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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880789

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To assess the effect of transnasal humidified rapid-insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE) on gastric insufflation during general anesthesia induction in obese patients.@*METHODS@#Ninety obese patients (BMI 30-39.9 kg/m@*RESULTS@#The incidence of gastric insufflation was significantly higher in Group M and Group M+T than in Group T (@*CONCLUSIONS@#Ultrasound monitoring of the comet tail sign and the changes of CSA-GA in the gastric antrum is feasible and reliable for detecting gastrointestinal airflow, and in obese patients, the application of THRIVE for induction of anesthesia can ensure the oxygenation level without further increasing gastric insufflation.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, General , Humans , Insufflation , Intubation, Intratracheal , Masks , Obesity
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The trans-tracheal rapid insufflation of oxygen (TRIO) device is less commonly used and is an alternative to trans-tracheal jet ventilation for maintaining oxygenation in a “cannot intubate, cannot oxygenate” (CICO) scenario. CASE: We report the successful use of this device to maintain oxygenation after jet ventilator failure in a parturient who presented with the CICO scenario during the procedure for excision of laryngeal papilloma. CONCLUSIONS: A stepwise approach to the airway plan and preparation for an event of failure is essential for good materno-fetal outcomes. The TRIO device may result in inadequate ventilation that can lead to hypercarbia and respiratory acidosis. Hence, it should only be used as a temporizing measure before a definitive airway can be secured.


Subject(s)
Acidosis, Respiratory , Airway Management , Airway Obstruction , Anesthesia, Obstetrical , High-Frequency Jet Ventilation , Insufflation , Oxygen , Papilloma , Ventilation , Ventilators, Mechanical
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759501

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Geriatric patients are susceptible to respiratory and hemodynamic adverse events during endotracheal intubation and extubation due to anatomic and physiological changes with aging. Supraglottic airway devices (SADs) provide reduced airway morbidity and increased hemodynamic stability in adults. However, studies that have compared the clinical performance of SADs in geriatric patients are limited. Therefore, we evaluated the clinical performance of airway management with i-gel® and laryngeal mask airway Supreme (LMA Supreme™) in geriatric patients. METHODS: The subjects were American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification I–III geriatric (65–85 years) patients who underwent elective surgery with general anesthesia and were randomly allocated into the i-gel® group and the LMA Supreme™ group. We compared the time for successful insertion on a first attempt as a primary outcome, and the secondary outcomes were success rate, ease of insertion, maneuver for successful ventilation, oropharyngeal leak pressure, gastric insufflation, fiberoptic view grades, ventilator problems, and adverse events. RESULTS: Insertion time was significantly shorter for the i-gel® than the LMA Supreme™ (21.4 ± 6.8 vs. 29.3 ± 9.9 s; P = 0.011). The i-gel® was also easier to insert than the LMA Supreme™ (P = 0.014). Gastric insufflation was less frequent with the i-gel® than the LMA Supreme™ (0% vs. 31.3%; P = 0.013). Other measurements were comparable between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Both devices can be safely applied to geriatric patients with similar success rates and oropharyngeal leak pressures. However, inserting the i-gel® was faster and easier compared to the LMA Supreme™ in geriatric patients.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aging , Airway Management , Anesthesia, General , Classification , Hemodynamics , Humans , Insufflation , Intubation , Intubation, Intratracheal , Laryngeal Masks , Prospective Studies , Ventilation , Ventilators, Mechanical
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the gold standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), although, associated with poor patient compliance. Conversely, high flow, humidified, temperature-regulated nasal insufflation of oxygen or air is well tolerated.CASE: We describe our experience of three patients with known or suspected moderate to severe OSA who were poorly compliant to CPAP therapy and received high flow nasal insufflation (HFNI) postoperatively. None had significant episodes of desaturation (SpO₂ < 95%) and all patients uniformly reported superior comfort levels than with the CPAP therapy. HFNI generates small amounts of positive end-expiratory pharyngeal pressure, increases inspiratory airflow and decreases dead space ventilation. Due to the open system, less difficulty with the patient-mask interface and improved patient comfort is experienced. These factors help prevent hypopnea and lead to enhanced sleep continuity.CONCLUSIONS: HFNI may be a promising alternative to CPAP therapy in the perioperative setting.


Subject(s)
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Humans , Insufflation , Oxygen , Patient Compliance , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive , Ventilation
6.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 549-555, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785670

ABSTRACT

A recent achalasia guideline suggests that peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a safe option for achalasia that is as effective as Heller myotomy. It is recommended that POEM should be performed under general anesthesia. The incidence of adverse events such as bleeding, perforation, and carbon dioxide insufflation-related complications was lower in POEM under endotracheal general anesthesia than in POEM under sedation. Subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, pneumoperitoneum, and accompanying hemodynamic instability can be caused by carbon dioxide insufflation. Treatment of possible physiological changes and adverse events during the POEM procedure from the point of view of anesthesiologists may give endoscopists a new perspective on improving patient safety. The territory of therapeutic endoscopy can be expanded through cooperation with other departments, including anesthesia services. Efforts to understand different perspectives will certainly help not only secure patient safety but also expand the area of treatment.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesia, General , Carbon Dioxide , Endoscopy , Esophageal Achalasia , Hemodynamics , Hemorrhage , Incidence , Insufflation , Mediastinal Emphysema , Patient Safety , Pneumoperitoneum , Pneumothorax , Subcutaneous Emphysema
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739329

ABSTRACT

Central hypoventilation syndrome is a rare and fatal condition resulting from various central nervous system disorders that is characterized by a failure of automatic breathing. We report a case of central hypoventilation syndrome following posterior circulation stroke whose pulmonary function was improved by respiratory rehabilitation. A 59-year-old woman with a history of hemorrhagic stroke of the bilateral cerebellum was hospitalized due to pneumonia. A portable ventilator was applied via tracheostomy, recurrent episodes of apnea and hypercapnia impeded weaning. A respiratory rehabilitation program including chest wall range of motion exercise, air stacking exercise, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on abdominal muscles, upper extremity ergometer, locomotor training, high-frequency chest wall oscillator, mechanical insufflation, and exsufflation was employed, as spirometry showed a severe restrictive pattern. A spontaneous breathing trial was started, and a portable ventilator was applied for 8 hours, only during nighttime, to prevent sudden apneic event. After 4 weeks of treatment, follow-up spirometry showed much improved respiratory parameters. This case suggests that respiratory rehabilitation can improve pulmonary function parameters and quality of life in central hypoventilation syndrome.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Muscles , Apnea , Central Nervous System Diseases , Cerebellum , Electric Stimulation , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Hypercapnia , Hypoventilation , Insufflation , Middle Aged , Pneumonia , Quality of Life , Range of Motion, Articular , Rehabilitation , Respiration , Respiratory Center , Spirometry , Stroke , Thoracic Wall , Tracheostomy , Upper Extremity , Ventilators, Mechanical , Weaning
8.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 334-343, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-715793

ABSTRACT

Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is a relatively new diagnostic procedure for patients with suspected colonic diseases. This convenient, noninvasive method enables the physician to explore the entire colon without significant discomfort to the patient. However, while CCE can be performed painlessly without bowel air insufflation, the need for vigorous bowel preparation and other technical limitations exist. Due to such limitations, CCE has not replaced conventional colonoscopy. In this review, we discuss historical and recent advances in CCE including technical issues, ideal bowel preparation, indications and contraindications and highlight further technical advancements and clinical studies which are needed to develop CCE as a potential diagnostic tool.


Subject(s)
Capsule Endoscopy , Colon , Colonic Diseases , Colonoscopy , Humans , Insufflation , Methods
10.
Intestinal Research ; : 299-305, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714179

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: This study aimed to compare tolerance to air, carbon dioxide, or water insufflation in patients with anticipated difficult colonoscopy (young, thin, obese individuals, and patients with prior abdominal surgery or irradiation). METHODS: Patients with body mass index (BMI) less than 18 kg/m2 or more than 30 kg/m2, or who had undergone previous abdominal or pelvic surgeries were randomized to air, carbon dioxide, or water insufflation during colonoscopy. The primary endpoint was cecal intubation with mild pain (less than 5 on visual analogue scale [VAS]), without use of sedation. RESULTS: The primary end point was achieved in 32.7%, 43.8%, and 84.9% of cases with air, carbon dioxide and water insufflation (P 30 kg/m2.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Carbon Dioxide , Carbon , Colonoscopy , Humans , Insufflation , Intubation , Water
11.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 125-137, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-715084

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During a laparotomy, the peritoneum is exposed to the cold, dry ambient air of the operating room (20℃, 0%–5% relative humidity). The aim of this review is to determine whether the use of humidified and/or warmed CO2 in the intraperitoneal environment during open or laparoscopic operations influences postoperative outcomes. METHODS: A review was performed in accordance with PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. The PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Embase databases were searched for articles published between 1980 and 2016 (October). Comparative studies on humans or nonhuman animals that involved randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or prospective cohort studies were included. Both laparotomy and laparoscopic studies were included. The primary outcomes identified were peritoneal inflammation, core body temperature, and postoperative pain. RESULTS: The literature search identified 37 articles for analysis, including 30 RCTs, 7 prospective cohort studies, 23 human studies, and 14 animal studies. Four studies found that compared with warmed/humidified CO2, cold, dry CO2 resulted in significant peritoneal injury, with greater lymphocytic infiltration, higher proinflammatory cytokine levels and peritoneal adhesion formation. Seven of 15 human RCTs reported a significantly higher core body temperature in the warmed, humidified CO2 group than in the cold, dry CO2 group. Seven human RCTs found lower postoperative pain with the use of humidified, warmed CO2. CONCLUSION: While evidence supporting the benefits of using humidified and warmed CO2 can be found in the literature, a large human RCT is required to validate these findings.


Subject(s)
Animals , Body Temperature , Carbon Dioxide , Cohort Studies , Humans , Inflammation , Insufflation , Laparotomy , Operating Rooms , Pain, Postoperative , Peritoneum , Pneumoperitoneum , Prospective Studies , Tissue Adhesions
12.
Clin. biomed. res ; 38(2): 167-177, 2018.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-1025629

ABSTRACT

Introdução: A unidade de terapia intensiva, pacientes que apresentam um grave comprometimento pulmonar, com alterações nos valores fisiológicos de complacência pulmonar, acabam desenvolvendo uma limitação relacionada a volumes pulmonares. Um dos problemas resultantes é a hipercapnia. Para ajudar a reduzir essas alterações, pode-se usar técnicas como a insuflação de gás traqueal (TGI), que atua minimizando o estresse pulmonar, melhorando as trocas gasosas e reduzindo o volume minuto ventilatório e a pressão. Assim, o objetivo deste estudo foi analisar e descrever o uso de TGI e a sua eficácia na redução da hipercapnia e nos parâmetros da ventilação mecânica invasiva de pacientes críticos. Métodos: Foi realizada uma revisão sistemática da literatura com busca nas bases de dados do SciELO, LILACS, PubMed e MEDLINE, com publicações de 2005 a 2016. Foram identificados um total de 1.437 artigos. Os critérios de elegibilidade foram a utilização do método de TGI isolado ou combinado a outros recursos e a inclusão de desfechos da sua efetividade em amostras experimentais ou humanas que mostravam lesão pulmonar e/ou outras alterações pulmonares, entre elas a hipercapnia. Resultados: Após a leitura e análise criteriosa dos artigos, 10 estudos foram incluídos nesta revisão. Eles abordavam a eficácia dos métodos de TGI na redução dos níveis de CO2 e as condições para a diminuição dos parâmetros da ventilação mecânica e melhora da mecânica ventilatória. Conclusão: Os estudos incluídos na presente revisão sugerem que a TGI pode ser uma técnica eficaz quando realizada em complicações pulmonares nos pacientes hipercápnicos com lesão pulmonar. Entretanto, são estudos distintos e controversos, o que compromete a análise dos resultados obtidos para total eficácia do recurso terapêutico. (AU)


Introduction: At intensive care units, patients presenting with severe pulmonary involvement, with changes in the physiological values of pulmonary compliance, develop a limitation related to pulmonary volumes, resulting in some cases in hypercapnia. In order to help decreasing these alterations, some techniques may be used such as tracheal gas insufflation (TGI), which acts minimizing pulmonary stress, improving gas exchanges and decreasing respiratory minute volume and pressure. Thus, this study aimed to analyze and to describe TGI use and efficacy in reducing hypercapnia and parameters of invasive mechanical ventilation of critically ill patients. Methods: For this systematic review, we searched SciELO, LILACS, PubMed and MEDLINE databases for articles published from 2005 to 2016. A total of 1,437 articles were found. The eligibility criteria were the use of TGI alone or together with other resources and the evaluation of its effectiveness in experimental or human samples that showed lung injury and/or other pulmonary abnormalities, including hypercapnia. Results: After careful reading and analysis of the articles, 10 studies were included in this review. They addressed the effectiveness of TGI methods in reducing levels of CO2 levels and conditions to decrease parameters of mechanical ventilation and to improve ventilation mechanics. Conclusion: The studies included in the present review suggest that TGI may be an efficient technique when applied to pulmonary complications of patients suffering from hypercapnia with pulmonary lesions. However, the studies are different and controversial, which compromises the analysis of the results obtained for total efficacy of the therapeutic resource. (AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Insufflation/methods , Hypercapnia/therapy , Capnography/statistics & numerical data
13.
Acta cir. bras ; 32(12): 1056-1063, Dec. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-886194

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the technical feasibility and homogeneity of drug distribution of pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy (PIPAC) based on a novel process of intraperitoneal drug application (multidirectional aerosolization). Methods: This was an in vivo experimental study in pigs. A single-port device was manufactured at the smallest diameter possible for multidirectional aerosolization of the chemotherapeutic drug under positive intraperitoneal pressure. Four domestic pigs were used in the study, one control animal that received multidirectional microjets of 9 mL/sec for 30 min and three animals that received multidirectional aerosolization (pig 02: 9 mL/sec for 30 min; pigs 03 and 04: 3 mL/sec for 15 min). Aerosolized silver nitrate solution was applied for anatomopathological evaluation of intraperitoneal drug distribution. Results: Injection time was able to maintain the pneumoperitoneum pressure below 20 mmHg. The rate of moderate silver nitrate staining was 45.4% for pig 01, 36.3% for pig 02, 36.3% for pig 03, and 72.7% for pig 04. Conclusions: Intra-abdominal drug distribution had a broad pattern, especially in animals exposed to the drug for 30 min. Our sample of only four animals was not large enough to demonstrate an association between aerosolization and a higher silver nitrate concentration in the stained abdominal regions.


Subject(s)
Animals , Peritoneal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Aerosols/administration & dosage , Peritoneal Neoplasms/pathology , Peritoneal Neoplasms/secondary , Peritoneum/drug effects , Pressure , Time Factors , Insufflation , Feasibility Studies , Drug Delivery Systems/instrumentation , Aerosols/pharmacokinetics , Abdominal Cavity , Sus scrofa , Disease Models, Animal , Injections, Intraperitoneal
14.
ABCD arq. bras. cir. dig ; 30(3): 177-181, July-Sept. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-885724

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background: In Brazil, an increasing number of people are submitted to colonoscopy, either for screening or for therapeutic purposes. Aim: To evaluate whether there are advantages of using carbon dioxide (CO2) over air for insufflation. Methods: Two hundred and ten of 219 patients were considered eligible for this study and were randomized into two groups according to the gas insufflation used: Air Group (n=104) and CO2 Group (n=97). The study employed a double-blind design. Results: The Air and CO2 Groups were similar in respect to bowel preparation evaluated using the Boston scale, age, gender, previous surgery, maneuvers necessary for the advancement of the device, and presence of polyps, tumors or signs of diverticulitis. However, "waking up with pain" and "pain at discharge" were more prevalent in the Air Group, albeit not statistically significant, with post-exam bloating seen only in the Air Group. The responses to a questionnaire, applied to analyze the late post-exam period, showed more comfort with the use of CO2. Conclusions: The use of CO2 is better than air as it avoids post-examination bloating, thereby providing greater comfort to patients.


RESUMO Racional: No Brasil, estima-se crescente aumento da população submetida à colonoscopia, apesar do desconforto do exame, decorrente sobretudo da insuflação colônica. Objetivo: Verificar se há vantagens do uso de CO2 sobre o ar como elemento de insuflação. Métodos: Um total de 219 participantes foram submetidos à análise de elegibilidade e dele extraíram-se 210 eleitos, que foram randomizados em dois grupos, de acordo com o elemento utilizado: ar, n=104 e CO2, n=97. O ensaio seguiu o modelo duplo-cego. Resultados: Os grupos demonstraram-se similares quando cotejados preparo intestinal avaliado pela Escala de Boston, idade, gênero, operação prévia, manobras necessárias para progressão do aparelho, presença de pólipo, tumor ou sinais de diverticulite, valorizando a comparação entre eles quanto ao elemento de insuflação. Então, observou-se que "acordar com dor" e a presença de dor na ocasião da alta foram bem mais prevalentes no "Grupo Ar", embora sem diferença estatisticamente significante, sendo a distensão pós-exame observada apenas no "Grupo Ar". De acordo com o questionário clínico aplicado para análise do período tardio pós-exame, as respostas apontaram muito mais conforto com o uso do CO2. Os elementos de insuflação não pareceram modificar substancialmente os aspectos técnicos do exame nem provocar índices expressivos de enantema da mucosa. Conclusão: O uso do dióxido de carbono é superior ao ar, pois evita a distensão abdominal pós-exame conferindo maior conforto aos pacientes no período pós-exame.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Young Adult , Carbon Dioxide , Insufflation/methods , Colonoscopy/methods , Air , Double-Blind Method
15.
Neumol. pediátr. (En línea) ; 12(3): 103-113, jul. 2017.
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-999074

ABSTRACT

Non-invasive respiratory care, combining with ventilatory support, initially at night and then during 24 hours/day, even in patients with minimal vital capacity and the implementation of specifics techniques like mechanically assisted coughing, glossopharyngeal breathing and air stacking, have contributed to a better quality of life and survival of patients with neuromuscular diseases. It is essential for health care professionals to know all the therapeutic possibilities for their patients and their families, so as the disease progresses it would facilitate their decision-making. Technological advances and proper training for patients and caregivers facilitate the stay at home and promote their autonomy and integration, without depending on hospital nor permanent nursing care. In November 2016 it was carried out the Noninvasive Ventilatory Support workshop/meeting with more than 200 physicians, physiotherapists, respiratory therapists and nurses in Montevideo, Uruguay. It was conducted by Dr. John Robert Bach, Medical Director of the Center for Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation at Rutgers New Jersey School of Medicine in Newark, New Jersey. Dr Bach is recognized worldwide for his extensive background in studies and publications on noninvasive ventilation and neuromuscular diseases.


Los cuidados respiratorios no invasivos, combinando la asistencia ventilatoria, inicialmente nocturna y luego durante las 24 h del día, incluso en pacientes con capacidad vital mínima, más la implementación de estrategias complementarias de tos asistida, respiración glosofaríngea y apilamiento de aire (air stacking) en forma activa o pasiva han contribuido a una mejor calidad de vida y sobrevida de los pacientes con enfermedades neuromusculares. Resulta esencial que los profesionales de la salud, conozcan todas las opciones terapéuticas al informar a sus pacientes y sus familias, de modo que ellos puedan tomar sus mejores decisiones en la medida que la debilidad e hipoventilación progresen. Los avances tecnológicos, la capacitación de los pacientes y sus cuidadores facilitan su estadía en el hogar sin depender de instituciones o cuidados de enfermería permanentes, promoviendo su autonomía e integración, disminuyendo el riesgo de falla respiratoria conducente a intubación endotraqueal y/o a traqueostomia. Los días 24 y 25 de noviembre del 2016, en Montevideo tuvo lugar un encuentro de capacitación en cuidados respiratorios no invasivos con más de 200 profesionales médicos, kinesiólogos y licenciadas de enfermería, destacando los avances y experiencia consolidad por el Dr. John Bach en más de 30 años de ejercicio profesional en pacientes con síndromes de hipoventilación secundario a enfermedades neuromusculares y otras condiciones que debilitan la bomba respiratoria. Las recomendaciones claves se resumen en este articulo, destacando como estos avances requieren impulsar un cambio de paradigma en la forma en que los profesionales de la salud ven y tratan a estos individuos.


Subject(s)
Humans , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Neuromuscular Diseases/complications , Neuromuscular Diseases/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , Tracheostomy , Insufflation , Cough , Noninvasive Ventilation/methods , Hypoventilation/therapy , Neuromuscular Diseases/physiopathology
16.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(3): 518-524, May.-June 2017. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-840851

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose To determine whether using different intraperitoneal insufflation pressures for transperitoneal laparoscopic urologic surgeries decreases postoperative pain. Materials and Methods 76 patients who underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic upper urinary tract surgery at different insufflation pressures were allocated into the following groups: 10mmHg (group I, n=24), 12mmHg (group II, n=25) and 14mmHg (group III, n=27). These patients were compared according to age, gender, body mass index (BMI), type and duration of surgery, intraoperative bleeding volume, postoperative pain score and length of hospital stay. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used for postoperative pain. Results Demographic characteristics, mean age, gender, BMI and type of surgeries were statistically similar among the groups. The mean operation time was higher in group I than group II and group III but this was not statistically significant (P=0.810). The mean intraoperative bleeding volume was significantly higher in group I compared with group II and group III (P=0.030 and P=0.006). The mean length of postoperative hospital stays was statistically similar among the groups (P=0.849). The mean VAS score at 6h was significantly reduced in group I compared with group III (P=0.011). At 12h, the mean VAS score was significantly reduced in group I compared with group II and group III (P=0.009 and P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the mean VAS scores at 24h among three groups (P=0.920). Conclusion Lower insufflation pressures are associated with lower postoperative pain scores in the early postoperative period.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Pain, Postoperative/prevention & control , Pressure , Urologic Surgical Procedures/instrumentation , Insufflation/methods , Laparoscopy/instrumentation , Pain, Postoperative/etiology , Turkey , Pain Measurement , Prospective Studies , Laparoscopy/adverse effects
17.
Rev. méd. Minas Gerais ; 27: [1-7], jan.-dez. 2017.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-996142

ABSTRACT

INTRODUÇÃO: Uma das funções do balonete do tubo endotraqueal é selar a via aérea, ou seja, ocupar o espaço entre o tubo e a parede da traqueia, impedindo a ocorrência de broncoaspiração e permitindo o funcionamento dos ventiladores. Considera-se adequada a pressão do balonete entre 25 a 30 cmH2O. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o método da palpação digital como técnica para determinar a insuflação adequada do balonete dos tubos traqueais de pacientes submetidos à anestesia geral. MÉTODOS: Foi conduzido um estudo prospectivo no Centro Cirúrgico do Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro. Após a intubação orotraqueal, o balonete foi insuflado com ar ambiente e o volume injetado determinado pela sensibilidade tátil. A insuflação foi realizada pelo residente em anestesiologia ou pelo Staff. Em qualquer momento da cirurgia foi anotada a pressão do balonete através do cufômetro. (AU)


Introduction: One of the functions of the endotracheal tube cuff is to seal the airway, that is, to occlude the space between the tube and the tracheal wall, thus preventing pulmonary aspiration and ensuring ventilator function. Cuff pressure must be maintained within the recommended range of 25-30 cmH2O. Objective: To evaluate digital palpation as a method to determine the appropriate inflation of endotracheal tube cuff of patients undergoing general anesthesia. Methods: A prospective study was performed at the Surgical Center of Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, in Uberaba, Brazil. After orotracheal intubation, the cuff was inflated with air and the injected volume was determined by tactile sensitivity. Inflation was performed by an anesthesiology resident or by anesthesiology staff, and the cuff pressure was measured by a cuff manometer at any time during the surgery. Results: 15.65% of the cases had adequate insufflation pressure, 21.2% had inadequate pressure, and 63.15% had high pressure. Statistical analysis showed that the R1 group had a mean cuff pressure of 61.7 cmH2O; R2 had 62.7; R3 had 55.4; and the Staff group had 55.6. Measurement of the degree of accuracy was appropriate in 27.3% of R1 cases, in 25.5% of R2 cases, in 7.2% of R3 cases, and in 8.9% of Staff cases. Conclusion: 84.34% were not in accordance with the appropriate limits, so digital palpation and professional experience were shown to be inappropriate methods for estimating the inflated pressure. Therefore, it is recommended that cuff pressure be measured by a specific device, the cuff manometer. (AU)


Subject(s)
Female , Intubation, Intratracheal , Trachea , Insufflation , Intubation , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Anesthesiology
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-136415

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is widely performed these days as the standard procedure for the treatment of early gastric cancer. During ESD, insertion and rotation of the scope, air insufflation, incision and hemostasis may provoke pain, which commonly requires either general anesthesia or moderate to deep sedation. Deep sedation precludes the need for general anesthesia, and can help endoscopists speed up the procedure compared to light sedation. But, there are risks of respiratory complication. We report a case of respiratory compromise caused by pneumoperitoneum from unrecognized gastric perforation during ESD under deep sedation.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, General , Deep Sedation , Hemostasis , Insufflation , Pneumoperitoneum , Respiratory Insufficiency , Stomach Neoplasms
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-136414

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is widely performed these days as the standard procedure for the treatment of early gastric cancer. During ESD, insertion and rotation of the scope, air insufflation, incision and hemostasis may provoke pain, which commonly requires either general anesthesia or moderate to deep sedation. Deep sedation precludes the need for general anesthesia, and can help endoscopists speed up the procedure compared to light sedation. But, there are risks of respiratory complication. We report a case of respiratory compromise caused by pneumoperitoneum from unrecognized gastric perforation during ESD under deep sedation.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, General , Deep Sedation , Hemostasis , Insufflation , Pneumoperitoneum , Respiratory Insufficiency , Stomach Neoplasms
20.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 407-409, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-178255

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Carbon Dioxide , Carbon , Insufflation
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