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1.
Braz. j. biol ; 83: e245202, 2023. tab, graf
Article in English | MEDLINE, LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1285622

ABSTRACT

Abstract Although propolis has been reported for having anti-inflammatory activities, its effects on complement system has not been much studied. This research was conducted to find out the effects of Indonesian propolis on the expression levels of C3, C1r/s, Bf, MBL, and C6 in zebrafish larvae which were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Counting of macrophages migrating to yolk sac and liver histology were carried out. Larvae were divided into four groups: CON (cultured in E3 medium only), LPS (cultured in a medium containing 0.5 μg/L LPS), LPSIBU (cultured in a medium containing LPS, and then treated with 100 μg/L ibuprofen for 24 hours), and LPSPRO (cultured in a medium containing LPS, and then immersed in 14,000 μg/L propolis for 24 hours) groups. The results showed that complement gene expression in larvae from the LPSIBU and LPSPRO groups were generally lower than in larvae from the LPS group. The number of macrophage migrations to the yolk in the LPSPRO group was also lower than in the LPS group. Histological structure of liver in all groups were considered normal. This study shows that Indonesian propolis has the potential to be used as an alternative to the substitution of NSAIDs.


Resumo Embora a própolis tenha sido relatada por ter atividade anti-inflamatória, seus efeitos no sistema complemento, uma parte do sistema imunológico inato, não foram muito estudados. Esta pesquisa foi conduzida para descobrir os efeitos da própolis da Indonésia nos níveis de expressão de C3, C1r/s, Bf, MBL e C6 em larvas de peixe-zebra induzidas por lipopolissacarídeo (LPS). Foram realizadas contagens de macrófagos que migram para o saco vitelino e histologia do fígado. As larvas foram divididas em quatro grupos: CON (cultivadas apenas em meio E3), LPS (cultivadas em meio contendo 0,5 μg/L de LPS), LPSIBU (cultivadas em meio contendo LPS e, em seguida, tratadas com 100 μg/L de ibuprofeno por 24 horas) e LPSPRO (cultivado em meio contendo LPS, e então imerso em própolis 14,000 μg/L por 24 horas). Os resultados mostraram que a expressão do gene do complemento em larvas dos grupos LPSIBU e LPSPRO foi geralmente menor que em larvas do grupo LPS. O número de migrações de macrófagos para a gema no grupo LPSPRO também foi menor que no grupo LPS. A estrutura histológica do fígado em todos os grupos foi considerada normal. Este estudo mostra que a própolis indonésia tem potencial para ser utilizada como alternativa na substituição dos AINEs (anti-inflamatórios não esteroides).


Subject(s)
Animals , Propolis/pharmacology , Zebrafish/genetics , Down-Regulation , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Indonesia , Larva/genetics
2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-921828

ABSTRACT

Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play an important role in the formation of immunothrombosis. However, how vascular endothelial cells mediate the formation of NETs has not been fully understood. We stimulated neutrophils firmly attached on the endothelial cell surface intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) for 4 h, then labeled NETs-DNA with Sytox green dye and the formation of NETs was observed by fluorescent microscopy. The area and fluorescence intensity of NETs-DNA were analyzed to quantify the formation of NETs. The results showed that both PMA and LPS were able to induce firmly adhered neutrophils on ICAM-1 to produce NETs. NETs induced by PMA were independent of neither β2 integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) nor macrophage antigen complex-1 (Mac-1). In contrast, LPS-stimulated NETs were mediated by Mac-1 integrin, but not by LFA-1. After inhibition of actin filaments or Talin-1, the formation of NETs irrespective of the stimulus was significantly reduced. This study reveals the mechanism of the direct interaction between neutrophils and endothelial cells to produce NETs under inflammatory conditions, providing a new theoretical basis for the treatment of related diseases and the development of new drugs.


Subject(s)
Cytoskeletal Proteins , Endothelial Cells , Extracellular Traps , Integrins , Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophages , Neutrophils
3.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880806

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To investigate the role of autophagy in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced apoptosis of murine odontoblasts.@*METHODS@#Murine odontoblasts (mDPC-23 cells) were treated with 5 μg/mL LPS for 6, 12 and 24 h, and the changes in cell viability was examined using CCK8 kit and cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL staining. The changes in the protein levels of LC3, Beclin1, Atg5, AKT, p-AKT, mTOR and p-mTOR were detected using Western blotting. The effect of 3-MA treatment for 24 h on LPS-induced apoptosis of mDPC-23 cells was evaluated by detecting the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3 and Bax using Western blotting.@*RESULTS@#Stimulation with LPS for 6 and 12 h did not cause significant changes in the proliferation or apoptosis of mDPC-23 cells, but LPS treatment for 24 h significantly suppressed cell proliferation (@*CONCLUSIONS@#LPS stimulation induces autophagy to promote apoptosis of mDPC-23 cells, and suppression of autophagy attenuates LPS-induced apoptosis. Autophagy may play an important role in the injury of inflamed pulp tissues.


Subject(s)
Animals , Apoptosis , Autophagy , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Mice , Odontoblasts/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Signal Transduction
4.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880817

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To explore the mechanism by which fractalkine (CX3CL1; FKN) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immunological response in RAW264.7 cells.@*METHODS@#A RAW264.7 cell model overexpressing FKN was established by transfection with the lentiviral vector CX3CL1. The effects of LPS, ICG-001 (a Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway inhibitor), either alone or in combination, on M1 polarization of na?ve and FKN-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells were evaluated by detecting of intereukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-@*RESULTS@#The RAW264.7 cell model of FKN overexpression was successfully established. In na?ve RAW264.7 cells, treatment with both ICG-001 and LPS, as compared with LPS alone, significant promoted TNF-@*CONCLUSIONS@#FKN overexpression suppresses LPS-induced M1 type polarization of RAW264.7 cells by activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.


Subject(s)
Animals , Chemokine CX3CL1 , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophages , Mice , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Wnt Signaling Pathway
5.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 34: e013, 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1089379

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study evaluated the effect of a cyclopentenone-type PG, 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-PG J2 (15d-PGJ2), and lectin (ScLL) on the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs), and on IL-6 and TGFβ-1 release by these fibroblasts, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). HGFs were stimulated with LPS 10 μg/ml and treated with 15d-PGJ2 1 and 2 μg/ml, and ScLL 2 and 5 μg/ml, for 1 and 3h, and then evaluated for viability by MTT assay. Supernatant was collected to detect IL-6 and TGFβ-1 release, by ELISA. Positive control was cells kept in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium, and negative control was those kept in LPS. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Dunnett's test (α = 0.05). No significant difference was found in viability among experimental groups at 1h (p > 0.05). Percentage of ScLL 5 µg/ml viable cells was similar to that of positive control at evaluated periods (p > 0.05), whereas the other groups had lower levels than the positive control (p < 0.05). IL-6 release was statistically higher for ScLL 5 μg/ml and 15d-PGJ2 2 µg/ml at 1h, compared with the other treated groups and positive control (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found among the groups at 3h (p > 0.05), except for ScLL 2 µg/ml and 15d-PGJ2 1 µg/ml, which showed lower IL-6 release compared with that of negative control (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found among the groups for TGFβ-1 release (p > 0.05). Results indicated that ScLL 5 μg/ml did not interfere in viability, and ScLL 2 µg/ml and 15d-PGJ2 1 µg/ml demonstrated reduced IL-6 release. Tested substances had no effect on TGFβ-1 release.


Subject(s)
Humans , Prostaglandin D2/analogs & derivatives , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Plant Lectins/pharmacology , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Fibroblasts/metabolism , Reference Values , Time Factors , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Prostaglandin D2/pharmacology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Analysis of Variance , Statistics, Nonparametric , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/drug effects , Gingiva/cytology
6.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190519, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1101254

ABSTRACT

Abstract Natural products have emerged as a rich source of bioactive compounds for adjunctive treatments of many infectious and inflammatory conditions, including periodontitis. Among the monoterpenes with significant biological properties, there is the perillyl alcohol (POH), which can be found in several essential oils and has shown immunomodulatory properties in recent studies, which may be interesting in the treatment of non-neoplastic inflammatory disorders. Objective To determine the antibacterial and immune modulatory activities of the POH. Methodology The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the POH for two significant Gram-negative periodontal pathogens were determined by macrodilution and subculture, respectively. Cell proliferation and cytotoxicity in RAW 264.7 macrophages were determined by Trypan Blue and mitochondrial enzymatic activity assay. The modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed by flow cytometry and expression of TNF and arginase-1 by real-time PCR. Results The POH was effective against P. gingivalis (ATCC 33277) and F. nucleatum (ATCC 25586) with MIC= MBC=1600 μM. No cytotoxicity up to 100 µM was observed on macrophages. The cell proliferation was inhibited from 48 hours at 100 μM (p<0.05) and 250 μM (p<0.01). The POH increased ROS production at both 10 μM and 100 μM (p<0.05) in unstimulated cells. The PMA-induced ROS production was not affected by POH, whereas 100 μM significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced (LPS-induced) ROS. The expression of TNF was not affected by POH in unstimulated cells or in cells polarized to M1 phenotype, whereas both concentrations of POH reduced (p<0.05) the expression of arginase-1 in M2-polarized macrophages. Conclusion The POH has antibacterial activity against periodontal pathogens and reduced proliferation of murine macrophages without significant cytotoxicity at concentrations up to 100 μM. In addition, the POH reduced the LPS-induced ROS and the expression of arginase-1 in M2-polarized macrophages.


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , Fusobacterium nucleatum/drug effects , Reactive Oxygen Species/analysis , Porphyromonas/drug effects , Monoterpenes/pharmacology , Macrophages/drug effects , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Arginase/analysis , Time Factors , Biological Products/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Gene Expression , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Reproducibility of Results , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/analysis , Fusobacterium nucleatum/growth & development , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Porphyromonas/growth & development , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Flow Cytometry , RAW 264.7 Cells , Macrophages/metabolism
7.
Braz. J. Psychiatry (São Paulo, 1999, Impr.) ; 41(5): 419-427, Sept.-Oct. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1039115

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate whether an animal model of mania induced by lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) has an inflammatory profile and whether immune activation by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) has a cumulative effect on subsequent stimuli in this model. We also evaluated the action of lithium (Li) on inflammatory and neurotrophic factors. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to an animal model of mania. After the open-field test, they were given LPS to induce systemic immune activation. Subsequently, the animals' blood was collected, and their serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interleukin [IL]-6, IL-1β, IL-10, and inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]) were measured. Results: LDX induced hyperactivity in the animals, but no inflammatory marker levels increased except brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Li had no effect on serum BDNF levels but prevented iNOS levels from increasing in animals subjected to immune activation. Conclusion: Although Li prevented an LPS-induced increase in serum iNOS levels, its potential anti-inflammatory effects in this animal model of mania were conflicting.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Bipolar Disorder/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate , Lithium/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Nerve Growth Factors/drug effects , Time Factors , Bipolar Disorder/physiopathology , Bipolar Disorder/chemically induced , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Reproducibility of Results , Cytokines/blood , Treatment Outcome , Rats, Wistar , Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor/blood , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/blood , Locomotion/drug effects
8.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180641, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1012519

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives: Infection, inflammation and bone resorption are closely related events in apical periodontitis development. Therefore, we sought to investigate the role of cyclooxygenase (COX) in osteoclastogenesis and bone metabolism signaling in periapical bone tissue after bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inoculation into root canals. Methodology: Seventy two C57BL/6 mice had the root canals of the first molars inoculated with a solution containing LPS from E. coli (1.0 mg/mL) and received selective (celecoxib) or non-selective (indomethacin) COX-2 inhibitor. After 7, 14, 21 and 28 days the animals were euthanized and the tissues removed for total RNA extraction. Evaluation of gene expression was performed by qRT-PCR. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by post-tests (α=0.05). Results: LPS induced expression of mRNA for COX-2 (Ptgs2) and PGE2 receptors (Ptger1, Ptger3 and Ptger4), indicating that cyclooxygenase is involved in periapical response to LPS. A signaling that favours bone resorption was observed because Tnfsf11 (RANKL), Vegfa, Ctsk, Mmp9, Cd36, Icam, Vcam1, Nfkb1 and Sox9 were upregulated in response to LPS. Indomethacin and celecoxib differentially modulated expression of osteoclastogenic and other bone metabolism genes: celecoxib downregulated Igf1r, Ctsk, Mmp9, Cd36, Icam1, Nfkb1, Smad3, Sox9, Csf3, Vcam1 and Itga3 whereas indomethacin inhibited Tgfbr1, Igf1r, Ctsk, Mmp9, Sox9, Cd36 and Icam1. Conclusions: We demonstrated that gene expression for COX-2 and PGE2 receptors was upregulated after LPS inoculation into the root canals. Additionally, early administration of indomethacin and celecoxib (NSAIDs) inhibited osteoclastogenic signaling. The relevance of the cyclooxygenase pathway in apical periodontitis was shown by a wide modulation in the expression of genes involved in both bone catabolism and anabolism.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Osteogenesis/physiology , Periapical Tissue/drug effects , Periapical Tissue/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases/physiology , Dental Pulp Cavity/metabolism , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Time Factors , Bone Resorption/metabolism , Gene Expression , Up-Regulation , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Indomethacin/pharmacology , Lipopolysaccharides/analysis , Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases/analysis , Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases/drug effects , Receptors, Prostaglandin E/analysis , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Escherichia coli/metabolism , Cyclooxygenase 2/analysis , Celecoxib/pharmacology , Mice, Inbred C57BL
9.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 52(7): e8732, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1011598

ABSTRACT

Inflammation plays an important role in the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), suggesting that the immune system is a target of therapeutic interventions used for treating CVDs. This study evaluated mechanisms underlying inflammatory response and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy associated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or heat shock protein 60 (HSP60)-induced Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation and the effect of a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II delta B (CaMKIIδB) on these outcomes. Our results showed that treatment with HSP60 or LPS (TLR agonists) induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and complement system C3 and factor B gene expression. In vitro silencing of CaMKIIδB prevented complement gene transcription and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy associated with TLR 2/4 activation but did not prevent the increase in interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alfa gene expression in primary cultured cardiomyocytes. Moreover, CaMKIIδB silencing attenuated nuclear factor-kappa B expression. These findings supported the hypothesis that CaMKIIδB acts as a link between inflammation and cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, the present study is the first to show that extracellular HSP60 activated complement gene expression through CaMKIIδB. Our results indicated that a stress stimulus induced by LPS or HSP60 treatment promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and initiated an inflammatory response through the complement system. However, CaMKIIδB silencing prevented the cardiomyocyte hypertrophy independent of inflammatory response induced by LPS or HSP60 treatment.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Myocytes, Cardiac/pathology , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism , Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology , Gene Expression , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Rats, Wistar , Chaperonin 60/pharmacology , Myocytes, Cardiac/drug effects , Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism , RNA, Small Interfering , Inflammation/metabolism
10.
Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2017; 30 (1): 43-48
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-185738

ABSTRACT

In this study we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanisms of Hizikia fusiformis [HF] extracts in lipopolysaccharide [LPS]-induced RAW 264.7 cells. We extracted HF using solvent and sub-critical water techniques. In results, HF extracts inhibited nitric oxide [NO] production in cell-free and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. HF210 [extract prepared with sub critical water at 210[degree]C] was most effective. The HF210 extract dose-dependently inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase expression [iNOS] and nuclear factor kappa [NF-kB] p65 translocation from cytosol to the nucleus. Furthermore, HF210 extract dose-dependently inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase [p38 MAPK], Jun N-terminal kinase [JNK], and signal transducers and activators of transcription [STAT]-1in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells. Thus, our results suggest that anti-inflammatory effects of HF210 extract showed a noticeable distinction by regulation of multiple signaling pathways in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells


Subject(s)
Phaeophyta , Plant Extracts , NF-kappa B/drug effects , Macrophages/drug effects , RAW 264.7 Cells/drug effects , Signal Transduction , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology
11.
Biol. Res ; 49: 1-11, 2016. ilus, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-950867

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Asthma is an increasing global health problem, and novel strategies to prevent or ameliorate the condition are needed. Here, the effects of 80 % ethanol extracts of Salvia plebeia R. Br. (SE) on an induced inflammatory response were investigated RESULTS: Salvia plebeia R. Br. inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, as well as nitric oxide (NO) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. NO and pro-inflammatory cytokine production was suppressed more effectively by SE of the aerial parts (SE-A) than of the roots (SE-R) of S. plebeia. In BEAS-2B cells, both SE-A and SE-R inhibited the increase in production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. We also investigated the antiasthmatic effects of SE in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced BALB/c mouse model. SE-A treatment significantly reduced the number of airway eosinophils, IL-4 and IL-13 levels, mucus production, and inflammatory infiltration, as compared with the corresponding levels in the untreated, OVA-induced mice, and had similar effects to dexamethasone CONCLUSIONS: Salvia plebeia ethanol extract ameliorated the induced inflammatory response in RAW 264.7 and BEAS-2B cells, with more effective inhibition noted for SE-A than for SE-R. SE-A treatment was effective in improving the histopathological changes in the lungs of asthma model mice via modulation of eosinophils and Th2 cytokines. These results suggest that SE-A can be considered as a therapeutic agent that can potentially relieve asthma


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Mice , Asthma/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Anti-Asthmatic Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Asthma/chemically induced , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Cells, Cultured , Ovalbumin , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Reproducibility of Results , Cytokines/analysis , Cytokines/drug effects , Plant Components, Aerial/chemistry , Disease Models, Animal , Ethanol/pharmacology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , RAW 264.7 Cells , Lung/drug effects , Lung/physiology , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Nitric Oxide/analysis
12.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 30(1): e140, 2016. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-951970

ABSTRACT

Abstract: The lectin (ScLL) extracted from the Synadenium carinatum plant has been evaluated as an immunomodulator in diseases such as asthma, neosporosis and leishmaniasis. However, it has not yet been evaluated in the oral cavity. This study evaluated the effect of ScLL on viability, proliferation and release of IL-10 in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). HGF were stimulated with LPS 1 µg/ml and treated with ScLL in concentrations of 10, 5 and 2 µg/ml for 1 and 5 h, and evaluated by flow cytometry for viability, apoptosis (initial/advanced) and necrosis. The supernatant was collected to detect release of IL-10 by ELISA. The proliferation was assessed with the BrdU assay. Positive control consisted of cells maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM), and the negative control, of those kept in tap water. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Dunnett's test (α = 0.05). No significant difference was found for ScLL concentrations regarding viability or initial and advanced apoptosis (p=0.455). All the groups, including the positive control, had a significantly lower necrosis parameter than negative control at 5 h (p < 0.001). No difference was found for proliferation among the experimental groups (p = 0.832). ScLL at 5 and 2 µg/ml resulted in a lower release of IL-10 than positive and negative controls at 5 h (p = 0.047). The results indicated that ScLL concentrations tested were not cytotoxic, and had no effect on proliferation and release of IL-10 parameters. A thorough understanding of ScLL, regarding its immunomodulatory potential, may open the door to new perspectives for dentistry.


Subject(s)
Humans , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Plant Lectins/pharmacology , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Time Factors , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Analysis of Variance , Interleukin-10/analysis , Apoptosis/drug effects , Statistics, Nonparametric , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Flow Cytometry , Gingiva/drug effects , Gingiva/chemistry
13.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 2015 Feb; 53(2): 82-92
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-158381

ABSTRACT

Toll-like receptors (TLR) are a family of pattern recognition receptors identifying pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). They play a critical role in the innate immune response during the initial interaction between the infecting microorganism and phagocytic cells. Here, we verified the presence of TLR-2 in spleen, lymph node and thymus of Swiss albino mice and their modulation after infection with Staphylococcus aureus and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. It was seen that TLR-2 gene transcribed to its respective mRNA on S. aureus infection, in thymus, spleen and lymph node of mice but their levels and mode of expression varied. When challenged with LPS no prominent changes in the expression of TLR-2 receptor was observed but its expression increased gradually with time in the thymus, spleen and lymph node of S. aureus infected mice. TLR-2 expression was also found enhanced in infected splenic macrophages. By studying the serum cytokine profile the functionality of the receptor was measured. The results indicate the presence of TLR-2 in thymus, spleen and lymph node of Swiss albino strain of mice and that they are modulated by S. aureus.


Subject(s)
Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Gene Expression/drug effects , Gene Expression/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Lymph Nodes/immunology , Lymph Nodes/metabolism , Lymph Nodes/microbiology , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/metabolism , Macrophages/microbiology , Male , Mice , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Spleen/immunology , Spleen/metabolism , Spleen/microbiology , Staphylococcal Infections/blood , Staphylococcal Infections/immunology , Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Staphylococcus aureus/immunology , Staphylococcus aureus/physiology , Thymus Gland/immunology , Thymus Gland/metabolism , Thymus Gland/microbiology , Time Factors , Toll-Like Receptor 2/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 2/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 2/metabolism
14.
Biol. Res ; 48: 1-8, 2015. ilus, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-950833

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Human amnion mesenchymal cells (hAMCs), isolated from the amniotic membrane of human placenta, are a unique population of mesenchymal stem cells. Recent studies demonstrated that hAMCs could inhibit the activities and functions of several immune cells. However, their effect on inflammatory macrophages is largely unknown. This study investigated the effect of hAMCs on expression of inflammatory cytokines and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)/NF-kB pathway in human THP-1 macrophages induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RESULTS: The levels of TNF-α and IL-1ß secreted by LPS- stimulated THP-1 cells were increased significantly compared with those in the control group. After co-culture with different numbers of hAMCs, the levels of TNF-α and IL-1ß in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells were significantly reduced compared with the LPS group. The mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-1ß were also markedly inhibited. Moreover, treating LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells with hAMCs supernatants could also suppress TNF-α and IL-1ß production in THP-1 cells. Important signaling pathways involved in the production of TNF-α and IL-1ß were affected by hAMCs co-culture: hAMCs remarkably suppressed NF-kB activation and down-regulated the phosphorylation of ERK and JNK in LPS- stimulated THP-1 cells. CONCLUSIONS: Human amnion mesenchymal cells inhibited the production of TNF-α and IL-1ß secreted by LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells, partly through the suppression of NF-kB activation and ERK and JNK phosphorylation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/biosynthesis , Interleukin-1beta/biosynthesis , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Amnion/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/drug effects , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Interleukin-1beta/drug effects
15.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 112-123, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-201303

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Although the proteasome inhibitor known as bortezomib can modulate the inflammatory process through the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway, the immunomodulatory effect of pre-incubated bortezomib has not been fully evaluated for inflammation by infectious agents. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of bortezomib on the expression of inflammatory cytokines and mediators in macrophage cell lines and on survival in a murine peritonitis sepsis model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Bortezomib was applied 1 hr before lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in RAW 264.7 cells. The cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) experiments were performed in C57BL/6J mice. RESULTS: Pre-incubation with bortezomib (25 nM or 50 nM) prior to LPS (50 ng/mL or 100 ng/mL) stimulation significantly recovered the number of viable RAW 264.7 cells compared to those samples without pre-incubation. Bortezomib decreased various inflammatory cytokines as well as nitric oxide production in LPS-stimulated cells. The 7-day survival rate in mice that had received bortezomib at 0.01 mg/kg concentration 1 hr prior to CLP was significantly higher than in the mice that had only received a normal saline solution of 1 mL 1 hr prior to CLP. In addition, the administration of bortezomib at 0.01 mg/kg concentration 1 hr before CLP resulted in a significant decrease in inflammation of the lung parenchyma. Collectively, pretreatment with bortezomib showed an increase in the survival rate and changes in the levels of inflammatory mediators. CONCLUSION: These results support the possibility of pretreatment with bortezomib as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of overwhelming inflammation, which is a characteristic of severe sepsis.


Subject(s)
Animals , Boronic Acids/administration & dosage , Cecum/pathology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Line , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chymotrypsin/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Ligation , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Nitric Oxide/metabolism , Proteasome Inhibitors/pharmacology , Punctures , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Sepsis/drug therapy
16.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 109(4): 459-465, 03/07/2014. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-716311

ABSTRACT

Nitric oxide (NO) participates in neuronal lesions in the digestive form of Chagas disease and the proximity of parasitised glial cells and neurons in damaged myenteric ganglia is a frequent finding. Glial cells have crucial roles in many neuropathological situations and are potential sources of NO. Here, we investigate peripheral glial cell response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection to clarify the role of these cells in the neuronal lesion pathogenesis of Chagas disease. We used primary glial cell cultures from superior cervical ganglion to investigate cell activation and NO production after T. cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in comparison to peritoneal macrophages. T. cruzi infection was greater in glial cells, despite similar levels of NO production in both cell types. Glial cells responded similarly to T. cruzi and LPS, but were less responsive to LPS than macrophages were. Our observations contribute to the understanding of Chagas disease pathogenesis, as based on the high susceptibility of autonomic glial cells to T. cruzi infection with subsequent NO production. Moreover, our findings will facilitate future research into the immune responses and activation mechanisms of peripheral glial cells, which are important for understanding the paradoxical responses of this cell type in neuronal lesions and neuroprotection.


Subject(s)
Animals , Chagas Disease/immunology , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophages, Peritoneal/parasitology , Neuroglia/parasitology , Nitric Oxide/biosynthesis , Trypanosoma cruzi/immunology , Chagas Disease/etiology , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Macrophages, Peritoneal/drug effects , Macrophages, Peritoneal/immunology , Neuroglia/drug effects , Neuroglia/immunology
17.
Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2014; 27 (1): 107-113
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-142988

ABSTRACT

Balamuthia amoebic encephalitis [BAE] is a life threatening human disease which, always lead to death. Amoebae invasion of the bloodstream is considered an important step in BAE followed by their haematogenous spread. It is more likely that Balamuthia mandrillaris enters into the central nervous system through blood-brain barrier [BBB] sites. The objective of the present study was to determine the impact of cytokines on biological properties of alamuthia in vitro. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells [HBMEC], which constitutes the BBB were used in vitro test model for the present investigation. It was observed that Balamuthia exhibited >90% binding and >70% cytotoxicity to HBMEC. However, cytokines did not affect amoebic binding and cytotoxicity except lipopolysaccharide [LPS] which reduced Balamuthia-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity. It is also important to note that amoebic numbers were reduced in the presence of LPS within 24 h. We have shown previously the bacterial uptake by Balamuthia is very limited which is further investigated in the presence of cytokines and observed a slight reduction of bacterial uptake during phagocytosis assay. Zymography assays revealed there is no effect of cytokines on proteolytic activity of Balamuthia. Overall we described for the first time that cytokines has no inhibitory effects on biological properties of Balamuthia in vitro.


Subject(s)
Humans , Cytokines/pharmacology , Endothelial Cells/parasitology , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Phagocytosis , Blood-Brain Barrier , Brain/blood supply , Cells, Cultured
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-36640

ABSTRACT

Redox-regulating molecule, recombinant human thioredoxin (rhTRX) which shows anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative effects against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammation and regulate protein expression levels. LPS-induced reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and NO production were inhibited by exogenous rhTRX. We identified up/downregulated intracellular proteins under the LPS-treated condition in exogenous rhTRX-treated A375 cells compared with non-LPS-treated cells via 2-DE proteomic analysis. Also, we quantitatively measured cytokines of in vivo mouse inflammation models using cytometry bead array. Exogenous rhTRX inhibited LPS-stimulated production of ROI and NO levels. TIP47 and ATP synthase may influence the inflammation-related lipid accumulation by affecting lipid metabolism. The modulation of skin redox environments during inflammation is most likely to prevent alterations in lipid metabolism through upregulation of TIP47 and ATP synthase and downregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Our results demonstrate that exogenous rhTRX has anti-inflammatory properties and intracellular regulatory activity in vivo and in vitro. Monitoring of LPS-stimulated pro-inflammatory conditions treated with rhTRX in A375 cells could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up of inflammation reduction related with candidate proteins. These results have a therapeutic role in skin inflammation therapy.


Subject(s)
Animals , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Cell Line, Tumor , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Lipid Metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Nitric Oxide/metabolism , Proteome/genetics , Skin/drug effects , Thioredoxins/pharmacology
19.
Indian J Biochem Biophys ; 2013 Dec; 50(6): 505-510
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-150264

ABSTRACT

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is related to the various signal routes that are activated in unfolded protein response (UPR). The Grp78, Grp94, CHOP, MTJ1 and HMOX1 genes expressions demonstrate UPR activity. In this study, we investigated the UPR gene expressions in larynx epidermoid carcinoma (HEp2) to which dexamethasone (dex) was applied. HEp2 cells were administered for 48 h with different combinations using 0.1 μM and 1 μM dex, 1 mM phenyl butyric acid (PBA) and 100 ng/ml lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The Grp78, Grp94, CHOP, MTJ1 and HMOX1 genes expression was determined using quantitative RT-PCR. The Grp78, MTJ1 and HMOX1 gene expression increased with the administration of 1 µM dex. CHOP expression, on the other hand, decreased with 0.1 µM dex. When dex was combined with LPS, nearly all gene expressions decreased. The increase in Grp78, Grp94, HMOX1 and MTJ1 gene expression was greater in groups in which dex was administered in combination with PBA than in groups in which dex was administered alone. Dex in low dose (0.1 μM) caused a decrease in CHOP expression in HEp2 cells and an increase in Grp78 expression, in particular. The changes in UPR genes expressions may lead to the extended survival of the cells.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis/drug effects , Butyric Acid/pharmacology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/pathology , Cell Line, Tumor , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Interactions , HSP40 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Heme Oxygenase-1/genetics , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Transcription Factor CHOP/genetics , Unfolded Protein Response/drug effects , Unfolded Protein Response/genetics
20.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 2013 Aug; 51(8): 606-614
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-149363

ABSTRACT

Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C; 5 mg/kg body weight, ip) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.3 mg/kg body weight, ip) induced microglial and astrocytic activation in Sprague Dawley rats. Higher microglial and astrocytic activities were noticed in Poly I:C infused rats throughout the hippocampus till postnatal day 21 with a comparatively weaker response in LPS group. However, LPS induced inflammation persisted even after postnatal day 21, indicating thereby, that the Poly I:C (viral mimic) produces an acute inflammation, while LPS (bacterial endotoxin) produces chronic inflammation when exposed during early neonatal life.


Subject(s)
Acute Disease , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Astrocytes/drug effects , Astrocytes/immunology , Astrocytes/metabolism , Chronic Disease , Female , Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein/metabolism , Hippocampus/drug effects , Hippocampus/immunology , Hippocampus/metabolism , Immunoenzyme Techniques , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Microglia/drug effects , Microglia/immunology , Microglia/metabolism , Poly I-C/pharmacology , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
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