for cross-sectional hardness analysis at different depths. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA and PLSD Fisher test (a=0.05). It was observed that previously demineralized teeth showed greater HP penetration (p<0.05). The bleaching treatment caused changes to a depth of 20 µm in sound enamel and up to 90 µm in demineralized enamel. SEM and PLM images revealed that the bleaching treatment caused superficial changes that were considerably more accentuated in previously demineralized teeth. It may be concluded that the enamel mineralization level influences HP penetration and the bleaching agent contributed to increase the demineralization depth.


O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a desmineralização e a penetração do peróxido de hidrogênio (HP) em dentes com lesões incipientes submetidos ao tratamento clareador. Para analisar a penetração do peróxido de hidrogênio, discos de esmalte/dentina hígidos e desmineralizados foram posicionados em câmaras pulpares artificiais contendo solução tampão de acetato. Após o tratamento clareador, esta solução foi submetida à análise da densidade óptica no espectrofotômetro e as superfícies dos discos foram analisadas por meio de microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV) e microscopia de luz polarizada (MLP). Os discos restantes foram submetidos à análise de microdureza transversal em diferentes profundidades. Os dados foram submetidos aos testes ANOVA e teste PLSD Fisher (= 5%). Observou-se que os dentes previamente desmineralizados mostraram maior penetração de HP (p<0,05). O tratamento clareador causou alterações em uma profundidade de 20 μm em esmalte hígido e até 90 μm em esmalte desmineralizado. As imagens obtidas em PLM e MEV mostraram que o tratamento clareador promove alterações superficiais no esmalte, sendo mais pronunciadas em dentes previamente desmineralizados. Foi concluído que o nível de mineralização do esmalte influencia a penetração do PH e que o agente clareador contribuiu para o aumento da profundidade de desmineralização.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Dentin Permeability/drug effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Demineralization , Dental Pulp Cavity , Hardness , In Vitro Techniques , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
19.
Full dent. sci ; 6(22): 151-157, mar. 2015. ilus
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-754378

ABSTRACT

Facetas minimamente invasivas, também conhecidas como ôlentes de contatoõ, têm sido consideradas uma alternativa interessante para tratar problemas estéticos nos dentes anteriores. O presente relato de caso descreve passo a passo o tratamento de diastemas múltiplos com facetas minimamente invasivas, e discute tópicos importantes relacionados a este assunto quanto a indicações, materiais utilizados e longevidade destes tipos de restaurações...


Minimally invasive veneers, also known as ôcontact lensesõ, are being considered an interesting alternative for aesthetic rehabilitation of anterior teeth. This case report describes, step by the step the treatment of multiple diastemas with minimally invasive veneers, and addresses important issues related to this topic concerning indications, materials and longevity of these type of restorations...


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adolescent , Ceramics/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Diastema , Dental Veneers , Smiling/psychology , Casts, Surgical , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Computer-Aided Design/instrumentation
20.
Rev. bras. epidemiol ; 18(1): 194-207, Jan-Mar/2015. tab
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-736436

ABSTRACT

OBJETIVO: Analisar os fatores pessoais associados à prevalência e duração dos benefícios auxílio-doença decorrentes de sinovite e tenossinovite (CID10 M65). MÉTODO: Estudo transversal referente aos benefícios auxílio-doença decorrentes de sinovite e tenossinovite concedidos pelo Instituto Nacional de Seguro Social aos empregados no Brasil em 2008. Dados sobre o ramo de atividade econômica (Classificação Nacional de Atividades Econômicas - CNAE divisão, classe), sexo, idade, espécie e duração dos benefícios foram coletados do Sistema Único de Benefícios. A população corresponde à média mensal dos vínculos empregatícios declarados ao Cadastro Nacional de Informações Sociais. RESULTADOS: Em 2008 foram concedidos 35.601 benefícios auxílio-doença decorrentes de sinovite e tenossinovite, com prevalência de 10,9/10.000 vínculos empregatícios. No conjunto dos benefícios auxílio-doença houve maior razão de prevalência (RP) acidentária (RP 1,2), sendo esta maior em mulheres (RP 3,3), e em trabalhadores com idade acima de 39 anos (RP 1,4). As CNAE 37-Esgoto (55,4) e 60-Atividade de rádio e TV (47,1) apresentaram as maiores prevalências, no entanto, 64-Atividade de serviços financeiros e 6422-Bancos múltiplos caracterizaram mais acidentes de trabalho (RP 3,2 e 3,8, respectivamente) e maior duração (70 e 73 dias, respectivamente). A maior duração de benefício ocorreu entre trabalhadores com idade superior a 39 anos. Tanto a CNAE-divisão 60-Atividade de rádio e TV, quanto a CNAE-classe 6010-Atividade de rádio apresentaram elevadas razões de feminilidade (RP 8,1 e 10,8, respectivamente). CONCLUSÃO: A incapacidade para o trabalho por sinovite e tenossinovite apresenta associação tanto da prevalência quanto da duração com o ramo de atividade, sexo, idade e espécie de benefício (previdenciário/acidentário). .


OBJECTIVE: To analyse the personal and occupational factors associated with the prevalence and duration of sickness benefit claims due to synovitis and tenosynovitis (CID10 M65). METHODS: Cross-sectional study regarding sickness benefit claims due to synovitis and tenosynovitis granted to employees by National Institute of Social Security in Brazil in 2008. Data on economic activity (Economic Activities National Classification - CNAE division, class), sex, age, type and duration of benefits were collected from the Unified Benefit System. The study's population consists of the average monthly employment contracts declared to the National Register of Social Information. RESULTS: In 2008, 35,601 employees were granted sickness benefits due to synovitis and tenosynovitis, with a prevalence of 10.9/10,000 employments. Sickness benefits showed higher prevalence rates (PR) for work-related claims (PR 1,2), mostly made by females (PR 3.3) and by workers older than 39 years (PR 1,4). The CNAE 37-Sewage (55.4) and 60-Broadcasting Activity (47.1) had the highest overall prevalence. However, the 64-Financial service activities, except insurance and pension funding and 6422-Multiple banks with commercial service had the highest rates of work-related claims (RP 3.2 and 3.8, respectively), and the longer duration (70 and 73 days, respectively). Workers older than 39 years had the highest durations of work disability claims. Both the CNAE-division 60-Broadcasting Activity, and the CNAE-class 6010-Radio showed a high activity ratio of females (PR 8.1 and 10.8, respectively). CONCLUSION: The work disability due to synovitis and tenosynovitis presents prevalence and duration associated with economic activity, sex, age and kind of benefit (non work-related and work-related claims). .


Subject(s)
Humans , Globins/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Nerve Tissue Proteins/chemistry , Nitrites/chemistry , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , Catalysis , Cysteine/chemistry , Cysteine/metabolism , Disulfides/chemistry , Disulfides/metabolism , Globins/metabolism , Hydrogen Peroxide/metabolism , Kinetics , Models, Molecular , Molecular Sequence Data , Myoglobin/chemistry , Myoglobin/metabolism , Nerve Tissue Proteins/metabolism , Nitrites/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Protein Conformation , Phenol/chemistry , Phenols/chemistry , Phenylacetates/chemistry , Tandem Mass Spectrometry
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