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1.
Chinese Journal of Epidemiology ; (12): 387-391, 2022.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-935400

ABSTRACT

Objective: To estimate the incidence of metabolic syndrome and explore possible risk factors for metabolic syndrome in adults of rural communities in Yuhuan county, Zhejiang province, China. Methods: During June-December, 2018, a follow-up survey was conducted in participants without metabolic syndrome at baseline survey in 2012 to obtain the information collected in questionnaire survey, anthropometric data and laboratory data. The incidence of metabolic syndrome in the participants was estimated, and Logistic regression model was used to explore the risk factors, adjusted risk ratio (aRR) and 95%CI. Results: Among 3 162 participants, 522 new metabolic syndrome cases were identified. The 6-year cumulative incidence rate of metabolic syndrome was 16.5%, and the cumulative incidence rate was higher in women (20.6%) than that in men (12.3%, P<0.001). Those incidence rates were higher in those in jobless, smoking or drinking groups. Being women (aRR=1.96, 95%CI: 1.50-2.58) and family history of hypertension (aRR=1.31, 95%CI: 1.04-1.63) were independent risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: The follow up indicated that the incidence of metabolic syndrome was relatively high in rural adults on islands in Zhejiang, and women or those with family history of hypertension were more likely to have metabolic syndrome.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Incidence , Islands , Male , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Rural Population
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887733

ABSTRACT

Pathogens like bacteria and protozoa, which affect human and animal health worldwide, can be transmitted by vectors like ticks. To investigate the epidemiology and genetic diversity of bacteria and protozoans carried by ticks in Chengmai county of Hainan province, China, 285 adult hard ticks belonging to two species [


Subject(s)
Anaplasmataceae/isolation & purification , Animals , Chaperonin 60/genetics , China , Citrate (si)-Synthase/genetics , Coccidia/isolation & purification , Coxiellaceae/isolation & purification , Insect Vectors/microbiology , Islands , Ixodidae/microbiology , Phylogeny , Piroplasmia/isolation & purification , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 18S/genetics
3.
Rev. Pesqui. (Univ. Fed. Estado Rio J., Online) ; 12: 1011-1016, jan.-dez. 2020.
Article in English, Portuguese | LILACS, BDENF | ID: biblio-1117076

ABSTRACT

Objetivos: Identificar a percepção de usuários ribeirinhos sobre a atenção à saúde ofertada no arquipélago do Combú e Discutir se essa atenção considera as particularidades socioculturais dessa população. Método: Estudo qualitativo, descritivo, realizado com 26 ribeirinhos cadastrados na estratégia saúde da família da Ilha do Combú. As informações foram coletadas em agosto/setembro de 2017, por meio de entrevistas individuais e analisadas por análise de conteúdo temática. Resultados: Mediante a análise organizaram-se duas categorias: A importância da atenção à saúde ofertada em uma Estratégia Saúde da Família Ribeirinha e A cultura no contexto da Atenção à Saúde para os ribeirinhos. Conclusão: Embora a atenção à saúde considere a peculiaridade local, a carência de profissionais e insumos, não estando em consonância com as políticas públicas é fator de associação com baixa qualidade no serviço, voltando-se a uma visão curativista sem um olhar ampliado das possibilidades de oferta de atenção à saúde


Objective: The study's purpose has been to identify the riverine people's perceptions on health care provided in the Island of Combú, as well as to discuss whether this care considers the sociocultural particularities of such population. Methods: It is a descriptive study with a qualitative approach, which was performed with 26 community members registered in the Family Health Strategy from the Island of Combú. Data collection took place from August to September 2017, through individual interviews and analyzed by thematic content analysis. Results: Based on the analysis, the two following categories were organized: The importance of healthcare services provided in a Family Health Strategy of riparian communities and Culture in the context of Health Care for riparian communities. Conclusion: Although the healthcare services do consider the local peculiarity, the lack of professionals and supplies, which are not aligned with public policies, were found to be factors of association with low service quality. So, turning it into a curative standpoint lacking a broad view regarding the possibilities of health care provision


Objetivos: Identificar la percepción de usuarios ribereños sobre la atención a la salud ofrecida en el archipiélago del Combú y Discutir si esa atención considera las particularidades socioculturales de esa población. Metodo: Estudio cualitativo, descriptivo, realizado con 26 ribereños catastrados en la estrategia salud de la familia de la Isla del Combú. Las informaciones fueron recolectadas en agosto / septiembre de 2017, por medio de entrevistas individuales y analizadas por análisis de contenido temático. Resultados: Mediante el análisis se organizaron dos categorías: La importancia de la atención a la salud ofrecida en una Estrategia Salud de la Familia Ribereñas y La cultura en el contexto de la Atención a la Salud para los ribereños. Conclusión: Aunque la atención a la salud considera la peculiaridad local, la carencia de profesionales y insumos, no estando en consonancia con las políticas públicas es factor de asociación con baja calidad en el servicio, volviéndose a una visión curativista sin una visión ampliada de las posibilidades de oferta de atención a la salud


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Risk Groups , Social Vulnerability , National Health Strategies , Delivery of Health Care , Perception , Family Health , Cultural Characteristics , Qualitative Research , Islands
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763798

ABSTRACT

The chinstrap (Pygoscelis antarcticus) and gentoo (P. papua) penguins are distributed throughout Antarctica and the sub-Antarctic islands. In this study, high-quality de novo assemblies of blood transcriptomes from these penguins were generated using the Illumina MiSeq platform. A total of 22.2 and 21.8 raw reads were obtained from chinstrap and gentoo penguins, respectively. These reads were assembled using the Oases assembly platform and resulted in 26,036 and 21,854 contigs with N50 values of 929 and 933 base pairs, respectively. Functional gene annotations through pathway analyses of the Gene Ontology, EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases were performed for each blood transcriptome, resulting in a similar compositional order between the two transcriptomes. Ortholog comparisons with previously published transcriptomes from the Adélie (P. adeliae) and emperor (Aptenodytes forsteri) penguins revealed that a high proportion of the four penguins’ transcriptomes had significant sequence homology. Because blood and tissues of penguins have been used to monitor pollution in Antarctica, immune parameters in blood could be important indicators for understanding the health status of penguins and other Antarctic animals. In the blood transcriptomes, KEGG analyses detected many essential genes involved in the major innate immunity pathways, which are key metabolic pathways for maintaining homeostasis against exogenous infections or toxins. Blood transcriptome studies such as this may be useful for checking the immune and health status of penguins without sacrifice.


Subject(s)
Animals , Base Pairing , Gene Ontology , Genes, Essential , Genome , Homeostasis , Immunity, Innate , Islands , Metabolic Networks and Pathways , Molecular Sequence Annotation , Sequence Homology , Spheniscidae , Transcriptome
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762755

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Skin defects of head and neck need reconstruction using various local flaps. In some cases, surgeons should consider skin graft for large skin defect. It is important to heal skin graft and donor sites. The authors investigated wound healing mechanisms at the donor sites with split-thick-ness skin graft (STSG). In this study, the authors compared two types of immediate regraft including sheets and islands for the donor site after facial skin graft using remnant skin. METHODS: The author reviewed 10 patients who underwent STSG, from March 2015 to May 2017, for skin defects in the craniofacial area. The donor site was immediately covered with the two types using remnant skin after harvesting skin onto the recipient site. Depending on the size of the remnant skin, we conducted regraft with the single sheet (n= 5) and island types (n= 5). RESULTS: On postoperative day 1 and 3 months, the scar formation was evaluated using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) and Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). Total POSAS and VSS scores for the island type were lower than in single sheet group after 3 months postoperatively. There was significant difference in specific categories of POSAS and VSS. CONCLUSION: This study showed a reduction in scar formation following immediate regrafting of the remnant skin at the donor site after STSG surgery. Particularly, the island type is useful for clinical application to facilitate healing of donor sites with STSG.


Subject(s)
Cicatrix , Head , Humans , Islands , Neck , Skin Neoplasms , Skin Transplantation , Skin , Surgeons , Tissue Donors , Transplants , Wound Healing
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762291

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We evaluated the relationship of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and desmoplastic reactions with cancer invasiveness and long-term outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: Histologic evaluation of mature CAFs and desmoplasia was performed by observing the collagen fiber structure and fibroblast cytomorphology in the intratumoral stroma and invasive front of CRC tissues. Cancer-cell invasiveness was evaluated using lymphatic invasion, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, tumor budding, and tumor growth patterns. Overall survival and systemic recurrence were analyzed. A network analysis was performed between CAF maturation, desmoplastic reaction, and cancer invasiveness. RESULTS: The proportions of mature CAFs in the intratumoral stroma and the invasive front were 57.6% and 60.3%, respectively. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression was significantly higher in the mature CAFs in the invasive front as compared to immature CAFs. Lymphatic invasion increased as the number of mature fibroblasts in the intratumoral stroma increased. Tumor budding was observed in almost half of both mature and immature stroma samples and occurred more frequently in infiltrating tumors. On network analysis, well-connected islands were identified that was associated with EGFR overexpression, CAF maturation, and infiltrating tumor growth patterns leading to tumor budding. CONCLUSION: The maturity of CAFs and desmoplastic reactions were associated with cancer invasion. However, the cytomorphologic characteristics of CAFs were insufficient as an independent prognostic factor for patients with CRC.


Subject(s)
Collagen , Colorectal Neoplasms , Fibroblasts , Humans , Islands , ErbB Receptors , Recurrence , Wound Healing
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761765

ABSTRACT

Indonesia and South Korea have become inseparable in various respects since the 2 countries established diplomatic relation in 1973. Indonesia is a tropical region that stretches across the equator, comprised of 5 main islands (Java, Kalimantan, Sumatra, Sulawesi, and Papua) and 4 archipelagoes (Riau, Bangka Belitung, Nusa Tenggara, and Maluku). As most population of Eastern Indonesia (Sulawesi, Papua and Nusa Tenggara & Maluku) live in poor areas, it is expected that there will be many parasites. Nevertheless, little is known about the status of parasites in Indonesia. This study examines the prevalences of malaria and lymphatic filaria, which are prevalent in Indonesia, as well as those of soil-transmitted-helminths (STH). As a result, the Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax case loads are almost equal. The current prevalence of P. vivax is uniformly low (<5%) in all age groups and annual parasite incidence (API) showed decreasing tendency as 0.84 per 1,000 population in 2016. However, more than 65 million people still live in malaria epidemic regions. Lymphatic filariasis remains an important public health problem and 236 cities were classified as endemic areas in 514 cities/districts in 2017. It is difficult to ascertain the current prevalence rate of STH in Indonesia, although West Sumba and Southwest Sumba in East Nusa Tenggara reported prevalence rate of more than 20%. The study also considers the (sero) prevalences of other parasites identified in Indonesia. This report should be useful not only to parasitologists but also to travelers and people with business in Indonesia.


Subject(s)
Commerce , Diplomacy , Elephantiasis, Filarial , Humans , Incidence , Indonesia , Islands , Korea , Malaria , Parasites , Plasmodium falciparum , Prevalence , Public Health
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786630

ABSTRACT

Gymnophalloides seoi (Digenea: Gymnophallidae) is a human intestinal trematode contracted by eating raw oysters (Crassostrea gigas) in the Republic of Korea (=Korea). It has been known to be highly endemic in Aphae Island, Shinan-gun, Jeollanam-do (Province). However, recent epidemiological status of G. seoi has not been reported since the 1990s. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of G. seoi metacercariae in natural and cultured oysters collected from 3 islands and 2 coastal areas in western parts of Korea. The oysters were examined using the artificial digestion method followed by stereomicroscopy. The overall positive rate of G. seoi metacercariae in natural oysters was 66.0% (99/150), and the oysters collected from Yubu Island showed the highest infection rate (74.0%). However, the metacercarial density per oyster was relatively low (1.5–2.4 per oyster). By contrast, no metacercaria was found in cultured oysters purchased from 2 coastal areas in Chungcheongnam-do. Thus, we could confirm that natural oysters produced from 3 western coastal islands are infected with G. seoi metacercariae, whereas cultured oysters purchased from 2 coastal areas were free from infection.


Subject(s)
Digestion , Eating , Humans , Islands , Korea , Metacercariae , Methods , Ostreidae , Prevalence , Republic of Korea
9.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 49(4): 695-702, Oct.-Dec. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974298

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Antarctica harbors a great diversity of microorganisms, including bacteria, archaea, microalgae and yeasts. The Pseudomonas genus is one of the most diverse and successful bacterial groups described to date, but only eight species isolated from Antarctica have been characterized. Here, we present three potentially novel species isolated on King George Island. The most abundant isolates from four different environments, were genotypically and phenotypically characterized. Multilocus sequence analysis and 16S rRNA gene analysis of a sequence concatenate for six genes (16S, aroE, glnS, gyrB, ileS and rpoD), determined one of the isolates to be a new Pseudomonas mandelii strain, while the other three are good candidates for new Pseudomonas species. Additionally, genotype analyses showed the three candidates to be part of a new subgroup within the Pseudomonas fluorescens complex, together with the Antarctic species Pseudomonas antarctica and Pseudomonas extremaustralis. We propose terming this new subgroup P. antarctica. Likewise, phenotypic analyses using API 20 NE and BIOLOG® corroborated the genotyping results, confirming that all presented isolates form part of the P. fluorescens complex. Pseudomonas genus research on the Antarctic continent is in its infancy. To understand these microorganisms' role in this extreme environment, the characterization and description of new species is vital.


Subject(s)
Phylogeny , Pseudomonas/isolation & purification , Pseudomonas/classification , Phenotype , Pseudomonas/genetics , Soil Microbiology , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Multilocus Sequence Typing , Islands , Genotype , Antarctic Regions
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714427

ABSTRACT

Escherichia coli can harbor genomic pks islands that code for a polyketide-peptide genotoxin known as colibactin. E. coli strains carrying pks islands trigger genetic instability. pks islands have been significantly associated with bacteremia. We investigated the molecular epidemiology of bacteremic E. coli isolates and the prevalence of bacteremia-causing E. coli carrying pks islands. A total of 146 E. coli isolates were collected at a tertiary-care hospital from January 2015 to December 2016. The phylogenetic groups were determined by multiplex PCR. All isolates were screened by PCR for sequence type 131 (ST131)-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mdh and gyrB. For detection of pks islands, we performed PCR for the clbB and clbN genes as colibactin system markers. Phylogenetic group B2 was the most common, accounting for 54.1% (N=79) of the isolates, followed by group D with 29.5% (N=43), group A with 11.6% (N=17), and group B1 with 4.8%. Of the group B2 isolates, 40.5% were ST131 strains and 32.9% carried pks islands. Only three ST131 isolates in group B2 carried the clbB and clbN genes, while the other 23 ST131 isolates did not. The pks gene might not be associated with ST131 strains.


Subject(s)
Bacteremia , Escherichia coli , Escherichia , Humans , Islands , Molecular Epidemiology , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Prevalence
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-758800

ABSTRACT

Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an acute, febrile zoonotic disease that is caused by the RVF virus (RVFV). RVF is mainly prevalent on the Arabian Peninsula, the African continent, and several islands in the Indian Ocean near southeast Africa. RVFV has been classified by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) as a category A pathogen. To avoid biological safety concerns associated with use of the pathogen in RVFV neutralization assays, the present study investigated and established an RVFV pseudovirus-based neutralization assay. This study used the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) lentiviral packaging system and RVFV structural proteins to successfully construct RVFV pseudoviruses. Electron microscopy observation and western blotting indicated that the size, structure, and shape of the packaged pseudoviruses were notably similar to those of HIV lentiviral vectors. Infection inhibition assay results showed that an antibody against RVFV inhibited the infective ability of the RVFV pseudoviruses, and an antibody neutralization assay for RVFV detection was then established. This study has successfully established a neutralization assay based on RVFV pseudoviruses and demonstrated that this method can be used to effectively evaluate antibody neutralization.


Subject(s)
Africa , Animals , Blotting, Western , HIV , Indian Ocean , Islands , Methods , Microscopy, Electron , Product Packaging , Rift Valley fever virus , Rift Valley Fever , Zoonoses
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719215

ABSTRACT

Malignant pilomatricoma (pilomatrical carcinoma) is a rare, locally occurring malignant tumor with a high rate of recurrence in the case of incomplete excision. This tumor has two characteristics. First, recurrences of pilomatrical carcinoma are common; second, distant metastasis is rare, but if it occurs, it is very fatal. It has characteristic features of high mitotic counts, cellular atypia, and local invasion. Although fine needle aspiration and excisional biopsy could help to confirm this tumor diagnosis, pathologic findings are critical. Pilomatricomas have some characteristic features in histological aspect, such as epithelial islands of basaloid cells and shadow cells or ghost cell. Also, various types of immunohistochemical staining are used to confirm the diagnosis. Despite the lack of clear surgical criteria, treatment is a wide local excision with histologically clear resection margins with or without adjuvant radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Biopsy , Biopsy, Fine-Needle , Cheek , Diagnosis , Facial Neoplasms , Humans , Infant , Islands , Neoplasm Metastasis , Pilomatrixoma , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant , Recurrence
13.
Biol. Res ; 51: 29, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-983934

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With 29 Km2, the Fildes Peninsula is the largest ice free area in King George Island and probably in Antarctica. The region is house of six permanent bases including the only airport in the South Shetlands, which led to impacts on its original landscape and vegetation. In recognition for the need to protect natural values, an Antarctic Specially Protected Area (ASPA 125) was established in the region. Focused mostly on protecting the fossils, the ASPA also plays a role in protecting the vegetation but so far, the management plan for the area does not contain a list of moss species present there. RESULTS: We provided an updated study and checklist of mosses present in ASPA 125. A key to species identification and photographs of main morphological features are also available in this paper. Also, six new occurrences are reported for Fildes Peninsula. CONCLUSION: Considering the scarce knowledge about specific local floras in Antarctica associated with highly impacted area, of which only a fraction is protected, it is suggested the necessity to invest in detailed sampling studies, as well as in a better understanding of the local floras interactions in Antarctica.


Subject(s)
Environmental Monitoring/methods , Bryophyta/classification , Fossils , Bryophyta/anatomy & histology , Islands , Antarctic Regions
14.
Biol. Res ; 51: 55, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1011399

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Antarctic continent is a source of extreme microorganisms. Millions of years of isolation have produced unique biodiversity with adaptive responses to its extreme environment. Although the Antarctic climate is mainly cold, the presence of several geothermal sites, including thermal springs, fumaroles, hot soils and hydrothermal vents, provides ideal environments for the development of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms. Their enzymes, called thermoenzymes, are the focus of interest in both academic and industrial research, mainly due to their high thermal activity and stability. Glutamate dehydrogenase, is an enzyme that plays a key role in the metabolism of carbon and nitrogen catalyzing reversibly the oxidative deamination of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonium. It belongs to the family of oxidoreductases, is widely distributed and it has been highly regarded for use as biosensors, particularly for their specificity and ability to operate in photochemical and electrochemical systems. However, the use of enzymes as biosensors is relatively problematic due to their instability to high temperatures, organic solvents and denaturing agents. The purpose of this study is to present the partial characterization of a thermophilic microorganism isolated from Deception Island, Antarctica, that displays glutamate dehydrogenase activity. RESULTS: In this work, we report the isolation of a thermophilic microorganism called PID15 from samples of Deception Island collected during the Antarctic Scientific Expedition ECA 46. This microorganism is a thermophile that grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 8.0. Scanning electron microscopy shows rod cells of 2.0 to 8.0 µm of length. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene revealed that this microorganism is closely related to Bacillus gelatini. This microorganism contains a thermostable glutamate dehydrogenase with optimal activity at pH 8.0 and temperatures for its activity from 37 to 50 °C, range of temperature of interest for biotechnological applications. This glutamate dehydrogenase is a highly thermostable enzyme. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of a microorganism from Antarctica containing a thermostable glutamate dehydrogenase that maintains its activity in a broad range of temperatures making it of potential interest for biotechnological applications.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bacteria/enzymology , Extremophiles/enzymology , Glutamate Dehydrogenase/analysis , Phylogeny , Time Factors , Bacteria/growth & development , Bacteria/genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Microscopy, Electron, Transmission , Islands , Extremophiles/growth & development , Extremophiles/genetics , Antarctic Regions
15.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(4): 747-753, Oct.-Dec. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889165

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT The red-tailed Amazon parrot (Amazona brasiliensis) is a threatened species of psittacine bird that inhabit coastal regions of Brazil. In view of the threat of this species, the aim of this study was to perform a health evaluation in wild nestlings in Rasa Island, determining the prevalence of enterobacteria and infectious agents according to type of nest. Blood samples were collected from 64 birds and evaluated for antibodies of Chlamydia psittaci by commercial dot-blot ELISA. Cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs samples were collected from 23 birds from artificial wooden nests, 15 birds from PVC nests and 2 birds from natural nests for microbiological analysis. Swab samples were collected from 58 parrots for C. psittaci detection by PCR and from 50 nestlings for Avian Influenza, Newcastle Disease and West Nile viruses' detection analysis by real-time RT-PCR. Ten bacterial genera and 17 species were identified, and the most prevalent were Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca. There was no influence of the type of nest in the nestlings' microbiota. All samples tested by ELISA and PCR were negative. There is currently insufficient information available about the health of A. brasiliensis and data of this study provide a reference point for future evaluations and aid in conservation plans.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/veterinary , Viruses/isolation & purification , Bird Diseases/microbiology , Bird Diseases/virology , Virus Diseases/veterinary , Amazona/microbiology , Amazona/virology , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Brazil , Virus Diseases/virology , Endangered Species , Islands , Animals, Wild/microbiology , Animals, Wild/virology
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-49034

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Because the true prevalence of food allergy (FA), as based on the results of an oral food challenge test (OFC), is unknown, it is likely that children with suspected FA unnecessarily eliminate potentially causative foods. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of FA and to determine the proportion of children who unnecessarily eliminate food. METHODS: To identify children with FA, a primary survey was conducted via a questionnaire with all children aged 0-18 years in Niijima village (remote islands of Japan). In the secondary survey, a detailed medical interview was conducted by doctors with children who currently did not eat some foods. The third survey involved serum food-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) tests and an OFC for children with suspected FA. RESULTS: Of 376 enrolled children, 374 (99.5%) completed the questionnaire. Some foods were eliminated by 18.6% and 13.0% of all children and those ≥6 years old, respectively. The target population for the secondary survey included 69 children who all completed the medical interview. The target population for the third survey consisted of 35 children, of whom 26 (74.3%) underwent the blood test. An OFC was performed 35 times with 20 children. As a result, the prevalence of FA was 4.9% in children of all ages and 4.7% in those ≥6 years old. Moreover, 55.0% children were able to cease eliminating food intake. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible that a considerable number of children unnecessarily eliminate food because of suspected FA.


Subject(s)
Child , Eating , Epidemiology , Food Hypersensitivity , Health Services Needs and Demand , Hematologic Tests , Humans , Immunoglobulin E , Immunoglobulins , Islands , Prevalence
18.
Mycobiology ; : 150-159, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-729300

ABSTRACT

This study analyzed the distribution of endophytic fungi in 3 coastal environments with different climatic, geographical, and geological characteristics: the volcanic islands of Dokdo, the East Sea, and the West Sea of Korea. The isolated fungal endophytes were characterized and analyzed with respect to the characteristics of their host environments. For this purpose, we selected common native coastal halophyte communities from three regions. Molecular identification of the fungal endophytes showed clear differences among the sampling sites and halophyte host species. Isolates were also characterized by growth at specific salinities or pH gradients, with reference to previous geographical, geological, and climate studies. Unlike the East Sea or West Sea isolates, some Dokdo Islands isolates showed endurable traits with growth in high salinity, and many showed growth under extremely alkaline conditions. A smaller proportion of West Sea coast isolates tolerate compared to the East Sea or Dokdo Islands isolates. These results suggest that these unique fungal biota developed through a close interaction between the host halophyte and their environment, even within the same halophyte species. Therefore, this study proposes the application of specific fungal resources for restoring sand dunes and salt-damaged agricultural lands and industrialization of halophytic plants.


Subject(s)
Biota , Climate , Endophytes , Fungi , Islands , Korea , Proton-Motive Force , Salinity , Salt-Tolerant Plants
19.
Korean Journal of Medicine ; : 262-265, 2016.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-36015

ABSTRACT

Chikungunya infection is caused by an arbovirus transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. A 19-year-old man who had traveled to the Republic of Surinam to perform volunteer work complained of a fever, arthralgia, articular stiffness, and a skin rash on both the arm and trunk. Chikungunya fever was diagnosed using a Chikungunya virus specific IgM antibody in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using blood samples obtained during follow-up visits. In this report, we describe a case of imported Chikungunya fever that presented with arthralgia and a skin rash, with islands of normal skin, that occurred following travel to Surinam, South America.


Subject(s)
Aedes , Arboviruses , Arm , Arthralgia , Chikungunya virus , Culicidae , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Exanthema , Fever , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunoglobulin M , Islands , Skin , South America , Suriname , Volunteers , Young Adult
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-57424

ABSTRACT

The 65th Medical Brigade and Public Health Command District-Korea, in collaboration with the Migratory Bird Research Center, National Park Research Institute, conducted migratory bird tick surveillance at Sogugul and Gaerin Islands (small rocky bird nesting sites), Jeollanam-do (Province), Republic of Korea (ROK), on 30 July and 1 August 2009. Breeding seabirds captured by hands in their nesting burrows were banded, identified to species, and carefully examined for ticks during the nesting season. A total of 9 Ornithodoros sawaii larvae were removed from 4 adult Hydrobates monorhis (Swinhoe's storm petrel). The identification of the larvae of O. sawaii collected from migratory seabirds were molecularly confirmed using mitochondrial 16S rDNA primer sets.


Subject(s)
Academies and Institutes , Adult , Argasidae , Birds , Breeding , Cooperative Behavior , DNA, Ribosomal , Hand , Humans , Islands , Larva , Ornithodoros , Public Health , Republic of Korea , Seasons , Ticks
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