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1.
Chinese Journal of Oncology ; (12): 50-55, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-969805

ABSTRACT

Objective: To observe the effects of exosomes derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and to analyze the contents of exosomes and explore the mechanisms affecting pancreatic cancer cells. Methods: Exosomes extracted from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells were added to pancreatic cancer cells BxPC3, Panc-1 and mouse models of pancreatic cancer, respectively. The proliferative activity and invasion abilities of BxPC3 and Panc-1 cells were measured by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and Transwell assays. The expressions of miRNAs in exosomes were detected by high-throughput sequencing. GO and KEGG were used to analyze the related functions and the main metabolic pathways of target genes with high expressions of miRNAs. Results: The results of CCK-8 cell proliferation assay showed that the absorbance of BxPC3 and Panc-1 cells in the hucMSCs-exo group was significantly higher than that in the control group [(4.68±0.09) vs. (3.68±0.01), P<0.05; (5.20±0.20) vs. (3.45±0.17), P<0.05]. Transwell test results showed that the number of invasion cells of BxPC3 and Panc-1 in hucMSCs-exo group was significantly higher than that in the control group (129.40±6.02) vs. (89.40±4.39), P<0.05; (134.40±7.02) vs. (97.00±6.08), P<0.05. In vivo experimental results showed that the tumor volume and weight in the exosomes derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hucMSCs-exo) group were significantly greater than that in the control group [(884.57±59.70) mm(3) vs. (695.09±57.81) mm(3), P<0.05; (0.94±0.21) g vs. (0.60±0.13) g, P<0.05]. High-throughput sequencing results showed that miR-148a-3p, miR-100-5p, miR-143-3p, miR-21-5p and miR-92a-3p were highly expressed. GO and KEGG analysis showed that the target genes of these miRNAs were mainly involved in the regulation of glucosaldehylation, and the main metabolic pathways were ascorbic acid and aldehyde acid metabolism, which were closely related to the development of pancreatic cancer. Conclusion: Exosomes derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells can promote the growth of pancreatic cancer cells and the mechanism is related to miRNAs that are highly expressed in exosomes.


Subject(s)
Mice , Animals , Humans , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Exosomes/genetics , Sincalide/metabolism , Pancreatic Neoplasms/metabolism , Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/genetics , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Umbilical Cord
2.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 1773-1788, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-981169

ABSTRACT

A triple-transgenic (tyrosine hydroxylase/dopamine decarboxylase/GTP cyclohydrolase 1, TH/DDC/GCH1) bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell line (BMSCs) capable of stably synthesizing dopamine (DA) transmitters were established to provide experimental evidence for the clinical treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) by using this cell line. The DA-BMSCs cell line that could stably synthesize and secrete DA transmitters was established by using the triple transgenic recombinant lentivirus. The triple transgenes (TH/DDC/GCH1) expression in DA-BMSCs was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and immunofluorescence. Moreover, the secretion of DA was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Chromosome G-banding analysis was used to detect the genetic stability of DA-BMSCs. Subsequently, the DA-BMSCs were stereotactically transplanted into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of Parkinson's rat models to detect their survival and differentiation in the intracerebral microenvironment of PD rats. Apomorphine (APO)-induced rotation test was used to detect the improvement of motor dysfunction in PD rat models with cell transplantation. The TH, DDC and GCH1 were expressed stably and efficiently in the DA-BMSCs cell line, but not expressed in the normal rat BMSCs. The concentration of DA in the cell culture supernatant of the triple transgenic group (DA-BMSCs) and the LV-TH group was extremely significantly higher than that of the standard BMSCs control group (P < 0.000 1). After passage, DA-BMSCs stably produced DA. Karyotype G-banding analysis showed that the vast majority of DA-BMSCs maintained normal diploid karyotypes (94.5%). Moreover, after 4 weeks of transplantation into the brain of PD rats, DA-BMSCs significantly improved the movement disorder of PD rat models, survived in a large amount in the brain microenvironment, differentiated into TH-positive and GFAP-positive cells, and upregulated the DA level in the injured area of the brain. The triple-transgenic DA-BMSCs cell line that stably produced DA, survived in large numbers, and differentiated in the rat brain was successfully established, laying a foundation for the treatment of PD using engineered culture and transplantation of DA-BMSCs.


Subject(s)
Rats , Animals , Dopamine , Parkinson Disease/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Cell Line , Brain/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation
3.
Chinese Journal of Biotechnology ; (12): 1351-1362, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-981142

ABSTRACT

In recent years, mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs)-derived exosomes have attracted much attention in the field of tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes are signaling molecules for communication among cells. They are characterized by natural targeting and low immunogenicity, and are mostly absorbed by cells through the paracrine pathway of mesenchymal stem cells. Moreover, they participate in the regulation and promotion of cell or tissue regeneration. As a scaffold material in regenerative medicine, hydrogel has good biocompatibility and degradability. Combining the two compounds can not only improve the retention time of exosomes at the lesion site, but also improve the dose of exosomes reaching the lesion site by in situ injection, and the therapeutic effect in the lesion area is significant and continuous. This paper summarizes the research results of the interaction of exocrine and hydrogel composite materials to promote tissue repair and regeneration, in order to facilitate research in the field of tissue regeneration in the future.


Subject(s)
Hydrogels/metabolism , Exosomes/metabolism , Wound Healing , Regenerative Medicine , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism
4.
International Journal of Oral Science ; (4): 6-6, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-971593

ABSTRACT

The failure rate of dental implantation in patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is higher than that in non-diabetic patients. This due, in part, to the impaired function of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from the jawbone marrow of T2DM patients (DM-BMSCs), limiting implant osseointegration. RNA N6-methyladenine (m6A) is important for BMSC function and diabetes regulation. However, it remains unclear how to best regulate m6A modifications in DM-BMSCs to enhance function. Based on the "m6A site methylation stoichiometry" of m6A single nucleotide arrays, we identified 834 differential m6A-methylated genes in DM-BMSCs compared with normal-BMSCs (N-BMSCs), including 43 and 790 m6A hypermethylated and hypomethylated genes, respectively, and 1 gene containing hyper- and hypomethylated m6A sites. Differential m6A hypermethylated sites were primarily distributed in the coding sequence, while hypomethylated sites were mainly in the 3'-untranslated region. The largest and smallest proportions of m6A-methylated genes were on chromosome 1 and 21, respectively. MazF-PCR and real-time RT-PCR results for the validation of erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 like 3, activity-dependent neuroprotector homeobox (ADNP), growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11), and regulator of G protein signalling 2 agree with m6A single nucleotide array results; ADNP and GDF11 mRNA expression decreased in DM-BMSCs. Furthermore, gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses suggested that most of these genes were enriched in metabolic processes. This study reveals the differential m6A sites of DM-BMSCs compared with N-BMSCs and identifies candidate target genes to enhance BMSC function and improve implantation success in T2DM patients.


Subject(s)
Humans , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/metabolism , Dental Implants/adverse effects , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Growth Differentiation Factors/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , RNA/metabolism , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional
5.
Journal of Biomedical Engineering ; (6): 95-102, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-970678

ABSTRACT

The study aims to explore the effect of mesenchymal stem cells-derived exosomes (MSCs-Exo) on staurosporine (STS)-induced chondrocyte apoptosis before and after exposure to pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) at different frequencies. The AMSCs were extracted from the epididymal fat of healthy rats before and after exposure to the PEMF at 1 mT amplitude and a frequency of 15, 45, and 75 Hz, respectively, in an incubator. MSCs-Exo was extracted and identified. Exosomes were labeled with DiO fluorescent dye, and then co-cultured with STS-induced chondrocytes for 24 h. Cellular uptake of MSC-Exo, apoptosis, and the protein and mRNA expression of aggrecan, caspase-3 and collagenⅡA in chondrocytes were observed. The study demonstrated that the exposure of 75 Hz PEMF was superior to 15 and 45 Hz PEMF in enhancing the effect of exosomes in alleviating chondrocyte apoptosis and promoting cell matrix synthesis. This study lays a foundation for the regulatory mechanism of PEMF stimulation on MSCs-Exo in inhibiting chondrocyte apoptosis, and opens up a new direction for the prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rats , Apoptosis , Chondrocytes , Electromagnetic Fields , Exosomes/physiology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism
6.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 194-206, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-970054

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#Imatinib mesylate (IM) resistance is an emerging problem for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Previous studies found that connexin 43 (Cx43) deficiency in the hematopoietic microenvironment (HM) protects minimal residual disease (MRD), but the mechanism remains unknown.@*METHODS@#Immunohistochemistry assays were employed to compare the expression of Cx43 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in bone marrow (BM) biopsies of CML patients and healthy donors. A coculture system of K562 cells and several Cx43-modified bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was established under IM treatment. Proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and other indicators of K562 cells in different groups were detected to investigate the function and possible mechanism of Cx43. We assessed the Ca 2+ -related pathway by Western blotting. Tumor-bearing models were also established to validate the causal role of Cx43 in reversing IM resistance.@*RESULTS@#Low levels of Cx43 in BMs were observed in CML patients, and Cx43 expression was negatively correlated with HIF-1α. We also observed that K562 cells cocultured with BMSCs transfected with adenovirus-short hairpin RNA of Cx43 (BMSCs-shCx43) had a lower apoptosis rate and that their cell cycle was blocked in G0/G1 phase, while the result was the opposite in the Cx43-overexpression setting. Cx43 mediates gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) through direct contact, and Ca 2+ is the key factor mediating the downstream apoptotic pathway. In animal experiments, mice bearing K562, and BMSCs-Cx43 had the smallest tumor volume and spleen, which was consistent with the in vitro experiments.@*CONCLUSIONS@#Cx43 deficiency exists in CML patients, promoting the generation of MRD and inducing drug resistance. Enhancing Cx43 expression and GJIC function in the HM may be a novel strategy to reverse drug resistance and promote IM efficacy.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Mice , Apoptosis , Bone Marrow Cells , Cell Communication , Connexin 43/genetics , Gap Junctions/metabolism , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , K562 Cells , Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive/pathology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Tumor Microenvironment , Calcium/metabolism
7.
Chinese Journal of Cellular and Molecular Immunology ; (12): 626-632, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-981909

ABSTRACT

Objective To investigate the effect of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on autophagy and apoptosis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Methods hBMSCs were isolated and cultured. The cells were divided into control group, 3-MA group, H2O2 group, H2O2 combined with 3-MA group. DCFH-DA staining was used to analyze the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). hBMSCs were treated with 0, 50, 100, 200, 400 μmol/L H2O2, and then the cell viability was detected by CCK-8 assay. The level of autophagy was detected by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and LysoTracker Red staining. The cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of beclin 1, mTOR, phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR), cleaved caspase-3(c-caspase-3) and caspase-3 proteins. Results Compared with the control group and 3-MA group, ROS level and autophagosomes were increased and the proliferation and apoptosis were decreased in H2O2 group. The protein expression of beclin 1, mTOR, c-caspase-3 was up-regulated, while the p-mTOR was down-regulated. Compared with the 3-MA group, the H2O2 combined with 3-MA group also had an increased ROS level and autophagosomes, but not with significantly increased apoptosis rate; The protein expression of beclin 1, mTOR, c-caspase-3 was up-regulated, and the p-mTOR was down-regulated. Conclusion H2O2 can induce hMSCs to trigger oxidative stress response. It enhances the autophagy and inhibits the proliferation and apoptosis of hBMSCs.


Subject(s)
Humans , Beclin-1/metabolism , Caspase 3/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Hydrogen Peroxide/pharmacology , Apoptosis , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Oxidative Stress , Autophagy , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Cell Proliferation
8.
Chinese Journal of Cellular and Molecular Immunology ; (12): 481-487, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-981889

ABSTRACT

Objective To investigate the effects of miR-877-3p on migration and apoptotic T lymphocytes of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Methods The model of osteoporosis induced by bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) and sham operation was established. At 8 weeks after operation, the bone parameters of the two groups were detected by micro-CT. The levels of monocyte chemotactic protein 1(MCP-1) in BMSCs were detected by ELISA. BMSC in OVX group and sham group were co-cultured with T lymphocytes, respectively. The migration ability of T lymphocytes in the two groups was observed by TranswellTM assay with PKH26 staining and apoptosis of T lymphocytes were detected by flow cytometry. Reverse transcription PCR was used to detect the expression of miR-877-3p in BMSCs. miR-877-3p was overexpressed or down-regulated by cell transfection. The level of MCP-1 secreted by BMSCs in each group was detected by ELISA. The migration and apoptosis of T lymphocytes were detected by the above methods. Results The number of trabecular bone and bone mineral density in OVX group were lower than those in sham group. The levels of MCP-1 secretion, chemotactic and apoptotic T lymphocyte ability of BMSCs in OVX group were also lower than those in sham group. The expression level of miR-877-3p in BMSC in OVX group was higher than that in sham group. After overexpression of BMSC miR-877-3p, the levels of MCP-1 secreted from BMSCs, and apoptotic T lymphocytes decreased, while the results were opposite after down-regulation of miR-877-3p. Conclusion miR-877-3p may be one of the causes of osteoporosis by inhibiting MCP-1 secretion of BMSCs and the migration and apoptosis of T lymphocytes.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Mice , Apoptosis/genetics , Bone Marrow Cells/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Chemokine CCL2/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Osteogenesis , Osteoporosis/genetics , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
9.
Chinese Journal of Burns ; (6): 422-433, 2022.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-936029

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the effects of non-muscle myosin Ⅱ (NMⅡ) gene silenced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) on pulmonary extracellular matrix (ECM) and fibrosis in rats with acute lung injury (ALI) induced by endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods: The experimental research methods were adopted. Cells from femur and tibial bone marrow cavity of four one-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were identified as BMMSCs by flow cytometry, and the third passage of BMMSCs were used in the following experiments. The cells were divided into NMⅡ silenced group transfected with pHBLV-U6-ZsGreen-Puro plasmid containing small interference RNA sequence of NMⅡ gene, vector group transfected with empty plasmid, and blank control group without any treatment, and the protein expression of NMⅡ at 72 h after intervention was detected by Western blotting (n=3). The morphology of cells was observed by an inverted phase contrast microscope and cells labeled with chloromethylbenzoine (CM-DiⅠ) in vitro were observed by an inverted fluorescence microscope. Twenty 4-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into blank control group, ALI alone group, ALI+BMMSC group, and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group according to the random number table, with 5 rats in each group. Rats in blank control group were not treated, and rats in the other 3 groups were given LPS to induce ALI. Immediately after modeling, rats in ALI alone group were injected with 1 mL normal saline via tail vein, rats in ALI+BMMSC group and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group were injected with 1×107/mL BMMSCs and NMⅡ gene silenced BMMSCs of 1 mL labelled with CM-DiⅠ via tail vein, and rats in blank control group were injected with 1 mL normal saline via tail vein at the same time point, respectively. At 24 h after intervention, the lung tissue was collected to observe intrapulmonary homing of the BMMSCs by an inverted fluorescence microscope. Lung tissue was collected at 24 h, in 1 week, and in 2 weeks after intervention to observe pulmonary inflammation by hematoxylin eosin staining and to observe pulmonary fibrosis by Masson staining, and the pulmonary fibrosis in 2 weeks after intervention was scored by modified Ashcroft score (n=5). The content of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), and MMP-9 was detected by immunohistochemistry in 2 weeks after intervention (n=3), the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase (MPO) was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 24 h after intervention (n=3), and the protein expressions of CD11b and epidermal growth factor like module containing mucin like hormone receptor 1 (EMR1) in 1 week after intervention were detected by immunofluorescence staining (n=3). Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance, Bonferroni method, and Kruskal-Wallis H test. Results: At 72 h after intervention, the NMⅡprotein expression of cells in NMⅡ silenced group was significantly lower than those in blank control group and vector group (with P values <0.01). BMMSCs were in long spindle shape and grew in cluster shaped like vortexes, which were labelled with CM-DiⅠ successfully in vitro. At 24 h after intervention, cell homing in lung of rats in ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group was more pronounced than that in ALI+BMMSC group, while no CM-DiⅠ-labelled BMMSCs were observed in lung of rats in blank control group and ALI alone group. There was no obvious inflammatory cell infiltration in lung tissue of rats in blank control group at all time points, while inflammatory cell infiltration in lung tissue of rats in ALI+BMMSC group and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group was significantly less than that in ALI alone group at 24 h after intervention, and alveolar wall turned to be thinner and a small amount of congestion in local lung tissue appeared in rats of the two groups in 1 week and 2 weeks after intervention. In 1 week and 2 weeks after intervention, collagen fiber deposition in lung tissue of rats in ALI alone group, ALI+BMMSC group, and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group was significantly aggravated compared with that in blank control group, while collagen fiber deposition in lung tissue of rats in ALI+BMMSC group and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group was significantly improved compared with that in ALI alone group. In 2 weeks after intervention, modified Ashcroft scores for pulmonary fibrosis of rats in ALI alone group, ALI+BMMSC group, and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group were 2.36±0.22, 1.62±0.16, 1.06±0.26, respectively, significantly higher than 0.30±0.21 in blank control group (P<0.01). Modified Ashcroft scores for pulmonary fibrosis of rats in ALI+BMMSC group and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group were significantly lower than that in ALI alone group (P<0.01), and modified Ashcroft score for pulmonary fibrosis of rats in ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group was significantly lower than that in ALI+BMMSC group (P<0.01). In 2 weeks after intervention, the content of α-SMA in lung tissue of rats in ALI+BMMSC group and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group were significantly decreased compared with that in ALI alone group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The content of MMP-2 in lung tissue of rats in the 4 groups was similar (P>0.05). The content of MMP-9 in lung tissue of rats in ALI alone group was significantly increased compared with that in blank control group (P<0.01), and the content of MMP-9 in lung tissue of rats in ALI+BMMSC group and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group was significantly decreased compared with that in ALI alone group (P<0.01). At 24 h after intervention, the activity of malondialdehyde, SOD, and MPO in lung tissue of rats in ALI alone group, ALI+BMMSC group, and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group were significantly increased compared with that in blank control group (P<0.01), the activity of malondialdehyde in lung tissue of rats in ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group and the activity of SOD in lung tissue of rats in ALI+BMMSC group and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group were significantly increased compared with that in ALI alone group (P<0.05 or P<0.01), and the activity of SOD in lung tissue of rats in ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group was significantly decreased compared with that in ALI+BMMSC group (P<0.01). The activity of MPO in lung tissue of rats in ALI+BMMSC group and ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group was significantly decreased compared with that in ALI alone group (P<0.01), and the activity of MPO in lung tissue of rats in ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group was significantly decreased compared with that in ALI+BMMSC group (P<0.01). In 1 week after intervention, the protein expression of CD11b in lung tissue of rats in ALI+NMⅡ silenced BMMSC group was significantly increased compared with those in the other three groups (P<0.05 or P<0.01), while the protein expressions of EMR1 in lung tissue of rats in the four groups were similar (P>0.05). Conclusions: Transplantation of NMⅡ gene silenced BMMSCs can significantly improve the activity of ECM components in the lung tissue in LPS-induced ALI rats, remodel its integrity, and enhance its antioxidant capacity, and alleviate lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Acute Lung Injury/therapy , Bone Marrow , Collagen/metabolism , Endotoxins , Extracellular Matrix , Lipopolysaccharides/adverse effects , Lung , Malondialdehyde/metabolism , Matrix Metalloproteinase 2/metabolism , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Myosin Type II/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Saline Solution/metabolism , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism
10.
Chinese Journal of Burns ; (6): 266-275, 2022.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-936004

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the effects of exosomes from human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) on pulmonary vascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) injury in septic mice and its mechanism. Methods: The experimental research method was adopted. The primary ADSCs were isolated and cultured from the discarded fresh adipose tissue of 3 patients (female, 10-25 years old), who were admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Air Force Medical University undergoing abdominal surgery, and the cell morphology was observed by inverted phase contrast microscope on the 5th day. The expressions of CD29, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD73, and CD90 of ADSCs in the third passage were detected by flow cytometry. The third to the fifth passage of ADSCs were collected, and their exosomes from the cell supernatant were obtained by differential ultracentrifugation, and the shape, particle size, and the protein expressions of CD9, CD63, tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101), and β-actin of exosomes were detected, respectively, by transmission electron microscopy, nano-particle tracking analysis and Western blotting. Twenty-four adult male BALB/c mice were adopted and were divided into normal control group, caecal ligation perforation (CLP) alone group, and CLP+ADSC-exosome group with each group of 8 according to random number table (the same grouping method below) and were treated accordingly. At 24 h after operation, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) levels of mice serum were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and lung tissue morphology of mice was detected by hematoxylin-eosin and myeloperoxidase staining, and the expression of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) of mouse lung cells was detected by immunofluorescence method. Primary PMVECs were obtained from 1-month-old C57 mice regardless gender by tissue block method. The expression of CD31 of PMVECs was detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. The third passage of PMVECs was co-cultured with ADSCs derived exosomes for 12 h, and the phagocytosis of exosomes by PMVECs was detected by PKH26 kit. The third passage of PMVECs were adopted and were divided into blank control group, macrophage supernatant alone group, and macrophage supernatant+ADSC-exosome group, with 3 wells in each group, which were treated accordingly. After 24 h, the content of reactive oxygen species in cells was detected by flow cytometry, the expression of 8-OHdG in cells was detected by immunofluorescence, and Transwell assay was used to determine the permeability of cell monolayer. The number of samples in above were all 3. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and least significant difference t test. Results: The primary ADSCs were isolated and cultured to day 5, growing densely in a spindle shape with a typical swirl-like. The percentages of CD29, CD44, CD73 and CD90 positive cells of ADSCs in the third passage were all >90%, and the percentages of CD34 and CD45 positive cells were <5%. Exosomes derived from ADSCs of the third to fifth passages showed a typical double-cavity disc-like structure with an average particle size of 103 nm, and the protein expressions of CD9, CD63 and TSG101 of exosomes were positive, while the protein expression of β-actin of exosomes was negative. At 24 h after operation, compared with those in normal control group, both the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β of mice serum in CLP alone group were significantly increased (with t values of 28.76 and 29.69, respectively, P<0.01); compared with those in CLP alone group, both the content of TNF-α and IL-1β of mice serum in CLP+ADSC-exosome group was significantly decreased (with t values of 9.90 and 4.76, respectively, P<0.05 or P<0.01). At 24 h after surgery, the pulmonary tissue structure of mice in normal control group was clear and complete without inflammatory cell infiltration; compared with those in normal control group, the pulmonary tissue edema and inflammatory cell infiltration of mice in CLP alone group were more obvious; compared with those in CLP alone group, the pulmonary tissue edema and inflammatory cell infiltration of mice in CLP+ADSC-exosome group were significantly reduced. At 24 h after operation, endothelial cells in lung tissues of mice in 3 groups showed positive expression of CD31; compared with that in normal control group, the fluorescence intensity of 8-OHdG positive cells of the lung tissues of mice in CLP alone group was significantly increased, and compared with that in CLP alone group, the fluorescence intensity of 8-OHdG positive cells in the lung tissues of mice in CLP+ADSC-exosome group was significantly decreased. The PMVECs in the 3rd passage showed CD31 positive expression by immunofluorescence, and the result of flow cytometry showed that CD31 positive cells accounted for 99.5%. At 12 h after co-culture, ADSC-derived exosomes were successfully phagocytose by PMVECs and entered its cytoplasm. At 12 h after culture of the third passage of PMVECs, compared with that in blank control group, the fluorescence intensity of reactive oxygen species of PMVECs in macrophage supernatant alone group was significantly increased (t=15.73, P<0.01); compared with that in macrophage supernatant alone group, the fluorescence intensity of reactive oxygen species of PMVECs in macrophage supernatant+ADSC-exosome group was significantly decreased (t=4.72, P<0.01). At 12 h after culture of the third passage of PMVECs, and the 8-OHdG positive fluorescence intensity of PMVECs in macrophage supernatant alone group was significantly increased; and compared with that in blank control group, the 8-OHdG positive fluorescence intensity of PMVECs in macrophage+ADSC-exosome supernatant group was between blank control group and macrophage supernatant alone group. At 12 h after culture of the third passage PMVECs, compared with that in blank control group, the permeability of PMVECs monolayer in macrophage supernatant alone group was significantly increased (t=6.34, P<0.01); compared with that in macrophage supernatant alone group, the permeability of PMVECs monolayer cells in macrophage supernatant+ADSC-exosome group was significantly decreased (t=2.93, P<0.05). Conclusions: Exosomes derived from ADSCs can ameliorate oxidative damage in mouse lung tissue, decrease the level of reactive oxygen species, 8-OHdG expression, and permeability of PMVECs induced by macrophage supernatant.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Humans , Male , Mice , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Exosomes/metabolism , Lung Injury/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Sepsis/pathology
11.
International Journal of Oral Science ; (4): 13-13, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-929141

ABSTRACT

The high neurogenic potential of dental and oral-derived stem cells due to their embryonic neural crest origin, coupled with their ready accessibility and easy isolation from clinical waste, make these ideal cell sources for neuroregeneration therapy. Nevertheless, these cells also have high propensity to differentiate into the osteo-odontogenic lineage. One strategy to enhance neurogenesis of these cells may be to recapitulate the natural physiological electrical microenvironment of neural tissues via electroactive or electroconductive tissue engineering scaffolds. Nevertheless, to date, there had been hardly any such studies on these cells. Most relevant scientific information comes from neurogenesis of other mesenchymal stem/stromal cell lineages (particularly bone marrow and adipose tissue) cultured on electroactive and electroconductive scaffolds, which will therefore be the focus of this review. Although there are larger number of similar studies on neural cell lines (i.e. PC12), neural stem/progenitor cells, and pluripotent stem cells, the scientific data from such studies are much less relevant and less translatable to dental and oral-derived stem cells, which are of the mesenchymal lineage. Much extrapolation work is needed to validate that electroactive and electroconductive scaffolds can indeed promote neurogenesis of dental and oral-derived stem cells, which would thus facilitate clinical applications in neuroregeneration therapy.


Subject(s)
Cell Differentiation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Neural Stem Cells/metabolism , Neurogenesis , Tissue Scaffolds
12.
International Journal of Oral Science ; (4): 2-2, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-929129

ABSTRACT

Dental stem cells (DSCs), an important source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), can be easily obtained by minimally invasive procedures and have been used for the treatment of various diseases. Classic paradigm attributed the mechanism of their therapeutic action to direct cell differentiation after targeted migration, while contemporary insights into indirect paracrine effect opened new avenues for the mystery of their actual low engraftment and differentiation ability in vivo. As critical paracrine effectors, DSC-derived extracellular vesicles (DSC-EVs) are being increasingly linked to the positive effects of DSCs by an evolving body of in vivo studies. Carrying bioactive contents and presenting therapeutic potential in certain diseases, DSC-EVs have been introduced as promising treatments. Here, we systematically review the latest in vivo evidence that supports the therapeutic effects of DSC-EVs with mechanistic studies. In addition, current challenges and future directions for the clinical translation of DSC-EVs are also highlighted to call for more attentions to the (I) distinguishing features of DSC-EVs compared with other types of MSC-EVs, (II) heterogeneity among different subtypes of DSC-derived EVs, (III) action modes of DSC-EVs, (IV) standardization for eligible DSC-EVs and (V) safety guarantee for the clinical application of DSC-EVs. The present review would provide valuable insights into the emerging opportunities of DSC-EVs in future clinical applications.


Subject(s)
Cell Differentiation , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism
13.
Journal of Southern Medical University ; (12): 272-277, 2022.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-936312

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To investigate the changes in autophagy of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from patients with ankylosing spondylitis and explore the mechanism for decreased autophagy in ASMSCs.@*METHODS@#MSCs collected from 14 patients with AS (ASMSCs) and from 15 healthy donors (HDMSCs) were cultured in the absence or presence of 25 ng/mL TNF-α for 6 h. Autophagy of the cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining of GFP-LC3B, and the results were confirmed by detecting the protein expressions of autophagy markers LC3 II/LC3 I and P62. The mRNA expressions of the related genes were detected using qRT-PCR, and the protein expressions of the autophagy markers and signaling pathway-related molecules were determined with Western blotting. TG100713 was used to block the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway, and its effect on autophagy of ASMSCs was evaluated.@*RESULTS@#ASMSCs showed significantly weaker GFP-LC3B puncta staining and lower protein expression levels of LC3 II/LC3 I but higher levels of P62 protein (P < 0.05), indicating a decreased autophagy capacity as compared with HDMSCs. TNF-α-induced ASMSCs showed significantly higher protein expressions of p-PI3K/ PI3K, p-AKT/AKT and p-mTOR/mTOR than HDMSCs (P < 0.05), suggesting hyperactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in ASMSCs. Blocking PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling with TG100713 eliminated the difference in TNF-α-induced autophagy between HDMSCs and ASMSCs.@*CONCLUSION@#In patients with AS, hyperactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway results in decreased autophagy of the MSCs and potentially contributes to chronic inflammation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Autophagy , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Spondylitis, Ankylosing , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
14.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 699-707, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-878065

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#Autophagy of alveolar macrophages is a crucial process in ischemia/reperfusion injury-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are multipotent cells with the potential for repairing injured sites and regulating autophagy. This study was to investigate the influence of BM-MSCs on autophagy of macrophages in the oxygen-glucose deprivation/restoration (OGD/R) microenvironment and to explore the potential mechanism.@*METHODS@#We established a co-culture system of macrophages (RAW264.7) with BM-MSCs under OGD/R conditions in vitro. RAW264.7 cells were transfected with recombinant adenovirus (Ad-mCherry-GFP-LC3B) and autophagic status of RAW264.7 cells was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Autophagy-related proteins light chain 3 (LC3)-I, LC3-II, and p62 in RAW264.7 cells were detected by Western blotting. We used microarray expression analysis to identify the differently expressed genes between OGD/R treated macrophages and macrophages co-culture with BM-MSCs. We investigated the gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which is downstream of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) signaling pathway.@*RESULTS@#The ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I of OGD/R treated RAW264.7 cells was increased (1.27 ± 0.20 vs. 0.44 ± 0.08, t = 6.67, P  < 0.05), while the expression of p62 was decreased (0.77 ± 0.04 vs. 0.95 ± 0.10, t = 2.90, P  < 0.05), and PI3K (0.40 ± 0.06 vs. 0.63 ± 0.10, t = 3.42, P  < 0.05) and p-Akt/Akt ratio was also decreased (0.39 ± 0.02 vs. 0.58 ± 0.03, t = 9.13, P  < 0.05). BM-MSCs reduced the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio of OGD/R treated RAW264.7 cells (0.68 ± 0.14 vs. 1.27 ± 0.20, t = 4.12, P  < 0.05), up-regulated p62 expression (1.10 ± 0.20 vs. 0.77 ± 0.04, t = 2.80, P  < 0.05), and up-regulated PI3K (0.54 ± 0.05 vs. 0.40 ± 0.06, t = 3.11, P  < 0.05) and p-Akt/Akt ratios (0.52 ± 0.05 vs. 0.39 ± 0.02, t = 9.13, P  < 0.05). A whole-genome microarray assay screened the differentially expressed gene HO-1, which is downstream of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and the alteration of HO-1 mRNA and protein expression was consistent with the data on PI3K/Akt pathway.@*CONCLUSIONS@#Our results suggest the existence of the PI3K/Akt/HO-1 signaling pathway in RAW264.7 cells under OGD/R circumstances in vitro, revealing the mechanism underlying BM-MSC-mediated regulation of autophagy and enriching the understanding of potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of ALI.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , Autophagy , Bone Marrow , Glucose , Heme Oxygenase-1/metabolism , Macrophages/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Oxygen , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Signal Transduction
15.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 53(3): e8876, 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1089338

ABSTRACT

The immune stimulatory and anti-neoplastic functions of type I interferon have long been applied for the treatment of melanoma. However, the systemic application of high levels of this recombinant protein is often met with toxicity. An approach that provides localized, yet transient, production of type I interferon may overcome this limitation. We propose that the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as delivery vehicles for the production of interferon-β (IFNβ) may be beneficial when applied together with our cancer gene therapy approach. In our previous studies, we have shown that adenovirus-mediated gene therapy with IFNβ was especially effective in combination with p19Arf gene transfer, resulting in immunogenic cell death. Here we showed that MSCs derived from mouse adipose tissue were susceptible to transduction with adenovirus, expressed the transgene reliably, and yet were not especially sensitive to IFNβ production. MSCs used to produce IFNβ inhibited B16 mouse melanoma cells in a co-culture assay. Moreover, the presence of p19Arf in the B16 cells sensitizes them to the IFNβ produced by the MSCs. These data represent a critical demonstration of the use of MSCs as carriers of adenovirus encoding IFNβ and applied as an anti-cancer strategy in combination with p19Arf gene therapy.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rabbits , Melanoma, Experimental/therapy , Interferon-beta/metabolism , Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16/administration & dosage , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Transduction, Genetic , Melanoma, Experimental/metabolism , Genetic Therapy , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , Disease Models, Animal , Mice, Inbred C57BL
16.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180317, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-984571

ABSTRACT

Abstract Bone morphogenetic protein type 2 (BMP-2) and retinoic acid (RA) are osteoinductive factors that stimulate endogenous mechanisms of bone repair which can be applied on management of osseous defects in oral and maxillofacial fields. Objective Considering the different results of RA on osteogenesis and its possible use to substitute/potency BMP-2 effects, this study evaluated the outcomes of BMP-2, RA, and BMP-2+RA treatments on in vitro osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and the signaling pathway(s) involved. Material and Methods ASCs were treated every other day with basic osteogenic medium (OM) alone or supplemented with BMP-2, RA, or BMP-2+RA. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was determined using the r-nitrophenol method. Extracellular matrix mineralization was evaluated using von Kossa staining and calcium quantification. Expression of osteonectin and osteocalcin mRNA were determined using qPCR. Smad1, Smad4, phosphorylated Smad1/5/8, BMP-4, and BMP-7 proteins expressions were analyzed using western blotting. Signaling pathway was evaluated using the IPA® software. Results RA promoted the highest ALP activity at days 7, 14, 21, and 28, in comparison to BMP-2 and BMP-2+RA. BMP-2+RA best stimulated phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 protein expression at day 7 and Smad4 expression at days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Osteocalcin and osteonectin mRNA expressions were best stimulated by BMP-2+RA at day 7. Matrix mineralization was most improved by BMP-2+RA at days 12 and 32. Additionally, BMP-2+RA promoted the highest BMP signaling pathway activation at days 7 and 14, and demonstrated more activation of differentiation of bone-forming cells than OM alone. Conclusions In summary, RA increased the effect of BMP-2 on osteogenic differentiation of human ASCs.


Subject(s)
Humans , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Tretinoin/pharmacology , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2/drug effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/drug effects , Osteoblasts/drug effects , Osteogenesis/physiology , Reference Values , Time Factors , Osteocalcin/analysis , Osteocalcin/drug effects , Osteonectin/analysis , Osteonectin/drug effects , Cell Differentiation/physiology , Cells, Cultured , Blotting, Western , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Alkaline Phosphatase/analysis , Alkaline Phosphatase/adverse effects , Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism
17.
Int. j. morphol ; 36(3): 1049-1056, Sept. 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-954229

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal cells (MCs) exhibit great regenerative potential due to their intrinsic properties and ability to restore tissue function, either directly through transdifferentiation or indirectly through paracrine effects. This study aimed to evaluate morphometric and phenotypic changes in MCs grown with facial nerve-conditioned medium in the presence or absence of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). For quantitative phenotypic analysis, the expression of GFAP, OX-42, MAP-2, β-tubulin III, NeuN, and NF-200 was analyzed by immunocytochemistry. Cells cultured with facial nerve-conditioned medium in the presence of FGF-2 expressed GFAP, OX-42, MAP-2, β-tubulin III, NeuN, and NF-200. On average, the area and perimeter of GFAP-positive cells were higher in the group cultured with facial nerve-conditioned medium compared to the group cultured with conditioned medium and FGF-2 (p=0.0001). This study demonstrated the plasticity of MCs for neuronal and glial lineages and opens up new research perspectives in cell therapy and trans.differentiation.


Las células mesenquimales (CM) exhiben un gran potencial regenerativo debido a sus propiedades intrínsecas y la capacidad de restaurar la función del tejido, ya sea directamente, a través de la transdiferenciación, o indirectamente, a través de efectos parácrinos. Este estudio tuvo como objetivo evaluar los cambios morfométricos y fenotípicos en CM cultivadas con medio condicionado por nervio facial en presencia o ausencia de factor de crecimiento de fibroblastos 2 (FGF-2). Para el análisis fenotípico cuantitativo, se analizó la expresión de GFAP, OX-42, MAP-2, β-tubulina III, NeuN y NF-200 mediante inmunocitoquímica. Las células cultivadas con medio condicionado por el nervio facial en presencia de FGF-2 expresaban GFAP, OX-42, MAP-2, β-tubulina III, NeuN y NF-200. En promedio, el área y el perímetro de las células positivas para GFAP fueron mayores en el grupo cultivado con medio condicionado por el nervio facial en comparación con el grupo cultivado con medio acondicionado y FGF-2 (p = 0,0001). Este estudio demostró la plasticidad de CM para linajes neuronales y gliales y abre nuevas perspectivas de investigación en terapia celular y transdiferenciación.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Bone Marrow , Fibroblast Growth Factor 2/metabolism , Facial Nerve Injuries , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Phenotype , Immunohistochemistry , Cells, Cultured , Rats, Wistar , Cell Transdifferentiation
18.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 51(2): e6520, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-889032

ABSTRACT

Multiple growth factors can be administered to mimic the natural process of bone healing in bone tissue engineering. We investigated the effects of sequential release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from polylactide-poly (ethylene glycol)-polylactide (PELA) microcapsule-based scaffolds on bone regeneration. To improve the double emulsion/solvent evaporation technique, VEGF was encapsulated in PELA microcapsules, to which BMP-2 was attached. The scaffold (BMP-2/PELA/VEGF) was then fused to these microcapsules using the dichloromethane vapor method. The bioactivity of the released BMP-2 and VEGF was then quantified in rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs). Immunoblotting analysis showed that BMP-2/PELA/VEG promoted the differentiation of rMSCs into osteoblasts via the MAPK and Wnt pathways. Osteoblast differentiation was assessed through alkaline phosphatase expression. When compared with simple BMP-2 plus VEGF group and pure PELA group, osteoblast differentiation in BMP-2/PELA/VEGF group significantly increased. An MTT assay indicated that BMP-2-loaded PELA scaffolds had no adverse effects on cell activity. BMP-2/PELA/VEG promoted the differentiation of rMSCs into osteoblast via the ERK1/2 and Wnt pathways. Our findings indicate that the sequential release of BMP-2 and VEGF from PELA microcapsule-based scaffolds is a promising approach for the treatment of bone defects.


Subject(s)
Animals , Rabbits , Rats , Polyesters/pharmacology , Polyethylene Glycols/pharmacology , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors/metabolism , Tissue Scaffolds , Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Time Factors , Bone Regeneration , Signal Transduction/physiology , Cells, Cultured , Models, Animal , Cell Proliferation , beta Catenin/physiology , Nanoparticles , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/drug effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Wnt Signaling Pathway/physiology
19.
Arq. bras. cardiol ; 109(6): 579-589, Dec. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-887981

ABSTRACT

Abstract Background: Diabetes mellitus is a severe chronic disease leading to systemic complications, including cardiovascular dysfunction. Previous cell therapy studies have obtained promising results with the use bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells derived from healthy animals (MSCc) in diabetes animal models. However, the ability of MSC derived from diabetic rats to improve functional cardiac parameters is still unknown. Objectives: To investigate whether bone-marrow-derived MSC from diabetic rats (MSCd) would contribute to recover metabolic and cardiac electrical properties in other diabetic rats. Methods: Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats with streptozotocin. MSCs were characterized by flow cytometry, morphological analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Cardiac electrical function was analyzed using recordings of ventricular action potential. Differences between variables were considered significant when p < 0.05. Results: In vitro properties of MSCc and MSCd were evaluated. Both cell types presented similar morphology, growth kinetics, and mesenchymal profile, and could differentiate into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. However, in an assay for fibroblast colony-forming units (CFU-F), MSCd formed more colonies than MSCc when cultured in expansion medium with or without hydrocortisone (1 µM). In order to compare the therapeutic potential of the cells, the animals were divided into four experimental groups: nondiabetic (CTRL), diabetic (DM), diabetic treated with MSCc (DM + MSCc), and diabetic treated with MSCd (DM + MSCd). The treated groups received a single injection of MSC 4 weeks after the development of diabetes. MSCc and MSCd controlled hyperglycemia and body weight loss and improved cardiac electrical remodeling in diabetic rats. Conclusions: MSCd and MSCc have similar in vitro properties and therapeutic potential in a rat model of diabetes induced with streptozotocin.


Resumo Fundamentos: O diabetes mellitus é uma doença crônica grave que leva a complicações sistêmicas, como a disfunção cardiovascular. Estudos anteriores de terapia celular obtiveram resultados promissores com utilização de células estromais mesenquimais (CEM) derivadas de medula óssea de animais saudáveis (CEMc) em modelos de animais diabéticos. No entanto, a capacidade das CEM derivadas de ratos diabéticos em melhorar parâmetros cardíacos funcionais é ainda desconhecida. Objetivos: Investigar se CEM derivadas de medula óssea de ratos diabéticos (CEMd) poderiam contribuir para a recuperação metabólica e de propriedades elétricas cardíacas em outros ratos também com diabetes. Métodos: O diabetes foi induzido em ratos Wistar com estreptozotocina. As CEM foram caracterizadas por citometria de fluxo, análise morfológica e imunohistoquímica. A função elétrica cardíaca foi analisada através de registro do potencial de ação ventricular. As diferenças entre as variáveis foram consideradas significativas quando p < 0,05. Resultados: As propriedades in vitro das CEMc e CEMd foram avaliadas. Ambos os tipos celulares apresentaram morfologia, cinética de crescimento e perfil mesenquimal semelhante, e puderam ser diferenciadas em linhagens adipogênica e osteogênica. No entanto, em ensaios para unidades formadoras de colônias de fibroblastos (UFC-F), as CEMd formaram mais colônias em comparação às CEMc quando cultivadas em meio com ou sem hidrocortisona (1 µM). Para comparar o potencial terapêutico das células, os animais foram divididos em quatro grupos experimentais: não diabéticos (CTRL), diabéticos (DM), diabéticos tratados com CEMc (DM + CEMc) e diabéticos tratados com CEMd (DM + CEMd). Os grupos tratados receberam uma única injeção de CEM 4 semanas após o estabelecimento do diabetes. Ambas CEMc e CEMd controlaram a hiperglicemia e a perda de peso corporal e melhoraram o remodelamento elétrico cardíaco em ratos com diabetes. Conclusão: As CEMd e CEMc possuem propriedades in vitro e potencial terapêutico semelhante em um modelo de rato com diabetes induzido por estreptozotocina. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2017; 109(6):579-589)


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/chemically induced , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy , Heart Diseases/etiology , Heart Diseases/therapy , Blood Glucose/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Cells, Cultured , Rats, Wistar , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism
20.
Braz. j. microbiol ; 48(1): 125-131, Jan.-Mar. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839349

ABSTRACT

Abstract Small ruminant lentiviruses isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes and target organs can be propagated in vitro in fibroblasts derived from goat synovial membrane cells. These cells are obtained from tissues collected from embryos or fetuses and are necessary for the establishment of the fibroblast primary culture. A new alternative type of host cells, derived from goat umbilical cord, was isolated and characterized phenotypically with its main purpose being to obtain cell monolayers that could be used for the diagnosis and isolation of small ruminant lentiviruses in cell culture. To accomplish this goal, cells were isolated from umbilical cords; characterized phenotypically by flow cytometry analysis; differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic lineage; and submitted to viral challenge. The proliferation of goat umbilical cord cells was fast and cell monolayers formed after 15 days. These cells exhibited morphology, immunophenotype, growth characteristics, and lineage differentiation potential similar to mesenchymal stem cells of other origins. The goat umbilical cord derived cells stained positive for vimentin and CD90, but negative for cytokeratin, CD34 and CD105 markers. Syncytia and cell lysis were observed in cell monolayers infected by CAEV-Cork and MVV-K1514, showing that the cells are permissive to small ruminant lentivirus infection in vitro. These data demonstrate the proliferative competence of cells derived from goat umbilical cords and provide a sound basis for future research to standardize this cell lineage.


Subject(s)
Animals , Umbilical Cord/cytology , Lentivirus/physiology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/virology , Osteogenesis , Virus Replication , In Vitro Techniques , Goats , Biomarkers , Cell Differentiation , Cells, Cultured , Immunophenotyping , Cell Culture Techniques , Chondrogenesis , Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral , Adipogenesis , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/pathology
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