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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-877671

ABSTRACT

Based on the modern anatomy and physiology, the referred pain of myofascial trigger points of each muscle is integrated; compared with the twelve meridians as well as conception vessel and governor vessel, the similarity of their position and running course is observed. With the current research progress of myofascial trigger points and fasciology, based on the running course of referred pain of trigger points, combined with fascia mechanics, nerve and vascular, the location of acupoints and meridians, as well as the relationship between acupoints and meridians, are discussed.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Points , Humans , Meridians , Muscles , Pain, Referred , Trigger Points
2.
Rev. bras. ortop ; 55(2): 147-155, Mar.-Apr. 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1138002

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective To quantify the levels of satisfaction and pain of patients submitted to external fixation removal without anesthesia at an outpatient facility. Methods The present was a prospective study involving 28 patients using external fixators who answered 3 questionnaires associated with the Visual Analogue and Numerical Pain Scale during different moments of the removal. Results The average pain prior to fixator removal was of 3.61. Shortly after the procedure, the patients reported that, on average, the most intense pain scored 6.68, and the least intense pain, 2.25 points. The average pain variation was of 4.43 points, and pain after 1 week scored, on average, 2.03 points. The recollection of the pain after fixator removal scored lower than the pain reported immediately after the procedure (mean value: 5.29). Most patients were middle-aged men, and 89.3% used circular external fixators. The main limb segment involved was the leg, and most patients (71.4%) had never used an external fixator before; they preferred the removal at an outpatient facility because it was faster (75%), and to avoid hospitalization (25%). The most intense pain was felt during the removal of Schanz pins (60.7%), being worse in the extremities of the limbs for 75% of the patients. An absolute majority of 85.7% was satisfied with the removal, and 82.1% stated that they would undergo the procedure again. Conclusion External fixator removal at an outpatient facility without anesthesia is a well-tolerated option for patients, with good levels of approval and satisfaction.


Resumo Objetivo Quantificar os níveis de satisfação e dor dos pacientes submetidos a retirada ambulatorial de fixadores externos sem anestesia. Métodos Estudo prospectivo envolvendo 28 pacientes usando fixadores externos submetidos a três questionários associados à Escala Visual Analógica e Numérica da dor durante diferentes etapas da retirada. Resultados A média de dor prévia à retirada foi de 3,61. Logo após o término do procedimento, encontramos média de 6,68 para a dor mais intensa, e de 2,25 para a dor menos intensa. A variação da dor média foi de 4,43, e a dor após uma semana teve média de 2,03. A lembrança dolorosa da retirada foi menor do que a dor referida imediatamente após a retirada (média de 5,29). A predominância no estudo foi de pacientes do sexo masculino de meia-idade, e 89,3% usavam fixador externo do tipo circular. O principal segmento dos membros envolvido foi a perna, e a maior parte dos pacientes não havia feito uso de fixador externo previamente (71,4%); eles optaram pela retirada ambulatorial por se tratar de opção mais rápida (75%), e para evitar internação hospitalar (25%). O momento de dor mais intensa ocorreu durante a retirada dos pinos de Schanz (60,7%), sendo pior nas extremidades dos membros para 75% dos entrevistados. Uma maioria absoluta de 85,7% mostrou-se satisfeita após a retirada, e 82,1% afirmaram que se submeteriam novamente ao procedimento. Conclusão A retirada ambulatorial de fixadores externos sem anestesia é uma opção bem tolerada pelos pacientes, tratando-se de um procedimento com bons níveis de aceitabilidade e satisfação.


Subject(s)
Humans , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Pain , Prospective Studies , External Fixators , Patient Satisfaction , Ilizarov Technique , Pain, Referred , Hospitalization , Anesthesia
3.
Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion ; (12): 1193-1198, 2019.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-776189

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To observe the correlation between referred pain distribution and acupoint sensitization in patients with intestinal diseases.@*METHODS@#In clinical research, 443 patients from 8 hospitals were recruited, including the outpatients and inpatients of Crohn's disease (=143), ulcerative colitis (=108), chronic appendicitis (=87) and other intestinal diseases (=105). The site with tenderness on the body surface and the morphological changes of local skin were observed and recorded in the patients. Using a sensory tenderness instrument, the pain threshold at the sensitization point was measured in 60 patients with ulcerative colitis. In animal experiment, SD rats were used and divided into a enteritis group (=8), in which the enteritis model were established, and a control group (=3), in which no any intervention was given. After the injection of Evans blue (EB) at caudal vein, the blue exudation points on the body surface were observed and the distribution rule was analyzed statistically.@*RESULTS@#The referred pain on the body surface in the patients with intestinal diseases was mainly located in the lower abdomen (93.9%, 416/443), the lumbar region (70.9%, 314/443) and the lower legs (33.0%, 146/443). The diameter of tenderness region was 1.5 to 2.5 cm. Compared with the region without sensitization, the pain threshold of the sensitization point in the patients with ulcerative colitis was reduced significantly (<0.001). The referred pain on the body surface in the patients with appendicitis was located in the right lower abdomen (97.7%, 85/87), the waist and back (54.0%, 47/87) and the right lower limbs on the medial side (71.3%, 62/87). The tenderness region was 1 to 2 cm in diameter and was irregular in form. After modeling of enteritis in the rats, the EB exudation points were visible from T to L.@*CONCLUSION@#Intestinal diseases induce referred pain on the body surface where is the same as or adjacent to the location of the spinal segment corresponding to the affected intestinal section. These sensitization regions are related to the locations of acupoints.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Points , Animals , Colitis, Ulcerative , Humans , Intestinal Diseases , Pain Threshold , Pain, Referred , Diagnosis , Therapeutics , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Sensation
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739476

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Buttock pain is common, and there are no fixed guidelines for its diagnosis and treatment. This study compared a selective nerve root block and a facet joint block for patients with degenerative spinal disease and buttock pain. METHODS: Patients with degenerative spinal disease who presented with buttock pain, received a selective nerve root block (group A) or a facet joint block (group B) from June 2017 to September 2017, and were able to be followed up for more than 3 months were prospectively enrolled. Clinical results were assessed using a visual analog scale for comparative analysis. RESULTS: One day after the procedure, an excellent response was found in 7% and 6% of groups A and B, respectively; a good response was found in 41% and 13% of groups A and B, respectively. Two weeks later, an excellent response was found in 11% and 4% of groups A and B, respectively; a good response was found in 41% and 20% of groups A and B, respectively. Six weeks later, an excellent response was found in 11% and 7% of groups A and B, respectively, and a good response was found in 41% and 20% of groups A and B, respectively. At the final follow-up, more than 47% and 46% of patients showed a good response in groups A and B, respectively. In group A, the visual analog scale score improved compared to the pre-procedure value of 5.01 to 2.74 on day 1, 2.51 at week 2, 2.38 at week 6, and 2.39 at week 12. In group B, the visual analog scale score improved compared to the preprocedure value of 5.24 to 3.94 on day 1, 3.99 at week 2, 3.24 at week 6, and 2.59 at week 12. On day 1 and at weeks 2 and 6, group A showed a significantly better outcome than group B (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The selective nerve root block showed superior results up to 6 weeks post-procedure. Considering that the selective nerve root block is effective for treating radiculopathy, the primary cause of buttock pain can be thought to be radiculopathy rather than degenerative changes of the facet joint.


Subject(s)
Buttocks , Diagnosis , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Nerve Block , Pain, Referred , Prospective Studies , Radiculopathy , Spinal Diseases , Spinal Stenosis , Visual Analog Scale , Zygapophyseal Joint
5.
Rev. fac. cienc. méd. (Impr.) ; 15(2): 45-50, jul.-dic. 2018. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-994529

ABSTRACT

El ameloblastoma sólido multiquístico es una neoplasia odontogénica rara, representa el 1% de los tumoresmaxilares, es de crecimiento lento y muestra un comportamiento agresivo local; en estado avanzado es capaz de generar deformidad facial, dolor, infección de la lesión, ulceración de la mucosa, pérdida dentaria, parestesia y puede alterar la masticación y la fonética. Objetivo: determinar las características clínicas, imagenológicas e histológicas del ameloblastoma para realizar el diagnóstico correcto y tratamiento oportuno. Presentación de caso clínico: p aciente femenina de 66 años, tratada en el servicio de cirugía oral y maxilofacial del Hospital Escuela Universitario, por presentar lesión de aspecto tumoral en cavidad bucal y región mandibular izquierda de 4 años de evolución. Los resultados deexámenes complementarios confirmaron que se trataba de un ameloblastoma sólido multiquístico. Se extirpó el tumor con amplios márgenes de seguridad mediante hemimandibulectomía y reconstrucción posterior con placa de titanio 2.4 W Lorenz. Conclusión: Los ameloblastomas son neoplasias benignas que presentan comportamientos clínicos similares con debe establecer un diagnóstico diferencial exhaustivo, auxiliándose de los exámenes complementarios pertinentes para iniciar el tratamiento adecuado y oportuno...(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Aged , Ameloblastoma/diagnosis , Maxillary Neoplasms , Mandibular Osteotomy , Surgery, Oral , Pain, Referred
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-718398

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hip pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint in general practice. Although comprehensive diagnostic approach on hip pain is mandatory for adequate treatment, un- or mis-diagnosis is not rare in primary care. The aim of this study was to analyze descriptively un- or mis-diagnosed hip pain cases referred from primary care to a tertiary hospital, especially in young adults ≤ 50 years old. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed a consecutive cohort of 150 patients (≤ 50 years old) with chronic hip pain (≥ 6 weeks), which was not diagnosed or misdiagnosed based on the information provided on the referral form. RESULTS: Overall an average 32 cases/month were referred due to hip pain without a diagnosis or with an incorrect diagnosis. Among them, 150 patients were enrolled in this study and 146 (97.3%) could be allocated to a specific disease by using data from routine clinical practice. Four common final diagnoses were femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome (55.3%), hip dysplasia (HD, 13.3%), referred pain from the lumbar spine (9.3%), and spondyloarthritis (SpA, 7.3%). In patients with FAI syndrome, 37 (44.0%) had pincer-type FAI and 33 (39.8%) had combined-type. Although the pain site or gender was not tightly clustered, the distribution of final diagnosis was significantly different according to hip pain location or gender. Especially, SpA or HD was not observed in younger women subgroup or elder men subgroup, respectively, when stratified by the mean age of participants. CONCLUSION: Most (> 80%) young patients with hip pain, a difficult issue to diagnosis for many primary physicians, had FAI syndrome, HD, spine lesions, and SpA. This study could give a chance to feedback information about cases with un- or mis-diagnosed hip pain, and it suggests that primary physicians need to be familiar with the diagnostic approach for these 4 diseases.


Subject(s)
Cohort Studies , Diagnosis , Female , Femoracetabular Impingement , General Practice , Hip Dislocation , Hip , Humans , Male , Pain, Referred , Primary Health Care , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Spine , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-52029

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report the characteristics of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle and evaluate the therapeutic effect of trigger-point injections. METHODS: Medical records of 297 patients (221 women; age, 53.9±11.3 years) with MTrPs in the infraspinatus muscle were reviewed retrospectively. Because there were 83 patients with MTrPs in both infraspinatus muscles, the characteristics of total 380 infraspinatus muscles with MTrPs (214 one side, 83 both sides) were investigated. Specific characteristics collected included chief complaint area, referred pain pattern, the number of local twitch responses, and distribution of MTrPs in the muscle. For statistical analysis, the paired t-test was used to compare a visual analogue scale (VAS) before and 2 weeks after the first injection. RESULTS: The most common chief complaint area of MTrPs in the infraspinatus muscle was the scapular area. The most common pattern of referred pain was the anterolateral aspect of the arm (above the elbow). Active MTrPs were multiple rather than single in the infraspinatus muscle. MTrPs were frequently in the center of the muscle. Trigger-point injection of the infraspinatus muscle significantly decreased the pain intensity. Mean VAS score decreased significantly after the first injection compared to the baseline (7.11 vs. 3.74; p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Characteristics of MTrPs and the therapeutic effects of trigger-point injections of the infraspinatus muscle were assessed. These findings could provide clinicians with useful information in diagnosing and treating myofascial pain syndrome of the infraspinatus muscle.


Subject(s)
Arm , Female , Humans , Medical Records , Muscles , Myofascial Pain Syndromes , Pain, Referred , Retrospective Studies , Therapeutic Uses , Trigger Points
8.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-656035

ABSTRACT

Otalgia consists of primary otalgia associated with disorders of the ear itself and referred otalgia due to disorders of organs that share the same innervation with the ear. Disorders of the oral cavity and laryngopharynx served by the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves are common causes of referred otalgia. Chest pain from myocardial infarction spreads through the afferent pain pathway, especially through the sympathetic nerves in the cardiac plexus and the phrenic nerve, resulting in a typical chest pain or referred pain in the left upper extremity. However, pain spreading through the vagus nerve can theoretically cause referred otalgia. This association between the heart and ear has not been widely acknowledged, even though a referred otalgia can occasionally be the only symptom of the tragic disease, myocardial infarction, and should be taken seriously. We report a patient who complained of left otalgia as the only symptom of myocardial infarction.


Subject(s)
Cardiomyopathies , Chest Pain , Ear , Earache , Heart , Humans , Hypopharynx , Infarction , Mouth , Myocardial Infarction , Pain, Referred , Phrenic Nerve , Upper Extremity , Vagus Nerve
9.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-168005

ABSTRACT

Changes in the musculoskeletal system due to aging lead to muscle weakness, muscle atrophy, degenerative changes in joints and cartilage, and decreased bone density. Pain in the joints is a very common and subjective symptom. There are various causes, such as referred pain or neurological pain that make it difficult to diagnose correctly. Especially, in elderly patients, their detailed history and a physical examination are important for the diagnosis of arthritis, and consideration of the effects of underlying diseases and drugs is essential. In this review, we first describe the clinical approach to diagnosis of arthritis, and briefly describe the diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout, which are common arthritis causing gait disorders in the elderly.


Subject(s)
Aged , Aging , Arthritis , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Bone Density , Cartilage , Diagnosis , Gait , Gout , Humans , Joints , Muscle Weakness , Muscular Atrophy , Musculoskeletal System , Osteoarthritis , Pain, Referred , Physical Examination
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-214135

ABSTRACT

In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP) have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs) have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients' overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia) has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function.


Subject(s)
Erectile Dysfunction , Humans , Male , Orgasm , Pain, Referred , Penis , Prevalence , Prostatectomy , Prostatic Neoplasms , Sensation , Urinary Incontinence
11.
Med. leg. Costa Rica ; 33(1): 219-227, ene.-mar. 2016.
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-782685

ABSTRACT

El síndrome de dolor miofascial es un complejo de síntomas sensoriales, motores y autonómicos causados por puntos gatillo miofasciales y estos como puntos de exquisita sensibilidad e hiperirritabilidad localizados en una banda tensa palpable, en músculos o su fascia, que producen una respuesta de contracción local de las fibras musculares por un tipo específico de palpación y si es lo suficientemente hiperirritable, da lugar a dolor, sensibilidad y fenómenos autonómicos, así como la disfunción en zonas por lo general distantes de su sitio de origen. Con una alta prevalencia en la población general, y responsable de gran parte de discapacidades y disfunciones en ámbitos laborales y actividades de la vida cotidiana. Presenta factores precipitantes de índole mecánico, estructural, postural, nutricional y endocrino, e involucra una fisiopatología específica, con la participación de múltiples factores proinflamatorios y sustancias neuro-vasoactivas. Su diagnóstico es fundamentalmente clínico, y existen diversos tratamientos para evitar su cronicidad y avance, que usualmente involucra tratamientos accesibles y costoefectivos, los cuales pueden brindar al paciente una solución o manejo a un dolor crónico, muchas veces subdiagnosticado e infratratado, si el médico cuenta con los conocimiento adecuados sobreesta entidad.


Myofascial pain syndrome is compoused by sensory, motor and autonomic symptoms that are generated by myofascial trigger points that are exquisite in sensitivity and irritability. These trigger points are located in a palpable taut band in muscle or fascia, which produce a local twitch response of muscle fibers for a specific type of palpation and if there is enough hyperirritability results in pain, tenderness and autonomic phenomena and dysfunction that appears usually in distant areas from its site of origin. With a high prevalence in the general population, myofascial síndrome is responsible for disability and dysfunction in work areas and daily life activities. It presents precipitating factors, such mechanical, structural, postural, nutritional and endocrine, and involves a specific pathophysiology, involving multiple pro-inflammatory factors and neuro-vasoactive substances. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, and there are various treatments to prevent chronicity and development, which usually involves easy and económica access to treatments, which may give the patient a solution or managing a chronic pain, often underdiagnosed and undertreated, if it has adequate knowledge about this entity.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Pain, Referred
12.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-882947

ABSTRACT

Este trabalho tem por objetivo abordar as queixas de dor irradiada para membros inferiores, procurando diferenciar a ciatalgia típica da pseudo radicular muito frequente na prática médica.


This study aims to approach the lower limbs irradiated pain, trying to distinguish typical sciatica from pseudoradicular pain, frequently found on medical practice.


Subject(s)
Sciatica/diagnosis , Pain, Referred , Radiculopathy
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-20800

ABSTRACT

Most dental pain is caused by an organic problem such as dental caries, periodontitis, pulpitis, or trauma. Diagnosis and treatment of these symptoms are relatively straightforward. However, patients often also complain of abnormal dental pain that has a non-dental origin, whose diagnosis is challenging. Such abnormal dental pain can be categorized on the basis of its cause as referred pain, neuromodulatory pain, and neuropathic pain. When it is difficult to diagnose a patient's dental pain, these potential alternate causes should be considered. In this clinical review, we have presented a case of referred pain from the digastric muscle (Patient 1), of pulpectomized (Patient 2), and of pulpectomized pain (Patient 3) to illustrate referred, neuromodulatory, and neuropathic pain, respectively. The Patient 1 was advised muscle stretching and gentle massage of the trigger points, as well as pain relief using a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline. The pain in Patient 2 was relieved completely by the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline. In Patient 3, the pain was controlled using either a continuous drip infusion of adenosine triphosphate or intravenous Mg2+ and lidocaine administered every 2 weeks. In each case of abnormal dental pain, the patient's diagnostic chart was used (Fig.2 and 3). Pain was satisfactorily relieved in all cases.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate , Amitriptyline , Dental Caries , Diagnosis , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Lidocaine , Massage , Neuralgia , Pain, Referred , Periodontitis , Pulpitis , Trigger Points
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-770739

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is one of the treatment options used for patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), although its effectiveness is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ESWT in the treatment of MPS in terms of pain relief and functional improvements. METHODS: We assessed 93 patients with MPS who underwent ESWT from March 2009 to July 2014. After exclusion of 25 patients with shoulder diseases, 68 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean follow-up period was 7.5 months (± 4.2 weeks), and the average duration of symptoms was 5 months (range, 2-16 months). ESWT was applied to intramuscular taut bands and referred pain areas once a week for 3 weeks. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were obtained at an initial assessment and at the 6-week, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up assessments. RESULTS: VAS pain scores and ASES scores improved significantly after 3 sessions of ESWT (p0.05). CONCLUSIONS: ESWT is an effective treatment option for patients with MPS.


Subject(s)
Elbow , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Myofascial Pain Syndromes , Pain, Referred , Shock , Shoulder , Visual Analog Scale
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-116044

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is one of the treatment options used for patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), although its effectiveness is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ESWT in the treatment of MPS in terms of pain relief and functional improvements. METHODS: We assessed 93 patients with MPS who underwent ESWT from March 2009 to July 2014. After exclusion of 25 patients with shoulder diseases, 68 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean follow-up period was 7.5 months (± 4.2 weeks), and the average duration of symptoms was 5 months (range, 2-16 months). ESWT was applied to intramuscular taut bands and referred pain areas once a week for 3 weeks. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were obtained at an initial assessment and at the 6-week, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up assessments. RESULTS: VAS pain scores and ASES scores improved significantly after 3 sessions of ESWT (p0.05). CONCLUSIONS: ESWT is an effective treatment option for patients with MPS.


Subject(s)
Elbow , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Myofascial Pain Syndromes , Pain, Referred , Shock , Shoulder , Visual Analog Scale
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-82814

ABSTRACT

Here, the author presents a case of bruxism-induced otalgia in a 29-year-old female patient. The pain was sharp and penetrating in character. It was usually worse in the morning and frequently radiated to the right temporal area. She had received unsuccessful medical treatments for migraine headache. The otoendoscopic examination revealed a normal tympanic membrane. A thorough inspection of her teeth revealed excessive wear on the incisal edges, and the cause of her otalgia was identified as bruxism-related temporomandibular joint disorder. After the use of an occlusal splint and repeated botulinum toxin injections in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles, along with good sleep hygiene, she experienced significant relief of pain and symptoms. The author suggests that multidisciplinary cooperation between ENT clinicians and dentists is necessary for the quick and accurate diagnosis and treatment of bruxism and the consequential referred otalgia.


Subject(s)
Adult , Botulinum Toxins , Bruxism , Dentists , Diagnosis , Earache , Female , Humans , Hygiene , Migraine Disorders , Muscles , Occlusal Splints , Pain, Referred , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Tooth , Tooth Wear , Tympanic Membrane
17.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-646096

ABSTRACT

Headaches attributed to disorders of the sinonasal region make their diagnosis and treatment sometimes challenging. Contact point between opposing mucosal surfaces in the nasal cavity can cause headache by a mechanism of referred pain in the distribution of trigeminal nerve. The most common anatomic abnormality of intranasal contact point is the diverse pattern of septal deviation in association with turbinate deformity or hypertrophy. In the absence of other pathological findings, the evaluation for intranasal contact points should be considered. We herein report that a patient, suffering from headache and periorbital pain refractory to medical treatment, experienced a complete abolition of pain after surgical correction of mucosal contact point in the nasal cavity.


Subject(s)
Congenital Abnormalities , Diagnosis , Headache , Humans , Hypertrophy , Nasal Cavity , Pain, Referred , Trigeminal Nerve , Turbinates
18.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-219517

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to verify the effectiveness of L2 spinal nerve root block for patients who are suffering from low back pain and referred pain with compound causes. SUMMARY OF LITERATURE REVIEW: Most of low back pain and referred pain arises from discs, facet joints and sacroiliac joints. All structures above have the pain perception pathway through sympathetic nerves with a connection to L2 spinal nerves. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We selected patients with low back pain and referred pain for more than 2 weeks. Each 50 patients were randomly allocated to an experimental and a control group.The experimental group underwent a L2 spinal nerve root block with 2cc of 0.25% bupibacaine at the symptom dominant side. The control group underwent a skin infiltration with 2cc of 2% lidocaine only. The pain was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS) consisting of 100 points at 5minutes, day 1, day 3, day 5, day 7 and day 30 postprocedure. RESULTS: Both groups showed a significant improvement after the procedures(p=0.000). However, a greater improvement was shown in the experimental group(p=0.000). In the individual analysis, the experimental group had improved as time elapsed and the significancewas maintained until 30 days. However, in control group, the significance was lost at day 30. CONCLUSION: L2 spinal nerve root block is recognized to reduce the low back and referred pains which arise from compound causes in a degenerative spinal disease.


Subject(s)
Humans , Intervertebral Disc , Lidocaine , Low Back Pain , Pain Perception , Pain, Referred , Prospective Studies , Sacroiliac Joint , Skin , Spinal Diseases , Spinal Nerve Roots , Spinal Nerves , Zygapophyseal Joint
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-135843

ABSTRACT

Acute scrotal pain is a common urologic presentation and critical pathology due to the possibility of organ loss in the emergency department. Referred pain in the lower quadrant of the abdomen may accompany testicular torsion. Of 58 patients with testicular torsion between January 2001 and March 2011, three visited the emergency department with abdominal pain alone. The median age of the patients was 16 years (range, 13-19). Median duration of abdominal pain to first medical examination and proper diagnosis by an urologist was 14 hours (range, 2-168) and 77 hours (range, 57-240), respectively. All patients underwent orchiectomy. Due to symptomatic variations for testicular torsion, all clinicians providing emergency care to patients who have referred pain in the lower abdomen without scrotal pain should consider the constellation of symptoms in order to avoid superfluous diagnostic delay.


Subject(s)
Abdomen , Abdomen, Acute , Abdominal Pain , Diagnosis , Emergency Medical Services , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Orchiectomy , Pain, Referred , Pathology , Spermatic Cord Torsion
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-135838

ABSTRACT

Acute scrotal pain is a common urologic presentation and critical pathology due to the possibility of organ loss in the emergency department. Referred pain in the lower quadrant of the abdomen may accompany testicular torsion. Of 58 patients with testicular torsion between January 2001 and March 2011, three visited the emergency department with abdominal pain alone. The median age of the patients was 16 years (range, 13-19). Median duration of abdominal pain to first medical examination and proper diagnosis by an urologist was 14 hours (range, 2-168) and 77 hours (range, 57-240), respectively. All patients underwent orchiectomy. Due to symptomatic variations for testicular torsion, all clinicians providing emergency care to patients who have referred pain in the lower abdomen without scrotal pain should consider the constellation of symptoms in order to avoid superfluous diagnostic delay.


Subject(s)
Abdomen , Abdomen, Acute , Abdominal Pain , Diagnosis , Emergency Medical Services , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Orchiectomy , Pain, Referred , Pathology , Spermatic Cord Torsion
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