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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880059

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To investigate the molecular mechanism in stable cell strains expressing Mini-hF9 gene with nonsense mutation.@*METHODS@#Mini-hF9 gene and its nonsense mutants were transfected into HeLa cells independently, and stable cell strains were obtained after G418 resistance screening and monoclonal transformation. The altered splicing and protein expression of mRNA in Mini-hF9 gene in stable cell strains were detected by using RT-PCR and Western blot.@*RESULTS@#The wild type and nonsense mutated human coagulation factor IX stable cell strains were constructed successfully, which were named HeLa-F9-WT, HeLa-F9-M1 and HeLa-F9-M2. Only normal splicing Norm was detected in the wild-type cell strain HeLa-F9-WT; Norm and Alt-S1 splicing were detected in HeLa-F9-M1; while Norm, Alt-S1 and Alt-S2 splicing were detected in HeLa-F9-M2.@*CONCLUSION@#The nonsense associated altered splicing (NAS) pathway, which generated alternately spliced transcripts, might be triggered in coagulation factor IX gene with nonsense mutation.


Subject(s)
Codon, Nonsense , Factor IX/metabolism , HeLa Cells , Humans , Mutation , RNA Splicing , RNA, Messenger/metabolism
2.
Journal of Experimental Hematology ; (6): 1019-1027, 2021.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-888513

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To detect the expression of different transcripts of lactamase β(LACTB) gene in leukemic cell lines.@*METHODS@#NCBI website and DNAstar software were used to detect the Bioinformatics analysis of LACTB. The expression of different transcripts of LACTB gene in leukemic cell lines (THP-1, HL60, K562, U937, Jurkat and Raji) was detected by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), DNA and clone sequencing; the expression of different transcripts of LACTB gene in leukemic cell lines was detected by Quantitative Real-time PCR.@*RESULTS@#There were a variety of splicing isomers in LACTB, and it could produce a variety of protein isomers with conserved N-terminal and different C-terminal, moreover, there were many splice isoforms of LACTB in leukemia cell lines, and there were different expression patterns in different cell lines, including XR1, V1, V2 and V3. The expression of total LACTB showed high in HL60 cells, while low in Raji cells, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The V1 was high expression in U937 cells but low in Raji cells, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). V2 was high expression in HL60 cells but lowly in Raji cells, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The expression of V3 was low in THP-1 cells, which was significantly different as compared with that in normal bone marrow (P<0.05).@*CONCLUSION@#The reaserch found that there are many splice isomers of LACTB in leukemic cell lines, and there are different expression patterns in different cell lines.


Subject(s)
Alternative Splicing , HL-60 Cells , Humans , Leukemia/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Mitochondrial Proteins/genetics , RNA Splicing , U937 Cells , beta-Lactamases/genetics
3.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-879624

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To explore the genetic basis for a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex.@*METHODS@#Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples from members of his family and 100 unrelated healthy controls. The proband was subjected to next-generation sequencing, and candidate variant was confirmed by multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and Sanger sequencing. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was carried out to determine the relative mRNA expression in the proband.@*RESULTS@#The patient was found to harbor a c.2355+1G>C splicing variant of the TSC2 gene. Sequencing of cDNA confirmed that 62 bases have been inserted into the 3' end of exon 21, which has caused a frameshift producing a truncated protein.@*CONCLUSION@#The novel splicing variant c.2355+1G>C of the TSC2 gene probably underlay the TSC in the proband. Above finding has expanded the variant spectrum of TSC2 and provided a basis for preimplantation genetic testing and/or prenatal diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Mutation , Pregnancy , RNA Splicing/genetics , Tuberous Sclerosis/genetics , Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 1 Protein/genetics , Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 Protein/genetics
4.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-879554

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To analyze the clinical phenotype and genetic variants in five Chinese pedigrees affected with Dysferlinopathy.@*METHODS@#Next generation sequencing (NGS) was carried out for the probands from the five pedigrees. Suspected variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. Pathogenicity of the variants was assessed based on the standards and guidelines by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG).@*RESULTS@#Ten DYSF gene variants (including 5 frameshift variants, 3 splicing variants, 1 missense variant and 1 nonsense variant) were detected. Among these, c.1375dupA (p.Met459Asnfs*15), c.610C>T (p.Arg204X), c.1180+5G>A and c.1284+2T>C were known to be pathogenic, while c.4008_4010delCCTinsAC (p.Leu1337Argfs*8), c.1137_1169del (p.379_390del), c.754A>G(p.Thr252Ala), c.1175_1176insGCAGAGTG (p.Met394Serfs*7), c.3114_3115insCGGC (p.Arg1040Profs*74) and c.1053+3G>C were unreported previously. Of the six novel variants, c.1137_1169del, c.1175_1176insGCAGAGTG and c.3114_3115insCGGC were predicted as pathogenic (PVS1+PM2+PM3), c.4008_4010delCCTinsAC as likely pathogenic (PVS1+PM2), c.754A>G and c.1053+3G>C as variants of uncertain significance based on the ACMG standards and guidelines.@*CONCLUSION@#Variants of the DYSF gene probably underlay Dysferlinopathy in the patients among the five pedigrees. Above finding has enriched the spectrum of DYSF gene variants.


Subject(s)
Humans , Muscular Dystrophies, Limb-Girdle/genetics , Mutation , Pedigree , Phenotype , RNA Splicing
5.
Journal of Experimental Hematology ; (6): 2056-2065, 2020.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880015

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To study two novel CD36 gene mutations at the CD36 splicing sites found in Guangxi population, as well as the molecular basis and population incidence of them.@*METHODS@#DNA sequencing and cDNA clonal sequencing were used to detect CD36 exon sequence and the protein coding region sequence of CD36 mRNA for 2 CD36 deficient individuals (HHC and WGM) found in Guangxi population. Eukaryotic expression cell lines were established for the discovery of CD36 mRNA abnormal transcripts and Western blot assay was used to verify the effect of abnormal CD36 mRNA transcripts on CD36 expression. A DNA PCR-SSP genotyping method was established for the two CD36 novel mutations, and the population distribution was investigated among 110 CD36 deficient individuals in Guangxi region and 296 random individuals in Guangxi population.@*RESULTS@#Novel mutation of c.430 -1G>C was found at the CD36 splicing site in HHC and WGM individuals, and novel mutation of c.1006 +2T>G at the CD36 splicing site was also found in the WGM individual. CD36 cDNA clonal sequencing showed that CD36 c.430 -1G>C could lead to the production of the two CD36 mRNA transcript variants: c.429_430ins[430-17_430-2;C](p.Ala144fsTer1) and c.430_609del(p.Ala144_Pro203del)(GenBank:HM 217023.1); and CD36 c.1006 +2T>G could lead to the production of CD36 mRNA transcript variant of c.819_1006 del (p.Ser274GlufsTer16) (GenBank: HM217025.1). It was verified that all the three transcript variants could lead to CD36 deficiency by establishment of eukaryotic expression cell lines and Western blot assay. A study of the population incidence of two novel CD36 splicing site mutations found showed that in 110 CD36 deficient individuals and in 296 random individuals in Guangxi region, the mutation rate of CD36 c.430 -1G>C was 10.91% (12/110) and 1.35% (4/296), respectively, while CD36 c.1006 +2T>G was 2.73% (3/110) and 0 (0/296), respectively.@*CONCLUSION@#This study identifies two novel CD36 mutations at CD36 splicing site, and preliminary clarified their molecular basis for the CD36 deficiency and the distribution characteristics in Guangxi population as well. It provides an experimental and theoretical basis for studying the molecular mechanism and characteristics of CD36 deficiency in Chinese population.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelet Disorders , China , Genetic Diseases, Inborn , Humans , Mutation , RNA Splicing
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-828956

ABSTRACT

A splicing mutation in VPS4B can cause dentin dysplasia type I (DD-I), a hereditary autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by rootless teeth, the etiology of which is genetically heterogeneous. In our study, dental follicle cells (DFCs) were isolated and cultured from a patient with DD-I and compared with those from an age-matched, healthy control. In a previous study, this DD-I patient was confirmed to have a loss-of-function splicing mutation in VPS4B (IVS7 + 46C > G). The results from this study showed that the isolated DFCs were vimentin-positive and CK14-negative, indicating that the isolated cells were derived from the mesenchyme. DFCs harboring the VPS4B mutation had a significantly higher proliferation rate from day 3 to day 8 than control DFCs, indicating that VPS4B is involved in cell proliferation. The cells were then replenished with osteogenic medium to investigate how the VPS4B mutation affected osteogenic differentiation. Induction of osteogenesis, detected by alizarin red and alkaline phosphatase staining in vitro, was decreased in the DFCs from the DD-I patient compared to the control DFCs. Furthermore, we also found that the VPS4B mutation in the DD-I patient downregulated the expression of osteoblast-related genes, such as ALP, BSP, OCN, RUNX2, and their encoded proteins. These outcomes confirmed that the DD-I-associated VPS4B mutation could decrease the capacity of DFCs to differentiate during the mineralization process and may also impair physiological root formation and bone remodeling. This might provide valuable insights and implications for exploring the pathological mechanisms underlying DD-I root development.


Subject(s)
ATPases Associated with Diverse Cellular Activities , Genetics , Case-Control Studies , Cell Differentiation , Genetics , Cells, Cultured , Dental Sac , Cell Biology , Dentin Dysplasia , Genetics , Pathology , Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport , Genetics , Humans , Mutation , Genetics , Osteogenesis , Genetics , RNA Splicing , Genetics
7.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-781305

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To detect pathogenic variant of ARSA gene in an infant with late infantile metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD).@*METHODS@#The male proband had an onset of walking dysfunction and seizure at 28 months. Arylsulfatase A activity of his peripheral blood leucocytes was 26.9 nmol/mg.17h, and cranial MRI showed wild symmetrical demyelination. With genomic DNA extracted from his peripheral blood sample, all coding exons and splicing sites of the ARSA gene were subjected to Sanger sequencing. PubMed Protein BLAST system was employed to analyze cross-species conservation of the mutant amino acid. Ucsf chimera software was used to analyze the impact of candidate variants on the secondary structure of the protein product. Impact of potential variants was also analyzed with software including PolyPhen-2, Mutation Taster, SIFT and PROVEAN. Whole-exome sequencing was carried out to identify additional variants which may explain the patient's condition.@*RESULTS@#The proband was found to harbor compound heterozygous variants of the ARSA gene [c.467G>A (p.Gly156Asp) and c.960G>A (p.Trp320*)], neither of which was reported previously. As predicted by Ucsf chimera software, the c.960G>A (p.Trp320*) variant may demolish important secondary structures including α-helix, β-strand and coil of the ARSA protein, causing serious damage to its structure and loss of function. The c.467G>A (p.Gly156Asp) variant was predicted to be "probably damaging" by PolyPhen-2, Mutation Taster and SIFT software.@*CONCLUSION@#The patient's condition may be attributed to the compound heterozygous c.467G>A (p.Gly156Asp) and c.960G>A (p.Trp320*) variants of the ARSA gene. Above results have facilitated genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for this family.


Subject(s)
Cerebroside-Sulfatase , Genetics , Exons , Genetics , Female , Humans , Infant , Leukodystrophy, Metachromatic , Genetics , Male , Mutation , Genetics , Pregnancy , RNA Splicing , Genetics
8.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-781304

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To explore the genetic basis of a pedigree affected with hereditary spherocytosis.@*METHODS@#Peripheral blood samples were collected from 17 members of the pedigree. Genomic DNA of the proband was subjected to next generation sequencing. Candidate variant was validated by co-segregation analysis. pCAS2(c.5798+1G) and pCAS2(c.5798+1A) plasmids were constructed by homologous recombination and transfected into 293T cells. Reverse transcription PCR, TA cloning and Sanger sequencing were used to analyze the effect of candidate variant on splicing. Meanwhile, peripheral blood RNAs were extracted to analyze the effect of candidate variant on splicing in vivo.@*RESULTS@#The proband was found to carry a c.5798+1G>A variant of the SPTB gene. The variant has co-segregated with the phenotype in the pedigree. In vitro and in vivo splicing experiments confirmed that the mutation has significantly affected the splicing, resulting in shift of reading frame and produced a premature termination codon.@*CONCLUSION@#The novel c.5798+1G>A variant of the SPTB gene probably underlies the pathogenesis of hereditary spherocytosis in this pedigree.


Subject(s)
Codon, Nonsense , Genetics , Genetic Variation , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mutation , Genetics , Pedigree , Plasmids , RNA Splicing , Spectrin , Genetics , Spherocytosis, Hereditary , Genetics , Transfection
9.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-771943

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To study the correlation of splicing mutations at the 5' end of the DMD gene with their phenotypes.@*METHODS@#DMD gene mutations were analyzed using Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA) and Sanger sequencing. Co-segregation analysis was performed for the pedigrees of the probands. Influence of mutations on protein function was predicted by bioinformatic analysis.@*RESULTS@#Three novel splicing mutations were identified in three patients with different phenotypes. Patient 1 carried a c.31+3insT mutation and presented primarily with dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDC). There was no clinical signs of skeletal myopathy. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that the mutation may inactivate the splicing donor of intron 1 and lead to premature termination of protein translation. Patient 2 carried a c.264_264+4delTGTAA mutation, which led to loss of splicing donor site for intron 4, and manifested Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). The mutation was predicted to result in skipping of exon 4. The defective protein may still retain most of its function. Patient 3 had Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and carried a c.832-3C>T mutation which was predicted to decrease the activity of splicing acceptor of intron 8, resulting in usage of alternative acceptor site or retain of intron 8. All related transcripts may cause premature termination of protein translation and complete loss of protein function. The three mutations were all inherited from the mothers of the patients.@*CONCLUSION@#Three novel splicing mutations were discovered at the 5' end of DMD gene in three patients with different disease phenotypes. Our study may facilitate understanding of the influence of splicing mutations at the 5' end of the DMD gene on dystrophin function and the correlation between genotypes and phenotypes.


Subject(s)
Dystrophin , Genetics , Humans , Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne , Genetics , Mutation , Phenotype , RNA Splicing
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-716080

ABSTRACT

Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) in which dysregulation of the Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathways is the major pathogenic mechanism. Most patients with PMF carry a driver mutation in the JAK2, MPL (myeloproliferative leukemia), or CALR (calreticulin) genes. Mutations in epigenetic regulators and RNA splicing genes may also occur, and play critical roles in PMF disease progression. Based on revised World Health Organization diagnostic criteria for MPNs, both screening for driver mutations and bone marrow biopsy are required for a specific diagnosis. Clinical trials of JAK2 inhibitors for PMF have revealed significant efficacy for improving splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms. However, the currently available drug therapies for PMF do not improve survival. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation is potentially curative, it is associated with substantial treatment-related morbidity and mortality. PMF is a heterogeneous disorder and decisions regarding treatments are often complicated, necessitating the use of prognostic models to determine the management of treatments for individual patients. This review focuses on the clinical aspects and outcomes of a cohort of Japanese patients with PMF, including discussion of recent advances in the management of PMF.


Subject(s)
Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Biopsy , Bone Marrow , Cohort Studies , Diagnosis , Disease Progression , Drug Therapy , Epigenomics , Humans , Mass Screening , Mortality , Primary Myelofibrosis , RNA Splicing , Splenomegaly , Stem Cell Transplantation , Transducers , World Health Organization
11.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-335152

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To identify potential mutation of PHEX gene in two patients from a family affected with X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed on blood samples from the patients and 100 healthy controls. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was used to determine the mRNA expression in patient samples.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>A splicing site mutation, IVS21+2T>G, was found in the PHEX gene in both patients but not among the 100 healthy controls. RT-PCR confirmed that exon 21 of the PHEX gene was deleted.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The novel splicing mutation IVS21+2T>G of the PHEX gene probably underlies the XLH in this pedigree. At the mRNA level, the mutation has led to removal of exon 21 and shift of the open reading frame (p.Val691fsx), resulting in premature termination of protein translation.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Base Sequence , DNA Mutational Analysis , Exons , Familial Hypophosphatemic Rickets , Genetics , Female , Genetic Diseases, X-Linked , Genetics , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Molecular Sequence Data , Mutation , PHEX Phosphate Regulating Neutral Endopeptidase , Genetics , Pedigree , RNA Splicing , Young Adult
12.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-335114

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To detect potential mutation of EXT1 gene in a pedigree affected with multiple osteochondroma and explore its pathogenic mechanism.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>The coding regions and their flanking sequences of the EXT1/EXT2 genes were subjected to PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. Suspected mutations were verified by excluding possible single nucleotide polymorphisms and bioinformatics analysis. Transcripts of the EXT1 gene in the proband were analyzed by TA clone-sequencing, with its abundance compared with that of healthy controls.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>DNA sequencing has identified in the proband a novel heterozygous point mutation (c.1164+1G to A) at the 5'splice sites of intron 3 of the EXT1 gene. The same mutation was not found in the healthy controls. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the mutation is highly conserved and can lead to skipping of exon 3 or aberrant splicing. TA clone-sequencing indicated that the numbers of transcripts with skipping of exon 3 has significantly increased in the proband (< 0.05) compared with the controls.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The c.1164+1G to A mutation has resulted in skipping of exon 3 in a proportion of EXT1 gene transcripts. As the result, the number of transcripts with tumor suppressing function is relatively reduced and has ultimately led to the tumors.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Base Sequence , Child , Exostoses, Multiple Hereditary , Genetics , Female , Humans , Male , Molecular Sequence Data , N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferases , Genetics , Point Mutation , RNA Splice Sites , RNA Splicing
13.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 50(5): e5981, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839288

ABSTRACT

Different pathways act synergistically to participate in many biological processes. Thus, the purpose of our study was to extract dysregulated pathways to investigate the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC) based on the functional dependency among pathways. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) information and pathway data were retrieved from STRING and Reactome databases, respectively. After genes were aligned to the pathways, each pathway activity was calculated using the principal component analysis (PCA) method, and the seed pathway was discovered. Subsequently, we constructed the pathway interaction network (PIN), where each node represented a biological pathway based on gene expression profile, PPI data, as well as pathways. Dysregulated pathways were then selected from the PIN according to classification performance and seed pathway. A PIN including 11,960 interactions was constructed to identify dysregulated pathways. Interestingly, the interaction of mRNA splicing and mRNA splicing-major pathway had the highest score of 719.8167. Maximum change of the activity score between CRC and normal samples appeared in the pathway of DNA replication, which was selected as the seed pathway. Starting with this seed pathway, a pathway set containing 30 dysregulated pathways was obtained with an area under the curve score of 0.8598. The pathway of mRNA splicing, mRNA splicing-major pathway, and RNA polymerase I had the maximum genes of 107. Moreover, we found that these 30 pathways had crosstalks with each other. The results suggest that these dysregulated pathways might be used as biomarkers to diagnose CRC.


Subject(s)
Humans , Adenoma/genetics , Adenoma/metabolism , Colorectal Neoplasms/genetics , Colorectal Neoplasms/metabolism , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , Area Under Curve , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Case-Control Studies , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Gene Expression Regulation , Principal Component Analysis , Protein Array Analysis , Reference Values , RNA Splicing , Signal Transduction , Transcriptome
14.
Biomédica (Bogotá) ; 36(supl.1): 128-136, dic. 2016. ilus, graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-783530

ABSTRACT

Introducción. Giardia intestinalis es un organismo tempranamente divergente en el que recientemente se demostró la presencia de intrones. La maquinaria responsable de la remoción de intrones en organismos eucariotas superiores es el empalmosoma, el cual está conformado por cinco ribonucleoproteínas, cada una de las cuales tiene un ARN pequeño nuclear, un set de siete proteínas Sm (B, D1, D2, D3, E, F y G) y varias proteínas específicas. En G. intestinalis se han identificado los genes de algunas proteínas del empalmosoma por bioinformática. Aunque se asume que este es el responsable del empalme en el parásito, su caracterización bioquímica no se ha hecho. Objetivo. Inhibir dos genes que codifican para proteínas del empalmosoma de G. intestinalis con el fin de determinar si esta inhibición afecta el crecimiento o el enquistamiento del parásito. Materiales y métodos. En un vector específico para G. intestinalis se clonaron secuencias antisentido de los genes que codifican para las proteínas SmB y SmD3 del empalmosoma del parásito. Posteriormente, se transfectó G. intestinalis con los vectores recombinantes y se seleccionaron aquellos parásitos que lo incorporaron. Se confirmó la disminución del mensajero mediante reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCR) en tiempo real, y se evaluaron el crecimiento y el enquistamiento en parásitos silvestres y transfectados. Resultados. Se observó una disminución de 40 y 70 % en el ARNm de SmB y SmD3, respectivamente. El crecimiento y el enquistamiento no se vieron afectados en estos parásitos. Conclusión. La disminución de SmB y SmD3 no afectó al parásito, lo que indica que el empalmosoma sigue siendo funcional, o que el empalme no es una función vital del parásito.


Introduction. Giardia intestinalis is an early divergent organism that was recently shown to have introns. The machinery responsible for the removal of introns in higher eukaryotes is the spliceosome, which consists of five ribonucleoproteins. Each of these ribonucleoproteins has a small nuclear RNA, a set of seven Sm proteins (B, D1, D2, D3, E, F and G) and several specific proteins. Some genes that encode spliceosome proteins have been bioinformatically identified in the parasite genome. Although it is assumed that the spliceosome is responsible for splicing in this parasite, biochemical characterization is lacking. Objective. To inhibit two G. intestinalis spliceosome protein genes in order to determine whether this inhibition affects parasite growth or encystation. Materials and methods. Antisense sequences of the genes encoding the spliceosomal parasite proteins SmB and SmD3 were cloned into a specific G. intestinalis vector. G. intestinalis individuals were subsequently transfected with the recombinant vectors and those parasites that incorporated the vector were selected. A decrease in mRNA levels by real-time PCR was confirmed and the growth and encystation in wild and transfected parasites was assessed. Results. A decrease of 40% and 70% of SmB and SmD3 mRNA levels, respectively, was observed. Growth and encystation in these parasites were not affected. Conclusion. Decrease of SmB and SmD3 mRNA levels does not affect the parasite, indicating that the spliceosome remains functional or that splicing is not essential for parasite viability.


Subject(s)
Giardia lamblia , Spliceosomes , Parasites , RNA Splicing , Transfection , Unicellular Eukaryotic Organisms
15.
Rev. bras. hematol. hemoter ; 38(4): 320-324, Oct.-Dec. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-829951

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background: Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a group of malignant clonal hematologic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and propensity for progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Acquired mutations in the gene encoding RNA splicing factor 3B subunit 1 (SF3B1) are highly associated with the MDS subtypes presenting ring sideroblasts, and represent a specific nosological entity. The effects of these mutations on clinical outcomes are diverse and contrasting. Methods: A cohort of 91 Brazilian MDS patients, including patients with ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow, were screened for mutations in the SF3B1 hotspots (exons 12-15) by direct Sanger sequencing. Results: SF3B1 heterozygous mutations were identified in six patients (7%), all of them with ring sideroblasts, thus confirming the association between SF3B1 mutations and myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes bearing this morphologic feature (frequency of 6/13, p-value < 0.0001). Conclusion: This is the first screening of SF3B1 mutations in a cohort of Brazilian myelodysplastic syndrome patients. Our findings confirm that mutations in this splicing gene correlate with bone marrow ringed sideroblasts.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Anemia, Sideroblastic , Mutation , Myelodysplastic Syndromes , RNA Splicing , RNA Splicing Factors
16.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-345364

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To identify potential mutations of PKD1 gene in a family affected with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>The coding regions of the PKD1 gene were subjected to PCR and Sanger sequencing. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was used to determine the relative mRNA expression in the patient.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>A splicing site mutation, c.8791+1_8791+5delGTGCG (IVS23+1_+5delGTGCG), was detected in the PKD1 gene in all 5 patients from the pedigree but not in 6 phenotypically normal relatives and 40 healthy controls. Sequencing of RNA has confirmed that there were 8 bases inserted in the 3' end of exon 23 of the PKD1 gene.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The novel c.8791+1_8791+5delGTGCG mutation has created a new splice site and led to a frameshift, which probably underlies the ADPKD in the family. Above finding has enriched the mutation spectrum of the PKD1 gene.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Mutation , Genetics , Pedigree , Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant , Genetics , RNA Splicing , Genetics , TRPP Cation Channels , Genetics , Young Adult
17.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-287955

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To identify the causative mutation in a Chinese family affected with dentinogenesis imperfecta shields type II (DGI-II).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>With informed consent obtained from all participants, peripheral blood or chorionic villi samples were collected from the family members. Genomic DNA was extracted using a standard SDS-proteinase K-phenol/chloroform method. The whole coding region and exon/intron boundaries of the DSPP gene were amplified with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to Sanger sequencing. To confirm the pathogenicity of the identified mutation, an Alu I recognition sequence was introduced into the mutant allele using mismatch primers by semi-nested PCR. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was then carried out for all family members and 60 unrelated healthy controls. Meanwhile, mini-DSPP constructs were conducted to confirm the effect of the mutation in vitro.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>A splicing site mutation, c.52-1G>A, which was located upstream of exon 3, was found in all three patients and the fetus of the proband. Restriction analysis confirmed that all unaffected individuals and the 60 healthy controls did not carry the same mutation. The expression of minigene showed that the exon 3 of the DSPP gene was skipped during the transcription.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>A novel pathogenic splicing-mutation c.52-1G>A has been detected in a Chinese family affected with DGI-II, which enabled prenatal diagnosis for the fetus of the proband.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Genetics , Base Sequence , Child, Preschool , Dentinogenesis Imperfecta , Genetics , Exons , Extracellular Matrix Proteins , Genetics , Female , Humans , Male , Molecular Sequence Data , Pedigree , Phosphoproteins , Genetics , Point Mutation , RNA Splicing , Sialoglycoproteins , Genetics
18.
Medicina (B.Aires) ; 75(2): 91-94, abr. 2015. graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-750520

ABSTRACT

La neurofibromatosis tipo 1 (NF1) es un desorden genético autosómico dominante, con una prevalencia de 1 en 2500-3000 nacidos vivos. La dificultad diagnóstica se debe al tamaño extenso del gen NF1 con pocos sitios hot-spot, la ausencia de una clara relación genotipo-fenotipo y rasgos clínicos con un espectro muy heterogéneo. Un caso sospechoso de NF1 procedente de la provincia de Jujuy fue analizado por MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) en nuestro laboratorio. Mujer, adolescente mestiza (Amerindia/Europea), con un osteoma maxilar, lordosis lumbar, neurofibromas cutáneos y manchas café con leche. Por MLPA se detectó una alteración en el exón 13 del gen NF1. Por secuenciación del exón 13 se identificó una mutación "missense" en la posición 1466 del ARNm (NM_000267.3:c.1466A>G) que introduce un sitio de splicing aberrante. La patogenicidad de la mutación fue corroborada en la base de datos de variantes clínicas del National Center for Biotechnology Information. En nuestro conocimiento, este es el primer registro de una mutación NF1 en un paciente proveniente de poblaciones mestizas del Noroeste Argentino. La alteración ha sido reportada en individuos de otras poblaciones de origen muy disímil al del caso presentado, como la europea, sugiriendo que el sitio podría considerarse un sitio hot-spot del gen. Donde exista baja disponibilidad de diagnósticos moleculares, como en nuestro caso, se puede aplicar un algoritmo que comience por el estudio del gen NF1 por MLPA, metodología relativamente sencilla y de costo accesible. Con ella se evita enviar muestras al extranjero para análisis genéticos.


Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a dominant autosomic genetic disorder, with a birth incidence of 1 in 2500-3000. Diagnosis is difficult because of the size of gene NF1 that has few hot-spots sites, the absence of a clear genotype-phenotype relation, and a heterogeneous clinical manifestation. A NF1 suspected case from Jujuy province was analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Mestizo female teenage (Amerindian/European), with a maxilar osteoma, lumbar lordosis, cutaneous neurofibromas and café au lait spots. MLPA detected an alteration in exon 13 of the NF1 gene. By sequencing of exon 13, a missense mutation (NM_000267.3:c.1466A>G) was found which introduces an aberrant splicing site and is registered as pathogenic in the clinical variants database of NCBI. As far as we are aware, this is the first report of a NF1 mutation in mestizo population of Northwest Argentina. 1466A>G has been described before in patients of European origin, suggesting that the affected site could be a hot-spot site of the gene. For countries as Argentina, with limited availability of molecular diagnostic methods, we propose a diagnosis algorithm by starting the mutational analysis of NF1 with MLPA. This methodology is relatively simple and of low cost, avoiding to send samples abroad for genetic analyses.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Female , Humans , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction , Mutation, Missense , Neurofibromatosis 1/genetics , RNA Splicing , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Algorithms , Argentina , European Continental Ancestry Group , Indians, South American
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-64361

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recurrent somatic SET-binding protein 1 (SETBP1) and splicing pathway gene mutations have recently been found in atypical chronic myeloid leukemia and other hematologic malignancies. These mutations have been comprehensively analyzed in adult AML, but not in childhood AML. We investigated possible alteration of the SETBP1, splicing factor 3B subunit 1 (SF3B1), U2 small nuclear RNA auxiliary factor 1 (U2AF1), and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) genes in childhood AML. METHODS: Cytogenetic and molecular analyses were performed to reveal chromosomal and genetic alterations. Sequence alterations in the SETBP1, SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 genes were examined by using direct sequencing in a cohort of 53 childhood AML patients. RESULTS: Childhood AML patients did not harbor any recurrent SETBP1 gene mutations, although our study did identify a synonymous mutation in one patient. None of the previously reported aberrations in the mutational hotspot of SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 were identified in any of the 53 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Alterations of the SETBP1 gene or SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 genes are not common genetic events in childhood AML, implying that the mutations are unlikely to exert a driver effect in myeloid leukemogenesis during childhood.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Carrier Proteins/genetics , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Cytogenetic Analysis , DNA Mutational Analysis , Female , Gene Frequency , Genotype , Humans , Infant , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/genetics , Male , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , RNA Splicing , Ribonucleoprotein, U2 Small Nuclear/genetics , Ribonucleoproteins/genetics
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