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1.
Rev. argent. cir. plást ; 27(2): 96-99, 20210000. fig
Article in Spanish | LILACS, BINACIS | ID: biblio-1357912

ABSTRACT

Las quemaduras químicas en cuero cabelludo, que se producen en lugares públicos como salones de belleza o peluquerías causadas por mezclas de sustancias activas como persulfatos y peróxido de hidrógeno, secundarias a la decoloración de cabellos, producen graves secuelas de alopecias en pacientes jóvenes. Se trata de un caso clínico, de quemadura química, espesor completo, extensa, en cuero cabelludo. Productos utilizados en forma cotidiana en salones de belleza, peluquerías o domicilios, que tiene estrecha relación con el daño. Resolución del caso con colgajos locales, con tiempos de internación y quirúrgicos cortos, en tiempos de COVID. Enfoque de la falta de control de sustancias usadas en peluquerías, pocos casos publicados y secuelas psicosociales importantes, con pronta mejoría de calidad de vida y reinserción social


Chemical burns in scalp after hair bleaching are produced in public places such as hairdressing salons and are caused by the combination of active agents like persulfate and hydrogen peroxide. The burns leave severe sequels of alopecia in young patients. This is about a clinical case of a chemical burn in the sculp which is full thickness and has a great large. Products used on a daily basis in hairdressing salons or in the domiciles have a close connection with the hurt. In times of COVID the case was resolved with local flaps, and short period of hospitalization and surgical. Focus on the lack of control in the usage of substances made by hairdressing salons, the existence of few published cases and the main psychosocial sequels, a speedy recovery in the quality of life and social reintegration


Subject(s)
Humans , Adult , Quality Control , Scalp/anatomy & histology , Scalp/injuries , Surgery, Plastic/methods , Burns, Chemical/therapy , Tissue Expansion , Skin Transplantation/rehabilitation , Permissible Limits/prevention & control , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity
2.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 115: e190469, 2020. graf
Article in English | SES-SP, LILACS, SES-SP | ID: biblio-1135243

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Oxidative stress is responsible for generating DNA lesions and the 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is the most commonly lesion found in DNA damage. When this base is incorporated during DNA replication, it could generate double-strand DNA breaks and cellular death. MutT enzyme hydrolyzes the 8-oxoG from the nucleotide pool, preventing its incorporation during DNA replication. OBJECTIVES To investigate the importance of 8-oxoG in Leishmania infantum and L. braziliensis, in this study we analysed the impact of heterologous expression of Escherichia coli MutT (EcMutT) enzyme in drug-resistance phenotype and defense against oxidative stress. METHODS Comparative analysis of L. braziliensis and L. infantum H2O2 tolerance and cell cycle profile were performed. Lines of L. braziliensis and L. infantum expressing EcMutT were generated and evaluated using susceptibility tests to H2O2 and SbIII, cell cycle analysis, γH2A western blotting, and BrdU native detection assay. FINDINGS Comparative analysis of tolerance to oxidative stress generated by H2O2 showed that L. infantum is more tolerant to exogenous H2O2 than L. braziliensis. In addition, cell cycle analysis showed that L. infantum, after treatment with H2O2, remains in G1 phase, returning to its normal growth rate after 72 h. In contrast, after treatment with H2O2, L. braziliensis parasites continue to move to the next stages of the cell cycle. Expression of the E. coli MutT gene in L. braziliensis and L. infantum does not interfere in parasite growth or in susceptibility to SbIII. Interestingly, we observed that L. braziliensis EcMutT-expressing clones were more tolerant to H2O2 treatment, presented lower activation of γH2A, a biomarker of genotoxic stress, and lower replication stress than its parental non-transfected parasites. In contrast, the EcMutT is not involved in protection against oxidative stress generated by H2O2 in L. infantum. MAIN CONCLUSIONS Our results showed that 8-oxoG clearance in L. braziliensis is important to avoid misincorporation during DNA replication after oxidative stress generated by H2O2.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Mice , Rats , Pyrophosphatases/genetics , Pyrophosphatases/metabolism , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism , Leishmania braziliensis/drug effects , Leishmania infantum/drug effects , Escherichia coli Proteins/genetics , Escherichia coli , Guanine/analogs & derivatives , Antimony/toxicity , Rabbits , Superoxide Dismutase/genetics , Leishmania braziliensis/enzymology , Leishmania infantum/enzymology , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Escherichia coli Proteins/metabolism , Guanine/pharmacology , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Antiprotozoal Agents/pharmacology
3.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180453, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1012522

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective This study was designed for the chemical activation of a 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bleaching gel to increase its whitening effectiveness and reduce its toxicity. Methodology First, the bleaching gel - associated or not with ferrous sulfate (FS), manganese chloride (MC), peroxidase (PR), or catalase (CT) - was applied (3x 15 min) to enamel/dentin discs adapted to artificial pulp chambers. Then, odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells were exposed for 1 h to the extracts (culture medium + components released from the product), for the assessment of viability (MTT assay) and oxidative stress (H2DCFDA). Residual H2O2 and bleaching effectiveness (DE) were also evaluated. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA complemented with Tukey's test (n=8. p<0.05). Results All chemically activated groups minimized MDPC-23 oxidative stress generation; however, significantly higher cell viability was detected for MC, PR, and CT than for plain 35% H2O2 gel. Nevertheless, FS, MC, PR, and CT reduced the amount of residual H2O2 and increased bleaching effectiveness. Conclusion Chemical activation of 35% H2O2 gel with MC, PR, and CT minimized residual H2O2 and pulp cell toxicity; but PR duplicated the whitening potential of the bleaching gel after a single 45-minute session.


Subject(s)
Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Bleaching Agents/toxicity , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Reference Values , Time Factors , Ferrous Compounds/chemistry , Catalase/chemistry , Cell Survival , Cells, Cultured , Chlorides/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Manganese Compounds/chemistry , Color , Peroxidase/chemistry , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Pulp/chemistry , Dental Pulp/diagnostic imaging , Dentin/drug effects , Dentin/chemistry , Odontoblasts/drug effects
4.
J. appl. oral sci ; 24(5): 509-517, Sept.-Oct. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-797983

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Tooth bleaching is a technique of choice to obtain a harmonious smile, but bleaching agents may damage the dental pulp. Objective: This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Material and Methods: Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups: control - no tooth bleaching (CG) (n=7); at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH) (n = 10), and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO) (n=12). Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+), blood vessels (CD31+), and macrophages (CD68+). Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p<.05. Results: The inflammation intensity and the number of macrophages were significantly greater in IO than in AH and CG (p<0.05). The results of CD31+ (blood vessels per mm2) were similar in CG (61.39±20.03), AH (52.29±27.62), and IO (57.43±8.69) groups (p>0.05). No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed. Conclusion: In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pulpitis/chemically induced , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/toxicity , Peroxides/toxicity , Pulpitis/pathology , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Urea/analogs & derivatives , Urea/toxicity , Blood Vessels/drug effects , Blood Vessels/pathology , Immunohistochemistry , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic , Random Allocation , Antigens, CD , Cell Count , Collagen/drug effects , Statistics, Nonparametric , Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 , Dental Pulp/pathology , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity
5.
J. appl. oral sci ; 23(5): 497-507, Sept.-Oct. 2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-764156

ABSTRACT

The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed.Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals.Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa.Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group.Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized.


Subject(s)
Animals , Gastric Mucosa/drug effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Tooth Bleaching Agents/toxicity , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Body Weight , Ethanol/toxicity , Gastric Mucosa/pathology , Organ Size , Rats, Wistar , Spleen/drug effects , Spleen/pathology , Time Factors
6.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 46(2): 601-611, Apr-Jun/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-749726

ABSTRACT

Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) is an extremophile that is well known for its resistance to radiation, oxidants and desiccation. The gene dr1790 of D. radiodurans was predicted to encode a yellow-related protein. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize the biological function of the DR1790 protein, which is a member of the ancient yellow/major royal jelly (MRJ) protein family, in prokaryotes. Fluorescence labeling demonstrated that the yellow-related protein encoded by dr1790 is a membrane protein. The deletion of the dr1790 gene decreased the cell growth rate and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and radiation and increased the membrane permeability of D. radiodurans. Transcript profiling by microarray and RT-PCR analyses of the dr1790 deletion mutant suggested that some genes that are involved in protein secretion and transport were strongly suppressed, while other genes that are involved in protein quality control, such as chaperones and proteases, were induced. In addition, the expression of genes with predicted functions that are involved in antioxidant systems, electron transport, and energy metabolism was significantly altered through the disruption of dr1790. Moreover, the results of proteomic analyses using 2-DE and MS also demonstrated that DR1790 contributed to D. radiodurans survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the DR1790 protein from the ancient yellow protein family plays a pleiotropic role in the survival of prokaryotic cells and contributes to the extraordinary resistance of D. radiodurans against oxidative and radiation stresses.


Subject(s)
Deinococcus/genetics , Genes, Bacterial , Genetic Pleiotropy , Mutagenesis, Insertional , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Cell Membrane/physiology , Deinococcus/drug effects , Deinococcus/growth & development , Deinococcus/radiation effects , Gene Deletion , Gene Expression Profiling , Genetic Complementation Test , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Microarray Analysis , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Microbial Viability/drug effects , Microbial Viability/radiation effects , Permeability , Radiation, Ionizing , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-206917

ABSTRACT

Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is a synthetic phenolic compound consisting of a mixture of two isomeric organic compounds: 2-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole and 3-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole. We examined the effect of BHA against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced apoptosis in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes. Cell viability was significantly decreased by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, H2O2 treatment increased Bax, decreased Bcl-2, and promoted PARP-1 cleavage in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with BHA before exposure to H2O2 significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced decrease of cell viability. H2O2 exposure resulted in an increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation that was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with BHA or N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, an ROS scavenger). H2O2-induced decrease of cell viability was also attenuated by pretreatment with BHA and NAC. Furthermore, H2O2-induced increase of Bax, decrease of Bcl-2, and PARP-1 cleavage was also inhibited by BHA. Taken together, results of this investigation demonstrated that BHA protects primary cultured mouse hepatocytes against H2O2-induced apoptosis by inhibiting ROS generation.


Subject(s)
Animals , Apoptosis/drug effects , Butylated Hydroxyanisole/chemistry , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Hepatocytes/drug effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Molecular Structure
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-219865

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of bevacizumab on expression of B-cell leukemia/lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells under oxidative stress conditions. METHODS: RPE cells were treated with H2O2 (0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 microM) and bevacizumab at or above the doses normally used in clinical practice (0, 0.33, 0.67, 1.33, and 2.67 mg/mL). Cell apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry with annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate. The expression of Bcl-2 mRNA was determined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Under low oxidative stress conditions (H2O2 100 microM), cell apoptosis was not significantly different at any concentration of bevacizumab, but Bcl-2 mRNA expression decreased with increasing concentration of bevacizumab (0.33, 0.67, 1.33, and 2.67 mg/mL). Under moderate oxidative stress conditions (H2O2 200 microM), Bcl-2 mRNA expression decreased with increasing concentration of bevacizumab (0.33, 0.67, 1.33, and 2.67 mg/mL), but cell apoptosis increased only at 2.67 mg/mL of bevacizumab. Under high oxidative stress (300 microM) conditions, cell apoptosis increased at high concentrations of bevacizumab (1.33 and 2.67 mg/mL), but it did not correlate with Bcl-2 expression. CONCLUSIONS: Withdrawal of vascular endothelial growth factor can lead to RPE cell apoptosis and influences the expression of anti-apoptotic genes such as Bcl-2 under oxidative stress conditions. Since oxidative stress levels of each patient are unknown, repeated injections of intravitreal bevacizumab, as in eyes with age-related macular degeneration, might influence RPE cell survival.


Subject(s)
Angiogenesis Inhibitors/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Bevacizumab/pharmacology , Cell Line , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Flow Cytometry , Gene Expression Regulation/physiology , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/genetics , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retinal Pigment Epithelium/drug effects , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/antagonists & inhibitors
9.
Biol. Res ; 48: 1-7, 2015. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-950809

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Low survival rate of transplanted cells compromises the efficacy of cell therapy. Hexokinase II (HKII) is known to have anti-apoptotic activity through its interaction with mitochondria. The objective was to identify miRNAs targeting HKII and investigate whether miRNA-mediated modulation of HKII could improve the survival of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exposed to H2O2. The expression of HKII in MSCs exposed to H2O2 was evaluated, and HKII-targeting miRNA was screened based on miRNA-target prediction databases. The effect of H2O2 on the expression of the selected HKII-targeting miRNA was examined and the effect of modulation of the selected HKII-targeting miRNA using anti-miRNA on H2O2-induced apoptosis of MSC was evaluated. RESULTS: H2O2 (600 µM) induced cell death of MSCs and decreased mitochondrial HKII expression. We have identified miR-181a as a HKII-targeting miRNA and H2O2 increased the expression of miR-181a in MSCs. Delivery of anti-miR-181a, which neutralizes endogenous miR-181a, significantly attenuated H2O2-induced decrease of HKII expression and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, improving the survival of MSCs exposed to H2O2. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that H2O2-induced up-regulation of miR-181a contributes to the cell death of MSCs by down-regulating HKII. Neutralizing miR-181a can be an effective way to prime MSCs for transplantation into ischemic tissues.


Subject(s)
Humans , Apoptosis , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/pathology , Glioma/pathology , Hexokinase/metabolism , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Cell Movement , Cell Survival , Reactive Oxygen Species , Semaphorins/genetics , Semaphorins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/antagonists & inhibitors , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/drug effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/enzymology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Glioma/metabolism , Hydrogen Peroxide/administration & dosage , Mitochondria/enzymology , Neoplasm Invasiveness
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-51697

ABSTRACT

The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is influenced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Effect of bilirubin on HIF-1 expression in proximal tubular cells was investigated under physiological oxygen concentration, which is relative hypoxic condition mimicking oxygen content in the medulla of renal tissue. The human kidney (HK2) cells were cultured in 5% oxygen with or without bilirubin. HIF-1alpha protein expression was increased by bilirubin treatment at 0.01-0.2 mg/dL concentration. The messenger RNA expression of HIF-1alpha was increased by 1.69+/-0.05 folds in the cells cultured with 0.1 mg/dL bilirubin, compared to the control cells. The inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR, PI3K/AKT, and ERK 1/2 pathways did not attenuate increased HIF-1alpha expression by bilirubin. HIF-1alpha expression decreased by 10 microM exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2); scavenger of ROS with or without bilirubin in the HK2 cells increased HIF-1alpha concentration more than that in the cells without bilirubin. Exogenous H2O2 decreased the phosphorylation of P70S6 kinase, which was completely reversed by bilirubin treatment. Knockdown of NOX4 gene by small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased HIF-1alpha mRNA expression. In coonclusion, bilirubin enhances HIF-1alpha transcription as well as the up-regulation of HIF-1alpha protein translation through the attenuation of ROS and subunits of NADPH oxidase.


Subject(s)
Bilirubin/pharmacology , Cell Line , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/cytology , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/metabolism , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/metabolism , NADPH Oxidases/antagonists & inhibitors , Oxygen/pharmacology , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Phosphorylation/drug effects , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , RNA Interference , Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Transcriptional Activation/drug effects , Up-Regulation/drug effects
11.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 44(3): 993-1000, July-Sept. 2013. graf, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-699796

ABSTRACT

Propolis is a natural product widely used for humans. Due to its complex composition, a number of applications (antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anesthetic, cytostatic and antioxidant) have been attributed to this substance. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model we investigated the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effect of propolis from Guarapari against oxidative stress. Submitting a wild type (BY4741) and antioxidant deficient strains (ctt1∆, sod1∆, gsh1∆, gtt1∆ and gtt2∆) either to 15 mM menadione or to 2 mM hydrogen peroxide during 60 min, we observed that all strains, except the mutant sod1∆, acquired tolerance when previously treated with 25 µg/mL of alcoholic propolis extract. Such a treatment reduced the levels of ROS generation and of lipid peroxidation, after oxidative stress. The increase in Cu/Zn-Sod activity by propolis suggests that the protection might be acting synergistically with Cu/Zn-Sod.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/pharmacology , Oxidative Stress , Propolis/pharmacology , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/drug effects , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/physiology , Brazil , Drug Tolerance , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Lipid Peroxidation , Reactive Oxygen Species/analysis , Superoxide Dismutase/analysis , /toxicity
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-98492

ABSTRACT

In this study, we explored the potentiality of human arginine decarboxylase (ADC) to enhance the survival of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) against unfavorable milieu of host tissues as the low survival of MSCs is the issue in cell transplantation therapy. To address this, human MSCs overexpressing human ADC were treated with H2O2 and the resultant intracellular events were examined. First, we examined whether human ADC is overexpressed in human MSCs. Then, we investigated cell survival or death related events. We found that the overexpression of human ADC increases formazan production and reduces caspase 3 activation and the numbers of FITC, hoechst, or propidium iodide positive cells in human MSCs exposed to H2O2. To elucidate the factors underlying these phenomena, AKT, CREB, and BDNF were examined. We found that the overexpression of human ADC phosphorylates AKT and CREB and increases BDNF level in human MSCs exposed to H2O2. The changes of these proteins are possibly relevant to the elevation of agmatine. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the overexpression of human ADC stimulates pro-survival factors to protect human MSCs against H2O2 toxicity. In conclusion, the present findings support that ADC can enhance the survival of MSCs against hostile environment of host tissues.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis/drug effects , Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor/metabolism , Carboxy-Lyases/genetics , Caspase 3/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein/metabolism , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Phosphorylation , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism
13.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-604989

ABSTRACT

The antimicrobial activity of five sanitizing agents employed in clean areas designated for the pharmaceutical manufacturing of sterile products was tested against nine microorganisms, including four microorganisms from the clean area microbiota. The method consisted of challenging 5 mL of each sanitizing agent - 70% isopropyl alcohol, 0.4% LPH®, 1.16% hydrogen peroxide, 4% hydrogen peroxide, 1% Bioper® and 5% phenol - with 0.1mL each of concentrated suspensions (105 ? 106 CFU/mL) of Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Corynebacterium sp., Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli, Aspergillus niger, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus sp. and Bacillus sp. for 10 minutes, followed by serial dilutions and plating. The results demonstrated that the five agents were effective against S. aureus, C. albicans, Corynebacterium sp., and M. luteus. The same was true of E. coli, except that isopropyl alcohol showed low levels of inactivation. With A. niger, isopropyl alcohol, 0.4% LPH® and hydrogen peroxide were more effective and 5% phenol and 1% Bioper® less effective. 1% Bioper® and 4% hydrogen peroxide showed greater inactivation of Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp. and B. subtilis than the other agents. Against S. aureus, C. albicans, Corynebacterium sp. and M. luteus, 5% phenol showed similar activity to other agents, while with A. niger, B. subtilis, Staphylococcus sp. and Bacillus sp., it was similar to or less active than the other agents. It was demonstrated that two microorganisms from the clean area microbiota, Staphylococcus sp. and Bacillus sp., were the most difficult to eradicate, requiring more frequent application of hydrogen peroxide and 1% Bioper® than the other strains.


O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a atividade antimicrobiana de cinco agentes sanitizantes empregados em áreas limpas construídas para a fabricação de produtos farmacêuticos estéreis contra nove microrganismos, incluindo quatro microrganismos oriundos da área limpa. A metodologia constituiu em desafiar 5 mL de cada agente sanitizante, álcool isopropílico 70%, LPH® 0,400%, peróxido de hidrogênio 1,160% e 4%, Bioper® 1% e fenol 5% com 0,1 mL de suspensão concentrada (105 ? 106 UFC/mL) de Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Corynebacterium sp., Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli, Aspergillus niger, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus sp. e Bacillus sp. individualmente por 10 minutos, seguido de diluições seriadas e plaqueamento. Os resultados demonstraram que os cinco agentes sanitizantes foram efetivos contra S. aureus, C. albicans, Corynebacterium sp., e M. luteus. Os mesmos resultados foram observados com E. coli, exceto para o álcool isopropílico, que demonstrou baixos níveis de inativação. Contra A. niger, álcool isopropílico, 0.4% LPH® e peróxido de hidrogênio foram mais efetivos e fenol e Bioper® menos efetivos. Bioper® e peróxido de hidrogênio 4% demonstraram altos níveis de inativação de Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp. e B. subtilis quando comparados com outros agentes. Fenol demonstrou atividade antimicrobiana similar aos outros agentes contra S. aureus, C. albicans, Corynebacterium sp. e M. luteus. Contra A. niger, B. subtilis, Staphylococcus sp. e Bacillus sp., a atividade antimicrobiana do fenol foi similar ou inferior a dos outros agentes. Foi demonstrado que os microrganismos isolados da área limpa, Staphylococcus sp. e Bacillus sp., foram os que apresentaram maior dificuldade para inativar, sendo necessária a aplicação de peróxido de hidrogênio e Bioper® , com maior frequência.


Subject(s)
Phenol/toxicity , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , /toxicity , Aspergillus niger/isolation & purification , Bacillus subtilis/isolation & purification , Candida albicans/isolation & purification , Corynebacterium/isolation & purification , Escherichia coli/isolation & purification , Micrococcus luteus/isolation & purification , Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification
14.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-151919

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Tetraploid cells are frequently observed in the inflamed mucosal epithelial cells of the patients with Barrett's esophagus or chronic ulcerative colitis. Polyploidy often occurs during cell fusion, abortive cell cycle, and endoreplication. Most tetraploid cells are engaged to apoptotic pathway, but some remaining stable tetraploid cells consequently cause aneuploidization and chromosomal instability. We investigated whether tetraploid cells could acquire survival advantage and hold a dominant position for natural selection. METHODS: We established tetraploid cell line (HCT116GH) from parental diploid colorectal cancer cell line (HCT116) via PEG-mediated cell fusion and compared its cell viability, cell cycle response and apoptotic fractions responded to H2O2 with diploid HCT116 and p53 suppressed HCT116/H6 cell lines. RESULTS: Using MTT assay, plating efficiency and clonogenicity, we evaluated the survival of each cell line. Tetraploid cell line HCT116GH demonstrated an 83 fold greater resistance to 100 microM H2O2 than the parental diploid HCT116, and 6 fold greater than even the p53 negative diploid HCT116/E6. Cellular sensitivity, G2/M arrests, and apoptotic proportion were observed less in response to H2O2 in HCT116GH compared with HCT116 and HCT116/E6. HCT116GH expressed lower level of p53 and p21 than diploid HCT116. CONCLUSIONS: Stable tetraploid cell lines showed enhanced viability in comparison to parental diploid cell lines. The enhanced viability observed in tetraploidization surpassed that from downregulation of p53. Frequent appearance of tetraploid cells in stressful condition can be caused by natural selection owing to their enhanced viability and may consequently contribute to cancer cell transformation.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , Cell Division , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Survival , Chromosomal Instability , Colonic Neoplasms/genetics , Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21/metabolism , G2 Phase , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Oxidative Stress , Polyploidy , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/metabolism
15.
Indian J Biochem Biophys ; 2010 Dec; 47(6): 378-382
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-135291

ABSTRACT

Hydrogen peroxide is most stable molecule among reactive oxygen species, which play a vital role in growth and development of plant as signaling molecule at low concentration in response to various abiotic and biotic stresses. Exogenous application of H2O2 is known to induce chilling tolerance in plants. Brassinosteroids are plant steroid hormones known for their anti-stress properties. In this study, effect of exogenous H2O2 on antioxidant defense system of Brassica juncea L. seedlings was investigated in 24-epibrassinolide (24-EBL) treated and untreated seedlings under chilling stress. The surface sterilized seeds of B. juncea L. were germinated in petriplates containing different concentrations of H2O2 alone and in combination with 10-8 M 24-EBL. Chilling treatment (4 ºC) was given to 10-days old seedlings grown in different treatments for 6 h daily up to 3 days. 24 h recovery period was given to chilling treated seedlings by placing at 25ºC ± 2ºC and harvested for antioxidant enzymes on 14th day after sowing (DAS). Treatment of 24-EBL in combination with H2O2 (15 and 20 mM) helped in reducing the toxicity of seed and seedlings due to H2O2 exposure on their germination rate, shoot and root length respectively. 24-EBL treatment at seed and seedling stage helped in alleviating the toxic effect of H2O2 through antioxidant defense system by increasing the activities of various enzymes involved in antioxidant defense system such as catalase (CAT, E.C. 1.11.1.6), ascorbate peroxidase (APOX, E.C. 1.11.1.11), and superoxide dismutase (SOD, E.C. 1.15.1.1). In conclusion, exogenous pretreatment of H2O2 to seeds of B. juncea L. adapted the seedlings to tolerate chilling stress, which was further ameliorated in combination of H2O2 with 24-EBL.


Subject(s)
Acclimatization/drug effects , Acclimatization/physiology , Antioxidants/metabolism , Ascorbate Peroxidases , Brassinosteroids , Catalase/metabolism , Cholestanols/pharmacology , Cold Temperature , Hydrogen Peroxide/pharmacology , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Mustard Plant/drug effects , Mustard Plant/enzymology , Peroxidases/metabolism , Seedlings/drug effects , Seedlings/enzymology , Steroids, Heterocyclic/pharmacology , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism
16.
Braz. oral res ; 24(4): 460-466, Oct.-Dec. 2010. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-569227

ABSTRACT

This in vitro study aimed to analyze the effect of different parameters of phototherapy with low intensity laser on the viability of human dental pulp fibroblasts under the effect of substances released by bleaching gel. Cells were seeded into 96 wells plates (1 x 10³ cells/well) and placed in contact with culture medium conditioned by a 35 percent hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel for 40 minutes, simulating the clinical condition of the in-office bleaching treatment. Cells cultured in ideal growth conditions served as positive control group (PC), and the cells grown in conditioned medium and non-irradiated served as negative control group (NC). Cells grown in conditioned medium were submitted to a single irradiation with a diode laser (40 mW, 0.04 cm²) emitting at visible red (660 nm; RL) or near infrared (780 nm; NIR) using punctual technique, in contact mode and energy densities of 4, 6 or 10 J/cm². The cell viability was analyzed through the MTT reduction assay immediately and 24 hours after the irradiation. The data was compared by ANOVA followed by the Tukey's test (p < 0.05). The cell viability increased significantly in 24 hours within each group. The PC presented cell viability significantly higher than NC in both experimental times. Only the NIR/10 J/cm² group presented cell viability similar to that of PC in 24 hours. The phototherapy with low intensity laser in defined parameters is able to compensate the cytotoxic effects of substances released by 35 percent hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel.


Subject(s)
Humans , Dental Pulp/radiation effects , Fibroblasts/radiation effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Low-Level Light Therapy , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Analysis of Variance , Cells, Cultured , Culture Media , Cell Survival/radiation effects , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Gels , Phototherapy , Time Factors
17.
J. appl. oral sci ; 18(1): 50-58, Jan.-Feb. 2010. tab, ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-545027

ABSTRACT

Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) is recommended for a number of clinical procedures and it has been pointed out as a potential cavity cleanser to be applied before adhesive restoration of dental cavities. OBJECTIVE: As CHX may diffuse through the dentinal tubules to reach a monolayer of odontoblasts that underlies the dentin substrate, this study evaluated the cytotoxic effects of different concentrations of CHX on cultured odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cells were cultured and exposed to CHX solutions at concentrations of 0.06 percent, 0.12 percent, 0.2 percent, 1 percent and 2 percent. Pure culture medium (á-MEM) and 3 percent hydrogen peroxide were used as negative and positive control, respectively. After exposing the cultured cells to the controls and CHX solutions for 60 s, 2 h or 60 s with a 24-h recovery period, cell metabolism (MTT assay) and total protein concentration were evaluated. Cell morphology was assessed under scanning electron microscopy. CHX had a dose-dependent toxic effect on the MDPC-23 cells. RESULTS: Statistically significant difference was observed when the cells were exposed to CHX in all periods (p<0.05). Significant difference was also determined for all CHX concentrations (p<0.05). The 60-s exposure time was the least cytotoxic (p<0.05), while exposure to CHX for 60 s with a 24-h recovery period was the most toxic to the cells (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Regardless of the exposure time, all CHX concentrations had a high direct cytotoxic effect to cultured MDPC-23 cells.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/toxicity , Chlorhexidine/toxicity , Odontoblasts/drug effects , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/administration & dosage , Cells, Cultured , Cell Adhesion/drug effects , Cell Shape/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorhexidine/administration & dosage , Coloring Agents , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Mitochondria/drug effects , Odontoblasts/metabolism , Oxidants/toxicity , Proteins/analysis , Succinate Dehydrogenase/drug effects , Time Factors , Tetrazolium Salts , Thiazoles
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-44279

ABSTRACT

Oxidative stress induced by chronic hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes plays a crucial role in progressive loss of beta-cell mass through beta-cell apoptosis. Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has effects on preservation of beta-cell mass and its insulin secretory function. GLP-1 possibly increases islet cell mass through stimulated proliferation from beta-cell and differentiation to beta-cell from progenitor cells. Also, it probably has an antiapoptotic effect on beta-cell, but detailed mechanisms are not proven. Therefore, we examined the protective mechanism of GLP-1 in beta-cell after induction of oxidative stress. The cell apoptosis decreased to ~50% when cells were treated with 100 microM H2O2 for up to 2 hr. After pretreatment of Ex-4, GLP-1 receptor agonist, flow cytometric analysis shows 41.7% reduction of beta-cell apoptosis. This data suggested that pretreatment of Ex-4 protect from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Also, Ex-4 treatment decreased GSK3beta activation, JNK phosphorylation and caspase-9, -3 activation and recovered the expression of insulin2 mRNA in beta-cell lines and secretion of insulin in human islet. These results suggest that Ex-4 may protect beta-cell apoptosis by blocking the JNK and GSK3beta mediated apoptotic pathway.


Subject(s)
Animals , Apoptosis , Caspase 3/metabolism , Caspase 9/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Cricetinae , Flow Cytometry , Glucagon-Like Peptide 1/pharmacology , Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3/metabolism , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Insulin/genetics , Insulin-Secreting Cells/drug effects , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Oxidative Stress , Peptides/pharmacology , Phosphorylation , Receptors, Glucagon/agonists , Signal Transduction , Venoms/pharmacology
19.
Rev. odonto ciênc ; 25(3): 271-275, 2010. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-574135

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the higher the concentration of carbamide peroxide, the greater is its cytotoxicity to fibroblast cells. Methods: Three concentrations of carbamide peroxide (10%, 16%, and 22%) used in home bleaching techniques were evaluated regarding their cytotoxic effect on gingival tissues. The materials were divided into three groups as follows: Group C10 (White Gold Home 10%, Dentsply), Group C16 (White Gold Home 16%, Dentsply, and Group C22 (Nite White 22%, ACP Discus Dental). The cytotoxicity essay was carried out using cell cultures (mouse fibroblast L929 cell line) in which the viable cells were determined by means of the dye-uptake method performed at 2, 4, and 8 hours. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) with multiple comparisons and Tukey’s test (P<0.05). Results: The results showed statistically significant differences between Groups C10, C16, C22, and the cell control at 2, 4, and 8 hours (P<0.05). The amount of cell lysis increased proportionally to the exposure time to the materials studied.Conclusion: The 22% carbamide peroxide group was more toxic than the other two groups (16% and 10% concentration) regardless of the exposure time.


Objetivo: Testar a hipótese que quanto maior a concentração do peróxido de carbamida, maior a citotoxicidade provocada em células fibroblásticas.Metodologia: Foram avaliadas 3 concentrações de peróxidos de carbamida (10%, 16% e 22%) usados na técnica de clareamento caseiro, divididos em 3 grupos: grupo C10 (White Gold Home 10%, Dentsply), grupo C16 (White Gold Home 16%, Dentsply) e grupo C22 (Nite White 22%, ACP Discus Dental) quanto ao efeito citotóxico nos tecidos gengivais. O ensaio de citotoxicidade foi realizado utilizando cultura de células (linhagem L929, fibroblastos de camundongos) e submetidos ao teste para células viáveis em vermelho neutro (“dye-uptake”) no tempo de 2, 4 e 8 h. Os dados foram analisados estatisticamente por análise de variância e teste de Tukey (P<0,05).Resultados: Houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre os grupos C10, C16 e C22 com o grupo CC (controle de células) nos tempos de 2, 4 e 8 h (P<0,05). A quantidade de lise celular aumentou diretamente proporcional ao tempo de exposição dos materiais com as culturas de células.Conclusão: O peróxido de carbamida 22% foi mais citotóxico que os peróxidos de carbamida nas concentrações de 16 e 10% independentemente do tempo avaliado.


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Case-Control Studies
20.
Indian J Biochem Biophys ; 2009 Apr; 46(2): 161-165
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-135189

ABSTRACT

Lentinula edodes (Berk) Pegler, commonly known as Shiitake mushroom has been used as medicinal food in Asian countries, especially in China and Japan and is believed to possess strong immunomodulatory property. In the present study, the methanolic extract of the fruit bodies of L. edodes was investigated for cytoprotective effect against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by measuring the activities of xanthine oxidase (XO) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) . H2O2 at a concentration of 5 μM caused 50% inhibition of PBMCs viability. The extract improved the PBMC viability and exerted a dose-dependent protection against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. At 100 μg/ml of extract concentration, the cell viability increased by 60% compared with the PBMCs incubated with H2O2 alone. The extract also inhibited XO activity in PBMC, while showing moderate stimulatory effect on GPx. However, in the presence of H2O2 alone, both the enzyme activities were increased significantly. The GPx activity increased, possibly in response to the increased availability of H2O2 in the cell. When the cells were pretreated with the extract and washed (to remove the extract) prior to the addition of H2O2, the GPx and XO activities as well as the cell viability were comparable to those when incubated with the extract alone. Thus, it is suggested that one of the possible mechanisms via which L. edodes methanolic extract confers protection against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in PBMC is by inhibiting the superoxide-producing XO and increasing GPx activity which could rapidly inactivate H2O2.


Subject(s)
Cell Survival/drug effects , Cytotoxins/antagonists & inhibitors , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Glutathione Peroxidase/metabolism , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/antagonists & inhibitors , Hydrogen Peroxide/metabolism , Hydrogen Peroxide/toxicity , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/enzymology , Methanol/chemistry , Shiitake Mushrooms/chemistry , Xanthine Oxidase/metabolism
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