Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 46
Filter
1.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 117(6): 659-663, dic. 2019. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS, BINACIS | ID: biblio-1046721

ABSTRACT

La paragonimiasis es una parasitosis provocada por varias especies de Paragonimus, un trematodo que se transmite a través del consumo de cangrejos poco cocidos o crudos y que se ha encontrado en áreas tropicales y subtropicales de América, Asia y África. Esta infección afecta, principalmente, los pulmones y provoca manifestaciones clínicas y radiológicas muy similares a la tuberculosis pulmonar, por lo cual siempre debe incluirse dentro del diagnóstico diferencial. Se presenta el caso de una niña escolar de 7 años de edad, hospitalizada con el diagnóstico de paragonimiasis pulmonar, quien presentó evolución favorable luego de recibir tratamiento con triclabendazol.


Paragonimiasis is a parasite infection caused by several species of Paragonimus, a trematode that is transmitted through the consumption of raw or undercooked crabs and that has been found in the subtropical areas of America, Asia and Africa. This infection mainly affects the lungs, causing clinical and radiological manifestations very similar to pulmonary tuberculosis, so it should always be included in the differential diagnosis. We present the case of a 7-year-old school patient, hospitalized with the diagnosis of pulmonary paragonimiasis, who had a favorable evolution after receiving treatment with triclabendazole.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Child , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , /therapeutic use , Paragonimiasis/therapy , Paragonimus/isolation & purification , Peru , Diagnosis, Differential , Lung/diagnostic imaging
2.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 41-45, 2015.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-58248

ABSTRACT

Paragonimiasis has been continuously decreasing in Korea. However, it still occurs by ingesting raw or incompletely cooked fresh water crab or crayfish. The diagnosis of paragonimiasis is challenging because of its rarity. It may be confused with other inflammatory disease or carcinomatosis. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has lower risk of complications such as bleeding, perforation than percutaneous fine needle aspiration. EUS-FNA is more accurate and popular method to find mucosal or submucosal tumors and the lesions of several organs. Benign and malignant tumors, infectious diseases have been diagnosed by EUS-FNA, but there was no report describing the use of EUS-FNA for diagnosing paragonimiasis. Herein, we present a 47-year-old male patient with paragonimiasis diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Imaging studies revealed mass lesions in the lung and peritoneal cavity, which was eventually confirmed as paragonimiasis using EUS-FNA.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Positron-Emission Tomography , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
3.
The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine ; : 56-61, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-106134

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis produces no specific symptoms or radiologic findings, allowing for the possibility of misdiagnosis. We evaluated the specific clinical and pleural fluid features of pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis masquerading as pleural tuberculosis. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiologic characteristics of 20 patients diagnosed with pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis between 2001 and 2011. RESULTS: In total, 17 patients presented with respiratory symptoms, including dyspnea (30%), hemoptysis (20%), cough (20%), and pleuritic chest pain (15%). Chest radiographs revealed intrapulmonary parenchymal lesions, including air-space consolidation (30%), nodular opacities (20%), cystic lesions (15%), ground-glass opacities (10%), and pneumothorax (5%). A pleural f luid examination revealed eosinophilia, low glucose levels, and high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in 87%, 76%, and 88% of the patients, respectively. These traits helped to distinguish pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis from other pleural diseases such as parapneumonic effusion, malignancy, and pleural tuberculosis. CONCLUSIONS: Pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis is often initially misdiagnosed as other pleural diseases. Therefore, it is important to establish the correct diagnosis. In patients with unexplained pleural effusion living in paragonimiasis-endemic areas, pleural fluid obtained by thoracentesis should be examined to distinguish pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis. When marked eosinophilia, high LDH levels, and low glucose levels are identified in pleural fluid, physicians could consider a diagnosis of pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Animals , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Biomarkers/analysis , Diagnosis, Differential , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Eosinophilia/diagnosis , Glucose/analysis , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/analysis , Lung Diseases, Parasitic/diagnosis , Paracentesis , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimus westermani/isolation & purification , Pleural Effusion/diagnosis , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Tuberculosis, Pleural/diagnosis
4.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 109(7): 849-855, 11/2014. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-728798

ABSTRACT

A review of national and international publications on paragonimiasis in Ecuador, epidemiological records from the Ministry of Public Health and unpublished research data was conducted to summarise the current status of the parasite/disease. The purpose of the review is to educate physicians, policy-makers and health providers on the status of the disease and to stimulate scientific investigators to conduct further research. Paragonimiasis was first diagnosed in Ecuador 94 years ago and it is endemic to both tropical and subtropical regions in 19 of 24 provinces in the Pacific Coast and Amazon regions. Paragonimus mexicanus is the only known species in the country, with the mollusc Aroapyrgus colombiensis and the crabs Moreirocarcinus emarginatus, Hypolobocera chilensis and Hypolobocera aequatorialis being the primary and secondary intermediate hosts, respectively. Recent studies found P. mexicanus metacercariae in Trichodactylus faxoni crabs of the northern Amazon. Chronic pulmonary paragonimiasis is commonly misdiagnosed and treated as tuberculosis and although studies have demonstrated the efficacy of praziquantel and triclabendazole for the treatment of human infections, neither drug is available in Ecuador. Official data recorded from 1978-2007 indicate an annual incidence of 85.5 cases throughout the 19 provinces, with an estimated 17.2% of the population at risk of infection. There are no current data on the incidence/prevalence of infection, nor is there a national control programme.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Lung Diseases, Parasitic/epidemiology , Metacercariae/isolation & purification , Paragonimiasis/epidemiology , Paragonimus/classification , Anthelmintics/therapeutic use , Astacoidea/parasitology , Brachyura/parasitology , Chronic Disease , Ecuador/epidemiology , Lung Diseases, Parasitic/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Parasitic/drug therapy , Neglected Diseases/epidemiology , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimiasis/drug therapy
6.
The Korean Journal of Parasitology ; : 763-766, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-197158

ABSTRACT

A synthetic peptide was prepared based on the antigenic region of Paragonimus westermani pre-procathepsin L, and its applicability for immunodiagnosis for human paragonimiasis (due to Paragonimus heterotremus) was tested using an ELISA to detect IgG4 antibodies in the sera of patients. Sera from other helminthiases, tuberculosis, and healthy volunteers were used as the references. This peptide-based assay system gave sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of 100%, 94.6%, 96.2%, 100%, and 88.9%, respectively. Cross reactivity was frequently seen against the sera of fascioliasis (75%) and hookworm infections (50%). Since differential diagnosis between paragonimiasis and fascioliasis can be easily done by clinical presentation and fascioliasis serology, this cross reaction is not a serious problem. Sera from patients with other parasitoses (0-25%) rarely responded to this synthetic antigen. This synthetic peptide antigen seems to be useful for development of a standardized diagnostic system for paragonimiasis.


Subject(s)
Adult , Animals , Humans , Antibodies, Helminth/blood , Antigens, Helminth , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Cross Reactions , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimus/immunology , Parasitology/methods , Predictive Value of Tests , Sensitivity and Specificity
7.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-144670

ABSTRACT

Ever since the discovery of the first indigenous case in 1981, paragonimiasis has gained recognition as a significant food borne parasitic zoonosis in India. The data available on the occurrence of paragonimiasis, until today, may be just the tip of an iceberg as the study areas covered were restricted to Northeast Indian States. Nevertheless, the results of research on paragonimiasis in India have revealed valuable information in epidemiology, life cycle, pathobiology and speciation of Indian Paragonimus. Potamiscus manipurensis, Alcomon superciliosum and Maydelliathelphusa lugubris were identified as the crab hosts of Paragonimus. Paragonimus miyazakii manipurinus n. sub sp., P. hueit’ungensis, P. skrjabini, P. heterotremus, P. compactus, and P. westermani have been described from India. P. heterotremus was found as the causative agent of human paragonimiasis. Ingestion of undercooked crabs and raw crab extract was the major mode of infection. Pulmonary paragonimiasis was the commonest clinical manifestation while pleural effusion and subcutaneous nodules were the common extra-pulmonary forms. Clinico-radiological features of pulmonary paragonimiasis simulated pulmonary tuberculosis. Intradermal test, ELISA and Dot-immunogold filtration assay (DIGFA) were used for diagnosis and epidemiological survey of paragonimiasis. Phylogenitically, Indian Paragonimus species, although nested within the respective clade were distantly related to others within the clade.


Subject(s)
Humans , India/epidemiology , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimiasis/epidemiology , Paragonimiasis/parasitology , Paragonimus/classification , Paragonimus/isolation & purification
8.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 1428-1432, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-128852

ABSTRACT

Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes.


Subject(s)
Animals , Child , Female , Humans , Anthelmintics/therapeutic use , Brain/parasitology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Dysarthria/etiology , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimus/isolation & purification , Praziquantel/therapeutic use , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Vascular Malformations/etiology
9.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 1428-1432, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-128837

ABSTRACT

Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes.


Subject(s)
Animals , Child , Female , Humans , Anthelmintics/therapeutic use , Brain/parasitology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Dysarthria/etiology , Facial Paralysis/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimus/isolation & purification , Praziquantel/therapeutic use , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Vascular Malformations/etiology
10.
The Korean Journal of Parasitology ; : 409-412, 2011.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-78164

ABSTRACT

In Korea, many people enjoy eating raw or underkooked freshwater crayfish and crabs which unfortunately may cause paragonimiasis. Here, we describe a case of pulmonary and abdominal paragonimiasis in a 9-year-old girl, who presented with a 1-month history of abdominal pain, especially in the right flank and the right inguinal area, with anorexia. A chest radiograph revealed pleural effusion in both lungs, and her abdominal sonography indicated an inflammatory lesion in the right psoas muscle. Peripheral blood analysis of the patient showed hypereosinophilia (66.0%) and an elevated total serum IgE level (>2,500 IU/ml). The pleural effusion tested by ELISA were also positive for antibodies against paragonimiasis. Her dietary history stated that she had ingested raw freshwater crab, 4 months previously. The diagnosis was pulmonary paragonimiasis accompanied by abdominal muscle involvement. She was improved after 5 cycles of praziquantel treatment and 2 times of pleural effusion drainage. In conclusion, herein, we report a case of pulmonary and abdominal paragonimiasis in a girl who presented with abdominal pain and tenderness in the inguinal area.


Subject(s)
Animals , Child , Female , Humans , Abdominal Muscles/parasitology , Anthelmintics/therapeutic use , Brachyura/parasitology , Drainage , Lung/parasitology , Lung Diseases, Parasitic/diagnosis , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimus/isolation & purification , Pleural Effusion/parasitology , Praziquantel/therapeutic use , Republic of Korea , Shellfish/parasitology , Treatment Outcome
11.
The Korean Journal of Parasitology ; : 69-72, 2011.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-222445

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary paragonimiasis is a relatively rare cause of lung disease revealing a wide variety of radiologic findings, such as air-space consolidation, nodules, and cysts. We describe here a case of pulmonary paragonimiasis in a 27-year-old woman who presented with a 2-month history of cough and sputum. Based on chest computed tomography (CT) scans and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings, the patient was suspected to have a metastatic lung tumor. However, she was diagnosed as having Paragonimus westermani infection by an immunoserological examination using ELISA. Follow-up chest X-ray and CT scans after chemotherapy with praziquantel showed an obvious improvement. There have been several reported cases of pulmonary paragonimiasis mimicking lung tumors on FDG-PET. However, all of them were suspected as primary lung tumors. To our knowledge, this patient represents the first case of paragonimiasis mimicking metastatic lung disease on FDG-PET CT imaging.


Subject(s)
Adult , Animals , Female , Humans , Diagnostic Errors , Lung Diseases, Parasitic/diagnosis , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimus westermani/isolation & purification , Positron-Emission Tomography , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
12.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 1272-1276, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-177043

ABSTRACT

Seroprevalence of the IgG antibodies for Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani, Taenia solium metacestode (cysticercus), and Spirometra erinacei plerocercoid (sparganum) was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in sera of patients in Korea from 1993 to 2006. A total of 74,448 specimens referred nationwide from 121 hospitals revealed an IgG positive rate of 7.6% for the 4 parasites. The IgG positive rate (18.7%) for the 4 parasites in 1993 decreased gradually to 6.6% in 2006. Individual positive rate decreased from 5.2% (1993) to 1.6% (2006) for C. sinensis, from 2.8% (1993) to 1.1% (2006) for P. westermani, from 8.3% (1993) to 2.2% (2006) for cysticercus, and from 2.6% (1993) to 1.6% (2006) for sparganum. The positive rate was highest (21.2%) in the group of patients who ranged in age from 50-59 yr old, and in the group that was referred from the Seoul area (55.9%). In conclusion, our results suggest that tissue invading parasitic infections should always be included in differential diagnosis for patients with eosinophilia associated lesions of the central nervous system, liver, and lungs in Korea.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Age Factors , Antibodies, Helminth/blood , Clonorchiasis/diagnosis , Clonorchis sinensis/immunology , Cysticercosis/diagnosis , Cysticercus/immunology , Diagnosis, Differential , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Eosinophilia/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimus westermani/immunology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Sparganosis/diagnosis , Sparganum/immunology
13.
Rev. colomb. neumol ; 21(4): 186-191, dic. 2009. tab, ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-652737

ABSTRACT

La paragonimiasis es una antropozoonosis de transmisión alimentaria causada por tremátodos del género Paragonimus siendo P. Westwermanii el que más infecta al hombre. La infección del humano ocurre posterior a la ingesta de crustáceos de agua dulce mal cocinados, infectados con metacercarias. La gravedad y la progresión de los síntomas dependen de la fase y del número de parásitos presentes. La fase de infección pulmonar está caracterizada por tos, hemoptisis, dolor torácico, pérdida de peso y anormalidades radiológicas. Dado la sintomatología respiratoria y los hallazgos radiológicos inespecíficos; la tuberculosis pulmonar es el principal diagnostico diferencial a considerar. El diagnóstico se basa en la demostración del paragonimus por medios parasitológicos, en algunos casos como paragonimiasis extra pulmonar o en otras circunstancias cuando los métodos bacteriológicos fallan es necesario la realización estudios serológicos. El prazicuantel actualmente es considerado el tratamiento de elección.


Subject(s)
Foodborne Diseases , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimiasis/epidemiology , Paragonimiasis/drug therapy , Serologic Tests , Trematode Infections , Zoonoses
14.
The Korean Journal of Parasitology ; : 281-285, 2009.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-191533

ABSTRACT

Paragonimiasis typically results from the consumption of raw or improperly cooked crustacea, especially crabs and crayfish. Although previously endemic in Korea, the prevalence of this disease decreased in the early 1970s because of educational campaigns and fewer intermediate hosts as a result of ecological changes. Recently, we were presented with a family where all members were infected with Paragonimus after ingestion of Kejang (= drunken crab). The mother was hospitalized for general myalgia and weakness first, followed by the father, who was hospitalized for dyspnea 2 month later. After the parents were diagnosed with paragonimiasis, we recommended their daughter to visit our hospital for a checkup, because they all had eaten freshwater crabs soaked in soybean sauce. She complained of generalized myalgia, fever, and pleuritic pain, and was also diagnosed with paragonimiasis. Peripheral blood of the 3 patients revealed hypereosinophilia, and computed tomography (CT) scans of their chests showed pleural effusion. The results of antibody tests by ELISA were positive for paragonimiasis. We report here the case series of familial paragonimiasis in a modern urban city, rather than in a typical endemic area.


Subject(s)
Adult , Animals , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Family , Korea , Lung Diseases, Parasitic/diagnosis , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimus/isolation & purification
15.
Invest. clín ; 49(2): 257-264, jun. 2008. ilus, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-518681

ABSTRACT

La Paragonimiasis es una zoonosis parasitaria de diversos animales silvestres o domésticos y del hombre, causada por especies de tremátodes del género Paragonimus siendo el Paragonimus westermani el que más infecta al hombre. El humano se infecta al ingerir crustáceos de agua dulce parasitados (cangrejos de río) crudos o insuficientemente cocidos. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir el caso de un preescolar masculino de 3 años y medio de edad, natural y procedente del estado Guárico quien vivió un año en zona costera del Ecuador (Provincia Manabí) donde consumió alimentos de la zona como ceviche. Consultó por dificultad respiratoria y durante la hospitalización se evidenció hepatomegalia y presencia de nódulos subcutáneos en espalda. La Tomografía Axial computarizada (TAC) de tórax reveló importante infiltrado a nivel de ambas bases pulmonares a predominio del lado derecho con derrame y engrosamiento pleural. Por la clínica, las imágenes radiológicas, la eosinofilia (47% con contaje absoluto de eosinófilos (CAE) 6.862/mm3) y el antecedente de ingesta de cangrejos crudos 6 meses antes, se sugirió descartar paragonimiasis pulmonar. En un estudio seriado de muestras de sueros se evidenció la presencia de anticuerpos específicos anti-Paragonimus por ELISA y Western blot, sin embargo no se encontraron huevos del parásito en heces o en esputo. Se indicó tratamiento con praziquantel 25 mg/kg de peso 3 tomas al día durante 3 días con lo cual desapareció la sintomatología, mejoraron las imágenes radiológicas y disminuyó el contaje de eosinófilos.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Child, Preschool , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Blotting, Western/methods
16.
The Korean Journal of Parasitology ; : 179-182, 2008.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-35031

ABSTRACT

As a part of a broader effort to determine the status of Paragonimus species infection in Lao PDR, an epidemiological survey was conducted on villagers and schoolchildren in Namback District between 2003 and 2005. Among 308 villagers and 633 primary and secondary schoolchildren, 156 villagers and 92 children evidenced a positive reaction on a Paragonimus skin test. Only 4 schoolchildren out of 128 skin test-positive cases had Paragonimus sp. eggs in their sputum, all of which was collected on 1 day. Several types of crabs, which were identified as the second intermediate host of the Paragonimus species, were collected from markets and streams in a paragonimiasis endemic area for the inspection of metacercariae. Among the examined crabs, only "rock crabs" (Indochinamon ou) harbored Paragonimus sp. metacercariae, and it is speculated that the life cycle of Paragonimus sp. was maintained via rock crabs in Namback District, Lao PDR.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Animals , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Brachyura/parasitology , Laos/epidemiology , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Population Surveillance , Skin Tests
17.
Braz. j. infect. dis ; 11(1): 153-156, Feb. 2007. ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-454695

ABSTRACT

The authors present a case from a 59 years old white female Brazilian patient, based in Salvador-Bahia, Brazil's northeastern side area, who experienced irritative cough and progressive dyspnea, and, after 18 months, was admitted to a hospital with respiratory insufficiency. The physical exam showed diffuse rales in both hemithoraces. Initial leukogram showed 14,400 cells/mL with 14 percent of eosinophils and chest X-ray showed peribronchovascular infiltrate, predominating in the lower half of the lung fields, and small opaque nodules. The high-resolution computed tomography scan of the chest (HRCT) presented compatible pattern with airways disease, especially from the small airways, with air trapping, tree sprouting images, central lobular nodules and bronchiectasis, making the results compatible with bronchiolitis and bronchiectasis. The transbroncho biopsy unveiled granulomatous lesion with necrosis, where was noticed a structure compatible to a parasitic case, and the research of the parasite eggs in the sputum was positive to paragonimus. After the praziquantel use, the patient presented a thick ferruginous expectoration and the result for BAAR examination was positive. The PCR exam and the sputum culture confirmed M. tuberculosis, and then the treatment for M. tuberculosis was initiated. The authors warn that this infection may have been a consequence of economics globalization process, where the importation of parasitized crustaceans might be the cause. However, there is the need of an accurate examination for the possibility of paragonimus specimens in this area of Brazil.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Lung Diseases, Parasitic/epidemiology , Paragonimiasis/epidemiology , Anthelmintics/therapeutic use , Brazil/epidemiology , Lung Diseases, Parasitic/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Parasitic/drug therapy , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimiasis/drug therapy , Paragonimus/isolation & purification , Praziquantel/therapeutic use
18.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 372-381, 2007.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-174912

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the serial CT findings of Paragonimus westermani infected dogs and the microscopic structures of the worm cysts using Micro-CT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was approved by the committee on animal research at our institution. Fifteen dogs infected with P. westermani underwent serial contrast-enhanced CT scans at pre-infection, after 10 days of infection, and monthly thereafter until six months for determining the radiologic-pathologic correlation. Three dogs (one dog each time) were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively. After fixation of the lungs, both multi-detector CT and Micro-CT were performed for examining the worm cysts. RESULTS: The initial findings were pleural effusion and/or subpleural ground-glass opacities or linear opacities at day 10. At day 30, subpleural and peribronchial nodules appeared with hydropneumothorax and abdominal or chest wall air bubbles. Cavitary change and bronchial dilatation began to be seen on CT scan at day 30 and this was mostly seen together with mediastinal lymphadenopathy at day 60. Thereafter, subpleural ground-glass opacities and nodules with or without cavitary changes were persistently observed until day 180. After cavitary change of the nodules, the migratory features of the subpleural or peribronchial nodules were seen on all the serial CT scans. Micro-CT showed that the cyst wall contained dilated interconnected tubular structures, which had communications with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus. CONCLUSION: The CT findings of paragonimiasis depend on the migratory stage of the worms. The worm cyst can have numerous interconnected tubular channels within its own wall and these channels have connections with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus.


Subject(s)
Animals , Dogs , Female , Male , Contrast Media/administration & dosage , Cysts/parasitology , Disease Progression , Follow-Up Studies , Hydropneumothorax/parasitology , Iohexol/analogs & derivatives , Lung/parasitology , Observer Variation , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimus westermani/growth & development , Pleural Effusion/parasitology , Radiographic Image Enhancement/methods , Time Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
19.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 57-69, 2006.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-192501

ABSTRACT

Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) is being used more and more to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions and it has been shown to be more efficacious than conventional chest computed tomography (CT). However, FDG is not a cancer-specific agent, and false positive findings in benign diseases have been reported. Infectious diseases (mycobacterial, fungal, bacterial infection), sarcoidosis, radiation pneumonitis and post-operative surgical conditions have shown intense uptake on PET scan. On the other hand, tumors with low glycolytic activity such as adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, carcinoid tumors, low grade lymphomas and small sized tumors have revealed false negative findings on PET scan. Furthermore, in diseases located near the physiologic uptake sites (heart, bladder, kidney, and liver), FDG-PET should be complemented with other imaging modalities to confirm results and to minimize false negative findings. Familiarity with these false positive and negative findings will help radiologists interpret PET scans more accurately and also will help to determine the significance of the findings. In this review, we illustrate false positive and negative findings of PET scan in a variety of diseases.


Subject(s)
Humans , Tuberculoma/diagnosis , Thoracic Diseases/diagnosis , Radiopharmaceuticals , Positron-Emission Tomography , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Lymphatic Diseases/diagnosis , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous/diagnosis , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , False Positive Reactions , False Negative Reactions , Diagnosis, Differential , Cryptococcosis/diagnosis
20.
Pulmäo RJ ; 15(4): 270-276, 2006. tab
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-612425

ABSTRACT

A paragonimíase é uma doença zoonótica, não-contagiosa, produzida por trematódeos do gênero Paragonimus. O homem e outros animais infectam-se ao ingerir crustáceos de água doce — crus, mal cozidos ou em conserva — ou, ainda, água e/ou alimentos contaminados com metacercárias. Apresenta evolução crônica e acometimento predominantemente pulmonar, ainda que sejam descritas descritas alterações extrapulmonares. Podem surgir sinais e sintomas como tosse com expectoração sanguinolenta, febre intermitente, dor torácica, suores noturnos e, mais raramente, astenia, anorexia e perda de peso. Como principais métodos diagnósticos destacam-se o exame a fresco do escarro e/ou das fezes do paciente e os testes imunológicos. O tratamento é realizado com praziquantel. A infecção, habitualmente, tem bom prognóstico.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Paragonimiasis/diagnosis , Paragonimiasis/etiology , Paragonimiasis/prevention & control , Paragonimiasis/therapy , Paragonimus/pathogenicity , Ecology , Natural History of Diseases
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL