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1.
An. bras. dermatol ; 94(1): 52-55, Jan.-Feb. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-983741

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Background: Pityriasis rosea is a common papulosquamous disorder. However, its etiology and pathogenesis remain unclear. Objective: We investigate the types of inflammatory cells infiltrating the lesional skin of pityriasis rosea and demonstrate whether T-cell-mediated immunity is involved in the pathogenesis of this condition or not. Methods: The biopsies were taken from the lesional skin of 35 cases of patients diagnosed with pityriasis rosea. The specimens were prepared in paraffin sections, then submitted to routine immunohistochemistry procedures using monoclonal antibodies directed against CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20 and CD45RO and horseradish peroxidase-labeled goat anti-human antibodies. The positive sections were determined by the ratio and staining intensity of positive inflammatory cells. Results: The mean score of positive CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD45RO staining was respectively 3.74±3.88, 5.67±4.40, 2.94±3.42 and 7.68±4.33 in these pityriasis rosea patients (P<0.001). The percentage of positive staining was 54.29% (19/35), 69.7% (23/33), 40% (14/35) and 79.41% (27/34) (P<0.05). However, the staining of CD20 was negative in all samples. The mean score of CD3 staining in patients with time for remission ≤60 days (4.90±4.21) was higher than that in patients with time for remission >60 days (2.00±2.5) (P<0.05), whereas no statistical difference in the mean score of CD4, CD8 and CD45RO staining was observed. study liMitations: The sample size and the selected monoclonal antibody are limited, so the results reflect only part of the cellular immunity in the pathogenesis of pityriasis rosea. Conclusion: Our findings support a predominantly T-cell mediated immunity in the development of pityriasis rosea.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Young Adult , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/pathology , Pityriasis Rosea/pathology , Reference Values , Staining and Labeling , Time Factors , Biopsy , Immunohistochemistry , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Pityriasis Rosea/immunology , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , CD3 Complex/analysis , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , Immunity, Cellular
2.
Indian J Pathol Microbiol ; 2011 Jul-Sept 54(3): 599-602
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-142055

ABSTRACT

Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a distinct type of CD30+ T/null-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that frequently involves nodal and extranodal sites. The presence of leukemic phase in ALCL is extremely rare and occurs exclusively with ALK1-positive ALCL. We describe two patients with ALK1-positive ALCL who developed a leukemic phase with rapid progression of the disease. Immunophenotypic pattern assessed on peripheral blood by flow cytometry revealed CD45, CD30, and CD25 positivity in both cases but NPM-ALK1 was expressed in only one case. Both patients developed leukemic phase as a terminal event of the disease and we share the immunophenotypic features of both cases.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Ki-1 Antigen/analysis , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , Child , Disease Progression , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit/analysis , Leukemia, Lymphoid/pathology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/chemistry , Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic/complications , Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic/diagnosis , Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic/pathology , Male , Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-131144

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the recent introduction of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies against cluster of differentiation (CD) 45 for the treatment of lymphoma, the clinical significance of the CD45 antigen has been increasing steadily. Here, we analyzed CD45 expression on lymphocyte subsets using flow cytometry in order to predict the susceptibility of normal lymphocytes to RIT. METHODS: Peripheral blood specimens were collected from 14 healthy individuals aged 25-54 yr. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the cell surface antigens was measured using a FACSCanto II system (Becton Dickinson Bioscience, USA). MFI values were converted into antibody binding capacity values using a Quantum Simply Cellular microbead kit (Bangs Laboratories, Inc., USA). RESULTS: Among the lymphocyte subsets, the expression of CD45 was the highest (725,368+/-42,763) on natural killer T (NKT) cells, 674,030+/-48,187 on cytotoxic/suppressor T cells, 588,750+/-48,090 on natural killer (NK) cells, 580,211+/-29,168 on helper T (Th) cells, and 499,436+/-21,737 on B cells. The Th cells and NK cells expressed a similar level of CD45 (P=0.502). Forward scatter was the highest in NKT cells (P<0.05), whereas side scatter differed significantly between each of the lymphocyte subsets (P<0.05). CD3 expression was highest in the Th and NKT cells. CONCLUSIONS: NKT cells express the highest levels of CD45 antigen. Therefore, this lymphocyte subset would be most profoundly affected by RIT or pretargeted RIT. The monitoring of this lymphocyte subset during and after RIT should prove helpful.


Subject(s)
Adult , Antibodies/immunology , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Female , Flow Cytometry/methods , Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate/chemistry , Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphoma/radiotherapy , Male , Middle Aged , Natural Killer T-Cells/immunology , Protein Binding , Radioimmunotherapy , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-131141

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the recent introduction of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies against cluster of differentiation (CD) 45 for the treatment of lymphoma, the clinical significance of the CD45 antigen has been increasing steadily. Here, we analyzed CD45 expression on lymphocyte subsets using flow cytometry in order to predict the susceptibility of normal lymphocytes to RIT. METHODS: Peripheral blood specimens were collected from 14 healthy individuals aged 25-54 yr. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the cell surface antigens was measured using a FACSCanto II system (Becton Dickinson Bioscience, USA). MFI values were converted into antibody binding capacity values using a Quantum Simply Cellular microbead kit (Bangs Laboratories, Inc., USA). RESULTS: Among the lymphocyte subsets, the expression of CD45 was the highest (725,368+/-42,763) on natural killer T (NKT) cells, 674,030+/-48,187 on cytotoxic/suppressor T cells, 588,750+/-48,090 on natural killer (NK) cells, 580,211+/-29,168 on helper T (Th) cells, and 499,436+/-21,737 on B cells. The Th cells and NK cells expressed a similar level of CD45 (P=0.502). Forward scatter was the highest in NKT cells (P<0.05), whereas side scatter differed significantly between each of the lymphocyte subsets (P<0.05). CD3 expression was highest in the Th and NKT cells. CONCLUSIONS: NKT cells express the highest levels of CD45 antigen. Therefore, this lymphocyte subset would be most profoundly affected by RIT or pretargeted RIT. The monitoring of this lymphocyte subset during and after RIT should prove helpful.


Subject(s)
Adult , Antibodies/immunology , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Female , Flow Cytometry/methods , Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate/chemistry , Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphoma/radiotherapy , Male , Middle Aged , Natural Killer T-Cells/immunology , Protein Binding , Radioimmunotherapy , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology
5.
Indian J Pathol Microbiol ; 2009 Jan-Mar; 52(1): 6-9
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-73092

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is now well established that Hodgkin cells are clonal B cells with a CD30 and CD15 phenotype. However, on immunohistochemistry, in our experience and the experience of others, CD20 positivity in an otherwise typical classical Hodgkin's Lymphoma is not uncommon and if associated with CD15 negativity poses a potential diagnostic trap and is likely to be called B-NHL. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of B-cell related antigens CD20 and CD79a in classical Hodgkin's Lymphoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 91 consecutive cases of classical Hodgkin's Lymphoma were analyzed for co-expression of CD20 and CD79a. Both males and females of all ages were included in this study. All cases of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's Lymphoma were excluded. All the cases were stained with a panel of antibodies including LCA, CD20, CD79a, CD30, CD15, CD3, EMA and Alk. Protein. RESULTS: All 91 cases of classical Hodgkin's Lymphoma showed negativity for LCA and positivity for CD30. Eighteen cases (19.8%) showed distinct membrane staining with CD20 in most of the large atypical cells. However, out of these, only 7 cases (7.7%) showed CD79a co-expression, which was largely focal. CD15 negativity with CD20 positivity was seen in 7 (7.7%) cases of otherwise typical classical Hodgkin's Lymphoma. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: CD20 expression is frequent in classical Hodgkin's Lymphoma and our results are in consensus with reported literature on this subject. In these cases, LCA negativity of large cells was extremely useful in clinching the right diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Lewis X Antigen/analysis , Antigens, CD20/analysis , Ki-1 Antigen/analysis , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , CD79 Antigens/analysis , B-Lymphocytes/chemistry , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Hodgkin Disease/pathology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
6.
Indian J Pathol Microbiol ; 2008 Jan-Mar; 51(1): 121-4
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-73167

ABSTRACT

We have had a recent spurt in cases of AIDS-related lymphoma (ARL) at our centre. Most of these cases are aggressive mature B cell lymphomas, mainly plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Most of the PBL are extranodal in location and are mucosa-based. We reviewed the morphological features of 34 cases of PBL. Diagnosis was based on morphology, immunohistochemistry, proliferation index, HIV positive status and its preference to extranodal sites (mostly mucosa based). We classified PBL into three morphological subtypes (immunoblastic - 25, Burkitt's - 7, plasmacytic - 2). Tumor cells expressed as leucocyte common antigen (LCA) in 60%, CD138 in 100%, EMA in 45% and light chain restriction in 86% cases. CD20 was negative in all cases. Pathologists need to be aware of PBL and its various morphological subtypes as the identification of this entity from its close differentials carries major therapeutic implications.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antigens, CD20/analysis , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , Burkitt Lymphoma/pathology , Child , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin Light Chains/analysis , Leukemia, Plasma Cell/pathology , Lymphoma, AIDS-Related/pathology , Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Immunoblastic/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Syndecan-1/analysis
7.
Indian J Pathol Microbiol ; 2007 Oct; 50(4): 917-9
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-73593

ABSTRACT

Non-hematopoietic malignancies infiltrating bone marrow have always been a source of erroneous diagnosis. Among these, the small round cell tumors like neuroblastomas and rhabdomyosarcomas mimick the hematopoietic blasts. Several case reports of rhabdomyosarcoma mimicking acute leukemia, clinically and morphologically at presentation have been reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge such an entity has not been reported in Indian literature. We report here one such case of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma masquerading as acute leukemia. A thorough clinical examination with high degree of suspicion on bone marrow morphology and judicious use of appropriate immunohistochemistry markers will solve many of these cases.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Ki-1 Antigen/analysis , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , Bone Marrow/pathology , Desmin/analysis , Diagnosis, Differential , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Male , MyoD Protein/analysis , Myogenin/analysis , Peroxidase/analysis , Phosphopyruvate Hydratase/analysis , Rhabdomyosarcoma, Alveolar/chemistry , Biomarkers, Tumor/analysis
8.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 517-525, 2007.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-71486

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Local activation of the complement system plays a role in target organ damage. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of cyclosporine (CsA)- induced renal injury on the complement system in the kidney. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice fed a low salt (0.01%) diet were treated with vehicle (VH, olive oil, 1mL/kg/day) or CsA (30mg/kg/day) for one or four weeks. Induction of chronic CsA nephrotoxicity was evaluated with renal function and histomorphology. Activation of the complement system was assessed through analysis of the expression of C3, C4d, and membrane attack complex (MAC), and the regulatory proteins, CD46 and CD55. CsA treatment induced renal dysfunction and typical morphology (tubulointerstitial inflammation and fibrosis) at four weeks. RESULTS: CsA-induced renal injury was associated with increased the expression of C3, C4d, and MAC (C9 and upregulation of complement regulatory proteins (CD 46 and CD55). Immunohistochemistry revealed that the activated complement components were mainly confined to the injured tubulointerstitium. CONCLUSION: CsA-induced renal injury is associated with activation of the intrarenal complement system.


Subject(s)
Animals , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , Membrane Cofactor Protein/analysis , CD55 Antigens/analysis , Complement C3/analysis , Complement C4b/analysis , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/analysis , Complement System Proteins/analysis , Cyclosporine/toxicity , Disease Models, Animal , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunoblotting , Immunohistochemistry , Immunosuppressive Agents/toxicity , Kidney/drug effects , Kidney Diseases/chemically induced , Mice , Microscopy, Confocal , Peptide Fragments/analysis
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-7856

ABSTRACT

The differential diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from other small round blue cell tumors in children is very important for proper treatment, but sometimes difficult. CD45 is expressed on almost all-human leukocytes and not expressed on other small round blue cell tumors. Moreover, CD19 is expressed on all stages of B lineage cells and loss of this antigen is very rare in precursor B-cell ALL. We report a case of ALL with atypical morphology and immunophenotype. A 6-yr-old girl presented with fever and weight loss. Many abnormal cells with variable sized, high nuclearcytoplasmic ratio and distinct nucleoli were counted 23% in bone marrow. The results of immunophenotyping were negative for CD45, CD19, CD10, CD20, CD3, CD5, CD7, CD56/16, CD13, and CD33 and positive for CD22, TdT, and CD34. The immunohistochemical staining of bone marrow biopsies was positive for CD79a, CD10, TdT and CD99. The cytogenetic study showed normal karyotype but amplification of MLL (myeloid/lymphoid or mixed lineage leukemia) gene was suggestive in the fluorescent in situ hybridization. The patient received the standard chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and reached complete remission.


Subject(s)
Acute Disease , Antigens, CD19/analysis , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , Bone Marrow/pathology , Child , Female , Humans , In Situ Hybridization , Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/diagnosis
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-211996

ABSTRACT

Granulocytic sarcoma (GS) is an extramedullary tumor composed of immature myeloid cells, typically occurring during the course of acute myelogenous leukemia. Non-leukemic GS, that is, GS with no evidence of overt leukemia and no previous history of leukemia, is very rare, and even more unusual is nonleukemic GS of the bile duct. We report a case of nonleukemic GS of the bile duct. The patient was initially misdiagnosed as a bile duct carcinoma arising in the hilum of the liver (so-called Klatskin tumor), and received a right lobectomy of the liver. Histological examination of the tumor yielded the diagnosis of GS, and the bone marrow biopsy did not show any evidence of leukemia. Considering the risk of subsequent development of overt leukemia, the patient was treated with two cycles of combination chemotherapy as used in the cases of acute myelogenous leukemia. To date, he has remained free of disease 15 months after treatment.


Subject(s)
Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Sarcoma, Myeloid/diagnosis , Radiography, Abdominal , Peroxidase/analysis , Male , Immunohistochemistry , Humans , Diagnosis, Differential , Bile Ducts/chemistry , Bile Duct Neoplasms/chemically induced , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , Adult
11.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 693-699, 2005.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-55369

ABSTRACT

Human embryonic stem (ES) cells can be induced to differentiate into hematopoietic precursor cells via two methods: the formation of embryoid bodies (EBs) and co-culture with mouse bone marrow (BM) stromal cells. In this study, the above two methods have been combined by co-culture of human ES-cell-derived EBs with human BM stromal cells. The efficacy of this method was compared with that using EB formation alone. The undifferentiated human ES cell line SNUhES3 was allowed to form EBs for two days, then EBs were induced to differentiate in the presence of a different serum concentration (EB and EB/high FBS group), or co- cultured with human BM stromal cells (EB/BM co-culture group). Flow cytometry and hematopoietic colony-forming assays were used to assess hematopoietic differentiation in the three groups. While no significant increase of CD34+/CD45- or CD34+/CD38- cells was noted in the three groups on days 3 and 5, the percentage of CD34+/CD45- cells and CD34+/ CD38- cells was significantly higher in the EB/BM co-culture group than in the EB and EB/high FBS groups on day 10. The number of colony-forming cells (CFCs) was increased in the EB/BM co-culture group on days 7 and 10, implying a possible role for human BM stromal cells in supporting hematopoietic differentiation from human ES cell-derived EBs. These results demonstrate that co-culture of human ES-cell-derived EBs with human BM stromal cells might lead to more efficient hematopoietic differentiation from human ES cells cultured alone. Further study is warranted to evaluate the underlying mechanism.


Subject(s)
Stromal Cells/physiology , Stem Cells/cytology , Humans , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/cytology , Embryonic Structures/cytology , Coculture Techniques , Cells, Cultured , Cell Differentiation , Bone Marrow Cells/cytology , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , ADP-ribosyl Cyclase 1/analysis , Antigens, CD34/analysis
12.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol ; 1999 Jun; 17(2): 85-92
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-37252

ABSTRACT

To determine if the immunopathologic alterations of HIV-infected lymph nodes have any correlation with clinical stages in the northern Thai patients, we conducted a comparative analysis of immunopathologic features of lymph nodes between 25 HIV-infected patients from various clinical categories and 25 non-HIV individuals of reactive hyperplasia morphology of lymph node biopsies. The risk factors for HIV infection were all heterosexual. The majority of patients in clinical category A (PGL) showed a histopathologic pattern of explosive follicular hyperplasia, while category C (AIDS) patients demonstrated follicular involution and lymphocyte depletion on lymph node sections. Interestingly, weak reactivity for HIV p24 gag protein was detected within the germinal centers and scattering interfollicular lymphocytes in only 20% of the HIV-infected cases. Morphologically, the presence of MGCs was specific for HIV-infected lymph nodes. MGCs (hematoxylin & eosin stain) were found in 64% of the HIV-infected cases, which was significantly different from 4% found in control cases (p = 0.00002). By S-100 immunostaining, MGCs were demonstrated in all HIV-infected lymph node sections, while they were found in 32% of the control lymph nodes. Immunostaining with S-100 protein also revealed the appearance of syncytial ballooning and countable numbers of MGCs. High numbers of MGCs seemed to correlate with histologic and clinical changes. In conclusion, the HIV-infected patients had high numbers of MGCs or syncytia on lymph node sections in early stage and pre-AIDS conditions, which has never been reported before.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antigens, CD/analysis , Antigens, CD20/analysis , CD3 Complex/analysis , CD4 Antigens/analysis , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , CD8 Antigens/analysis , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/analysis , Female , Giant Cells/chemistry , HIV Infections/metabolism , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Lymph Nodes/chemistry , Male , Middle Aged , S100 Proteins/analysis , Thailand
13.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-17640

ABSTRACT

The utility of staining Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells with CD30, CD15 and CD45 as a diagnostic aid in Hodgkin's disease (HD) and the value of microwave citrate antigen retrieval (AR) method in improving the results of immunohistochemical (IHC) studies were evaluated. Histological and immunohistological studies were carried out on 21 patients with HD seen from January 1987 to December 1996 in the Pathology Department of the Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine. Avidin biotin peroxidase complex (ABC) was used in IHC study as a method for detection of RS cells. Monoclonal antibodies CD30, CD15 and CD45 were applied on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue sections. In order to enhance the immunoreactivity, microwave citrate AR method and proteolytic pretreatment were used. The reactivity of RS cells and staining patterns were determined. In 14 (70%) of the 20 patients, RS cells stained positively with CD30, in 16 (80%) CD15 staining was positive and only 1 (5%) was positively stained with CD45. A combination of cytoplasmic with cell surface staining was common with CD30, while paranuclear deposit with cell surface and cytoplasmic staining was common with CD15. In conclusion, to facilitate the detection of RS cells in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues, the application of a panel of markers appears to be necessary. Also AR method seems to be helpful in obtaining optimal results on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue.


Subject(s)
Lewis X Antigen/analysis , Ki-1 Antigen/analysis , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , Hodgkin Disease/diagnosis , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Microwaves
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-218194

ABSTRACT

To investigate the differential expression of various types of leukocyte common antigen (LCA) isoforms during development, we analyzed human fetal lymphoid organs, including the thymus, liver, spleen, and bone marrow from 14 weeks to 29 weeks of gestational age by immunohistochemical and flow cytometric methods. In fetal thymus, over 90% of thymocytes throughout the entire fetal life expressed CD45RO and CD45RB, while CD45RA was expressed only in less than 5% of thymocytes. This expression pattern of LCA isoforms was established by a gestational age of 14 weeks or earlier, and persisted throughout the fetal period. The tissue distribution was different from each isoform; CD45RO-positive thymocytes were found in both the cortex and medulla at the 14th week with low intensity, but was localized in the cortex with increasing fetal age. CD45RB-positive thymocytes distributed mainly in the medulla from early gestational age. Among extrathymic lymphoid organs, a small portion of lymphoid cells expressing leukocyte common antigens appeared first in the liver at 10-12 weeks of gestational age and was followed by a small number in the spleen and bone marrow by 13-15 weeks. All lymphoid cells in these extrathymic lymphoid organs at this stage were CD19+ B cells. The number of these CD19+ cells increased abruptly during the early period of mid-gestational age. The pattern of tissue distribution of each LCA isoform in the fetal liver and spleen correlated well with the patterns of quantitative analysis by flow cytometry. In summary we found that different LCA isoforms expressed in cell-type-specific pattern and showed different tissue distribution during the period of fetal development, and that LCA was the earliest antigen expressed by lymphocytes in the thymus and extrathymic lymphoid organs in our series.


Subject(s)
Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , Bone Marrow/immunology , Female , Fetus/immunology , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Immunoenzyme Techniques , Liver/immunology , Lymphoid Tissue/immunology , Pregnancy , Spleen/immunology
15.
Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol ; 1994 Dec; 12(2): 105-9
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-36566

ABSTRACT

A three-color flow cytometric determination of CD4 T-lymphocytes on whole blood specimens from AIDS patients which contain a high proportion of non-lymphocyte elements is described. Peripheral blood cells were stained by a three-color method using monoclonal antibodies conjugated respectively with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-CD3, phycoerythrin (PE)-CD4 and peridinin chlorophyll protein (PerCP)-CD45. CD45 stains all leukocytes with the highest fluorescence expression of CD45 antigen in lymphocytes. By combining light scatter with CD45 in the fluorescence 3 (FL3) channel, a light scattering window can be drawn to include almost all bright CD45 lymphocytes. This live gate of lymphocytes was then acquired and analysed simultaneously using other irrelevant two-color (FITC/PE) antibodies of CD3 and CD4 in the FITC and PE channels, respectively. This method is easy and straightforward, and gives successful analysis of CD4 T-lymphocytes in AIDS blood specimens contaminated with an unusually large number of non-lymphocytic cells.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/blood , Antibodies, Monoclonal , CD3 Complex/analysis , CD4 Antigens/analysis , Leukocyte Common Antigens/analysis , CD4 Lymphocyte Count/methods , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Flow Cytometry/methods , Fluorescent Dyes , HIV Seropositivity/blood , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Male
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