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1.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 54(3): e9422, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1153527

ABSTRACT

Hyptis crenata, commonly known as "salva-do-Marajó", "hortelã-do-campo", and "hortelãzinha", is used in folk medicine in Northeast Brazil as tea or infusion to treat inflammatory diseases. Due to the pharmacological efficacy and the low toxicity of the essential oil of Hyptis crenata (EOHc), we decided to investigate the EOHc antiedematogenic effect in experimental models of inflammation. EOHc was administrated orally at doses of 10-300 mg/kg to male Swiss albino mice. Paw edema was induced by subcutaneous injection in the right hind paw of inflammatory stimuli (carrageenan, dextran, histamine, serotonin, and bradykinin) 60 min after administration of EOHc. EOHc significantly inhibited the induced edema. The inhibitory effect of EOHc on dextran-induced edema extended throughout the experimental time. For the 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg doses of EOHc, the inhibition was of 40.28±1.70, 51.18±2.69, and 59.24±2.13%, respectively. The EOHc inhibitory effect on carrageenan-induced edema started at 10 mg/kg at the second hour (h) and was maintained throughout the observation period. At 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg doses the inhibition started earlier, from 30 min. At the edema peak of 180 min, 56, 76, and 82% inhibition was observed for 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg doses, respectively. Additionally, the effect of EOHc on carrageenan-induced paw edema was influenced by the time of administration. The EOHc also inhibited myeloperoxidase activity. In conclusion, the EOHc showed a potent effect, both preventing and reversing the edema, consistent with its anti-inflammatory use in folk medicine.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rabbits , Oils, Volatile/therapeutic use , Hyptis/chemistry , Edema/drug therapy , Inflammation/drug therapy , Brazil , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Carrageenan , Edema/chemically induced , Inflammation/chemically induced
2.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 54(11): e11215, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1285662

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the acute blockade of endogenous melatonin (MLT) using Luzindole with or without systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and evaluated changes in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in the mouse jejunum. Luzindole is an MT1/MT2 MLT receptor antagonist. Both receptors occur in the small intestine. Swiss mice were treated with either saline (0.35 mg/kg, ip), Luzindole (0.35 mg/kg, ip), LPS (1.25 mg/kg, ip), or Luzindole+LPS (0.35 and 1.25 mg/kg, ip, respectively). Jejunum samples were evaluated regarding intestinal morphometry, histopathological crypt scoring, and PAS-positive villus goblet cell counting. Inflammatory Iba-1, interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, nuclear factor (NF)-kB, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and oxidative stress (NP-SHs, catalase, MDA, nitrate/nitrite) markers were assessed. Mice treated with Luzindole, LPS, and Luzindole+LPS showed villus height shortening. Crypt damage was worse in the LPS group. Luzindole, LPS, and Luzindole+LPS reduced the PAS-goblet cell labeling and increased Iba-1-immunolabelled cells compared to the saline group. Immunoblotting for IL-1β, TNF-α, and NF-kB was greater in the Luzindole group. The LPS-challenged group showed higher MPO activity than the saline and Luzindole groups. Catalase was reduced in the Luzindole and Luzindole+LPS groups compared to saline. The Luzindole group showed an increase in NP-SHs, an effect related to compensatory GSH activity. The acute blockade of endogenous MLT with Luzindole induced early changes in inflammatory markers with altered intestinal morphology. The other non-detectable deleterious effects of Luzindole may be balanced by the unopposed direct action of MLT in immune cells bypassing the MT1/MT2 receptors.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Lipopolysaccharides , Melatonin , Tryptamines , Inflammation/chemically induced , Jejunum
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880649

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES@#Human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) are important source of periodontal tissue reconstruction. Under chronic inflammation, the multi-directional differentiation potential and chemotaxis in hPDLCs are decreased. Therefore, inhibiting inflammatory microenvironment and improving the functional characteristics of stem cells can better promote periodontal tissue reconstruction. This study was to investigate the effect of astaxanthin (AST) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in hPDLCs and the underlying mechanisms.@*METHODS@#hPDLCs were isolated and cultured in vitro, and vimentin and keratin immunocytochemical staining were used to identify hPDLCs. CCK-8 assay was used to measure the effects of AST (1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, and 200 μmol/L) on proliferation of hPDLCs. Quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) and ELISA were used to measure the mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory factors (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) in the control (Con) group, the LPS group, and the LPS+AST (5, 10, 20, and 50 μmol/L) group. Western blotting was used to detect the protein expression of IKBα, phosphorylated IKBα (p-IKBα), and p65 in the Con group, the LPS group, the AST (20 μmol/L) group, and the LPS+AST (20 μmol/L) group. After 10 μmol/L PDTC treatment, the mRNA and protein expressions of IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α were detected by RT-qPCR and ELISA.@*RESULTS@#Cell morphology and immunocytochemical staining showed that the cells were in line with the characteristics of hPDLCs. Treatment with AST could promote the proliferation of hPDLCs, which reached the peak at 20 μmol/L. The mRNA and protein expressions of IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α in the LPS group were higher than those in the Con group (all @*CONCLUSIONS@#AST promotes the proliferation of hPDLCs, which is related to suppression of LPS-induced the secretion of inflammatory factors via inhibiting the activation of NF-κB signaling pathway.


Subject(s)
Cells, Cultured , Humans , Inflammation/chemically induced , Lipopolysaccharides , NF-kappa B , Periodontal Ligament , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Xanthophylls
4.
Clinics ; 75: e1665, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1133413

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study intended to explore the effect of T regulatory cells (Tregs) in the perinatal liver against LPS-induced inflammation in a preterm birth mouse model. Moreover, the role of adoptive Tregs on the inflammatory response induced by LPS was also studied. METHODS: Female BALB/C mice were injected intraperitoneally (IP) with LPS dissolved in normal saline solution at a dose of 50 µg/kg. Spleens from pregnant mice were used to obtain Tregs. The expression of Forkhead family transcription factor-3 (Foxp3), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4), and Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were assessed from fetal liver tissues by polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. RESULTS: LPS administered to mice induced an inflammatory response in the perinatal liver, and this inflammatory response was negatively regulated by Tregs in the experimental group. Maternal-fetal tolerance was maintained by Tregs. Transmission of Tregs was estimated in different experimental groups based on the mRNA expression of TLR-4, IL-6, HO-1, and Foxp3. CONCLUSIONS: After analysis of the experimental data, it was determined that Tregs exhibited regulatory potential against LPS-induced inflammatory response. Further, it was concluded that the transmission of Tregs improved the mother's immune tolerance against LPS-induced inflammation in the fetal liver.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Pregnancy , Mice , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Premature Birth , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory , Forkhead Transcription Factors , Inflammation/chemically induced , Liver , Mice, Inbred BALB C
5.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 53(12): e9949, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | ColecionaSUS, LILACS, ColecionaSUS | ID: biblio-1132509

ABSTRACT

Acne is a kind of common, chronic skin condition caused by the inflammation of the sebaceous glands in hair follicles. Recent studies have demonstrated that baicalin (BA) possesses potential anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of BA in vitro and in vivo. Heat-killed Propionibacterium acnes-induced THP-1 cells and live P. acnes-injected male Sprague Dawley rats were used for establishing the acne model. The rate of ear swelling was calculated, and the severity was determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The production of cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α)] in the cell supernatant and ear tissue homogenates was measured by ELISA. Protein levels of JNK, ERK, P38, IκBα, P65, Nod-like receptor pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3), pro-caspase-1, and IL-1β in THP-1 cells and ear tissues were detected by western blotting. NLRP3 and IL-1β were detected by immunohistochemistry, and the NLRP3, IL-1β and pro-caspase-1 mRNAs were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results showed that BA decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, BA down-regulated the phosphorylation of JNK, ERK1/2, and κBα and inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65. Furthermore, BA inhibited the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, at both the gene and protein levels. Taken together, the results demonstrated that BA might exert its anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathways and consequently suppressing the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome both in vivo and in vitro.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Dermatitis/drug therapy , Inflammasomes , Propionibacterium acnes/metabolism , Flavonoids , Signal Transduction , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , MAP Kinase Signaling System , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/drug therapy
6.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-879210

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to identify the effects and underlying mechanisms of visfatin on inflammation and necroptosis in vascular endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were stimulated with visfatin or pretreated with Polyinosinic acid (LOX-1 inhibitor). By using the Western blot, RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), MTT and flow cytometry technique, the occurrence of inflammation and necroptosis in HUVECs were evaluated. Our results showed that 100 ng/mL visfatin significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and LOX-1 after 24 hours' treatment in HUVECs. However, pretreatment with Polyinosinic acid could significantly reduce the expression of MCP-1 compared with visfatin group. Additionally, 100 ng/mL visfatin could induce the production of necrotic features and increase the mRNA expression of BMF (one of the markers of necroptosis), while pretreating with Polyinosinic acid markedly downregulated the mRNA expression of BMF gene and promoted the cell proliferation. These results indicate that visfatin might induce inflammation and necroptosis via LOX-1 in HUVECs, suggesting that visfatin plays a central role in the development of atherosclerosis.


Subject(s)
Cells, Cultured , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells , Humans , Inflammation/chemically induced , Necroptosis , Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase , Scavenger Receptors, Class E/genetics
7.
Bol. latinoam. Caribe plantas med. aromát ; 18(6): 566-576, nov. 2019. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1102643

ABSTRACT

This paper reports for the first time volatile compounds, anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of essential oils from the leaves of Waltheria indica L. (Stericullaceae) growing in Nigeria. The essential oil was hydro-distilled and characterized by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated on carrageenan induced rat paw edema while the anti-nociceptive test was based on hot plate model. The hydro-distillation afforded 0.41% (dry weight basis) of light green oil. Forty compounds representing 99.8% were identified in the oil. The main constituents of the oil were limonene (34.7%), sabinene (21.2%) and citronellal (9.7%). The anti-nociceptive property of the essential oils statically inhibited edema development (p<0.001) at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg independent of time of exposure. However, the 100 mg/kg Waltheria indica essential oils (WIEO) displayed a relatively low inhibition (p<0.01-p>0.5) which declines as exposure time increases. The anti-inflammatory activities shows a steady rate and non-dose dependent activity (p<0.001) up to the 3rd h of inflammation study. Conversely, a sharp reduction at the rate of p<0.5, 0.1 and 0.01 for the 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg WIEO doses respectively. Overall, the results presented sustain and establish the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties and justifies the need for further evaluation and development of the essential oils from this plant.


Este artículo informa por primera vez de compuestos volátiles, actividades anti-nociceptivas y antiinflamatorias de aceites esenciales de las hojas de Waltheria indica L. (Stericullaceae) que crecen en Nigeria. El aceite esencial fue hidro-destilado y se caracterizó por cromatografía de gases-detección de ionización de llama (GC-FID) y cromatografía de gases junto con análisis de espectrometría de masas (GC-MS). La actividad antiinflamatoria se evaluó en el edema de pata de rata inducido por carragenano, mientras que la prueba antinociceptiva se basó en el modelo de placa caliente. La destilación hidráulica proporcionó 0,41% (en peso seco) de aceite verde claro. Cuarenta compuestos que representan el 99.8% fueron identificados en el aceite. Los principales componentes del aceite fueron el limoneno (34,7%), el sabineno (21,2%) y el citronelal (9,7%). La propiedad anti-nociceptiva de los aceites esenciales inhibió estáticamente el desarrollo del edema (p<0.001) a una dosis de 200 y 400 mg/kg independientemente del tiempo de exposición. Sin embargo, los aceites esenciales de Waltheria indica de 100 mg/kg (WIEO) mostraron una inhibición relativamente baja (p<0.01-p>0.5) que disminuye a medida que aumenta el tiempo de exposición. Las actividades antiinflamatorias muestran una tasa constante y una actividad no dependiente de la dosis (p<0.001) hasta la tercera hora del estudio de inflamación. Por el contrario, una fuerte reducción a una tasa de p<0.5, 0.1 y 0.01 para las dosis de 100, 200 y 400 mg/kg de WIEO respectivamente. En general, los resultados presentados sostienen y establecen las propiedades anti-nociceptivas y antiinflamatorias y justifican la necesidad de una mayor evaluación y desarrollo de los aceites esenciales de esta planta.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Female , Rats , Oils, Volatile/pharmacology , Malvaceae/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Temperature , Carrageenan/toxicity , Chromatography, Gas/methods , Rats, Wistar , Monoterpenes/analysis , Flame Ionization , Analgesics/pharmacology , Inflammation/chemically induced
8.
Int. arch. otorhinolaryngol. (Impr.) ; 23(1): 60-64, Jan.-Mar. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1002175

ABSTRACT

Abstract Introduction The human larynx is a very important organ for communication. Many conditions lead to scarring of the vocal folds, decreasing voice quality. Objective We aimed to determine whether fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) may influence tissue integration of grafted fascia into the vocal folds of an animal model. Methods This is an experimental animal study with 12 adult rabbits that were submitted to a grafting fragment obtained from superficial cervical fascia into the vocal fold lamina propria, bilaterally. The right vocal fold was injected with FGFs. The animals were sacrificed after 1 month or 12 months, depending on the group they were assigned to, and a histological analysis of their vocal folds was performed.We analyzed the histological changes (such as the presence of fibrosis and neovascularization) induced by the acute or chronic inflammatory reactions. Results The FGFs induced acute inflammatory changes in all animals after 1 month of the initial experiment. The presence of FGFs triggered more fibrosis than the expected due to the surgical procedure itself when compared with the control side of all animals after 12 months of the initial experiment. Conclusions Fibroblast growth factors alone do not represent a good therapeutic option in phonosurgery, since we observed higher levels of fibrosis in the vocal fold lamina propria. Further studies combining more substances may be necessary to elucidate the best option to be used in this kind of surgery. (AU)


Subject(s)
Animals , Vocal Cords/pathology , Fascia Lata/transplantation , Fibroblast Growth Factors/pharmacology , Rabbits , Fibrosis/etiology , Laryngeal Diseases/congenital , Inflammation/chemically induced , Neovascularization, Pathologic/etiology
9.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 52(3): e8251, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-984035

ABSTRACT

Oral mucositis (OM) is a common and dose-limiting side effect of cancer treatment, including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiotherapy. The efficacy of the therapeutic measures to prevent OM is limited and disease prevention is not fully observable. Amifostine is a cytoprotective agent with a described anti-inflammatory potential. It is clinically used to reduce radiotherapy and chemotherapy-associated xerostomia. This study investigated the protective effect of amifostine on an experimental model of OM. Hamsters were divided into six groups: saline control group (5 mL/kg), mechanical trauma (scratches) of the right cheek pouch; 5-FU (60 and 40 mg/kg, ip, respectively, administered on days 1 and 2); amifostine (12.5, 25, or 50 mg/kg) + 5-FU + scratches. Salivation rate was assessed and the animals were euthanized on day 10 for the analysis of macroscopic and microscopic injury by scores. Tissue samples were harvested for the measurement of neutrophil infiltration and detection of inflammatory markers by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. 5-FU induced pronounced hyposalivation, which was prevented by amifostine (P<0.05). In addition, 5-FU injection caused pronounced tissue injury accompanied by increased neutrophil accumulation, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) tissue levels, and positive immunostaining for TNF-α, IL-1β, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Interestingly, amifostine prevented the inflammatory reaction and consequently improved macroscopic and microscopic damage (P<0.05 vs 5-FU group). Amifostine reduced inflammation and protected against 5-FU-associated oral mucositis and hyposalivation.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Stomatitis/prevention & control , Xerostomia/prevention & control , Amifostine/therapeutic use , Protective Agents/therapeutic use , Fluorouracil/adverse effects , Inflammation/prevention & control , Stomatitis/chemically induced , Stomatitis/pathology , Xerostomia/chemically induced , Xerostomia/pathology , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/pathology
10.
Acta cir. bras ; 34(2): e201900202, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-989055

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the hyaluronic acid (HA) inflammatory reaction, fibroblasts, fibrosis and duration of effect in the dorsal region of tobacco-exposed rats. Methods: Ten Wistar rats were divided into two groups: tobacco-exposed-group (TEG;n=5) and air-control-group (CG;n=5). The TEG animals were tobacco-exposed twice a day, 30-minutes/session, during 60 days. After this period, all animals received 0.1 mL HA subcutaneous injection in the dorsal area. The volume of HA was measured immediately after HA injection and weekly using a hand-caliper in nine weeks. After this period, all the animals were euthanized, and a specimen of was collected to evaluate inflammatory cells, fibroblasts, and fibrosis by HE. Results: This study showed a higher inflammatory reaction in TEG than CG: inflammatory cell-count (CG: 1.07±0.9; TEG: 8.61±0.36, p<0.001); fibroblast count (CG: 2.92±0.17; TEG: 19.14±0.62, p<0.001), and fibrosis quantification (CG: 2.0; TEG: 3.75, p<0.001). The analysis of the HA volume in nine weeks in the dorsal region did not show a difference between groups (p=0.39). Conclusions: This study suggested that the HA injection in the TEG caused an increase in inflammatory cell count, fibroblast, and fibrosis quantification when compared to the CG. There was no difference in the duration of effect of HA between the groups.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Tobacco/adverse effects , Inhalation Exposure/adverse effects , Viscosupplements/adverse effects , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Hyaluronic Acid/adverse effects , Inflammation/pathology , Time Factors , Fibrosis , Rats, Wistar , Disease Models, Animal , Epidural Space/drug effects , Epidural Space/pathology , Fibroblasts/pathology , Inflammation/chemically induced
11.
Acta cir. bras ; 33(2): 134-143, Feb. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-886257

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To investigate the effects of pycnogenol on peritoneal adhesions and additionally to investigate the immunohistochemical effects of free oxygen radicals and reactive lymph nodes detected in the adhesive tissue that was sampled surrounding the cecum on intra-abdominal adhesions. Methods: Twenty-seven Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups. In group 1 (sham), laparotomy was performed and stitched up. In group 2 (control), after laparotomy was performed, punctate hemorrhage was induced by cecal abrasion in the cecum and each rat was intraperitoneally administered 2 cc of saline. In group 3 (experimental), after laparotomy was performed, punctate hemorrhage was induced by cecal abrasion in the cecum and each rat was intraperitoneally administered a sterile Pycnogenol derivative. The rats in all groups were re-laparotomized on postoperative day 7; samples were obtained from the peritoneal tissue surrounding the cecum, and the rats were sacrificed. Results: In group 3, there was a statistically significant difference in terms of inflammation, lymph node size, and free oxygen radicals; these parameters tended to increase. In terms of fibrosis evaluated using H&E and MT, there was no significant difference between groups 2 and 3. Conclusions: No positive outcomes indicating that pycnogenol reduces intra-abdominal adhesions were obtained. However, it caused severe inflammation in the tissue. Moreover, a significant increase in lymph node size was detected secondary to inflammation. Additionally, in immunohistochemical analyses conducted to detect oxidative stress, pycnogenol increased the production of free oxygen radicals in the tissue.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Peritoneal Diseases/prevention & control , Peritoneum/surgery , Flavonoids/therapeutic use , Tissue Adhesions/prevention & control , Peritoneal Diseases/etiology , Peritoneum/pathology , Postoperative Complications , Flavonoids/adverse effects , Immunohistochemistry , Plant Extracts , Tissue Adhesions/etiology , Tissue Adhesions/pathology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Rats, Wistar , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Disease Models, Animal , Free Radicals/analysis , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/pathology , Laparotomy , Lymph Nodes/drug effects , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/therapeutic use
12.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 51(6): e6997, 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889113

ABSTRACT

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to be associated with heart valve disease, which can be caused by inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the functional impacts of miR-27a on TNF-α-induced inflammatory injury in human mitral valve interstitial cells (hMVICs). hMVICs were subjected to 40 ng/mL TNF-α for 48 h, before which the expressions of miR-27a and NELL-1 in hMVICs were altered by stable transfection. Trypan blue staining, BrdU incorporation assay, flow cytometry detection, ELISA, and western blot assay were performed to detect cell proliferation, apoptosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. We found that miR-27a was lowly expressed in response to TNF-α exposure in hMVICs. Overexpression of miR-27a rescued hMVICs from TNF-α-induced inflammatory injury, as cell viability and BrdU incorporation were increased, apoptotic cell rate was decreased, Bcl-2 was up-regulated, Bax and cleaved caspase-3/9 were down-regulated, and the release of IL-1β, IL-6, and MMP-9 were reduced. NELL-1 was positively regulated by miR-27a, and NELL-1 up-regulation exhibited protective functions during TNF-α-induced cell damage. Furthermore, miR-27a blocked JNK and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways, and the blockage was abolished when NELL-1 was silenced. This study demonstrated that miR-27a overexpression protected hMVICs from TNF-α-induced cell damage, which might be via up-regulation of NELL-1 and thus modulation of JNK and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Inflammation/chemically induced , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Mitral Valve/drug effects , Nerve Tissue Proteins/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology , Apoptosis , Cell Proliferation , Cell Survival , Cytokines/metabolism , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Heart Valve Diseases/prevention & control , Inflammation/pathology , Mitral Valve/cytology , Mitral Valve/metabolism , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Transfection , Up-Regulation
13.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 30(1): e25, 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952016

ABSTRACT

Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of diabetes mellituson tissue response and mineralization ability of Sealapex®and MTA Fillapex® sealers. Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided into two groups: diabetic and non-diabetic. The materials were placed in polyethylene tubes and implanted into dorsal connective tissue of rats for 7 and 30 days. Six animals from each group received injection of calcein, alizarin, and oxytetracycline on days 7, 14, and 21, respectively. The animals were killed after 7 and 30 days and specimens were prepared for histologic analysis by staining with hematoxylin and eosin or Von Kossa or left unstained for polarized light or fluorescence microscopy. On day 7, inflammatory reactions were characterized. Moderate inflammatory responses were observed for all groups and on day 30, a mild inflammatory response against MTA Fillapex® and a moderate inflammatory response against Sealapex® were observed. Von Kossa-positive structures were observed in response to both materials and birefringent structures were observed upon polarized light analysis; these had no relation to the diabetic condition (p > 0.05). The fluorescence intensity was unaffected in diabetic rats (p > 0.05). In conclusion, diabetes mellitus did not influence the tissue response or mineralization stimulated by Sealapex® or MTA Fillapex®.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Oxides/pharmacology , Calcium Hydroxide/pharmacology , Salicylates/pharmacology , Silicates/pharmacology , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Aluminum Compounds/pharmacology , Subcutaneous Tissue/drug effects , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/physiopathology , Time Factors , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Materials Testing , Rats, Wistar , Subcutaneous Tissue/pathology , Drug Combinations , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/pathology , Microscopy, Fluorescence
14.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 30(1): e81, 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951987

ABSTRACT

Abstract Obturation of the root canal system aims to fill empty spaces, promoting hermetic sealing and preventing bacterial activity in periapical tissues. This should provide optimal conditions for repair, stimulating the process of biomineralization. An endodontic sealer should be biocompatible once it is in direct contact with periapical tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rat subcutaneous tissue response to implanted polyethylene tubes filled with Smartpaste Bio, Acroseal, and Sealapex and investigate mineralization ability of these endodontic sealers. Forty Wistar rats were assigned to the three sealers groups and control group, (n = 10 animals/group) and received subcutaneous implants containing the test sealers, and the control group were implanted with empty tubes. After days 7, 15, 30, and 60, animals were euthanized and polyethylene tubes were removed with the surrounding tissues. Inflammatory infiltrate and thickness of the fibrous capsule were histologically evaluated. Mineralization was analyzed by Von Kossa staining and polarized light. Data were tabulated and analyzed via Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's test. All tested materials induced a moderate inflammatory reaction in the initial periods. Smartpaste Bio induced the mildest inflammatory reactions after day 15. No difference was observed among groups after days 30 or 60. Von Kossa-positive staining and birefringent structures observed under polarized light revealed a larger mineralization area in Sealapex-treated animals followed by Smartpaste Bio-treated animals. At the end of the experiment, all tested sealers were found to be biocompatible. All sealers induced biomineralization, except Acroseal, which induced a mild tissue reaction.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Root Canal Filling Materials/pharmacology , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology , Calcium Hydroxide/pharmacology , Ceramics/pharmacology , Subcutaneous Tissue/drug effects , Epoxy Resins/pharmacology , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Time Factors , Biocompatible Materials/chemistry , Materials Testing , Calcium Hydroxide/chemistry , Ceramics/chemistry , Salicylates/pharmacology , Salicylates/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Rats, Wistar , Subcutaneous Tissue/pathology , Epoxy Resins/chemistry , Inflammation/chemically induced
15.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 49(7): e5103, 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-785054

ABSTRACT

Pharmacological treatment of inflammatory pain is usually done by administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These drugs present high efficacy, although side effects are common, especially gastrointestinal lesions. One of the pharmacological strategies to minimize such effects is the combination of drugs and natural products with synergistic analgesic effect. The monoterpene terpinolene (TPL) is a chemical constituent of essential oils present in many plant species, which have pharmacological activities, such as analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The association of ineffective doses of TPL and diclofenac (DCF) (3.125 and 1.25 mg/kg po, respectively) presented antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in the acute (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h, after treatment) and chronic (10 days) inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of female Wistar rats (170-230 g, n=6-8). The mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed by the Randall Selitto paw pressure test, which determines the paw withdrawal thresholds. The development of edema was quantified by measuring the volume of the hind paw by plethismography. The TPL/DCF association reduced neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in the histological analysis of the paw, following a standard staining protocol with hematoxylin and eosin and the counts were performed with the aid of optical microscopy after chronic oral administration of these drugs. Moreover, the TPL/DCF association did not induce macroscopic gastric lesions. A possible mechanism of action of the analgesic effect is the involvement of 5-HT2A serotonin receptors, because ketanserin completely reversed the antinociceptive effect of the TPL/DCF association. These results suggest that the TPL/DCF association had a synergistic anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect without causing apparent gastric injury, and that the serotonergic system may be involved in the antinociceptive effect of this association.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Analgesics/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Diclofenac/pharmacology , Inflammation/drug therapy , Pain/drug therapy , Terpenes/pharmacology , Chronic Disease , Drug Combinations , Drug Synergism , Edema/drug therapy , Freund's Adjuvant , Hyperalgesia/drug therapy , Hyperalgesia/pathology , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/pathology , Pain Measurement , Pain/pathology , Rats, Wistar , Reproducibility of Results , Stomach/drug effects , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
16.
Braz. j. biol ; 75(2): 491-496, 05/2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-749675

ABSTRACT

This study evaluated the acute inflammatory response induced by carrageenin in the swim bladder of Nile tilapia supplemented with the mixture of natural extracts of propolis and Aloe barbadensis (1:1) at a concentration of 0.5%, 1% and 2% in diet during 15 days. Thirty-six fish were distributed into four treatments with three replicates: fish supplemented with 0.5% of admix of extracts of propolis and Aloe (1:1) injected with 500 µg carrageenin; fish supplemented with 1% of admix of extracts of propolis and Aloe (1:1) injected with 500 µg carrageenin; fish supplemented with 2% of admix of extracts of propolis and Aloe (1:1), injected with 500 µg carrageenin and unsupplemented fish injected with 500 µg carrageenin. Six hours after injection, samples of blood and exudate from the swim bladder of fish were collected. It was observed an increase in the leukocyte count in the swim bladder exudate of fish supplemented with extracts of propolis and Aloe injected with carrageenin. The most frequent cells were macrophages followed by granular leukocytes, thrombocytes and lymphocytes. Supplementation with propolis and Aloe to 0.5% caused a significant increase in the number of cells on the inflammatory focus mainly macrophages, cells responsible for the phagocytic activity in tissues, agent of innate fish immune response.


Este estudo avaliou a resposta inflamatória aguda induzida por carragenina na bexiga natatóriade tilápia do Nilo suplementada com a mistura dos extratos naturais de própolis e Aloe barbadensis (1:1), nas concentrações de 0,5%, 1% e 2% na dieta durante o período de 15 dias. Trinta e seis peixes foram distribuídos em quatro tratamentos com três repetições: peixes suplementados com 0,5% da mistura dos extratos de própolis e Aloe (1:1) injetados na bexiga natatória com 500 µg de carragenina; peixes suplementados com 1% da mistura dos extratos de própolis e Aloe (1:1) injetados na bexiga natatória com 500 µg de carragenina; peixes suplementados com 2% da mistura dos extratos de própolis e Aloe (1:1) injetados na bexiga natatória com 500 µg de carragenina e peixes não suplementados injetados na bexiga natatória com 500 µg de carragenina. Seis horas após as injeções foram coletadas amostras de sangue e exsudato da bexiga natatória dos peixes. Foi observado aumento na contagem de leucócitos no exsudato da bexiga natatória de peixes suplementados com os extratos de própolis e Aloe injetados com carragenina. As células mais frequentes foram os macrófagos seguidos pelos leucócitos granulares, trombócitos e linfócitos. A suplementação com própolis e Aloe a 0,5% provocou aumento significativo no número de células no foco inflamatório, principalmente dos macrófagos, células responsáveis pela atividade fagocitária nos tecidos, agente da resposta imune inata nos peixes.


Subject(s)
Animals , Aloe/chemistry , Cichlids , Dietary Supplements , Inflammation/prevention & control , Propolis/administration & dosage , Urinary Bladder Diseases/veterinary , Acute Disease , Blood Cell Count , Carrageenan , Cichlids/blood , Inflammation/chemically induced , Plant Extracts/administration & dosage , Urinary Bladder Diseases/chemically induced , Urinary Bladder Diseases/prevention & control
17.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 48(4): 321-331, 4/2015. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-744363

ABSTRACT

It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2•−) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Mice , /drug effects , Hyperalgesia/chemically induced , Inflammation/chemically induced , Nociceptive Pain/chemically induced , Superoxides/pharmacology , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , /therapeutic use , /genetics , Edema/chemically induced , Hindlimb , Hot Temperature , Hyperalgesia/drug therapy , Inflammation/drug therapy , Nociceptive Pain/drug therapy , Pain Measurement/methods , Peroxidase/drug effects , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Skin/drug effects , Time Factors , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-149088

ABSTRACT

Silica nanoparticles (SNPs) are widely used in many scientific and industrial fields despite the lack of proper evaluation of their potential toxicity. This study examined the effects of acute exposure to SNPs, either alone or in conjunction with ovalbumin (OVA), by studying the respiratory systems in exposed mouse models. Three types of SNPs were used: spherical SNPs (S-SNPs), mesoporous SNPs (M-SNPs), and PEGylated SNPs (P-SNPs). In the acute SNP exposure model performed, 6-week-old BALB/c female mice were intranasally inoculated with SNPs for 3 consecutive days. In the OVA/SNPs asthma model, the mice were sensitized two times via the peritoneal route with OVA. Additionally, the mice endured OVA with or without SNP challenges intranasally. Acute SNP exposure induced significant airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness, particularly in the S-SNP group. In OVA/SNPs asthma models, OVA with SNP-treated group showed significant airway inflammation, more than those treated with only OVA and without SNPs. In these models, the P-SNP group induced lower levels of inflammation on airways than both the S-SNP or M-SNP groups. Interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, IL-1beta and interferon-gamma levels correlated with airway inflammation in the tested models, without statistical significance. In the mouse models studied, increased airway inflammation was associated with acute SNPs exposure, whether exposed solely to SNPs or SNPs in conjunction with OVA. P-SNPs appear to be relatively safer for clinical use than S-SNPs and M-SNPs, as determined by lower observed toxicity and airway system inflammation.


Subject(s)
Animals , Asthma/chemically induced , Female , Inflammation/chemically induced , Interferon-gamma/analysis , Interleukins/analysis , Lung/drug effects , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Nanoparticles/adverse effects , Ovalbumin/adverse effects , Polyethylene Glycols/adverse effects , Silicon Dioxide/adverse effects , Surface Properties
20.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 2014 Jul; 52(7): 712-719
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-153751

ABSTRACT

Animal studies using oleic acid (OA) model to produce acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been inconsistent. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to establish an acute model of ARDS in rats using OA and to characterize its effect on cardio-respiratory parameters and lethality. The trachea, jugular vein and femoral artery of anesthetized adult rats were cannulated. A dose of OA (30-90 µL; iv) was injected in each animal and changes in respiratory frequency (RF), heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded. Minute ventilation and PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) ratio were also determined. At the end, lungs were excised for determination of pulmonary water content and histological examination. At all doses of OA, there was immediate decrease followed by increase in RF, however at 75 and 90 µL of OA, RF decreased abruptly and the animals died by 63 ± 8.2 min and 19 ± 6.3 min; respectively. In all the groups, HR and MAP changes followed the respiratory changes. The minute ventilation increased in a dose-dependent manner while the values of P/F ratio decreased correspondingly. Pulmonary edema was induced at all doses. Histological examination of the lung showed alveolar damage, microvascular congestion, microvascular injury, infiltration of inflammatory cells, pulmonary edema and necrosis in a dose-dependent manner. With these results, OA can be used to induce different grades of ARDS in rats and OA doses of 50, 60 and 75 µL resemble mild, moderate and severe forms of ARDS respectively. Hence, OA model serves as a useful tool to study the pathophysiology of ARDS.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena/drug effects , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Heart Rate/drug effects , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/mortality , Inflammation/pathology , Male , Necrosis , Oleic Acid/toxicity , Pulmonary Edema/chemically induced , Pulmonary Edema/mortality , Pulmonary Edema/pathology , Pulmonary Ventilation/drug effects , Rats , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Rate/drug effects , Survival Rate
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