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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-922261

ABSTRACT

To investigate the molecular mechanism of resveratrol inhibiting the metastasis of liver cancer . HepG2 and Huh7 cells were treated with different concentrations of resveratrol, and the cell viability was determined by CCK-8 assay to determine the optimal concentration of resveratrol for subsequent experiments. The expressions of miR-186-5p in liver cancer tissues and liver cancer cells were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The migration and invasion of HepG2 and Huh7 cells were detected by wound healing assay and Transwell assay, and the expression levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) related proteins were determined by Western blotting. Resveratrol with concentration of had no effect on the viability of HepG2 and Huh7 cells, so the concentration of resveratrol in subsequent experiments was 6.25 μmol/L. Resveratrol inhibited the wound healing and invasion of liver cancer cells; increased the expression of E-cadherin, and decreased the expression of vimentin and Twist1. The expression of miR-186-5p was significantly down-regulated in liver cancer tissues and cells compared with the adjacent tissues and normal liver cells (both <0.05). Furthermore, resveratrol induced the expression of miR-186-5p in liver cancer cells (both <0.01). Overexpression of miR-186-5p suppressed the migration, invasion and EMT of liver cancer cells. Knockdown of miR-186-5p blocked the inhibition effects of resveratrol on the migration, invasion and EMT of liver cancer cells. Resveratrol could inhibit the metastasis of liver cancer , which might be associated with up-regulating miR-186-5p.


Subject(s)
Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Movement , Cell Proliferation , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Neoplasm Invasiveness/genetics , Resveratrol/pharmacology
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-921867

ABSTRACT

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common malignancy and the fourth leading cause of cancer related death worldwide. China covers over half of cases, leading HCC to be a vital threaten to public health. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatments, high recurrence rate remains a major obstacle in HCC management. Multi-omics currently facilitates surveillance, precise diagnosis, and personalized treatment decision making in clinical setting. Non-invasive radiomics utilizes preoperative radiological imaging to reflect subtle pixel-level pattern changes that correlate to specific clinical outcomes. Radiomics has been widely used in histopathological diagnosis prediction, treatment response evaluation, and prognosis prediction. High-throughput sequencing and gene expression profiling enabled genomics and proteomics to identify distinct transcriptomic subclasses and recurrent genetic alterations in HCC, which would reveal the complex multistep process of the pathophysiology. The accumulation of big medical data and the development of artificial intelligence techniques are providing new insights for our better understanding of the mechanism of HCC via multi-omics, and show potential to convert surgical/intervention treatment into an antitumorigenic one, which would greatly advance precision medicine in HCC management.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Prognosis
3.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 2721-2729, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-921206

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#The chaperonin containing t-complex (CCT) proteins play an important role in cell cycle-related protein degradation in yeast and mammals. The role of the chaperonin containing t-complex 4 (CCT4), one subtype of CCT proteins, in the progress of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was not fully elucidated. Here, we aimed to explore the mechanisms of CCT4 in HCC.@*METHODS@#In this study, we used the UALCAN platform to analyze the relationship between CCT4 and HCC, and the association of CCT4 with the overall survival (OS) of HCC patients was also analyzed. CCT4 expression in HCC tumor tissues and normal tissues was also determined by western blot (WB) assay. Lentivirus vector was used to knock down the CCT4 expression, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and WB were used to determine the level of CCT4 in HCC cell lines. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) assays were used to detect the cell proliferation, and flow cytometry (FCM) was performed to evaluate the effect of CCT4 on the apoptosis of HCC cells. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assay and WB were used to explore the mechanisms of CCT4 regulating the growth of HCC. Data were calculated from at least three replicate experiments and expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Student's t test, paired t test, and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to compare across different groups.@*RESULTS@#We found CCT4 was upregulated in HCC tissues compared with normal tissues, and its high expression was associated with poor prognosis (P < 0.001). CCT4 was significantly increased in HCC tumor tissues compared with normal tissues (0.98 ± 0.12 vs. 0.23 ± 0.05, t = 7.73, P < 0.001). After being transfected with CCT4 short-hairpin RNA (shRNA), CCT4 was decreased in mRNA level and protein level in both Huh7 (mRNA level: 0.41 ± 0.07 vs. 1.01 ± 0.11, t = 8.09, P = 0.001; protein level: 0.61 ± 0.03 vs. 0.93 ± 0.07, t = 7.19, P = 0.002) and Hep3b cells (mRNA level: 0.55 ± 0.11 vs. 1.04 ± 0.15, t = 4.51, P = 0.011; protein level: 0.64 ± 0.10 vs. 0.95 ± 0.08, t = 4.32, P = 0.012). CCK8 assay indicated that CCT4 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation in both Huh7 (OD value of 3 days: 0.60 ± 0.14 vs. 0.97 ± 0.16, t = 3.13, P = 0.036; OD value of 4 days: 1.03 ± 0.07 vs. 1.50 ± 0.12, t = 5.97, P = 0.004) and Hep3b (OD value of 3 days: 0.69 ± 0.14 vs. 1.10 ± 0.11, t = 3.91, P = 0.017; OD value of 4 days: 1.12 ± 0.12 vs. 1.48 ± 0.13, t = 3.55, P = 0.024) cells. EdU assay showed that CCT4 knockdown inhibited the cell proliferation in both Huh7 (EdU positive rate: [31.25 ± 3.41]% vs. [58.72 ± 3.78]%, t = 9.34, P = 0.001) and Hep3b cells (EdU positive rate: [44.13 ± 7.02]% vs. [61.79 ± 3.96]%, t = 3.79, P = 0.019). FCM assay suggested that CCT4 knockdown induced apoptosis in HCC cells (apoptosis rate of Huh7: [9.10 ± 0.80]% vs. [3.66 ± 0.64]%, t = -9.18, P = 0.001; apoptosis rate of Hep3b: [6.69 ± 0.72]% vs. [4.20 ± 0.86]%, t = -3.84, P = 0.018). We also found that CCT4 could regulate anaphase-promoting complex (APC)Cdc20 activity via interacting with Cdc20. Furthermore, CCT4 knockdown induced securin (0.65 ± 0.06 vs. 0.44 ± 0.05, t = -4.69, P = 0.009) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) interacting mediator of cell death (Bim; 0.96 ± 0.06 vs. 0.61 ± 0.09, t = -5.65, P = 0.005) accumulation. The upregulation of securin inhibited cell growth by downregulating cyclin D1 (0.65 ± 0.05 vs. 1.04 ± 0.07, t = 8.12, P = 0.001), and the accumulation of Bim inhibited Bcl-2 (0.77 ± 0.04 vs. 0.87 ± 0.04, t = 3.00, P = 0.040) and activated caspase 9 (caspase 9: 0.77 ± 0.04 vs. 0.84 ± 0.05, t = 1.81, P = 0.145; cleaved caspase 9: 0.64 ± 0.06 vs. 0.16 ± 0.07, t = 1.81, P = 0.001), which led to elevated apoptosis.@*CONCLUSIONS@#Overall, these results showed that CCT4 played an important role in HCC pathogenesis through, at least partly, interacting with Cdc20.


Subject(s)
Animals , Apoptosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Cdc20 Proteins , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/genetics
4.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 2611-2618, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-921137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#Nucleolar protein 6 (NOL6) is a nucleolar RNA-associated protein that is highly conserved between species. It has been proved to be associated with the prognosis of liver cancer. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully established. This study aimed to assess the relationship between NOL6 and liver cancer prognosis.@*METHODS@#We constructed an NOL6-short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing lentivirus. Through viral transfection, cell growth assay and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we evaluated the effect of shRNA-mediated NOL6 knockdown on the proliferation, colony formation, and apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. The relationship between NOL6 expression and HCC patient survival has been established through bioinformatics analysis. We also explored the downstream molecular regulatory network of NOL6 in HCC by performing an Ingenuity Pathway Analysis in the database.@*RESULTS@#Increased NOL6 expression was detected in HCC cells compared to normal controls; HCC patients with high NOL6 expression had poorer prognoses than those with low expression. NOL6 knockdown inhibited HCC cell proliferation, apoptosis, and colony formation. Also, MAPK8, CEBPA, and FOSL1 were selected as potential downstream genes of NOL6.@*CONCLUSIONS@#NOL6 up-regulates HCC cell proliferation and affects downstream expression of related genes. Moreover, NOL6 is considered to be associated with poor prognosis in HCC patients.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Nuclear Proteins , Prognosis
5.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887869

ABSTRACT

Objective To explore the function and mechanism of related genes in the occurrence and development of liver cancer, and the possibility of key genes as potential biomarkers and prognostic indicators for the treatment of liver cancer.Methods We selected 4 datasets(GSE57957, GSE121248, GSE36376 and GSE14520)from the GEO database.With


Subject(s)
Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Carrier Proteins , Computational Biology , Cytochrome P-450 CYP2E1 , Cytochrome P-450 CYP3A , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Gene Regulatory Networks , Glycoproteins , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Prognosis , Protein Interaction Maps
6.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 2719-2736, 2021.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887836

ABSTRACT

Primary liver cancer (PLC) is an aggressive tumor and prone to metastasize and recur. According to pathological features, PLC are mainly categorized into hepatocellular carcinoma, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, mixed hepatocellular cholangiocarcinoma, and fibrolamelic hepatocellular carcinoma, etc. At present, surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are still the main treatments for PLC, but the specificities are poor and the clinical effects are limited with a 5-year overall survival rate of 18%. Liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) are a specific cell subset existing in liver cancer tissues. They harbor the capabilities of self-renewal and strong tumorigenicity, driving tumor initiation, metastasis, drug resistance and recurrence of PLC. Therefore, the identification of molecular markers and the illustration of mechanisms for stemness maintenance of LCSCs can not only reveal the molecular mechanisms of PLC tumorigenesis, but also lay a theoretical foundation for the molecular classification, prognosis evaluation and targeted therapy of PLC. The latest research showed that the combination of 5-fluorouracil and CD13 inhibitors could inhibit the proliferation of CD13+ LCSCs, thereby reducing overall tumor burden. Taken together, LCSCs could be the promising therapeutic targets of PLC in the future. This review summarizes the latest progress in molecular markers, mechanisms for stemness maintenance and targeted therapies of LCSCs.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplastic Stem Cells , Prognosis
7.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 331-341, 2021.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-878566

ABSTRACT

Genetic and epigenetic alterations accumulate in the process of hepatocellular carcinogenesis, but the role of genomic spatial organization in HCC is still unknown. Here, we performed in situ Hi-C in HCC cell line PLC/PRF/5 compared with normal liver cell line L02, together with RNA-seq and ChIP-seq of SMC3/CTCF/H3K27ac. The results indicate that there were significant compartment switching, TAD shifting and loop pattern altering in PLC/PRF/5. These spatial changes are correlated with abnormal gene expression and more opening promoter regions of the HCC cell line. Thus, the 3D genome organization alterations in PLC/PRF/5 are important in epigenetic mechanisms of HCC tumorigenesis.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Cell Line , Cell Line, Tumor , Genomics , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/genetics
8.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 54(9): e10390, 2021. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1249337

ABSTRACT

Sorafenib (SOR) resistance is still a significant challenge for the effective treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mechanism of sorafenib resistance remains unclear. Several microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as playing a role in impairing the sensitivity of tumor cells to treatment. We examined the mechanism behind the role of miR-92b in mediating sorafenib resistance in HCC cells. We detected that miR-92b expression was significantly upregulated in SOR-resistant HepG2/SOR cells compared to parental HepG2/WT cells. After transfection with miR-92b inhibitor, the proliferation of HepG2/SOR cells was remarkably weakened and rates of apoptosis significantly increased. PTEN was considered to be a functional target of miR-92b according to a luciferase reporter assay. Knockdown of PTEN significantly impaired the ability of miR-92b inhibitor on increasing sorafenib sensitivity of HepG2/SOR cells. Furthermore, we confirmed by western blotting and immunofluorescence that miR-92b can mediate sorafenib resistance by activating the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in HCC cells by directly targeting PTEN. These findings further validate the mechanism of miR-92b in SOR resistance in HCC treatment.


Subject(s)
Humans , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/drug therapy , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm , MicroRNAs/genetics , Sorafenib/pharmacology , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/drug therapy , Signal Transduction , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , PTEN Phosphohydrolase/genetics , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
9.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 54(7): e10213, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1249312

ABSTRACT

Sevoflurane (SEVO) is widely applied as an anesthetic, which exerts antitumor capacity in various cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Previous studies indicated that long non-coding RNA KCNQ1 opposite strand/antisense transcript 1 (KCNQ1OT1) was upregulated, while microRNA-29a-3p (miR-29a-3p) was downregulated in HCC. Thus, we aimed to explore the roles of KCNQ1OT1 and miR-29a-3p in HCC cells exposed to SEVO. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion were assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, flow cytometry, and transwell assays, respectively. The levels of genes were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) or western blot. Furthermore, the interaction between miR-29a-3p and KCNQ1OT1 or chromebox protein homolog 3 (CBX3) was predicted by Starbase or Targetscan, and then confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. We found that the levels of KCNQ1OT1 and CBX3 were decreased, while miR-29a-3p was increased in SEVO-treated HCC cells. KCNQ1OT1 overexpression weakened the inhibitory effects of SEVO on HCC cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Interestingly, KCNQ1OT1 bound to miR-29a-3p, and miR-29a-3p targeted CBX3. KCNQ1OT1 upregulated CBX3 level by repressing miR-29a-3p expression. Furthermore, KCNQ1OT1 exerted tumor promotion in HCC cells via suppressing miR-29a-3p to regulate CBX3 expression. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that KCNQ1OT1 regulated the antitumor effects of SEVO on HCC cells through modulating the miR-29a-3p/CBX3 axis, providing a theoretical basis for the treatment of HCC.


Subject(s)
Humans , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/drug therapy , Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated , MicroRNAs/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/drug therapy , Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , Sevoflurane/pharmacology
10.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 53(4): e8882, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1100927

ABSTRACT

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common primary malignant tumors of the liver worldwide. Liver resection and transplantation are currently the only effective treatments; however, recurrence and metastasis rates are still high. Previous studies have shown that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step in HCC invasion and metastasis. Inhibition of EMT has become a new therapeutic strategy for tumors. Recently, puerarin, a well-characterized component of traditional Chinese medicine, has been isolated from Pueraria radix and exerts positive effects on many diseases, particularly cancers. In this study, CCK-8, EdU immunofluorescence, colony formation, wound healing, and migration assays were used to detect the effects of puerarin on HCC cells. We further analyzed the relationship between puerarin and miR-21/PTEN/EMT markers in HCC cell lines. Our results showed that HCC cell proliferation, migration, invasion, tumor formation, and metastasis were reduced by puerarin in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, puerarin inhibited the EMT process of HCC by affecting the expression of Slug and Snail. Moreover, oncogenic miR-21 was inhibited by puerarin, coupled with an increase in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN. Increasing miR-21 expression or decreasing PTEN expression reversed the inhibition effects of puerarin in HCC. These data confirmed that puerarin affects HCC through the miR-21/PTEN/EMT regulatory axis. Overall, puerarin may represent a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent for HCC treatment.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/drug therapy , PTEN Phosphohydrolase/genetics , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/drug effects , Isoflavones/therapeutic use , Liver Neoplasms/drug therapy , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Pyrroles , Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Isoflavones/pharmacology , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasm Invasiveness , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology
11.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 53(4): e9114, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1089357

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to explore the prognostic role of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). DPP4 expression was measured in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens that were gathered from 327 HCC patients. Immunohistochemistry analyses were utilized to examine DPP4 expression characteristics and prognostic values (overall survival (OS) and time to recurrence) of DDP4 in HCC tissues. In addition, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model was used to assess the correlation between DPP4 expression and tumor growth in vivo. DPP4 was expressed in low levels in HCC tissues in contrast to paired peritumoral tissues (38 cases were down-regulated in a total of 59 cases, 64.4%. P=0.0202). DPP4 expression was significantly correlated with TNM stage (P=0.038), tumor number (P=0.035), and vascular invasion (P=0.024), and significantly reduced in patients who were in TNM stages II and III-V, with multiple tumors, and with microvascular invasion compared to patients with TNM stage I, single tumor, and no microvascular invasion. Notably, HCC tissues with low expression of DPP4 had poor OS (P=0.016) compared with HCC tissues with high expression of DPP4, and results from PDX model showed that tumor growth was significantly faster in HCC patients that lowly expressed DPP4 compared to those with highly expressed DPP4. Our findings suggested that low levels of DPP4 could impact the aggressiveness of HCC and contribute to a poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/metabolism , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/metabolism , Liver Neoplasms/metabolism , Prognosis , Immunohistochemistry , Biomarkers, Tumor , Follow-Up Studies , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/mortality , Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
12.
Braz. arch. biol. technol ; 63: e20190511, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1132257

ABSTRACT

Abstract Long-chain non-encoded RNAs (lncRNAs) are important in many life activities and can participate in the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Moreover, lncRNAs can be used as basis for developing new strategies to hinder liver cancer. To investigate the utility of lncRNAs in HCC as potential biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis, we mined genomic data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and analyzed the gene expressions from 374 tumor patients and 50 normal patients. The abnormal expressions of 387 differentially expressed lncRNAs (DElncRNAs) were identified from a total of 3099 lncRNAs. Moreover, 18 modules were divided based on WGCNA, and 2 of the 18 modules were positively correlated with stage and grade, and negatively correlated with survival time. Finally, 10 lncRNAs were found and their main functions are the enhancement of cellular metabolic capacity and cell proliferation. These 10 lncRNAs may serve as novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets, and may help guide subsequent studies on HCC.


Subject(s)
Humans , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Genetic Markers/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/genetics
13.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 52(10): e8631, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1039247

ABSTRACT

The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3), a tumor suppressor, is critical for the carcinogenesis and progression of different cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To date, the roles of lncRNA MEG3 in HCC are not well illustrated. Therefore, this study used western blot and qRT-PCR to evaluate the expression of MEG3, miR-9-5p, and Sex determining Region Y-related HMG-box 11 (SOX11) in HCC tissues and cell lines. RNA pull-down and luciferase reporter assay were used to evaluate these molecular interactions. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and flow cytometry detected the viability and apoptosis of HCC cells, respectively. The results showed that MEG3 and SOX11 were poorly expressed but miR-9-5p was highly expressed in HCC. The expression levels of these molecules suggested a negative correlation between MEG3 and miR-9-5p and a positive correlation with SOX11, confirmed by Pearson's correlation analysis and biology experiments. Furthermore, MEG3 could combine with miR-9-5p, and SOX11 was a direct target of miR-9-5p. Moreover, MEG3 over-expression promoted cell apoptosis and growth inhibition in HCC cells through sponging miR-9-5p to up-regulate SOX11. Therefore, the interactions among MEG3, miR-9-5p, and SOX11 might offer a novel insight for understanding HCC pathogeny and provide potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for HCC.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , SOXC Transcription Factors/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Transfection , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Transcriptional Activation , Up-Regulation , Apoptosis/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/metabolism , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/pathology , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/genetics , SOXC Transcription Factors/metabolism , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism , Liver Neoplasms/metabolism , Liver Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasm Staging
14.
São Paulo; s.n; 2019. 247 p. ilus, tab, quadros.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, Inca | ID: biblio-1007843

ABSTRACT

O hepatoblastoma, câncer de fígado mais comum na infância, é um tumor embrionário que se supõe surgir da interrupção da diferenciação hepática durante a embriogênese. O genoma deste tipo tumoral carrega poucas alterações somáticas, principalmente aneuploidias cromossômicas e mutações em CTNNB1. Essa relativa escassez de mutações somáticas representa um desafio à estratificação de risco dos pacientes e ao desenvolvimento de terapias direcionadas. Neste trabalho, investigamos por sequenciamento de exoma o espectro de mutações somáticas em um grupo de 10 hepatoblastomas, pareados com suas respectivas amostras germinativas, incluindo um caso de tumor congênito. Os dados genômicos revelaram que os hepatoblastomas tem número reduzido de mutações somáticas codificadoras não-sinônimas (média de ~6 variantes/tumor, com exclusão do caso congênito), totalizando 94 mutações (92 diferentes) nos 10 tumores, mapeadas em 87 genes. Apenas três genes apresentaram mutações detectadas em mais de uma amostra, CTNNB1, CX3CL1 e CEP164. As mutações foram validadas pelo sequenciamento de um painel composto pelos genes identificados no exoma, também utilizado para investigar estes genes em um grupo adicional de 12 tumores; apenas mutações em CTNNB1 foram detectadas neste grupo adicional. Mutações somáticas em CTNNB1 foram detectadas em ~54% do grupo estudado (22 hepatoblastomas): sete variantes patogênicas do tipo nucleotídeo único (SNV) ou indel foram identificadas em oito hepatoblastomas (~36%), uma delas nunca previamente descrita (A21_S33del); deleções intragênicas foram detectadas por sequenciamento Sanger em quatro outros tumores (~18%). A proteína ß-catenina foi avaliada por imunohistoquímica, apresentando translocação para o núcleo, o que indica ativação da via WNT; esse resultado também foi observado em tumores nos quais mutações em CTNNB1 não foram detectadas. O principal achado do estudo do exoma de hepatoblastomas foi a identificação de uma mutação somática recorrente no éxon 3 do gene CX3CL1 (A235G), observada em dois diferentes tumores. A análise de expressão gênica e proteica de CX3CL1 e de seu receptor CX3CR1 revelou aumento de expressão de CX3CL1 em hepatoblastomas; este resultado foi replicado em duas coortes independentes. O detalhamento da análise evidenciou um padrão bimodal: (a) linfócitos infiltrados em regiões tumorais de inflamação pós-quimioterapia eram negativos para essas proteínas, que deveriam estar expressas neste tipo celular em condições normais, enquanto as células tumorais as expressavam; (b) nas áreas de necrose tumoral pós-quimioterapia, houve detecção das proteínas CX3CL1/CX3CR1 nos linfócitos, mas não nas células tumorais. Em conjunto, estes resultados sugerem que a ativação da via CX3CL1/CX3CR1 ocorre em parte dos hepatoblastomas, independentemente da detecção de mutações, o que parece ser um achado relevante, potencialmente relacionado a inflamação e/ou resistência à quimioterapia. Adicionalmente, três assinaturas mutacionais foram detectadas nos hepatoblastomas, duas delas com predomínio das assinaturas do COSMIC, HB-S1 (COSMIC 1 e 6, presentes em todos os tipos de câncer) e HB-S2, com similaridades à assinatura COSMIC 29, relacionada apenas a carcinoma oral de células escamosas (gengivo-bucal) associado ao hábito de mascar tabaco; uma nova assinatura mutacional foi observada em um subconjunto de hepatoblastomas (HB-S3), com padrão inespecífico de pequeno aumento de mutações C>A. As assinaturas mutacionais já relatadas para câncer de fígado não foram evidentes nestes hepatoblastomas, sugerindo um processo mutacional diferente em sua origem. Por fim, análise de mutações germinativas no caso de hepatoblastoma congênito levou à identificação de variantes germinativas em genes de predisposição a câncer (BRCA1 e FAH), levantando a questão do papel da predisposição genética no desenvolvimento destes tumores embrionários (AU)


Hepatoblastoma, the most common liver cancer in infancy, is an embryonal tumor supposed to arise from differentiation impairment during embryogenesis. Hepatoblastomas genomes carry few somatic changes, mainly chromosomal aneuploidies and mutations in the CTNNB1 gene. This relative paucity of somatic mutations poses a challenge to risk stratification and development of targeted therapies. In this work, we investigated the burden of somatic mutations in a cohort of 10 hepatoblastomas paired with their respective germline samples, including a case of congenital tumor. Data revealed a low number of non-synonymous somatic coding mutations (mean of ~6 variants/tumor), totalizing 94 mutations in the 10 tumors, mapped in 87 genes; only three genes exhibited mutations detected in more than one sample, CTNNB1, CX3CL1 and CEP164. Target sequencing was used for validation and screening of the mutated genes in an additional group of 12 tumors; only CTNNB1 mutations were detected in this additional group. CTNNB1 mutations were detected in ~54% of the cohort (22 hepatoblastomas): seven single nucleotide variant or indel mutations were identified in eight hepatoblastomas (~36%), including the A21_S33del mutation, not previously reported; intragenic deletions were detected by Sanger sequencing in 4 tumors (~18%). The ß-catenin protein was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, presenting translocation to the nucleus, indicating activation of the WNT pathway; this result was also observed in tumors without CTNNB1 mutations. The main finding of the exome study was the identification of a recurrent somatic mutation in the exon 3 of the CX3CL1 gene (A235G) in two different hepatoblastomas. Gene expression and protein analysis of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 revealed increased expression of CX3CL1 in hepatoblastomas, a result that was replicated in two independent cohorts. A bimodal pattern of expression was observed: (a) lymphocytes infiltrated in tumor regions of inflammation post-chemotherapy were negative for these proteins, which should be expressed in this cell type under normal conditions, while the tumor cells expressed them; (b) in areas of tumor necrosis after chemotherapy, CX3CL1/CX3CR1 proteins were detected in lymphocytes, but not in tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of the CX3CL1/CX3CR1 pathway occurs in part of the hepatoblastomas, regardless of mutation detection, potentially related to inflammation and/or resistance to chemotherapy. Additionally, three mutational signatures were detected, two of them with a predominance of signatures of COSMIC, HB-S1 (COSMIC 1 and 6, present in all types of cancer) and HB-S2 (COSMIC 29 signature, related only to oral cell carcinoma gingival-buccal associated with the habit of chewing tobacco). A new mutational signature was observed in a subset of hepatoblastomas (HB-S3), with a non-specific pattern of small increase in C>A mutations. Mutational signatures already reported for liver cancer were not evident in these hepatoblastomas, suggesting a different mutational process. Finally, an exploration of germline mutations in the congenital hepatoblastoma led to the identification of variants in genes of cancer predisposition (BRCA1 and FAH), raising the question of the role of genetic predisposition in the development of these embryonal tumors (AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Syndrome , Hepatoblastoma , Carcinoma, Embryonal , Genomics , Chemokine CX3CL1 , Wnt Signaling Pathway , Whole Exome Sequencing , Liver Neoplasms/physiopathology , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Mutation/genetics
15.
Appl. cancer res ; 39: 1-7, 2019. ilustr.
Article in English | LILACS, Inca | ID: biblio-1023627

ABSTRACT

Background: Mutations in the RAS/RAF pathway predict resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies in colorectal cancer (CRC), and may be targets for future therapies. This study investigates concordance of BRAF, HRAS, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA mutation status in primary CRC with matched liver (n = 274), lung (n = 114) or combined liver and lung metastases (n = 14). Methods: Next generation sequencing was performed on DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded CRC and matched liver and/or lung metastases, for recurrent mutations in BRAF, HRAS, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA and using the single-molecule molecular inversion probe method. Results: Paired sequencing results on all five genes were reached in 249 of the 402 cases (62%). The obtained number of unique reads was not always sufficient to confidently call the absence or presence of mutations for all regions of interest. The mutational status of matched pairs was highly concordant; 91.1% concordance for all five genes, 95.5% for KRAS, 99.1% for NRAS. Lung metastases more often harboured RAS mutations compared to liver metastases (71% vs. 48%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: In this large series of CRC we show that both primary tumors and corresponding metastases can be used to determine the mutational status for targeted therapy, given the high concordance rates. Next generation sequencing including a single molecule tags is feasible, however in combination with archival formalin-fixed paraffin embedded material is limited by coverage depth.


Subject(s)
Humans , Colorectal Neoplasms/genetics , ras Proteins/genetics , Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Lung Neoplasms/genetics , Base Sequence , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Liver Neoplasms/secondary , Lung Neoplasms/secondary , Mutation/genetics
16.
Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop ; 52: e20170427, 2019. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1041583

ABSTRACT

Abstract INTRODUCTION: HPA polymorphism has been associated with HCV presence and fibrosis progression in chronic hepatitis C. However, it is unknown if there is an association between HPA-1 polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate HPA-1 polymorphism in the presence of HCC. METHODS: PCR-SSP was used to perform HPA genotyping on 76 HCV-infected patients. RESULTS: There was no association between patients with and without HCC. There was significant difference in HPA-1 genotypic frequency distribution between HCC and F1/F2 fibrosis degree. CONCLUSIONS: The HPA-1a/1b polymorphism appears to be more associated with liver damage progression than with HCC presence.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Antigens, Human Platelet/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/virology , Hepatitis C, Chronic/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/virology , Prognosis , Genetic Markers , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Risk Factors , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Disease Progression , Hepatitis C, Chronic/virology , Genotype , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Middle Aged
18.
IBJ-Iranian Biomedical Journal. 2018; 22 (3): 171-179
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-192466

ABSTRACT

Background: Curcumin, extracted from turmeric, represents enormous potential to serve as an anticancer agent. Telomerase is viewed as a prominent molecular target of curcumin, and transforming growth factor- beta 1 [TGF beta 1] has proven to be a major inhibitory signaling pathway for telomerase activity. In the current study, we aimed to explore suppressive effects of nanocurcumin on telomerase expression through TGF beta 1 pathway in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line [Huh7]


Methods: MTT assay was used to determine the effect of nonocurcumin on viability of Huh7 cells. RT-PCR was used to analyze the gene expression patterns


Results: MTT assay revealed that nanocurcumin acts in a dose- and time-dependent manner to diminish the cell viability. RT-PCR analysis indicated that nanocurcumin results in augmentation of TGF beta 1 72 hours post treatment and leads to the reduction of telomerase expression 48 and 72 hours post exposure. Also, up-regulation of Smad3 and E2F1 and down-regulation of Smad7 confirmed the effect of nanocurcumin on intermediate components of TGF beta 1 pathway. Furthermore, transfection of the proximal promoter of telomerase triggered a significant reduction in luciferase activity


Conclusion: The data from the present study lead us to develop a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying nanocurcumin-mediated regulation of telomerase expression, thereby presenting a new perspective to the landscape of using nanocurcumin as a cancer-oriented therapeutic agent


Subject(s)
Animals, Laboratory , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Curcumin/therapeutic use , Telomerase , Gene Expression , Transforming Growth Factor beta1
19.
Biol. Res ; 51: 52, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1011396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Phosphoinositide-3-kinase, regulatory subunit 1 (PIK3R1) could regulate cancer cell proliferation important for cancer cell proliferation; however, its role in Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of PIK3R1 in HCC and examined the underlying molecular mechanisms. METHODS: The expression of PIK3R1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR in a series of HCC tissues. The mRNA and protein expression of PIK3R1 was used by qRT-PCR and western blot assays in a series of human HCC cell lines, and then we choose MHCC97H and HCCLM3 cells as a model to investigate the effect of PIK3R1 on HCC progression. The effects of PIK3R1 knowdown on cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis of HCC were assessed by the MTT assay, clonogenic assays, wound healing assay and flow cytometry in vitro. Western blot assay was performed to assess the expression changes of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. RESULTS: Our results found that PIK3R1 was highly expressed in HCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Knockdown of PIK3R1 inhibited the proliferation, migration and promoted apoptosis of HCC cell lines. In addition, we proved that knockdown of PIK3R1 downregulated p-PI3K, p-AKT, and p-mTOR expressions in MHCC97H and HCCLM3 cells. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, PIK3R1 providing potential novel targets for the treatment of HCC.


Subject(s)
Humans , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Immunohistochemistry , Blotting, Western , Apoptosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/pathology , Disease Progression , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , Class Ia Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Liver Neoplasms/pathology
20.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 51(7): e7220, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889115

ABSTRACT

An abnormality in the Lin28/let-7a axis is relevant to the progression of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-positive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which could be a novel therapeutic target for this malignant tumor. The present study aimed to investigate the antiproliferative and anti-invasive effects of urolithin A in a stable full-length HBV gene integrated cell line HepG2.2.15 using CCK-8 and transwell assays. The RNA and protein expressions of targets were assessed by quantitative PCR and western blot, respectively. Results revealed that urolithin A induced cytotoxicity in HepG2.2.15 cells, which was accompanied by the cleavage of caspase-3 protein and down-regulation of Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Moreover, urolithin A suppressed the protein expressions of Sp-1, Lin28a, and Zcchc11, and elevated the expression of microRNA let-7a. Importantly, urolithin A also regulated the Lin28a/let-7a axis in transient HBx-transfected HCC HepG2 cells. Furthermore, urolithin A decelerated the HepG2.2.15 cell invasion, which was involved in suppressing the let-7a downstream factors HMGA2 and K-ras. These findings indicated that urolithin A exerted the antiproliferative effect by regulating the Lin28a/let-7a axis and may be a potential supplement for HBV-infected HCC therapy.


Subject(s)
Humans , RNA-Binding Proteins/drug effects , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/drug therapy , Coumarins/pharmacology , MicroRNAs/drug effects , Liver Neoplasms/drug therapy , Reference Values , Sincalide/analysis , Time Factors , Virus Replication/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Blotting, Western , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , RNA-Binding Proteins/analysis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/virology , MicroRNAs/analysis , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Hep G2 Cells , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Liver Neoplasms/virology
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