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1.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 328-335, March-Apr. 2022. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364937

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objectives: To compare thulium laser enucleation of prostate (ThuLEP) versus laparoscopic trans-vesical simple prostatectomy (LSP) in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Materials and Methods: Data of patients who underwent surgery for "large" BPH (>80mL) at three Institutions were collected and analyzed. Two institutions performed ThuLEP only; the third institution performed LSP only. Preoperative (indwelling catheter status, prostate volume (PVol), hemoglobin (Hb), Qmax, post-voiding residual volume (PVR), IPSS, QoL, IIEF-5) and perioperative data (operative time, enucleated adenoma, catheterization time, length of stay, Hb-drop, complications) were compared. Functional (Qmax, PVR, %ΔQmax) and patient-reported outcomes (IPSS, QoL, IIEF-5, %ΔIPSS, %ΔQoL) were compared at last follow-up. Results: 80 and 115 patients underwent LSP and ThuLEP, respectively. At baseline, median PVol was 130 versus 120mL, p <0.001; Qmax 9.6 vs. 7.1mL/s, p=0.005; IPSS 21 versus 25, p <0.001. Groups were comparable in terms of intraoperative complications (1 during LSP vs. 3 during ThuLEP) and transfusions (1 per group). Differences in terms of operative time (156 vs. 92 minutes, p <0.001), Hb-drop (-2.5 vs. −0.9g/dL, p <0.001), catheterization time (5 vs. 2 days, p <0.001) and postoperative complications (13.8% vs. 0, p <0.001) favored ThuLEP. At median follow-up of 40 months after LSP versus 30 after ThuLEP (p <0.001), Qmax improved by 226% vs. 205% (p=0.5), IPSS decreased by 88% versus 85% (p=0.9), QoL decreased by 80% with IIEF-5 remaining almost unmodified for both the approaches. Conclusions: Our analysis showed that LSP and ThuLEP are comparable in relieving from BPO and improving the patient-reported outcomes. Invasiveness of LSP is more significant.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Prostatic Hyperplasia/complications , Laparoscopy , Laser Therapy , Lasers, Solid-State/therapeutic use , Prostate/surgery , Prostatectomy , Quality of Life , Thulium/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(1): 200-201, Jan.-Feb. 2022.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1356299

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: The expansion of technology is leading to a paradigm shift in several urological fields (1, 2). In particular, the adoption of lasers within the surgical treatment of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is considered one of the most relevant innovations (3-5). In this video, we aimed to report our experience with holmium laser for the ablation of the prostate (HoLAP) in patients with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to BPH. Materials and Methods: From 2018 to 2020, 10 patients with obstructive LUTS secondary to BPH were treated at our Institution with HoLAP (120W Holmium laser Lumenis® with Moses® technology). Main inclusion criteria were: 1) International Prostate Symptom Score ≥12; 2) prostate volume ≤65mL, 3) maximal flow rate (Qmax) ≤15ml/s at preoperative non-invasive uroflowmetry. Results: Mean patient age was 65 (range: 59-72) years. Preoperative mean prostate volume was 50 (range: 35-65) mL. Mean operative time was 66 (range: 45-85) minutes with a mean laser time/operative time ratio of 0.51 (range: 0.44-0.60). Voiding symptoms, Qmax and post voiding residual were significantly improved after 3 and 12 months (all p <0.05). No postoperative urinary incontinence was detected. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that HoLAP is a slightly time-spending procedure, thus its use should be limited to prostate volume <70-80mL. However, no postoperative complications were recorded at all. This technique showed to be a safe option in patients with low-intermediate prostate volume, also in patients whose antiaggregant/anticoagulant therapy is maintained.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Transurethral Resection of Prostate , Laser Therapy , Lasers, Solid-State/therapeutic use , Prostate/surgery , Prostatectomy , Technology , Holmium
3.
Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. (1992) ; 68(1): 50-55, Jan. 2022. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1360703

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the rate of urethral stricture development, predictor factors, and the reliability following bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate. METHODS: A total of 124 patients participated in this study. Patient data were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into group 1 (those who developed urethral stricture) and group 2 (those who did not develop urethral stricture). Annual checkups were performed after the postoperative months 1 and 6. The patients were checked by uroflowmetry + post-voiding residue and international index of erectile function. We evaluated the complications that developed during the perioperative period according to the Clavien system. RESULTS: Urethral stricture developed in 10.5% (13/124) of the patients. It was found that patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate for the second time (p=0.007), patients with a preoperative catheter or history of catheter insertion (p=0.009), patients with high preoperative median white blood cell (103) counts (p=0.013), and patients with long postoperative catheterization time had a higher rate of urethral stricture after bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate (p=0.046). No grade 4 and grade 5 complications were observed according to the Clavien system in patients. CONCLUSION: Factors such as second transurethral resection of the prostate surgery, history of preoperative catheter insertion, high postoperative white blood cell count, and long postoperative catheterization time increase the risk of urethral stricture after bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Prostatic Hyperplasia/complications , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Urethral Stricture/etiology , Transurethral Resection of Prostate/adverse effects , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies
4.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 191-194, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928523

ABSTRACT

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in elderly men, and transurethral laser prostatectomy (TULP) has been widely used in the clinic to remove bladder outlet obstruction caused by BPH. Previous animal models for wound repair after prostatectomy have many limitations, and there have been no previous reports of a mouse model of TULP. Therefore, this study aimed to establish a novel mouse model of TULP. Twelve healthy adult Kunming (KM) mice received transurethral laser vaporization prostatectomy with a 200-μm thulium laser. The mice were sacrificed, and wound specimens from the prostatic urethra and bladder neck were harvested at 1 day, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after surgery. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and immunohistochemistry were applied to confirm the establishment of the mouse TULP model. One day after the surgery, urothelium expressing uroplakin (UPK) was absent in the urethral wound site, and a large number of necrotic tissues were found in the wound site. There was no UPK-positive urothelium in the wound 3 days after surgery. At 5 days after surgery, monolayer urothelium expressing UPK was found in the wound site, indicating that the re-epithelization of the wound had been completed. On the 7th day after surgery, there were multiple layers of urothelium with UPK expression, indicating that the repair was completed. It is feasible to establish a mouse TULP model by using a microcystoscope system and a 200-μm thulium laser.


Subject(s)
Aged , Animals , Humans , Laser Therapy , Male , Mice , Prostatectomy , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Thulium , Transurethral Resection of Prostate
5.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(2): 308-321, Mar.-Apr. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1154449

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction and objective: To evaluate changes in verumontanum anatomy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) who used 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) and to propose an anatomical classification of the verumontanum. Materials and Methods: We studied 86 patients with BPH and 7 patients without the disease (age under 40 years-old who underwent kidney or ureteral lithotripsy). Of the patients with BPH, 34 (mean age=67.26) had 5-ARIs use and 52 (mean age=62.69) did not use the drug. During surgeries, photographs of the seminal colliculus were taken and later, with the aid of software (Image J), the length (longitudinal diameter) and width (transverse diameter) of the verumontanum were measured in all patients. During the procedure, we evaluated the different types of verumontanum. For statistical analysis, the R-Project software was used. Results: In the group of patients with BPH who were taking medication (group 1), the mean measures of length and width of the verumontanum were 4.69mm and 2.94mm respectively. In the group of patients with BPH who did not use the drug (group 2), the mean diameters were 4.54mm and 3.20mm respectively. In the control group (group 3), the average length and width were 5.63mm and 4.11mm respectively. There was an increase in longitudinal and transverse measurements of the control group with an increase in body mass index (BMI) (p=0.0001 and p=0.035 respectively). In addition, there was a reduction in transverse diameter in the group of BPH using 5-ARI with increased prostate volume (p=0.010). We found five different verumontanum types: "volcano" (51.61%), "lighthouse" (24.73%), "whale tail" (12.90%), "hood" (5.38%) and "castle door" (5.38%), which we propose as an anatomical classification. Conclusion: Veromontanum has smaller measurements in patients with BPH regardless of treatment. In the control group, there was an increase in verumontanum diameters with an increase in BMI. The volcano type of verumontanum was the most frequent regardless of groups and BMI.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Prostatic Hyperplasia/drug therapy , Urethra , Endoscopy , 5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors
6.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(1): 131-144, Jan.-Feb. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134328

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To generate high-quality data comparing the clinical efficacy and safety profile between monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (M-TURP) and bipolar plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PK-TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized, single-blinded study conducted in a tertiary-care public institution (Dec/2014-Aug/2016). Inclusion criteria: prostate of <80g in patients with drug-refractory lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), complications derived from BPH, or both. Exclusion criteria: a history of pelvic surgery/radiotherapy, neurogenic bladder dysfunction or documented/suspected prostate carcinoma. Treatment efficacy evaluated at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Efficacy outcomes: international prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality-of-life (QoL) score, international index of erectile function-5 (IIEF-5), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), postvoid residual urine (PVRU) volume, and prostate volume (PV). Complications and sequelae also assessed. Comparisons performed with parametric/non-parametric tests. Results: Out of the 100 hundred patients, 84 qualified for the analysis (45 M-TURP/39 PK-TURP). No significant differences found in baseline characteristics or operative data, except for a longer operative time in PK-TURP (MD:7.9min; 95%CI:0.13-15.74; p=0.04). No differences found in IPSS, Qmax or PVRU volume. QoL score at 12 months was higher in PK-TURP (MD:0,9points; 95%CI:0.18-1.64; p=0.01). No differences in sexual function, PV, complications or sequelae were found. This study is "rigorous" (Jadadscale) and has a low risk of bias (Cochrane-Handbook). Conclusions: Based on this controlled trial, there is not significant variation in effectiveness and safety between M-TURP and PK-TURP for the treatment of BPH. The small difference in QoL between PK-TURP and M-TURP at the one-year follow-up is not perceivable by the patients and, therefore, not clinically relevant.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Transurethral Resection of Prostate/adverse effects , Quality of Life , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
8.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 616-620, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-922365

ABSTRACT

Adoption of the prostatic urethral lift (PUL) as a treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia highlights the importance of training residents with novel technology without compromising patient care. This study examines the effect of resident involvement during PUL on patient and procedural outcomes. Retrospective chart review was conducted on all consecutive PUL cases performed by a single academic urologist between October 2017 and November 2019. Trainees in post-graduate year (PGY) 1-3 are considered junior residents, while those in PGY 4-6 are senior residents. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and quality of life (QOL) scores were used to measure outcomes. Simple and mixed-effects linear regression models were used to compare differences. There were 110 patients with a median age of 66.4 years. Residents were involved in 73 cases (66.4%), and senior residents were involved in 31 of those cases. Resident involvement was not associated with adverse perioperative outcomes with respect to the number of implants fired, the percentage of implants successfully placed, or the postoperative catheterization rate. After adjustment for confounding factors, junior residents were associated with significantly longer case length compared to the attending alone (+12.6 min, P = 0.003) but senior residents were not (+2.4 min, P = 0.59). IPSS and QOL scores were not significantly affected by resident involvement (P = 0.12 and P = 0.21, respectively). The presence of surgeons-in-training, particularly those in the early stages, prolongs PUL case length but does not appear to have an adverse impact on patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
Aged , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Prostate/surgery , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Quality of Life/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Ureteroscopy/statistics & numerical data
9.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 787-792, 2021.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-922158

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To evaluate the safety and clinical efficiency of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in the treatment of small-volume BPH (SBPH) complicated by severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).@*METHODS@#We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data on 82 cases of SBPH with severe LUTS treated by HoLEP from January 2017 to December 2018. The patients were aged (65.5 ± 7.6) years, with a mean prostate volume of <40 ml, a total IPSS of 24.8 ± 4.6, a QOL score of 5.2 ± 0.8, the maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) of (7.6 ± 3.7) ml/s, and a mean PSA level of (1.8 ± 1.4) μg/L.@*RESULTS@#All the operations were successfully completed, the mean operation time averaging (30.2 ± 5.0) min, enucleation time (26.7 ± 5.6) min and comminution time (3.5 ± 1.1) min, and the enucleated tissue weighing (20.3 ± 4.9) g. After surgery, the bladders were irrigated for (3.5 ± 1.9) h, with (3.0 ± 1.7) L of rinse solution, and catheterization lasted (24.8 ± 9.7) h. Histopathology revealed moderate or severe lymphocytic infiltration in 69 cases (84.1%). At 6 months after operation, significant improvement was observed in the IPSS, QOL, Qmax and PSA level compared with the baseline (P < 0.05). To date, no urethral stricture-related reoperation was ever necessitated.@*CONCLUSIONS@#HoLEP is safe and effective for the treatment of SBPH complicated by severe LUTS and can be employed after adequate preoperative evaluation of the patient.《.


Subject(s)
Humans , Lasers, Solid-State , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/surgery , Male , Prostate/surgery , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies
11.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(4): 575-584, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134201

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective and Hypothesis We aimed to investigate the reasons of storage symptoms ( SS) after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). The hypothesis was that a positive correlation would be identified between preoperative and postoperative SS in patients with undergoing TURP and starting early solifenacin treatment in patients with high preoperative SS would be reasonable. In addition, we aimed to analyze multiple other risk factors for post-TURP SS. Materials and Methods A total of 160 patients undergoing TURP were prospectively evaluated and divided into two groups according to their OABS. Those with a score of ≥10 points were Group 1 (G1), and those with <10 points Group 2 (G2). In addition, patients in each group were randomly further divided into two subgroups: those who were started on 5 mg solifenacin succinate in the early postoperative period (G1/G2 A) and those who were not (G1/G2 B). In additions to SS Preop, perop and at the 3rd-month of postoperatively 14 variable were evaluated. The effects of these factors, surgery and the efficacy of an early medical treatment on the postoperative SS were investigated. LUTS were assessed by International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and SS were assessed by sum of IPSS 2, 4 and 7 questionnaires (Storage, S- IPSS). Results Preoperative IPSS and S-IPSS were significantly higher in G1 (p<0.001); there was a significant improvement at IPSS, S-IPSS, QoL score, Qmax, and PVR for all groups after surgery. Only preoperative S-IPSS was found to have significant effect on postoperative SS (p<0.001). There was a significant difference between G1A and G1B but no significant difference between G2A and G2B in terms of SS at postoperatively. In addition to this, prostatic volume was found smaller than non-symptomatic patients in de novo SS patients. Conclusion TURP provides significant improvement in both storage and voiding symptoms. The predictive value of the preoperative S-IPSS on postop SS is significant. These results suggest that 5 mg solifenacin succinate treatment in the early postoperative period may be beneficial for patients with high preoperative SS and may not be beneficial in others. Small prostatic volume may bode ill for postoperative SS in the patients with de novo SS.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Aged , Transurethral Resection of Prostate , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Prostatic Hyperplasia/drug therapy , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome , Solifenacin Succinate/therapeutic use , Middle Aged
12.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(4): 624-631, 2020. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134194

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose To identify incidence and predictors of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) following Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective review of 589 HoLEP patients from 2012-2018. Patients were assessed at pre-operative and post-operative visits. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of SUI. Results 52/589 patients (8.8%) developed transient SUI, while 9/589 (1.5%) developed long-term SUI. tSUI resolved for 46 patients (88.5%) within the first six weeks and in 6 patients (11.5%) between 6 weeks to 3 months. Long-term SUI patients required intervention, achieving continence at 16.4 months on average, 44 men (70.9%) with incontinence were catheter dependent preoperatively. Mean prostatic volume was 148.7mL in tSUI patients, 111.6mL in long-term SUI, and 87.9mL in others (p <0.0001). On univariate analysis, laser energy used (p <0.0001), laser "on" time (p=0.0204), resected prostate weight (p <0.0001), overall International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) (p=0.0005), and IPSS QOL (p=0.02) were associated with SUI. On multivariate analysis, resected prostate weight was predictive of any SUI and tSUI, with no risk factors identified for long-term SUI. Conclusion Post-HoLEP SUI occurs in ~10% of patients, with 1.5% continuing beyond six months. Most patients with tSUI recover within the first six weeks. Prostate size >100g and catheter dependency are associated with increased risk tSUI. Larger prostate volume is an independent predictor of any SUI, and tSUI.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/surgery , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Transurethral Resection of Prostate , Laser Therapy , Lasers, Solid-State/adverse effects , Surgeons , Middle Aged
13.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(6): 1279-1280, Nov.-Dec. 2019.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1056342

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objectives: Surgical treatment is indicated in patients where medical therapy fails to prove beneficial or in patients who develop complications related with bladder outlet obstruction. In our study, we developed a new surgical technique which can be defined as Transvesical Resection of Prostate (TVRP) without using the urethra. This method was previously described in our articles (1). Materials and Methods: A 62-years-old male patient, using an alpha blocker agent for 5 years, reported increased discomfort with urination. His findings were as follows: PSA: 1.2 ng/dL, prostate volume: 45 cc, digital rectal examination: benign, IPSS: 30, QoL: 5, Qmax: 6, urine volume: 225 cc, post-mictional residue: 65 cc. Eventually the patient was informed and prostate resection decision was made. Results: Suprapubic catheter was removed 1 day after surgery and the patient was discharged. Urethral catheter was removed 4 days after urine output became clear. No complications developed after the operation. At postoperative 1st month, Qmax was 22, urine volume was 260 cc, post-mictional residue was 40 cc, IPSS was 8, QoL was 1, and the pathology was benign prostate tissue. Conclusions: Urethral stricture is one of the most important postoperative complications of TURP. The incidence of urethral stricture is reported between 2.2% and 9.8% in different series (2-5). In this technique which we developed, urethra is not used and prostate is removed through the bladder, similar to open prostatectomies. For this reason, we suggest that it has an advantage over TURP, regarding urethral stricture development.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatectomy/methods , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction/surgery , Prostatic Hyperplasia/complications , Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction/etiology , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Middle Aged
14.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(5): 1023-1031, Sept.-Oct. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-975621

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To protect the urethra from instrumentation related urethra injures and stricture, we developed a new surgical technique which can be defined as transvesical resection of prostate without using urethra. Materials and Methods: Our study included 12 consecutive bladder outlet obstruction patients treated with transvesical prostate resection in our clinic between March 2016 and May 2016. Detailed anamnesis, results of physical examination, digital rectal examination, routine lab tests, international prostate symptoms score, transrectal ultrasound, measurement of prostate-specific antigen levels and uroflowmetry was performed in all patients prior to surgery. Results: Hospitalization period following surgery was 1 day. Foley catheter and suprapubic cystostomy catheters were removed in a median period of 3.6 days and 1 day. Median mass of resected adenomas was measured as 21.8 gr. Median maximum flow rate was measured as 6mL/s. Median postvoid residual urine volume was 70.6 cc and median international prostate symptoms score and quality of life scores were 9 and 1.4, respectively. Conclusion: In this study, we would like to show the possible practicality of transvesical resection of prostate technique in this patient group. However, we think that this technique is very useful in special patient groups such as patients with bladder stones, priapism and penile prosthesis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatectomy/methods , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction/surgery , Prostatic Hyperplasia/complications , Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction/etiology , Treatment Outcome
15.
Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. (1992) ; 64(10): 876-881, Oct. 2018. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-976785

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY The minimally invasive procedures (mips) for the treatment of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (bph) are presented as attractive techniques due to their ease of accomplishment and the possibility of outpatient treatment. This guideline aims to present recommendations that may assist in decision making in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and indication of the different minimally invasive therapies. For this, a systematic review of the literature was performed, with the descriptors according to the pico: patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia, minimally invasive therapy, clinical outcome and adverse events. With no time restriction, in medline, cochrane central and lilacs databases via vhl, 1,007 papers were retrieved, of which 16 were selected to respond to clinical doubt. Details of the methodology and results of this guideline are set out in annex I


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/methods , Urinary Tract/surgery , Urination Disorders/surgery , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/classification , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Evidence-Based Medicine
16.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(4): 765-770, July-Aug. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-954087

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: The urinary bladder diverticula (BD) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a complication that can lead to urinary stasis, stone, urinary tract infection (UTI) and tumors. It's role in acute urinary retention (AUR) is not totally understood. Objectives: To determine the effect of BD size on AUR rates in patients with BPH candidates to surgery. Subjects and Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 47 patients with BPH and BD who underwent BPH surgery associated to complete bladder diverticulectomy from 2006 to 2016. We analyzed risk factors for AUR in patients with BD using univariate, multivariate and correlation analysis. Results: There was a difference in the size of the diverticula, with 6.8 cm vs. 4.5 cm among patients with and without AUR respectively (p=0.005). The ROC curve showed a correlation between the size of BD and the risk of AUR. The value of 5.15 cm presented a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 72%. The area under the curve was 0.75 (p=0.01). Comparing groups with BD >5.0 cm vs. ≤5.0 cm, the AUR incidence was 74% and 27.8% respectively with an OR of 2.65 (1.20-5.85) (p=0.005). In the multivariate analysis, only the size of the diverticula reached statistical significance (p=0.012). Conclusions: The diameter of BD is an independent risk factor for AUR in patients with BPH and BD who are candidates to surgery. A diameter greater than 5.15 cm increases the risk of AUR.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Aged , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Prostatic Hyperplasia/complications , Urinary Bladder/abnormalities , Urinary Retention/etiology , Diverticulum/complications , Diverticulum/pathology , Reference Values , Urinary Bladder/pathology , Urinary Bladder/diagnostic imaging , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Acute Disease , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , ROC Curve , Diverticulum/diagnostic imaging , Risk Assessment , Middle Aged
18.
Clinics ; 73: e264, 2018. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-890740

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the associations between preoperative treatment with 5-alpha reductase inhibitors and the risks of blood transfusion during transurethral resection of the prostate and blood clot evacuation or emergency department visits for hematuria within 1 month after surgery. METHODS: We used data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database in this population-based cohort study. A total of 3,126 patients who underwent first-time transurethral resection of the prostate from 2004 to 2013 were identified. Adjusted odds ratios estimated by multiple logistic regression models were used to assess the independent effects of the preoperative use of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors on the risks of perioperative hemorrhagic events after adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS: Two hundred and ninety-seven (9.4%) patients were treated with 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for <3 months, and 65 (2.1%) patients were treated for ≥3 months prior to undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate. The blood transfusion rates for patients who were not treated with 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (controls), patients who were treated with 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for <3 months, and patients who were treated with 5-alpha reductase inhibitors ≥3 months were 9.5%, 8.8%, and 3.1%, respectively. 5-alpha reductase inhibitors tended to decrease the risk of blood transfusion; however, this association was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio=0.14, 95% confidence interval: 0.02-1.01). Age ≥80 years, coagulopathy, and a resected prostate tissue weight >50 g were associated with significantly higher risks of blood transfusion than other parameters. CONCLUSIONS: This nationwide study did not show that significant associations exist between 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use before transurethral resection of the prostate and the risks of blood transfusion and blood clot evacuation or emergency visits for hematuria.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Blood Loss, Surgical/prevention & control , Transurethral Resection of Prostate/adverse effects , 5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Time Factors , Blood Transfusion , Preoperative Care/methods , Logistic Models , Risk Factors , Cohort Studies , Treatment Outcome , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/antagonists & inhibitors , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hematuria/etiology , Hematuria/prevention & control
19.
Medwave ; 18(1): e7134, 2018.
Article in English, Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-909743

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCCIÓN: La resección transuretral es el método de elección para la resolución endoscópica de la uropatía obstructiva baja por hiperplasia benigna de la próstata menor a 80cc. Tradicionalmente esta ha sido realizada con asas de resección que utilizan energía monopolar. El uso de energía bipolar ha desplazado la tecnología precedente en el último tiempo. Se dispone a evaluar la eficacia y seguridad de ambas tecnologías para la técnica. MÉTODOS: Para responder esta pregunta utilizamos Epistemonikos, la mayor base de datos de revisiones sistemáticas en salud, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en múltiples fuentes de información, incluyendo MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, entre otras. Extrajimos los datos desde las revisiones identificadas, reanalizamos los datos de los estudios primarios, realizamos un metanálisis y preparamos tablas de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. RESULTADOS Y CONCLUSIONES: Identificamos 13 revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen 32 estudios primarios, de los cuales 31 corresponden a ensayos aleatorizados. Concluimos que, si bien podrían no existir diferencias de eficacia entre ambas técnicas, la utilización de energía bipolar disminuye la incidencia de síndrome post resección transuretral y probablemente disminuye el riesgo de sangrado que requiere transfusión.


INTRODUCTION: Transurethral resection is currently considered as standard endoscopic treatment for lower urinary tract obstruction due to benign hyperplasia under 80 cc. Monopolar resection loops has been traditionally used but bipolar energy has recently displaced precedent technology. The purpose of this summary is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of both technologies. METHODS: To answer this question we used Epistemonikos, the largest database of systematic reviews in health, which is maintained by screening multiple information sources, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, among others. We extracted data from the systematic reviews, reanalyzed data of primary studies, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE approach. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: We identified 13 systematic reviews including 32 primary studies, among them 31 randomized trials. We concluded although there may be no difference in terms of efficacy among both techniques, the use of bipolar energy reduces the incidence of transurethral resection syndrome and probably reduces the risk of bleeding that requires red blood cell transfusion.


Subject(s)
Humans , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Transurethral Resection of Prostate/methods , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/surgery , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Blood Loss, Surgical/prevention & control , Databases, Factual , Treatment Outcome
20.
Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. (1992) ; 63(8): 711-716, Aug. 2017.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-896385

ABSTRACT

Summary Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition in adult men and its incidence increases progressively with aging. It has an important impact on the individual's physical and mental health and its natural progression can lead to serious pathological situations. Although the initial treatment is pharmacological, except in specific situations, the tendency of disease progression causes a considerable portion of the patients to require surgical treatment. In this case, there are several options available today in the therapeutic armamentarium. Among the options, established techniques, such as open surgery and endoscopic resection using monopolar energy, still prevail in the choice of surgeons because they are more accessible, both from a socioeconomic standpoint in the vast majority of medical services and in terms of training of medical teams. On the other hand, new techniques and technologies arise sequentially in order to minimize aggression, surgical time, recovery and complications, optimizing results related to the efficacy/safety dyad. Each of these techniques has its own peculiarities regarding availability due to cost, learning curve and scientific consolidation in order to achieve recognition as a cutting-edge method in the medical field. The use of bipolar energy in endoscopic resection of the prostate, laser vaporization and enucleation techniques, and videolaparoscopy are examples of new options that have successfully traced this path. Robot-assisted surgery has gained a lot of space in the last decade, but it still needs to dodge the trade barrier. Other techniques and technologies will need to pass the test of time to be able to conquer their space in this growing market.


Resumo A hiperplasia prostática benigna (HPB) é uma condição comum em homens adultos, de incidência progressiva com o envelhecimento, com importante impacto nas saúdes física e mental do indivíduo e história natural que pode levar a situações patológicas graves. Embora o tratamento inicial, salvo em situações específicas, seja farmacológico, a tendência de progressão da doença leva uma considerável parcela dos pacientes a necessitar do tratamento cirúrgico. Neste caso, existem diversas opções hoje disponíveis no arsenal terapêutico. Dentre estas, as técnicas consagradas, como as cirurgias por via aberta e a ressecção endoscópica por energia monopolar, ainda ocupam extenso terreno na escolha dos cirurgiões por serem mais acessíveis, tanto do ponto de vista socioeconômico na imensa maioria dos serviços médicos quanto do de aprendizado por parte das equipes médicas. Por outro lado, novas técnicas e tecnologias surgem sequencialmente no intuito de minimizar a agressão, o tempo cirúrgico, as complicações, bem como favorecer a recuperação, otimizando resultados em relação ao binômio eficácia/segurança. Cada uma destas tem seu próprio curso em relação à disponibilidade de acesso em decorrência de custo, curva de aprendizagem e consolidação científica, a fim de atingir conceituação e utilização de ponta no meio médico. O uso da energia bipolar na ressecção endoscópica da próstata, as técnicas de vaporização e enucleação a laser e a videolaparoscopia são exemplos de novas opções que trilharam esse caminho com sucesso. A cirurgia robô-assistida tem conquistado bastante espaço na última década, embora ainda esbarre na barreira comercial. Outras técnicas e tecnologias devem passar pelo crivo do tempo para poderem cavar espaço neste mercado que, tempo após tempo, torna-se mais vasto.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatectomy/trends , Prostatectomy/methods , Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery , Disease Progression
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