Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 217
Filter
1.
Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. (1992) ; 68(2): 183-190, Feb. 2022. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1365348

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to ascertain the long-term respiratory effects of COVID-19 pneumonia through pulmonary function tests in follow-ups at 1 and 6 months. METHODS: Our study was conducted between August 1, 2020 and April 30, 2021. At 1 month after discharge, follow-up evaluations, PFTs, and lung imaging were performed on patients aged above 18 years who had been diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia. In the 6th month, the PFTs were repeated for those with pulmonary dysfunction. RESULTS: A total of 219 patients (mean age, 49±11.9 years) were included. Pathological PFT results were noted in the 1st month for 80 patients and in the 6th month for 46 (7 had obstructive disorder, 15 had restrictive disorder, and 28 had small airway obstruction) patients. A significant difference was found between abnormal PFT results and patient-described dyspnea in the 1st month of follow-up. The 6-month PFT values (especially those for forced vital capacity) were statistically significantly lower in the patients for whom imaging did not indicate complete radiological improvement at the 1-month follow-up. No statistically significant difference was found between the severity of the first computed tomography findings or clinical condition on emergency admission and pulmonary dysfunction (Pearson's chi-square test, P=0.904; Fisher's exact test, P=0.727). CONCLUSION: It is important that patients with COVID-19 pneumonia be followed up for at least 1 month after discharge to be monitored for potential long-term lung damage. PFTs should be administered to those in whom ongoing dyspnea, which started with COVID-19, and/or full recovery were not identified in pulmonary imaging.


Subject(s)
Humans , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Respiratory Function Tests , Vital Capacity , Follow-Up Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Middle Aged
2.
Chinese Journal of Traumatology ; (6): 170-176, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928495

ABSTRACT

PROPOSE@#In this study, we re-assessed the criteria defined by the radiological society of North America (RSNA) to determine novel radiological findings helping the physicians differentiating COVID-19 from pulmonary contusion.@*METHODS@#All trauma patients with blunt chest wall trauma and subsequent pulmonary contusion, COVID-19-related signs and symptoms before the trauma were enrolled in this retrospective study from February to May 2020. Included patients (Group P) were then classified into two groups based on polymerase chain reaction tests (Group Pa for positive patients and Pb for negative ones). Moreover, 44 patients from the pre-pandemic period (Group PP) were enrolled. They were matched to Group P regarding age, sex, and trauma-related scores. Two radiologists blindly reviewed the CT images of all enrolled patients according to criteria defined by the RSNA criteria. The radiological findings were compared between Group P and Group PP; statistically significant ones were re-evaluated between Group Pa and Group Pb thereafter. Finally, the sensitivity and specificity of each significant findings were calculated. The Chi-square test was used to compare the radiological findings between Group P and Group PP.@*RESULTS@#In the Group PP, 73.7% of all ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and 80% of all multiple bilateral GGOs were detected (p < 0.001 and p = 0.25, respectively). Single bilateral GGOs were only seen among the Group PP. The Chi-square tests showed that the prevalence of diffused GGOs, multiple unilateral GGOs, multiple consolidations, and multiple bilateral consolidations were significantly higher in the Group P (p = 0.001, 0.01, 0.003, and 0.003, respectively). However, GGOs with irregular borders and single consolidations were more significant among the Group PP (p = 0.01 and 0.003, respectively). Of note, reticular distortions and subpleural spares were exclusively detected in the Group PP.@*CONCLUSION@#We concluded that the criteria set by RSNA for the diagnosis of COVID-19 are not appropriate in trauma patients. The clinical signs and symptoms are not always useful either. The presence of multiple unilateral GGOs, diffused GGOs, and multiple bilateral consolidations favor COVID-19 with 88%, 97.62%, and 77.7% diagnostic accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Contusions/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Lead , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung Injury/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
3.
Singapore medical journal ; : 219-224, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-927281

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION@#We aimed to compare the early clinical manifestations, laboratory results and chest computed tomography (CT) images of COVID-19 patients with those of other community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients to differentiate CAP from COVID-19 before reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results are obtained.@*METHODS@#The clinical and laboratory data and chest CT images of 51 patients were assessed in a fever observation ward for evidence of COVID-19 between January and February 2020.@*RESULTS@#24 patients had laboratory-confirmed COVID-19, whereas 27 individuals had negative results. No statistical difference in clinical features was found between COVID-19 and CAP patients, except for diarrhoea. There was a significant difference in lymphocyte and eosinophil counts between COVID-19 and CAP patients. In total, 22 (91.67%) COVID-19 patients had bilateral involvement and multiple lesions according to their lung CT images; the left lower lobe (87.50%) and right lower lobe (95.83%) were affected most often, and all lesions were located in the peripheral zones of the lung. The most common CT feature of COVID-19 was ground-glass opacity, found in 95.83% of patients, compared to 66.67% of CAP patients.@*CONCLUSION@#Diarrhoea, lymphocyte counts, eosinophil counts and CT findings (e.g. ground-glass opacity) could help to distinguish COVID-19 from CAP at an early stage of infection, based on findings from our fever observation ward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , China , Community-Acquired Infections/diagnostic imaging , Diarrhea/pathology , Fever , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
6.
Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. (1992) ; 67(10): 1409-1414, Oct. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1351436

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe chest computed tomography image findings in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: The chest computed tomography scans of 453 hospitalized patients with confirmed COVID-19 were collected at two tertiary care Brazilian hospitals. Demographics and clinical data were extracted from the electronic record medical system. RESULTS: The main chest computed tomography findings were ground-glass opacities (92.5%), consolidation (79.2%), crazy-paving pattern (23.9%), parenchymal bands (50%), septal thickening (43.5%), and inverted halo sign (3.5%). Of the 453 hospitalized patients, 136 (30%) died. In this group, ground-glass opacities (94.1%), consolidation (89.7%), septal thickening (58.1%), crazy-paving pattern (52.2%), and parenchymal bands (39.7%) were the most common imaging findings. CONCLUSIONS: In a dynamic disease with a broad clinical spectrum such as COVID-19, radiologists can cooperate in a better patient management. On wisely indicated chest computed tomography scans, the fast identification of poor prognosis findings could advise patient management through hospital care facilities and clinical team decisions.


Subject(s)
Humans , COVID-19 , Thorax , Brazil , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , SARS-CoV-2 , Lung/diagnostic imaging
7.
Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. (1992) ; 67(9): 1328-1332, Sept. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1351488

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY OBJECTIVE: In coronary computed tomography angiography, a part of the lung parenchyma also enters the image area which is called the field of view. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of pulmonary abnormalities and document their association with demographic features in subjects undergoing multislice coronary computed tomography angiography obtained for the assessment of coronary artery disease. METHODS: This was a retrospective observational study evaluating the coronary computed tomography angiography scans of 1,050 patients (58.5% males and 47.3% smokers) with a mean age of 52.2±11.2 years, obtained between January 2018 and March 2020. Pulmonary abnormalities were reported as nodules, focal consolidations, ground-glass opacities, consolidations, emphysema, cysts, bronchiectasis, atelectasis, and miscellaneous. RESULTS: In total, 274 pulmonary abnormalities were detected in 266 patients (25.3%). The distribution of incidental lung findings was as follows: pulmonary nodules: 36.4%, emphysema: 15.6%, bronchiectasis: 11%, ground-glass opacities: 7.2%, atelectasis 7.2%, focal consolidations: 5%, cysts: 6%, consolidations: 2.5%, and miscellaneous: 9.1%. The patients with pulmonary pathology were older (55.5±11.4 versus 51.0±10.9 years), and the percentage of smokers was higher (60.1 versus 43.2%). The possibility of the presence of any incidental lung findings in field of view of coronary computed tomography angiography increases significantly over the age of 40.5 years (p<0.001, AUC 0.612, 95%CI 0.573-0.651). CONCLUSION: Multislice coronary computed tomography angiography can give important clues regarding pulmonary diseases. It is essential for the reporting radiologist to review the entire scan for pulmonary pathological findings especially in patients with smoking history and over the age of 40.5 years.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Incidental Findings , Computed Tomography Angiography , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Retrospective Studies , Coronary Angiography , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Middle Aged
9.
Gac. méd. Méx ; 157(3): 261-266, may.-jun. 2021. tab, graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1346105

ABSTRACT

Resumen Introducción: La implementación del ultrasonido pulmonar (LUS) en los pacientes con COVID-19 puede ayudar a establecer el grado de afectación pulmonar, evaluar la respuesta al tratamiento y estimar el desenlace intrahospitalario. Objetivo: Evaluar la aplicación de un protocolo LUS en pacientes con infección por COVID-19 para predecir mortalidad intrahospitalaria. Métodos: El estudio se realizó del 1 de abril al 1 de agosto de 2020 en pacientes con infección por COVID-19, ingresados en la Unidad de Terapia Intensiva. Se realizó evaluación pulmonar por médicos entrenados en ultrasonografía crítica. Resultados: La mayoría de los pacientes fue del sexo masculino, la edad mediana fue de 56 años y 59 % requirió ventilación mecánica. La mortalidad intrahospitalaria fue de 39.4 % y en aquellos con puntuación de LUS ≥ 19, de 50 %. El modelo de regresión logística múltiple mostró que la puntuación de LUS ≥ 19 se asoció significativamente a mortalidad (cociente de riesgo = 2.55, p = 0.01). Conclusiones: El LUS es una herramienta clínica segura y rápida que puede realizarse al lado de la cama de los pacientes con infección por COVID-19, para establecer el grado de afectación parenquimatosa y predecir la mortalidad.


Abstract Introduction: Lung ultrasound (LUS) implementation in patients with COVID-19 can help to establish the degree of pulmonary involvement, evaluate treatment response and estimate in-hospital outcome. Objective: To evaluate the application of LUS in patients with COVID-19 infection to predict in-hospital mortality. Methods: The study was carried out from April 1 to August 1, 2020 in patients with COVID-19 infection admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. Lung evaluation was carried out by physicians trained in critical care ultrasonography. Results: Most patients were males, median age was 56 years, and 59 % required mechanical ventilation. In-hospital mortality was 39.4 %, and in those with a LUS score ≥ 19, mortality was higher (50 %). The multiple logistic regression model showed that a LUS score ≥ 19 was significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio = 2.55, p = 0.01). Conclusions: LUS is a safe and fast clinical tool that can be applied at bedside in patients with COVID-19 infection to establish the degree of parenchymal involvement and predict mortality.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Aged , Ultrasonography , Hospital Mortality , COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Critical Care , COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization
10.
Säo Paulo med. j ; 139(5): 505-510, May 2021. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1290253

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The mechanism of exercise limitation in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is not fully understood. The role of hemodynamic alterations is well recognized, but mechanical, ventilatory and gasometric factors may also contribute to reduction of exercise capacity in these individuals. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether there is an association between ventilatory pattern and stress Doppler echocardiography (SDE) variables in IPAH patients. DESIGN AND SETTING: Single-center prospective study conducted in a Brazilian university hospital. METHODS: We included 14 stable IPAH patients and 14 age and sex-matched controls. Volumetric capnography (VCap), spirometry, six-minute walk test and SDE were performed on both the patients and the control subjects. Arterial blood gases were collected only from the patients. The IPAH patients and control subjects were compared with regard to the abovementioned variables. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 38.4 years, and 78.6% were women. The patients showed hypocapnia, and in spirometry 42.9% presented forced vital capacity (FVC) below the lower limit of normality. In VCap, IPAH patients had higher respiratory rates (RR) and lower elimination of CO2 in each breath. There was a significant correlation between reduced FVC and the magnitude of increases in tricuspid regurgitation velocity (TRV). In IPAH patients, VCap showed similar tidal volumes and a higher RR, which at least partially explained the hypocapnia. CONCLUSIONS: The patients with IPAH showed hypocapnia, probably related to their higher respiratory rate with preserved tidal volumes; FVC was reduced and this reduction was positively correlated with cardiac output.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension , Cross-Sectional Studies , Prospective Studies , Echocardiography, Stress , Exercise Test , Familial Primary Pulmonary Hypertension , Lung/diagnostic imaging
12.
Rev. bras. ginecol. obstet ; 43(3): 200-206, Mar. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1251306

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective Covid-19 became a pandemic, and researchers have not been able to establish a treatment algorithm. The pregnant population is also another concern for health care professionals. There are physiological changes related to pregnancy that result in different laboratory levels, radiological findings and disease progression. The goal of the present article is to determine whether the laboratory results and radiological findings were different in non-pregnant women (NPWs) of reproductive age and pregnant women (PWs) diagnosed with the Covid-19 infection. Methods Out of 34 patients, 15 (44.11%) PWs and 19 (55.8%) NPWs were included in the study. Age, comorbidities, complaints, vitals, respiratory rates, computed tomography (CT) findings and stages, as well as laboratory parameters, were recorded from the hospital database. Results Themean age of the PWs was of 27.6 ± 0.99 years, and that of the NPWs was of 37.63 ± 2.00; when agewas compared between the groups, a statistically significant difference (p=0.001) was found. The mean systolic blood pressure of the PWs was of 116.53 ± 11.35, and that of the NPWs was of 125.53 ± 13.00, and their difference was statistically significant (p=0.05). The difference in the minimum respiratory rates of the patients was also statistically significant (p=0.05). The platelet levels observed among the PWs with Covid-19 were lower than those of the NPWs (185.40 ± 39.09 x 109/mcL and 232.00 ± 71.04 x 109/mcL respectively; p=0.05). The mean D-dimer value of the PWs was lower in comparison to that of the NPWs (p<0.05). Conclusion The laboratory findings and imaging studiesmay differ between pregnant and non-pregnant populations. It is important to properly interpret these studies. Future studies with a higher number of patients are required to confirm these preliminary data.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Prognosis , Biomarkers/blood , Cross-Sectional Studies , Retrospective Studies , Disease Progression , COVID-19/blood , Lung/diagnostic imaging
13.
An. bras. dermatol ; 96(2): 240-242, Mar.-Apr. 2021. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1248742

ABSTRACT

Abstract Small vessel vasculitis with anti-proteinase antibodies 3 is an atypical clinical presentation of tuberculosis. The authors present the case of a 47-year-old male patient, with palpable purpura and palmoplantar hemorrhagic blisters, with subsequent dissemination. He presented severe pulmonary symptoms with cavitation, fever, hemoptysis, and high levels of anti-proteinase 3. Histopathological assessment of the skin revealed small vessel vasculitis; pulmonary histopathology showed granulomas with caseation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was positive for alcohol-acid-fast bacilli. In countries with a high prevalence of tuberculosis, the presence of autoantibodies in a patient with vasculitis, fever, and pulmonary cavitation requires investigation of infectious causes.


Subject(s)
Vasculitis/diagnosis , Skin Diseases, Vascular , Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic , Myeloblastin , Hemoptysis/diagnosis , Hemoptysis/etiology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Middle Aged
14.
J. pediatr. (Rio J.) ; 97(1): 37-43, Jan.-Feb. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1154715

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: To compare quantitative CT parameters between children with severe asthma and healthy subjects, correlating to their clinical features. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed CT data from 19 school-aged children (5-17 years) with severe asthma and 19 control school-aged children with pectus excavatum. The following CT parameters were evaluated: total lung volume (TLV), mean lung density (MLD), CT air trapping index (AT%) (attenuation ≤856 HU), airway wall thickness (AWT), and percentage of airway wall thickness (AWT%). Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) data were correlated to the following clinical parameters: forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF 25-75%), FEV1/FVC ratio, sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage analysis, serum IgE levels, and previous hospitalizations due to asthma. Results: Asthma patients presented higher mean values of AT% (23.8 ± 6.7% vs. controls, 9.7 ± 3.2%), AWT (1.46 ± 0.22 mm vs. controls, 0.47 ± −735 ± 28 HU vs. controls, −666 ± 19 HU). Mean AT% was 29.0 ± 4.7% in subjects with previous hospitalization against 19.2 ± 5.0% in those with no prior hospitalization (p < 0.001). AT% presented very strong negative correlations with FVC (r = −0.933, p < 0.001) and FEV1 (r = −0.841, p < 0.001) and a moderate correlation with FEF 25-75% (r = −0.608, p = 0.007). AT% correlation with FEV1/FVC ratio and serum IgE was weak (r = −0.184, p = 0.452, and r = −0.363, p = 0.202) Conclusion: Children with severe asthma present differences in quantitative chest CT scans compared to healthy controls with strong correlations with pulmonary function tests and previous hospitalizations due to asthma.


Subject(s)
Humans , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Aged , Asthma/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Function Tests , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Vital Capacity , Forced Expiratory Volume , Retrospective Studies , Lung/diagnostic imaging
15.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 1828-1837, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887599

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#Prenatal evaluation of fetal lung maturity (FLM) is a challenge, and an effective non-invasive method for prenatal assessment of FLM is needed. The study aimed to establish a normal fetal lung gestational age (GA) grading model based on deep learning (DL) algorithms, validate the effectiveness of the model, and explore the potential value of DL algorithms in assessing FLM.@*METHODS@#A total of 7013 ultrasound images obtained from 1023 normal pregnancies between 20 and 41 + 6 weeks were analyzed in this study. There were no pregnancy-related complications that affected fetal lung development, and all infants were born without neonatal respiratory diseases. The images were divided into three classes based on the gestational week: class I: 20 to 29 + 6 weeks, class II: 30 to 36 + 6 weeks, and class III: 37 to 41 + 6 weeks. There were 3323, 2142, and 1548 images in each class, respectively. First, we performed a pre-processing algorithm to remove irrelevant information from each image. Then, a convolutional neural network was designed to identify different categories of fetal lung ultrasound images. Finally, we used ten-fold cross-validation to validate the performance of our model. This new machine learning algorithm automatically extracted and classified lung ultrasound image information related to GA. This was used to establish a grading model. The performance of the grading model was assessed using accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic curves.@*RESULTS@#A normal fetal lung GA grading model was established and validated. The sensitivity of each class in the independent test set was 91.7%, 69.8%, and 86.4%, respectively. The specificity of each class in the independent test set was 76.8%, 90.0%, and 83.1%, respectively. The total accuracy was 83.8%. The area under the curve (AUC) of each class was 0.982, 0.907, and 0.960, respectively. The micro-average AUC was 0.957, and the macro-average AUC was 0.949.@*CONCLUSIONS@#The normal fetal lung GA grading model could accurately identify ultrasound images of the fetal lung at different GAs, which can be used to identify cases of abnormal lung development due to gestational diseases and evaluate lung maturity after antenatal corticosteroid therapy. The results indicate that DL algorithms can be used as a non-invasive method to predict FLM.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Deep Learning , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Neural Networks, Computer , Pregnancy
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-888245

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveTo describe the epidemiologic, clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics and prognoses of COVID-19 confirmed patients in a single center in Beijing, China. Methods The study retrospectively included 19 patients with nucleic acid-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection at our hospital from January 20 to March 5, 2020. The final follow-up date was March 14, 2020. The epidemiologic and clinical information was obtained through direct communication with the patients or their family members. Laboratory results retrieved from medical records and radiological images were analyzed both qualitatively by two senior chest radiologists as well as quantitatively via an artificial intelligence software. Results We identified 5 family clusters (13/19, 68.4%) from the study cohort. All cases had good clinical prognoses and were either mild (3/19) or moderate (16/19) clinical types. Fever (15/19, 78.9%) and dry cough (11/19, 57.9%) were common symptoms. Two patients received negative results for more than three consecutive viral nucleic acid tests. The longest interval between an initial CT abnormal finding and a confirmed diagnosis was 30 days. One patient's nucleic acid test turned positive on the follow-up examination after discharge. The presence of radiological abnormalities was non-specific for the diagnosis of COVID-19. Conclusions COVID-19 patients with mild or no clinical symptoms are common in Beijing, China. Radiological abnormalities are mostly non-specific and massive CT examinations for COVID-19 screening should be avoided. Analyses of the contact histories of diagnosed cases in combination with clinical, radiological and laboratory findings are crucial for the early detection of COVID-19. Close monitoring after discharge is also recommended.


Subject(s)
Adult , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Child , China , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-921876

ABSTRACT

Objective Focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) and lung ultrasound (LU) are increasingly being used in critically ill patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of FCU in combination with LU on these patients and to determine if the timing of ultrasound examination was associated with treatment change. Methods This is a multicenter cross-sectional observational study. Consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were screened for enrollment. FCU and LU were performed within the first 24 h, and treatment change was proposed by the performer based on the ultrasound results and other clinical conditions. Results Among the 992 patients included, 502 were examined within 6 h of ICU admission (early phase group), and 490 were examined after 6 h of admission (later phase group). The early phase group and the later phase group had similar proportions of treatment change (48.8%


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Echocardiography , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies
18.
Singapore medical journal ; : 458-465, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-920941

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION@#Chest radiographs (CXRs) are widely used for the screening and management of COVID-19. This article describes the radiographic features of COVID-19 based on an initial national cohort of patients.@*METHODS@#This is a retrospective review of swab-positive patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to four different hospitals in Singapore between 22 January and 9 March 2020. Initial and follow-up CXRs were reviewed by three experienced radiologists to identify the predominant pattern and distribution of lung parenchymal abnormalities.@*RESULTS@#In total, 347 CXRs of 96 patients were reviewed. Initial CXRs were abnormal in 41 (42.7%) out of 96 patients. The mean time from onset of symptoms to CXR abnormality was 5.3 ± 4.7 days. The predominant pattern of lung abnormality was ground-glass opacity on initial CXRs (51.2%) and consolidation on follow-up CXRs (51.0%). Multifocal bilateral abnormalities in mixed central and peripheral distribution were observed in 63.4% and 59.2% of abnormal initial and follow-up CXRs, respectively. The lower zones were involved in 90.2% of initial CXRs and 93.9% of follow-up CXRs.@*CONCLUSION@#In a cohort of swab-positive patients, including those identified from contact tracing, we found a lower incidence of CXR abnormalities than was previously reported. The most common pattern was ground-glass opacity or consolidation, but mixed central and peripheral involvement was more common than peripheral involvement alone.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Radiography, Thoracic , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL