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1.
Electron. j. biotechnol ; 51: 50-57, May. 2021. ilus, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1343384

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Molecular brain therapies require the development of molecular switches to control gene expression in a limited and regulated manner in time and space. Light-switchable gene systems allow precise control of gene expression with an enhanced spatio-temporal resolution compared to chemical inducers. In this work, we adapted the existing light-switchable Light-On system into a lentiviral platform, which consists of two modules: (i) one for the expression of the blue light-switchable transactivator GAVPO and (ii) a second module containing an inducible-UAS promoter (UAS) modulated by a light-activated GAVPO. RESULTS: In the HEK293-T cell line transfected with this lentiviral plasmids system, the expression of the reporter mCherry increased between 4 to 5 fold after light induction. A time expression analysis after light induction during 24 h revealed that mRNA levels continuously increased up to 9 h, while protein levels increased throughout the experiment. Finally, transduction of cultured rat hippocampal neurons with this dual Light-On lentiviral system showed that CDNF, a potential therapeutic trophic factor, was induced only in cells exposed to blue light. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the optimized lentiviral platform of the Light-On system provides an efficient way to control gene expression in neurons, suggesting that this platform could potentially be used in biomedical and neuroscience research, and eventually in brain therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.


Subject(s)
Gene Expression Regulation , Optogenetics/methods , Light , Neurons/metabolism , Immunoblotting , Gene Expression , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Lentivirus
2.
Adv Rheumatol ; 60: 45, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1130781

ABSTRACT

Abstract Background Anti-ribosomal P (anti-Rib-P) antibody is a specific serological marker for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and routinely tested by targeting the common epitope of three ribosomal proteins of P0, P1 and P2. This study aimed to investigate if testing antibodies against individual ribosomal protein, but not the common epitope, is required to achieve the best diagnostic benefit in SLE. Methods The study included 82 patients with SLE and 22 healthy donors. Serum antibodies were determined by ELISA and immunoblot. Results The prevalence of each antibody determined by ELISA was 35.4% (anti-Rib-P), 45.1% (anti-Rib-P0), 32.9% (anti-Rib-P1) and 40.2% (anti-Rib-P2) at 99% specificity, respectively. Of 53 patients with negative anti-Rib-P antibody, 21 (39.6%) were positive for anti-Rib-P0, 9 (17.0%) for anti-Rib-P1 and 12 (22.6%) for anti-Rib-P2 antibody. The positive rate of anti-Rib-P antibody detected by ELISA was close to the results by immunoblot (33.4%). Patients with any of these antibodies were featured by higher disease activity and prevalence of skin rashes than those with negative antibodies. Moreover, each antibody was particularly related to some clinical and laboratory disorders. The distribution of subclasses of IgG1-4 was varied with each antibody. Anti-Rib-P0 IgG1 and IgG3 were strongly correlated with disease activity and lower serum complement components 3 and 4. Conclusions Anti-Rib-P antibody is not adequate to predict the existence of antibodies against ribosomal P0, P1 and P2 protein. The examination of antibodies against each ribosomal protein is required to achieve additional diagnostic benefit and to evaluate the association with clinical and serological disorders as well.(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Ribosomal Protein L10/blood , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/diagnosis , Antibodies/blood , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/instrumentation , Immunoblotting/instrumentation
3.
Electron. j. biotechnol ; 40: 30-39, July. 2019. ilus, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1053221

ABSTRACT

Background: Myostatin (MSTN) negatively regulates muscle mass and is a potent regulator of energy metabolism. However, MSTN knockout have affect mitochondrial function. This research assessed the mitochondrial energy metabolism of Mstn−/+ KO cells, and wondered whether the mitochondria biogenesis are affected. Results: In this study, we successfully achieved Mstn knockout in skeletal muscle C2C12 cells using a CRISPR/Cas9 system and measured proliferation and differentiation using the Cell-Counting Kit-8 assay and qPCR, respectively. We found that MSTN dysfunction could promote proliferation and differentiation compared with the behaviour of wild-type cells. Moreover, Mstn KO induced an increase in KIF5B expression. The mitochondrial content was significantly increased in Mstn KO C2C12 cells, apparently associated with the increases in PGC-1α, Cox1, Cox2, ND1 and ND2 expression. However, no differences were observed in glucose consumption and lactate production. Interestingly, Mstn KO C2C12 cells showed an increase in IL6 and a decrease in TNF-1α levels. Conclusion: These findings indicate that MSTN regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism. This gene-editing cells provided favourable evidence for animal breeding and metabolic diseases.


Subject(s)
Myostatin/genetics , Mitochondria/genetics , Mitochondria/metabolism , Organelle Biogenesis , Immunoblotting , Cell Differentiation , Muscle, Skeletal/cytology , Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism , Myoblasts/cytology , Myoblasts/metabolism , MicroRNAs , Cell Proliferation , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Flow Cytometry , Gene Editing
4.
Rev. bras. parasitol. vet ; 28(2): 298-302, Apr.-June 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1042507

ABSTRACT

Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of infection by Sarcocystis neurona in horses and identify potential risk factors. Were analyzed 427 samples from 36 farms in 21 municipalities in the Alagoas State, Brazil. Presence of anti-S. neurona antibodies was diagnosed by indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and was confirmed using the immunoblot test. Risk factors were assessed through investigative questionnaires on animal management on the farms. The prevalence of anti-S.neurona antibodies was 2.8% (confidence interval, CI: 1.5-4.9%) from IFAT and 1.6% (CI:0.8-3.34%) from immunoblot, and there were positive horses on 16.6% of the studied farms. None of the variables studied presented associations with serological status for S. neurona. This is the first report on infection by S. neurona in horses reared in Alagoas, Brazil showing a low exposure to S. neurona in this region, but with significant numbers of foci.


Resumo Objetivou-se neste estudo determinar a prevalência e os fatores de risco associados à infecção por Sarcocystis neurona em equinos. Foram analisadas 427 amostras de 36 propriedades localizadas em 21 municípios do estado de Alagoas. O diagnóstico de anticorpos anti-S. neurona foi realizado pela técnica de Imunofluorescência Indireta (IFI) e confirmada por immunoblot. O estudo dos fatores de risco foi realizado a partir de questionários investigativos sobre o manejo dos animais nas propriedades. A prevalência de anticorpos anti-S. neurona foi de 2,8% (I.C. 1,5-4,9%) na IFI e de 1,6% (I.C. 0,8-3,34%) no immunoblot com equinos positivos em 16,6% das propriedades estudadas. Nenhuma variável estudada apresentou associação com o status sorológico para S. neurona. Este é o primeiro relato da infecção por S. neurona em equinos criados no Estado de Alagoas, Brasil, confirmando que os animais desta região têm baixa exposição a S. neurona, mas com significativo número de focos.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Female , Antibodies, Protozoan/blood , Sarcocystis/immunology , Sarcocystosis/veterinary , Horse Diseases/epidemiology , Brazil/epidemiology , Immunoblotting , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Risk Factors , Sarcocystosis/diagnosis , Sarcocystosis/epidemiology , Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect/veterinary , Horse Diseases/diagnosis , Horses
5.
Blood Research ; : 253-261, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785541

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Fluoranthene (FR) is a common environmental pollutant that exists in a complex mixture with other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We identified biomarkers for monitoring FR exposure and investigated the rescue effect of FR-induced cellular toxicity via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) antagonist activity in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs).METHODS: Morphological changes, viability, and rescue effects of an AHR antagonist (CH223191) were examined in BM-MSCs after exposure to FR. Cytotoxic effects were assayed using the tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay. Apoptosis was measured by annexin V and propidium iodide dye-based flowcytometry assay, mitochondrial membrane potential assay, and nuclear DNA fragmentation assay. Molecular signaling pathways of apoptosis and autophagy were investigated using immunoblotting. Proteomics were performed in order to reveal the spectra of cellular damage and identify biomarkers for FR exposure.RESULTS: Exposing BM-MSCs to FR (IC₅₀=50 µM) induced cell death and morphological changes, while the AHR antagonist showed rescue effects. Autophagy was activated and mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased. Proteomic analysis identified 48 deregulated proteins (26 upregulated and 22 downregulated). Among them, annexin A6, pyruvate kinase, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, and phospholipase A2 could be potential biomarkers for FR exposure.CONCLUSION: The exposure of BM-MSCs to FR induced remarkable alterations in cellular biology and the proteome, allowing for identification of novel biomarkers for FR exposure. Furthermore, AHR antagonists might be able to prevent cellular damage due to FR exposure.


Subject(s)
Annexin A5 , Annexin A6 , Apoptosis , Autophagy , Biomarkers , Bone Marrow , Cell Death , DNA Fragmentation , Immunoblotting , Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Oxidoreductases , Phospholipases A2 , Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons , Propidium , Proteome , Proteomics , Pyruvate Kinase , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719507

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Little is known about the importance of lipid transfer protein (LTP) sensitization in China. In this study, we investigated the relationship between LTP sensitization and the severity of clinical symptoms in a population of patients with mugwort pollen-related food allergy. METHODS: Food-induced symptoms were evaluated in 148 patients with mugwort pollen allergy by a standardized questionnaire. Specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) to Art v 1, Art v 3, Pru p 3, Ara h 9 and Cor a 8 were quantified by ImmunoCAP. Immunoblotting of peach extracts were performed with sera from peach-allergic patients. RESULTS: In total, 72% (107/148) of the study population experienced food allergy. Forty-eight percent (51/107) of patients with mugwort pollen-related food allergy experienced at least 1 episode of food-induced anaphylaxis. Food allergy correlated with IgE reactivity to Art v 3, but not to Art v 1. Sensitization to Pru p 3, Ara h 9 or Cor a 8 was prevalent (80%, 69 or 63%, respectively) among individuals with food allergy. Food allergic patients with systemic reactions (SR) had higher values for Pru p 3, Ara h 9 and Cor a 8 than patients with oral allergy syndrome (OAS). Furthermore, the strong IgE reactivity detected in immunoblots of peach extracts indicated that Pru p 3 was the major allergen and was more prevalent in patients with SR than in patients with OAS (100% vs. 55%). CONCLUSIONS: LTPs are major food allergens for mugwort pollen-related food allergy in China, and may contribute to SR.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Anaphylaxis , Artemisia , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , China , Food Hypersensitivity , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Immunoblotting , Immunoglobulin E , Immunoglobulins , Prunus persica , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719275

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a uremic toxin and an important causative factor in the progression of chronic kidney disease. Recently, paricalcitol (19-nor-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2) was shown to exhibit protective effects in kidney injury. Here, we investigated the effects of paricalcitol treatment on IS-induced renal tubular injury. METHODS: The fluorescent dye 2ʹ,7ʹ-dichlorofluorescein diacetate was used to measure intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) following IS administration in human renal proximal tubular epithelial (HK-2) cells. The effects of IS on cell viability were determined using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assays and levels of apoptosis-related proteins (Bcl-2-associated protein X [Bax] and B-cell lymphoma 2 [Bcl-2]), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65, and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt) were determined by semiquantitative immunoblotting. The promoter activity of NF-κB was measured by luciferase assays and apoptosis was determined by f low cytometry of cells stained with f luorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Annexin V protein. RESULTS: IS treatment increased ROS production, decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in HK-2 cells. IS treatment increased the expression of apoptosis-related protein Bax, decreased Bcl-2 expression, and activated phosphorylation of MAPK, NF-κB p65, and Akt. In contrast, paricalcitol treatment decreased Bax expression, increased Bcl-2 expression, and inhibited phosphorylation of MAPK, NF-κB p65, and Akt in HK-2 cells. NF-κB promoter activity was increased following IS, administration and was counteracted by pretreatment with paricalcitol. Additionally, flow cytometry analysis revealed that IS-induced apoptosis was attenuated by paricalcitol treatment, which resulted in decreased numbers of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Annexin V positive cells. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with paricalcitol inhibited IS-induced apoptosis by regulating MAPK, NF-κB, and Akt signaling pathway in HK-2 cells.


Subject(s)
Annexin A5 , Apoptosis , Cell Survival , Flow Cytometry , Fluorescein , Humans , Immunoblotting , Indican , Kidney , Luciferases , Lymphoma, B-Cell , Phosphorylation , Protein Kinases , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt , Reactive Oxygen Species , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Signal Transduction
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-740562

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Protein overloading in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leads to endoplasmic reticulum stress, which exacerbates various disease conditions. Emodin, an anthraquinone compound, is known to have several health benefits. The effect of emodin against palmitic acid (PA) - induced ER stress in HepG2 cells was investigated. METHODS: HepG2 cells were treated with varying concentrations of palmitic acid to determine the working concentration that induced ER stress. ER stress associated genes such as ATF4, XBP1s, CHOP and GRP78 were checked using RT- PCR. In addition, the expression levels of unfolded protein response (UPR) associated proteins such as IRE1α, eIF2α and CHOP were checked using immunoblotting to confirm the induction of ER stress. The effect of emodin on ER stress was analyzed by treating HepG2 cells with 750 µM palmitic acid and varying concentrations of emodin, then analyzing the expression of UPR associated genes. RESULTS: It was evident from the mRNA and protein expression results that palmitic acid significantly increased the expression of UPR associated genes and thereby induced ER stress. Subsequent treatment with emodin reduced the mRNA expression of ATF4, GRP78, and XBP1s. Furthermore, the protein levels of p-IRE1α, p-elF2α and CHOP were also reduced by the treatment of emodin. Analysis of sirtuin mRNA expression showed that emodin increased the levels of SIRT4 and SIRT7, indicating a possible role in decreasing the expression of UPR-related genes. CONCLUSION: Altogether, the results suggest that emodin could exert a protective effect against fatty acid-induced ER stress and could be an agent for the management of various ER stress related diseases.


Subject(s)
Emodin , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Endoplasmic Reticulum , Hep G2 Cells , Immunoblotting , Insurance Benefits , Palmitic Acid , Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA, Messenger , Sirtuins , Unfolded Protein Response
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-764407

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oral cancer has a high incidence worldwide and has been closely associated with smoking, alcohol, and infection by the human papillomavirus. Metastasis is highly important for oral cancer survival. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that promotes various cellular processes, including cell survival, proliferation, metastasis, and invasion. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STATs) are transcription factors that mediate gene expression. Among the seven types of STATs in mammals, STAT3 is involved in invasion and metastasis of numerous tumors. However, little is known about the role of STAT3 in oral tumor invasion. In the present study, we hypothesized that STAT3 mediates LPA-induced oral cancer invasion. METHODS: Immunoblotting was performed to analyze LPA-induced STAT3 activation. 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed to assess the survival rates of YD-10B cells. STAT3 levels in LPA-treated oral tumor cells were evaluated by performing in vitro invasion assay. RESULTS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that LPA enhances STAT3 phosphorylation in oral cancer. In addition, treatment with WP1066, a selective inhibitor of STAT3, at a concentration that does not cause severe reduction in cell viability, significantly attenuated LPA-induced YD-10B cancer cell invasion. CONCLUSION: The results suggested that LPA induces oral tumor cells with greater invasive potential via STAT3 activation. Our findings provided important insights into the mechanisms underlying mouth neoplasms.


Subject(s)
Cell Survival , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition , Gene Expression , Humans , Immunoblotting , In Vitro Techniques , Incidence , Lysophospholipids , Mammals , Mouth Neoplasms , Neoplasm Metastasis , Phosphorylation , Smoke , Smoking , STAT3 Transcription Factor , Survival Rate , Transcription Factors , Transducers
10.
Journal of Bone Metabolism ; : 113-121, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-764243

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis is a geriatric disease with diminished bone density. The increase in the number of patients and medical expenses due to a global aging society are recognized as problems. Bone loss is the most common symptom of bone disease, not only osteoporosis but Paget's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple myeloma, and other diseases. The main cause of this symptoms is excessive increase in the number and activity of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are multinucleated giant cells that can resorb bone. They are differentiated and activation from monocytes/macrophages in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). METHODS: The effect of extract of Flavoparmelia sp. (EFV), a genus of lichenized fungi within the Parmeliaceae, on the differentiation of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) into osteoclasts was examined by phenotype assay and the cell cytotoxicity was evaluated by cell counting kit-8. The osteoclast differentiation-related genes and proteins were investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. The functional activity of osteoclast in response to EFV treatment was evaluated by an Osteo Assay plate. RESULTS: In this study, we found that EFV, a genus of lichenized fungi within the Parmeliaceae, inhibited osteoclast formation. And we investigated its inhibitory mechanism. EFV reduced RANKL-mediated osteoclast formation and activation by inhibiting expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells 1, a key factor of osteoclastogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our results show that EFV is a promising candidate for health functional foods or therapeutic agents that can help treat bone diseases such as osteoporosis.


Subject(s)
Aging , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Bone Density , Bone Diseases , Cell Count , Functional Food , Fungi , Giant Cells , Humans , Immunoblotting , Lichens , Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor , Macrophages , Multiple Myeloma , NFATC Transcription Factors , Osteoclasts , Osteoporosis , Parmeliaceae , Phenotype , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , T-Lymphocytes
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-764036

ABSTRACT

Xylitol is well-known to have an anti-caries effect by inhibiting the replication of cariogenic bacteria. In addition, xylitol enhances saliva secretion. However, the precise molecular mechanism of xylitol on saliva secretion is yet to be elucidated. Thus, in this study, we aimed to investigate the stimulatory effect of xylitol on saliva secretion and to further evaluate the involvement of xylitol in muscarinic type 3 receptor (M3R) signaling. For determining these effects, we measured the saliva flow rate following xylitol treatment in healthy individuals and patients with dry mouth. We further tested the effects of xylitol on M3R signaling in human salivary gland (HSG) cells using real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunostaining. Xylitol candy significantly increased the salivary flow rate and intracellular calcium release in HSG cells via the M3R signaling pathway. In addition, the expressions of M3R and aquaporin 5 were induced by xylitol treatment. Lastly, we investigated the distribution of M3R and aquaporin 5 in HSG cells. Xylitol was found to activate M3R, thereby inducing increases in Ca²⁺ concentration. Stimulation of the muscarinic receptor induced by xylitol activated the internalization of M3R and subsequent trafficking of aquaporin 5. Taken together, these findings suggest a molecular mechanism for secretory effects of xylitol on salivary epithelial cells.


Subject(s)
Aquaporin 5 , Bacteria , Calcium , Calcium Signaling , Candy , Epithelial Cells , Humans , Immunoblotting , Mouth , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Receptors, Muscarinic , Saliva , Salivary Glands , Xylitol
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763136

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Although the interferon α (IFNα) signaling and the paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) have both been implicated in the progression of breast cancer (BCa), it remains obscure whether these two pathways act in a coordinated manner. We therefore aimed to elucidate the expression and function of PITX2 during the pathogenesis of endocrine resistance in BCa. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PITX2 expression was assessed in BCa tissues using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunohistochemistry and in experimentally induced letrozole-resistant BCa cells using RT-qPCR and immunoblotting. Effects of PITX2 deregulation on BCa progression was determined by assessing MTT, apoptosis and xenograft model. Finally, using multiple assays, the transcriptional regulation of interferon-inducible transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) by PITX2 was studied at both molecular and functional levels. RESULTS: PITX2 expression was induced in letrozole-resistant BCa tissues and cells, and PITX2 induction by IFNα signaling powerfully protected BCa cells against letrozole insult and potentiated letrozole-resistance. Mechanistically, PITX2 enhanced IFNα-induced AKT activation by transactivating the transcription of IFITM1, thus rendering BCa cells unresponsive to letrozoleelicited cell death. Additionally, ablation of IFITM1 expression using siRNA substantially abolished IFNα-elicited AKT phosphorylation, even in the presence of PITX2 overexpression, thus sensitizing BCa cells to letrozole treatment. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that constitutive upregulation of PITX2/IFITM1 cascade is an intrinsic adaptive mechanism during the pathogenesis of letrozole-resistance, and modulation of PITX2/IFITM1 level using different genetic and pharmacological means would thus have a novel therapeutic potential against letrozole resistance in BCa.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , Breast Neoplasms , Breast , Cell Death , Heterografts , Immunoblotting , Immunohistochemistry , Interferons , Phosphorylation , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reverse Transcription , RNA, Small Interfering , Transcription Factors , Transcriptional Activation , Up-Regulation
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759498

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pain-relief properties of tricyclic antidepressants can be attributed to several actions. Recent observations suggest that adenosine is involved in the antinociceptive effect of amitriptyline. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is the only adenosine subtype overexpressed in inflammatory and cancer cells. This study was performed to investigate the role of A3AR in the anti-nociceptive effect of amitriptyline. METHODS: Spinal nerve-ligated neuropathic pain was induced by ligating the L5 and L6 spinal nerves of male Sprague-Dawley rats. The neuropathic rats were randomly assigned to one of the following three groups (8 per group): a neuropathic pain with normal saline group, a neuropathic pain with amitriptyline group, and a neuropathic pain with amitriptyline and 3-ethyl-5-benzyl- 2-methyl-4-phenylethynyl-6-phenyl-1,4-(±)-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate (MRS) group. Amitriptyline or saline was administered intraperitoneally and 3-ethyl-5-benzyl-2-methyl-4-phenylethynyl-6-phenyl-1,4-(±)-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate (MRS-1191), an A3AR antagonist, was injected subcutaneously immediately before amitriptyline administration. The level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase P44/42 (ERK1/2), cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and proinflammatory cytokines were assessed using immunoblotting or reverse-transciption polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Amitriptyline increased the mechanical withdrawal threshold of the neuropathic rats. The level of phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-CREB proteins, and proinflammatory cytokines produced by spinal nerve ligation were significantly reduced by amitriptyline administration. However, the use of MRS-1191 before amitriptyline administration not only reduced the threshold of mechanical allodynia, but also increased the signaling protein and proinflammatory cytokine levels, which were reduced by amitriptyline. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that the anti-nociceptive effect of amitriptyline involves the suppression of ERK1/2 and CREB signaling proteins, and A3AR activation also affects the alleviation of the inflammatory response.


Subject(s)
Adenosine , Amitriptyline , Animals , Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Cytokines , Humans , Hyperalgesia , Immunoblotting , Ligation , Male , Neuralgia , Phosphotransferases , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Receptors, Purinergic P1 , Spinal Nerves
14.
Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop ; 52: e20180465, 2019. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1041598

ABSTRACT

Abstract INTRODUCTION We evaluated the anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) antibody prevalence and HEV-RNA in archived serum samples of non-A-C hepatitis, or suspected cases of HEV infection from the Eastern Brazilian Amazon from 1993 to 2014. METHODS Serum samples (n = 318) were tested using ELISA and immunoblotting, and screened for HEV-RNA by RT-qPCR. RESULTS Anti-HEV IgM and IgG were detected in 3.4% (11/318) and 5.9% (19/318) of the samples, respectively. All samples were HEV-RNA negative. CONCLUSIONS HEV was detected at a low prevalence. Broader serological and molecular evaluation of HEV infection in the Amazon region should be carried out.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Hepatitis Antibodies/blood , Hepatitis E virus/immunology , Hepatitis E/epidemiology , Brazil , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , RNA, Viral/blood , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Immunoblotting , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Hepatitis E/diagnosis , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
15.
Asia Pacific Allergy ; (4): e4-2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-750129

ABSTRACT

Yam (Dioscorea opposita) is commonly consumed in East Asia, but allergic reaction to this plant food is rare. To date, there is no report of anaphylactic reaction after ingestion of cooked yam. We described 3 cases with anaphylaxis after eating boiled yam and 1 present with oral allergy syndrome as well. Basophil activation test in patients showed positive reactivity to boiled yam extract. In immunoblotting, a 30-kDa protein was recognized by all patients' sera and a 17-kDa band was detected by 1 patient. N-terminal amino acid revealed the 30-kDa IgE reacted band was DB3S, dioscorin in Dioscorea tuber. It promoted us that DB3S was a thermal stable oral allergen to trigger anaphylactic reaction and oral allergy syndrome in cooked yam (D. opposita) allergy. Patients with this plant food allergy should avoid both raw and well-cooked yam.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , Basophils , Dioscorea , Eating , Far East , Food Hypersensitivity , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Immunoblotting , Immunoglobulin E , Plants
16.
Journal of Liver Cancer ; : 33-43, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765682

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Because there is a lack of effective biomarkers, we aimed to discover proteomic candidate markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients at the highest-risk of HCC, and to validate the markers. METHODS: We collected tumor tissue from 5 cirrhotics with HCC, and from 5 cirrhotics without HCC, who underwent liver resection or transplantation. These tissue samples were analyzed by 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and potential markers were validated at the transcriptional and translational levels. We also performed western blot assays using other blood samples from 10 cirrhotics with HCC and 10 without HCC. RESULTS: Among the 66 distinguishable spots on 2-D gel images, we identified 15 proteins overexpressed more than 1.5 fold in terms of volume ratio in the tumors. Ten of the over-expressed proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF MS; of those, only methionine adenosyltransferase 1 (MAT1), a protein specific for liver, and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were significantly up-regulated in tumors in further immunoblotting analyses (Ps<0.05). There was no between-pair difference in MAT1 mRNA measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (P=0.96). However, in western blots of serum samples, distinct MAT1 bands were observed in all 10 HCC patients, but in only 2 of the non-HCC patients. CONCLUSIONS: MAT1 is a potential marker for surveillance in cirrhotic patients with and without prior HCC.


Subject(s)
Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase , Biomarkers , Blotting, Western , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Humans , Immunoblotting , Liver , Liver Cirrhosis , Mass Spectrometry , Methionine Adenosyltransferase , Methionine , Proteomics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA, Messenger , Two-Dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714648

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In our previous study, it has been reported that valproic acid (VPA) effects gliogenesis and increases the number of glial precursor cells during the early postnatal period. However there is no specific report that whether this process is going on up to the age of mature brain development and the consequence effect of this ongoing gliogenesis process. METHODS: As an ongoing study, using Immunoblotting analysis, we checked the level of glial protein and glial-derived factor markers in the frontal cortex of a rat brain at postnatal day (PND) 21. RESULTS: The finding of the study suggests that, in the VPA group (p < 0.05), early exposure elicited significantly to increase the expression level of glial protein cells at PND 21 in the frontal cortex of rat brain. CONCLUSION: Therefore we suggest that, alter gliogenesis and abnormal number of glial cells modulate the neurobiological dysfunction and induces the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders.


Subject(s)
Animals , Astrocytes , Brain , Frontal Lobe , Immunoblotting , Neurodevelopmental Disorders , Neuroglia , Rats , Valproic Acid
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We developed skin prick test (SPT) reagents for common inhalant allergens that reflected the real exposure in Korea. The study aim was to evaluate diagnostic usefulness and allergen potency of our inhalant SPT reagents in comparison with commercial products. METHODS: We produced eight common inhalant allergen SPT reagents using total extract (Prolagen): Dermatophagoides farinae, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, oak, ragweed, mugwort, Humulus japonicus pollens, as well as cat and dog allergens. We compared the newly developed reagents with three commercially available SPT reagents (Allergopharma, Hollister-Stier, Lofarma). We measured total protein concentrations, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), major allergen concentration, and biological allergen potencies measured by immunoglobulin E (IgE) immunoblotting and ImmunoCAP inhibition test. RESULTS: Diagnostic values of these SPT reagents were expressed as positivity rate and concordance rate of the results from ImmunoCAP allergen-specific IgE test in 94 allergic patients. In vitro analysis showed marked differences in protein concentrations, SDS-PAGE features, major allergen concentrations, and biological allergen potencies of four different SPT reagents. In vivo analysis showed that positive rates and concordance rates of Prolagen® SPT reagents were similar compared to the three commercial SPT reagents. CONCLUSION: The newly developed Prolagen® inhalant SPT reagents are not inferior to the commercially available SPT reagents in allergy diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Allergens , Allergy and Immunology , Ambrosia , Animals , Artemisia , Cats , Dermatophagoides farinae , Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus , Diagnosis , Dogs , Electrophoresis , Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel , Humans , Humulus , Hypersensitivity , Immunoblotting , Immunoglobulin E , Immunoglobulins , In Vitro Techniques , Indicators and Reagents , Korea , Methods , Pollen , Skin , Sodium
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713532

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: To define the effect of statins on interleukin 1β (IL-1β)-induced osteoclastogenesis and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Bone marrow cells were obtained from 5-week-old male ICR (Institute for Cancer Research) mice, and they were cultured to differentiate them into osteoclasts with macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand in the presence or absence of IL-1β or atorvastatin. The formation of osteoclasts was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and resorption pit assay with dentine slice. The molecular mechanisms of the effects of atorvastatin on osteoclastogenesis were investigated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting for osteoclast specific molecules. RESULTS: Atorvastatin significantly reduced the number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells as well as the bone resorption area. Atorvastatin also downregulated the expression of the NF of activated T-cell c1 messenger RNA and inhibited the expression of osteoclast-specific genes. A possible underlying mechanism may be that atorvastatin suppresses the degradation of the inhibitors of NF-κB and blocks the activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38; thus, implicating the NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases pathway in this process. CONCLUSIONS: Atorvastatin is a strong inhibitor of inflammation-induced osteoclastogenesis in inflammatory joint diseases.


Subject(s)
Acid Phosphatase , Animals , Atorvastatin , Bone Marrow Cells , Bone Resorption , Dentin , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Immunoblotting , Interleukins , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases , Joint Diseases , Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor , Male , Mice , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases , Osteoclasts , Osteoprotegerin , Phosphotransferases , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reverse Transcription , RNA, Messenger , T-Lymphocytes
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-716616

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), leading to the production of type I interferons (IFNs). It is well known that the gene expression profile of PBMC is similar to that of the liver. The present study explored the dynamic gene expression profile of PBMCs collected from HCV-infected patients undergoing direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy. METHODS: A prospective cohort comprising 27 patients under DAA therapy was formed. Expression level of IFN-β and its downstream interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) was measured in PBMCs before and after DAA treatment. Furthermore, immunoblotting was performed to identify the signaling molecules involved in the expression of ISGs. RESULTS: The pretreatment expression level of interferon-induced protein 44 (IFI44) and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) correlated with the pretreatment expression level of IFN-β. After DAA treatment, a significant decrease in the expression levels of IFN-β, IFI44, and CXCL10 was observed in the PBMCs. Furthermore, the pretreatment expression level of IFN-β and ISGs correlated with the level of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation, and DAA treatment abrogated STAT1 phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: Pretreatment activation of IFN-β response is rapidly normalized after DAA treatment. The present study suggests that the decreased type I IFN response by the clearance of HCV might contribute to DAA-induced alleviation of extrahepatic manifestation of chronic HCV infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , Cohort Studies , Hepacivirus , Hepatitis C , Hepatitis , Humans , Immunoblotting , Interferon Type I , Interferons , Liver , Phosphorylation , Prospective Studies , STAT1 Transcription Factor , Transcriptome
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