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1.
J. oral res. (Impresa) ; 9(5): 405-413, oct. 31, 2020. ilus, graf, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1179032

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This study evaluated the influence of sonic vibration and thermocycling on the bond strength of fiberglass posts using conventional dual-cured and self-adhesive resin cements. Material and Methods: Ninety-six single-rooted endodontically treated teeth were divided randomly into eight groups according to the cement used (dual-cured or self-adhesive resin cement), use of sonic vibration during post accommodation, and aging conditions (24h in distilled water or 5,000 thermal cycles). The fiberglass posts (White Post DC1, FGM) were cleaned with alcohol, treated with silane and cemented with dual-cured (Allcem Core, FGM) or with self-adhesive resin cement (seT, SDI). For groups in which sonic vibration was used, the posts were accommodated, and sonic vibration was applied for 10 s using a special tip placed on top of the post (Sonic Smart Device, FGM). Pull-out tests were performed after storage in distilled water for 24h at 37°C or after thermocycling (5000 cycles, at 5°C and 55°C). The results were evaluated using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results: Significant differences were not observed between the bond strengths of dual-cured (87.93±41.81 N) and self-adhesive cement (82.53±41.43 N). Bond strength for the sonic vibration groups (100.36±42.35 N) was significantly higher than for groups without sonic vibration (70.13±34.90 N). There were significant differences between specimens subjected to thermocycling (98.33±39.42 N) and those stored for 24h in distilled water (72.16±39.67 N). Conclusion: It can be concluded that both sonic vibration and thermocycling significantly improved bond strength of fiberglass posts with the two evaluated resin cements.


Introducción: Este estudio evaluó la influencia de la vibración sónica y el termociclado en la fuerza de unión de los postes de fibra de vidrio utilizando cementos de resina autoadhesivos y de curado dual convencionales Material y Métodos: Se dividieron aleatoriamente noventa y seis dientes tratados endodónticamente de raíz única en ocho grupos según el cemento utilizado (cemento de resina de curado dual o autoadhesivo), el uso de vibración sónica durante la acomodación posterior y las condiciones de envejecimiento (24 horas agua destilada o 5.000 ciclos térmicos). Los postes de fibra de vidrio (White Post DC1, FGM) se limpiaron con alcohol, se trataron con silano y se cementaron con cemento de curado dual (Allcem Core, FGM) o con cemento de resina autoadhesivo (seT, SDI). Para los grupos en los que se utilizó vibración sónica, se acomodaron los postes y se aplicó la vibración sónica durante 10 s utilizando una punta especial colocada en la parte superior del poste (Sonic Smart Device, FGM). Las pruebas de extracción se realizaron después del almacenamiento en agua destilada durante 24 horas a 37ºC o después del termociclado (5000 ciclos, a 5ºC y 55ºC). Los resultados se evaluaron mediante ANOVA de tres vías y la prueba de Tukey (α = 0.05). Resultados: No se observaron diferencias significativas entre las resistencias de adhesión del cemento de curado dual (87,93 ± 41,81 N) y el cemento autoadhesivo (82,53 ± 41,43 N). La fuerza de unión para los grupos de vibración sónica (100,36 ± 42,35 N) fue significativamente mayor que para los grupos sin vibración sónica (70,13 ± 34,90 N). Hubo diferencias significativas entre los especímenes sometidos a termociclado (98,33 ± 39,42 N) y los almacenados durante 24 h en agua destilada (72,16 ± 39,67 N). Conclusión: Se puede concluir que tanto la vibración sónica como el termociclado mejoraron significativamente la fuerza de unión de los postes de fibra de vidrio con los dos cementos de resina evaluados.


Subject(s)
Humans , Vibration , Post and Core Technique/instrumentation , Resin Cements/chemistry , Flexural Strength , Glass , Sonication/methods , Tooth Root , Dental Bonding , Dentin-Bonding Agents , Dentin/chemistry , Ultrasonic Waves
2.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190371, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1056595

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective This study aims to evaluate the influence of different air-abrasion pressures and subsequent heat treatment on the flexural strength, surface roughness, and crystallographic phases of highly translucent partially stabilized zirconia (Y-PSZ), and on the tensile bond strength of resin cement to Y-PSZ. Methodology Fully sintered zirconia specimens were ground with SiC paper (control) and/or air-abraded with 50 µm particles of alumina at 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, or 0.3 MPa or left as-sintered. After air-abrasion at 0.2 MPa (0.2AB), additional specimens were then heated to 1500°C, and held for one hour at this temperature (0.2AB+HT1h). Flexural strength and surface roughness were evaluated. Crystalline phase identification was also carried out using X-ray diffraction. Bonded zirconia specimens with self-adhesive resin cement were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h, either with or without aging (thermal cycling 4-60°C/20000). Results were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests. Results The flexural strength decreased with the increase in air-abrasion pressure, while in contrast, the surface roughness increased. The lowest flexural strength and the highest roughness value were found for the 0.2AB and 0.3AB groups, respectively. All groups contained cubic-, tetragonal ( t )-, and rhombohedral ( r )-ZrO2 phases with the exception of the as-sintered group. Upon increasing the air-abrasion pressure, the relative amount of the r -ZrO2 phase increased, with a significant amount of r -ZrO2 phase being detected for the 0.2AB and 0.3AB groups. The 0.2AB+HT1h group exhibited a similar flexural strength and t -ZrO2 phase content as the as-sintered group. However, the 0.2AB group showed a significantly higher tensile bond strength (p<0.05) than the 0.2AB+HT1h group before and after aging. Conclusion Micromechanical retention by alumina air-abrasion at 0.2 MPa, in combination with chemical bonding of a resin to highly translucent Y-PSZ using a MDP-containing resin cement may enable durable bonding.


Subject(s)
Zirconium/chemistry , Dental Bonding/methods , Resin Cements/chemistry , Air Abrasion, Dental/methods , Aluminum Oxide/chemistry , Reference Values , Surface Properties , Tensile Strength , X-Ray Diffraction/methods , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Microscopy, Confocal/methods , Flexural Strength , Hot Temperature
3.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 34: e004, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1055523

ABSTRACT

Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze the structural, morphological and mechanical properties of two different lithium disilicate glass-reinforced ceramics for CAD-CAM systems (IPS e.max CAD and Rosetta SM). Five methodologies were used for both ceramics: microstructure (n = 2) was analyzed using x-ray diffraction (XRD); morphological properties (n = 2) were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), with and without hydrofluoric etching; porosity (n = 3) was assessed using 3D micro-computed tomography (micro-CT); flexural strength was measured (n =1 0) using the three-point bending test; and bond strength was determined with self-adhesive resin cement (n = 10), using a microshear bond test. After performing all the tests, the data were analyzed using t-Student test and two-way ANOVA. All the tests used a significance level of α = 0.05. High peak positions corresponding to standard lithium metasilicate and lithium disilicate with similar intensities were observed for both ceramics in the XRD analysis. Morphological analysis showed that the crystalline structure of the two ceramics studied showed no statistical difference after acid etching. Additionally, no significant differences were recorded in the number or size of the pores for the ceramics evaluated. Moreover, no differences in flexural strength were found for the ceramic materials tested, or in the bond strength to ceramic substrates for the resin cements. Based on the study results, no significant differences were found between the two CAD-CAM lithium disilicate glass-reinforced ceramics tested, since they presented similar crystalline structures with comparable intensities, and similar total porosity, flexural strength and bond strength.


Subject(s)
Ceramics/chemistry , Computer-Aided Design , Dental Porcelain/chemistry , Glass/chemistry , Reference Values , Surface Properties , X-Ray Diffraction , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Porosity , Dental Bonding/methods , Resin Cements/chemistry , Shear Strength , Flexural Strength
4.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 34: e001, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1055529

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study analyzed the effect of prior application of copaiba oil (CO) emulsions as a dentin cleaning substance on microleakage and microtensile adhesive strength. Twenty-five premolars and sixty-four molars were used for microleakage and microtensile assays. For the microleakage assays, specimens with standard class V cavities were divided (n = 5), according to the tested CO emulsions: CO10%X, CO10%Y, and CO10%Z, as well as chlorhexidine 2% (CHX) and distilled water (DW), as positive and negative controls, respectively. Restorations were performed using the Adper Single Bond® and/or Clearfil SE Bond® systems. Cervical, occlusal, distal and mesial sections were assessed for tracer penetration degree at the composite/tooth interface. For the microtensile assay, healthy molars were divided into sixteen groups, in which artificial caries were induced in half of the groups. Dentin surfaces were treated with CO10%X and CO10%Y, CHX and DW. Microtensile bond strength was measured by fixing each sample to the plate of a universal testing machine operated at a speed of 0.5 mm/minute until failure. Dentin treated with CO10%X showed a lower infiltration rate than dentin treated with the other CO emulsions, CHX2% and DW. According to the microtensile assay, both healthy and affected dentin treated with CO10%X and Adper Single Bond® adhesive system presented higher adhesive strength. CO emulsion, used as a dentin biomodifier, interfered positively in microleakage and improved adhesive strength after acid etching in the Adper Single Bond® adhesive system, or before applying the Clearfil SE Bond® self-etching system.


Subject(s)
Humans , Plant Oils/chemistry , Dental Bonding/methods , Dentin-Bonding Agents/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Fabaceae/chemistry , Surface Properties , Tensile Strength , Materials Testing , Chlorhexidine/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Statistics, Nonparametric , Composite Resins/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dental Cements/chemistry , Dental Leakage , Dentin/chemistry , Emulsions/chemistry
5.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 34: e020, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1089398

ABSTRACT

Abstract: This in vitro study aimed to assess the effects of different pretreatments used to adapt glass-fiber posts cemented to root canals with different resin cements, regarding porosity percentage and bond strength. Twelve bovine incisor roots were prepared with Largo drills. After post space preparation, the specimens were randomized into two types of pretreatment groups (n = 3): water-wet bonding and ethanol-wet bonding. After the post were cemented, the roots were stored in 100% humidity at room temperature for 7 days. The samples were scanned by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Images were reconstructed by NRecon software, and CTAn software was used to analyze the porosity percentage (%) at the luting interface. Evaluation of the push-out bond strength was performed by serially cutting the roots, and submitting the slices to testing. Additionally, the resin cement post-gel shrinkage values (%) were measured using the strain-gauge method (n = 10). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA, Tukey's test and Student's t test (a = 0.05). The roots prepared with ethanol-wet bonding using RelyX™ U200 had significantly lower porosity in the coronal and apical thirds (p < 0.05). The group prepared with ethanol-wet bonding using RelyX™ ARC presented better bond strength results in the coronal and apical thirds (p < 0.05). RelyX™ ARC (0.97%) produced a higher post-gel shrinkage value than RelyX™ U200 (0.77%). Canals pretreated with ethanol-wet bonding presented better outcomes in regard to porosity percentage and push-out bond strength.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Root/drug effects , Post and Core Technique , Dentin-Bonding Agents/pharmacology , Resin Cements/chemistry , Ethanol/pharmacology , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Materials Testing , Cattle , Porosity , Dental Bonding , Dental Materials/chemistry , Dental Pulp Cavity , X-Ray Microtomography , Glass
6.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 34: e045, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1132712

ABSTRACT

Abstract This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the effect of a silane-containing universal adhesive used with or without a silane agent on the repair bond strength between aged and new composites. Forty nanohybrid composite resin blocks were stored in distilled water for 14 d and thermo-cycled. Sandpaper ground, etched, and rinsed speciments were randomly assigned into four experimental groups: silane + two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system, two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system, silane + silane-containing universal adhesive system, and silane-containing universal adhesive system. Blocks were repaired using the same composite. After 24 h of water storage, the blocks were sectioned and bonded sticks were submitted to microtensile testing. Ten unaged, non-repaired composite blocks were used as a reference group to evaluate the cohesive strength of the composite. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests were used to analyze average µTBS. One-way ANOVA and Dunnet post-hoc tests were used to compare the cohesive strength values and bond strength obtained in the repaired groups (α = 0.05). The µTBS values were higher for the silane-containing universal adhesive compared to the two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (p = 0.002). Silane application improved the repair bond strength (p = 0.03). The repair bond strength ranged from 39.3 to 65.8% of the cohesive strength of the reference group. Using universal silane-containing adhesive improved the repair bond strength of composite resin compared to two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive. However, it still required prior application of a silane agent for best direct composite resin repair outcomes.


Subject(s)
Silanes/chemistry , Composite Resins/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dental Cements/chemistry , Reference Values , Surface Properties , Tensile Strength , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Dental Bonding/methods
7.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 34: e001, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1089393

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study analyzed the effect of prior application of copaiba oil (CO) emulsions as a dentin cleaning substance on microleakage and microtensile adhesive strength. Twenty-five premolars and sixty-four molars were used for microleakage and microtensile assays. For the microleakage assays, specimens with standard class V cavities were divided (n = 5), according to the tested CO emulsions: CO10%X, CO10%Y, and CO10%Z, as well as chlorhexidine 2% (CHX) and distilled water (DW), as positive and negative controls, respectively. Restorations were performed using the Adper Single Bond® and/or Clearfil SE Bond® systems. Cervical, occlusal, distal and mesial sections were assessed for tracer penetration degree at the composite/tooth interface. For the microtensile assay, healthy molars were divided into sixteen groups, in which artificial caries were induced in half of the groups. Dentin surfaces were treated with CO10%X and CO10%Y, CHX and DW. Microtensile bond strength was measured by fixing each sample to the plate of a universal testing machine operated at a speed of 0.5 mm/minute until failure. Dentin treated with CO10%X showed a lower infiltration rate than dentin treated with the other CO emulsions, CHX2% and DW. According to the microtensile assay, both healthy and affected dentin treated with CO10%X and Adper Single Bond® adhesive system presented higher adhesive strength. CO emulsion, used as a dentin biomodifier, interfered positively in microleakage and improved adhesive strength after acid etching in the Adper Single Bond® adhesive system, or before applying the Clearfil SE Bond® self-etching system.


Subject(s)
Humans , Plant Oils/chemistry , Dental Bonding/methods , Dentin-Bonding Agents/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Fabaceae/chemistry , Surface Properties , Tensile Strength , Materials Testing , Chlorhexidine/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Statistics, Nonparametric , Composite Resins/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dental Cements/chemistry , Dental Leakage , Dentin/chemistry , Emulsions/chemistry
8.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 34: e018, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1089390

ABSTRACT

Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of hydrofluoric acid (HF) concentration, etching time, and application of phosphoric acid (PA) followed by neutralization with sodium bicarbonate on the bond strength between a feldspar ceramic and resin cement. Thus, 80 blocks (10 x 12 x 2 mm) of glass ceramic (VM - Vita Mark II - Vita Zahnfabrik) were made and randomly assigned to eight groups (n = 10) according to the factors: HF concentration (5 and 10%), etching time (60 and 120 s), and use of phosphoric acid (PA) (with and without). According to the experimental group, 37% PA (Condac, FGM) was applied after HF etching for 60s. Afterwards, samples were immersed in sodium bicarbonate for 1 min then in an ultrasonic bath in distilled water (5 min) for cleaning. After surface bonding treatment, cylinders (Ø = 2 mm; h = 2 mm) of dual resin cement (AllCem / FGM) were made in the center of each block. The samples were then stored in water (37ºC) for 90 days and submitted to the shear bond test (50 KgF, 1 mm/min). Failure analysis was performed by stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy. Data (MPa) were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Only the factor "HF concentration" was significant (p = 0.02). Most failures were of cohesive in ceramic (40%) and mixed types (42.5%). The 10% HF resulted in higher shear bond strength value than the 5% HF. Surface cleaning with phosphoric acid followed by sodium bicarbonate and HF time (60 or 120 seconds) did not influence the resin bond strength to feldspar ceramic.


Subject(s)
Phosphoric Acids/chemistry , Dental Bonding/methods , Potassium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Silicates/chemistry , Hydrofluoric Acid/chemistry , Reference Values , Silanes/chemistry , Surface Properties , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Resin Cements/chemistry , Shear Strength/drug effects , Dental Porcelain/chemistry , Methacrylates/chemistry
9.
Int. j. odontostomatol. (Print) ; 13(3): 279-286, set. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1012423

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to compare the polymerization shrinkage of Eclipse photopolymerization resin for prosthesis based on urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) with that of three heat-cured acrylic resins based on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) after the polymerization process and immersion in water. A total of 40 prostheses were fabricated on a standard metallic upper edentulous model: group 1, Eclipse; group 2, Triplex hot; group 3, Veracril; and group 4, Lucitone 199. Subsequently, the polymerization contraction was tested using a microscope in which measurements were made in micrometres at 3 points located in the middle parts of the right and left sides and the middle part of the palate at three time points once the prosthesis was completed, after 30 days of immersion in water for 8 hours a day at a temperature of 37 °C, and after cutting the prosthesis at the level of the second premolar. ANOVA revealed that the contraction of the polymerization no statistically significant differences between the groups, (P> 0.05). The type of resin and its interaction with the processing method behaves similarly for all test resins. The Veracril heat-cured resin obtained the lowest contraction value in the three measurements (mm) and the highest value was obtained with the Eclipse photopolymerization resin. The Eclipse resin exhibited no lower polymerization shrinkage compared to conventional acrylic resins based on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), however it was not significantly affected by immersion in water.


RESUMEN: El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar la contracción de polimerización de la resina de fotopolimerización Eclipse para prótesis basadas en dimetacrilato de uretano (UDMA) con la de tres resinas acrílicas curadas con calor a base de polimetacrilato de metilo (PMMA) después del proceso de polimerización e inmersión en agua. Se fabricaron un total de 40 prótesis en un modelo edéntulo superior metálico estándar: grupo 1, Eclipse; grupo 2, triplex caliente; grupo 3, veracril; y grupo 4, Lucitone 199. Posteriormente, la contracción de la polimerización se probó utilizando un microscopio en el que se realizaron mediciones en micrometros en 3 puntos ubicados en las partes medias de los lados derecho e izquierdo y la parte media del paladar en tres puntos de tiempo una vez la prótesis se completó, después de 30 días de inmersión en agua durante 8 horas al día a una temperatura de 37 °C, y después de cortar la prótesis a nivel del segundo premolar. ANOVA reveló que la contracción de la polimerización no presenta diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre los grupos, (P> 0,05). El tipo de resina y su interacción con el método de procesamiento se comportan de manera similar para todas las resinas de prueba. La resina curada con calor Veracril obtuvo el valor de contracción más bajo en las tres mediciones (mm) y el valor más alto se obtuvo con la resina de fotopolimerización Eclipse. La resina Eclipse no mostró una contracción de polimerización menor en comparación con las resinas acrílicas convencionales basadas en polimetilmetacrilato (PMMA), sin embargo, no se vio afectada significativamente por la inmersión en agua.


Subject(s)
Composite Resins/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dental Stress Analysis/methods , Denture Bases , Polymerization , Acrylic Resins , In Vitro Techniques , Hydrogel, Polyethylene Glycol Dimethacrylate , Dental Stress Analysis/instrumentation
10.
J. oral res. (Impresa) ; 8(3): 210-219, jul. 31, 2019. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1145338

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the six-month clinical outcome of restorations of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL) with two composite resins: Bulk-Fill and nanohybrid resin. Materials and methods: Fifty-one patients, with three NCCLs each, were randomly allocated into three restoration groups: Tetric-N-Ceram Bulk-Fill (TB); Filtek Bulk-Fill (FB); y Filtek Z350XT (Z350). Adhesive techniques and restorative procedures were performed according to the manufacturers' instructions for the different materials. A 4mm increment was applied in TB and FB, and increments of ≤2mm depth were applied in Z350. Restorations were assessed by two calibrated examiners at baseline and at six months according to the FDI World Dental Federation guidelines (1: excellent, 2: acceptable, 3: sufficient, 4: unsatisfactory, 5: unacceptable) in Marginal Staining (MS), Fracture-Retention (FR), Marginal Adaptation (MA), Postoperative Sensitivity (S) and Caries (C). Wilcoxon test was used for the comparison between baseline and 6 months, and Kruskal-Wallis for the comparison of the three groups at six months (95% significance). Results: Forty-six patients with a total of 138 restorations attended a check-up at six months and were evaluated with excellent clinical outcome. In MS, 91.2% for Z350 and 97.8% for FB and TB; in FR, 97.8% for Z350 and 100% for FB and TB; in MA, 95.6% for Z350, 97.8% for FB and 100% for TN; in S, 95.6% for all three groups; and 100% for C. No statistically significant differences were found between the three groups nor in the comparison between the baseline and 6 months (p>0.05) Conclusion: No significant differences are observed between the three groups of resins in the parameters of MS, MA, S, FR and C regarding clinical outcome at six months.


Objetivo: Evaluar el comportamiento clínico a 6 meses en restauraciones de lesiones cervicales no cariosas (LCNC) con dos resinas compuestas Bulk-Fill y una resina nanohíbrida. Materiales y métodos: En 51 pacientes se restauraron 3 LCNC distribuidas aleatoriamente en 3 grupos, TB: Tetric-N-Ceram Bulk-Fill, FB: Filtek Bulk-Fill y Z350: Filtek Z350XT. Las técnicas adhesivas y procedimientos restauradores fueron realizados según las instrucciones de los fabricantes para los diferentes materiales. En TB y FB se aplicó un incremento de 4mm y en Z350 se aplicó incrementos ≤2mm de profundidad. Dos operadores calibrados evaluaron las restauraciones al baseline y 6 meses mediante los criterios clínicos FDI (1: excelente, 2: aceptable, 3: suficiente, 4: insatisfactorio, 5: inaceptable) en Tinción Marginal (TM), Fractura-Retención (FR), Adaptación Marginal (AM), Sensibilidad Postoperatoria (S) y Caries (C). Se utilizó Wilcoxon para la comparación entre baseline ­ 6 meses y Kruskal-Wallis para la comparación de los 3 grupos a 6 meses (significancia de 95%). Resultados: A los 6 meses asistieron 46 pacientes con un total de 138 restauraciones siendo evaluados con comportamiento clínico excelente; en TM 91,2% para Z350 y 97,8% para FB y TB; en FR, Z350 presentó 97,8% y en FB y TB el 100%; en AM, 95,6% para Z350, 97,8% para FB y 100% para TN; en S presentó 95,6% para los tres grupos; en C se presentó el 100%. No hubo diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre los 3 grupos y en la comparación de baseline - 6 meses (p>0.05). Conclusión: No existen diferencias significativas en el comportamiento clínico a 6 meses entre los 3 grupos de resinas en los parámetros TM, AM, S, FR Y C.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Tooth Demineralization/therapy , Composite Resins/chemistry , Dental Restoration, Permanent/methods , Chile , Double-Blind Method , Treatment Outcome , Tooth Cervix , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dental Materials
11.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e0088, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1019596

ABSTRACT

Abstract The main of the study was quantify the effect of two ceramics with two underlying resin cements on apparent fluorescence levels. Buccal surfaces of two bovine incisors were ground flat producing one enamel and one dentin substrate. The veneers were fabricated (0.5 and 1.0 mm thickness) using two ceramics (IPSe.max Press and IPSe.max Zirpress, Ivoclar Vivadent). Veneers were cemented using either light-cured (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent) or self-adhesive dual (Rely X U200, 3M ESPE) cement. The layered Control group materials had no cement application. Semi-quantitative fluorescence image analysis (Matlabs software, Matworks) involved processing the images as captured under each daylight (DL, Gretagmacbeth) and ultraviolet illuminants (UVA, Sylvania) within a neutral-gray lightbox (Macbeth Spectral Light). Statistical analysis of the quantitative fluorescence values was performed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). The e.max Zirpress on the dentin substrate produced greater fluorescence (p < 0.05) when subjected to UV illumination and more fluorescence (p < 0.05) than e.max Press in both cement groups. Light-cured cement produced higher (p < 0.05) fluorescence than the dual-cement with e.max Press on enamel under UV illumination. The fluorescence for e.max Press on the dentin substrate was greater (p < 0.05) than for e.max Zirpress using dual self-adhesive cement subjected to daylight illumination. Thus, it is possible to conclude that the combination of ceramic and cement produce definite, significant effects on the apparent fluorescence, vital quality for restorative dentistry.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Resin Cements/chemistry , Reference Values , Surface Properties , Materials Testing , Ceramics/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Dental Veneers , Dentin , Dentin/drug effects , Optical Imaging/methods , Light
12.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e015, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-989477

ABSTRACT

Abstract We assessed the effect of a new coating material based on resin-modified glass-ionomer with calcium (Ca) in inhibiting the demineralization of underlying and adjacent areas surrounding caries-like lesions in enamel. The measures used were surface hardness (SH) and cross-sectional hardness (CSH). Thirty-six bovine enamel specimens (3 × 6 × 2 mm) were randomly allocated into three groups (n = 12): No treatment (NT); resin-modified glass-ionomer with Ca (Clinpro XT Varnish, 3M ESPE) (CL), and fluoride varnish (Duraphat, Colgate) (DU). The specimens were subjected to alternated immersions in demineralizing (6 h) and remineralizing solutions (18 h) for 7 days. SH measurements were conducted at standard distances of 150, 300, and 450 µm from the treatment area. CSH evaluated the mean hardness profile over the depth of the enamel surface and at standard distances from the materials. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis was conducted to evaluate the demineralization bands created on the sublayer by % of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and fluoride (F). Ca/P weight ratio was also calculated. Based on SH and CSH measurements, there was no difference between groups at the distances 150 µm (p = 0.882), 300 µm (p = 0.995), and 450 µm (p = 0.998). Up to 50 µm depth (at 150 µm from the treatment area), CL showed better performance than DU ( p< 0.05). NT presented higher loss of Ca and P than CL and DU (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the % of F ion among the three groups. The new coating material was similar to F varnish in attenuating enamel demineralization.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Calcium/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Glass Ionomer Cements/chemistry , Reference Values , Sodium Fluoride/chemistry , Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Cariostatic Agents/chemistry , Random Allocation , Fluorides, Topical/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Tooth Demineralization/prevention & control , Hardness Tests , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
13.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180297, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1012517

ABSTRACT

Abstract Polymer-based composite materials have been proposed as an alternative for single unit restorations, due to their resilient and shock absorbing behavior, in contrast to the brittleness of ceramic materials that could result in failure by fracture. Objective: To evaluate the fatigue strength and damage modes of monolithic posterior resin nanoceramic and lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. Methodology: Twenty-six resin nanoceramic (RNC) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic (LD) 2 mm monolithic crowns (n=13) were cemented on composite resin replicas of a prepared tooth and subjected to cyclic load with lithium disilicate indenters for 2 million cycles. Specimens and indenters were inspected every 500,000 cycles and suspended when presenting fractures or debonding. Surviving specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, polished and subsurface damage was analyzed. Specimens presenting fractures or severe subsurface damage were considered as failures. Survival data was subjected to Fisher's exact test; damage modes were subjected to Mann-Whitney test (p<0.05). Results: There were no debonding, cohesive or catastrophic failures. Considering subsurface damage, 53.8% of RNC and 46.2% of LD crowns survived the fatigue test, presenting no statistical difference. Chief damage modes were radial cracks for RNC and inner cone cracks for LD, presenting no statistical difference. Conclusions: The results suggest that if debonding issues can be resolved, resin nanoceramic figures can be an alternative to posterior crowns. Although distinct, damage modes revealed potential to cause bulk fracture in both glass ceramic and resin nanoceramic crowns.


Subject(s)
Humans , Ceramics/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Crowns , Dental Porcelain/chemistry , Surface Properties , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Dental Prosthesis Design , Computer-Aided Design , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Restoration Failure , Dental Restoration Wear , Dental Restoration, Permanent/methods , Dental Stress Analysis
14.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180351, 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1012511

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective Since the transmittance of ceramics can influence the degree of conversion (DC) of resin cements, ceramics composition and shade should be considered in the selection of resin cement. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the effect of the transmittance of different composition, opacities and shades of ceramics on the degree of conversion of two dual-cured resin cements. Methodology Sixty discs were prepared from low translucency (LT) and medium opacity (MO) lithium disilicate ceramic, and zirconia ceramic (Z). Each group was subdivided into 5 subgroups (n=4) in shades A2, A3.5, B2, C2 and D3. The transmittance measurement was performed in a spectrophotometer. The Variolink II and Rely X U200 resin cements were photoactivated by LED (1400 mW/cm2) for 40 s through the ceramic discs and without the discs (control group). The DC was measured with infrared FTIR spectroscopy, immediately after light activation. Data were analyzed with Kruskall-Wallis and one-way ANOVA, following post-hoc comparisons by Tukey test and Pearson's correlation test (P<0.05). Results LT ceramic exhibited higher transmittance values compared to MO and Z ceramics. LTA2 and LTB2 showed statistically higher transmittance values compared to MOA2, MOA3.5 and ZA3.5. For Variolink II, the ceramic interposition did not influence the DC, since there were no statistical differences between groups with ceramic interposition and the control group. For Rely X U200 cement, the interposition of some ceramics types/shades (LTA3.5, MOA2, MOA3.5 and ZA3.5) significantly decreased the DC values compared to control group. A positive correlation was found between the ceramic transmittance and DC values of both tested cements. Conclusions. The transmittance and DC values of the cements were influenced by composition and shades of the ceramics. The higher the transmittance of ceramics, the higher the DC values for both cements.


Subject(s)
Zirconium/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dental Porcelain/chemistry , Reference Values , Spectrophotometry/methods , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Statistics, Nonparametric , Phase Transition , Light-Curing of Dental Adhesives , Curing Lights, Dental , Polymerization
15.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180449, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1002401

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective This study aims to evaluate the effect of sonochemical treatment on the surface of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) before and after the final sintering. Material and Methods Twenty-eight Y-TZP discs were divided into four groups (n=7), according to surface treatment: PRE: pre-sintering sonication with 30% nominal power for 15 min; POS: post-sintering sonication with 30% nominal power for 15 min; JAT: air abrasion with 50-μm alumina particles; and CON: control group with no treatment. The POS and JAT groups were sintered before sonication and the PRE group after sonication. Surface roughness was analyzed using confocal microscopy, after which resin cement cylinders were placed on the surface of the Y-TZP discs and subjected to mechanical microshear bond strength test until fracture. Surface roughness and microshear bond strength values underwent ANOVA and the Tukey tests. Results The surface roughness values for the PRE group (299.91 nm) and the POS group (291.23 nm) were not significantly different (p≥0.05), statistically, and the surface roughness value of the JAT group (925.21 nm) was higher than those of PRE and POS (p=0.007) groups. The mechanical microshear bond strength test showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.08). Conclusions Therefore, the results showed that sonochemical treatment modifies the Y-TZP surface and is similar to the well-established sandblasting surface treatment regarding the strength of the bond with the resin cement.


Subject(s)
Yttrium/chemistry , Zirconium/chemistry , Dental Bonding/methods , Resin Cements/chemistry , Reference Values , Surface Properties , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Statistics, Nonparametric , Air Abrasion, Dental , Shear Strength
16.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180188, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-984574

ABSTRACT

Abstract Sources of calcium and phosphate have been added to dental restorative materials to improve their anticaries effect. Objective This study evaluated the effect of adding calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP) to resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) on the physico-mechanical properties, ion release, and enamel demineralization. Material and Methods: Specimens were fabricated for each experimental group: RMGIC without CaGP (Control), RMGIC with 1, 3 and 9% CaGP. To determine the release of fluoride (F), calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P), six specimens were immersed in demineralization and remineralization solutions for 15 days. In another experimental trial, the following physico-mechanical properties were evaluated at time intervals of 1 and 7 days after fabrication: compressive strength (n=12), diametral tensile strength (n=12), surface hardness of material (n=6) and the degree of conversion of monomers (n=8). To study enamel demineralization, specimens (n=12) were attached to enamel blocks and submitted to pH-cycling. Subsequently, surface and cross-sectional hardness and the concentration of F, Ca and P in enamel were determined. Results The addition of CaGP to RMGIC led to higher mean release of F, Ca and P when compared with control (p<0.001). Mechanical properties were within the range of those of the ionomer cements after addition of 1% and 3% CaGP. The degree of conversion did not differ between groups at the 1st and the 7th day (p>0.439). The addition of 3% and 9% CaGP reduced mineral loss and increased F, Ca and P in the enamel when compared with control (p<0.05). Conclusion The addition of 3% CaGP in RMGIC increased the release of F, P and Ca, reduced enamel demineralization, and maintained the physico-mechanical properties within the parameters for this material.


Subject(s)
Humans , Tooth Demineralization/prevention & control , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Glass Ionomer Cements/chemistry , Glycerophosphates/chemistry , Phosphates/analysis , Reference Values , Surface Properties , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Photomicrography , Calcium/analysis , Reproducibility of Results , Compressive Strength , Dental Enamel/chemistry , Fluorides/analysis , Hardness Tests
17.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180230, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-984573

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives To study the fluoride uptake and release properties of glass carbomer dental cements and compare them with those of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomers. Materials and Methods Three materials were used, as follows: glass carbomer (Glass Fill), conventional glass ionomer (Chemfil Rock) and resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC). For all materials, specimens (sets of six) were matured at room temperature for time intervals of 10 minutes, 1 hour and 6 weeks, then exposed to either deionized water or sodium fluoride solution (1000 ppm in fluoride) for 24 hours. Following this, all specimens were placed in deionized water for additional 24 hours and fluoride release was measured. Results Storage in water led to increase in mass in all cases due to water uptake, with uptake varying with maturing time and material type. Storage in aqueous NaF led to variable results. Glass carbomer showed mass losses at all maturing times, whereas the conventional glass ionomer gained mass for some maturing times, and the resin-modified glass ionomer gained mass for all maturing times. All materials released fluoride into deionized water, with glass carbomer showing the highest release. For both types of glass ionomer, uptake of fluoride led to enhanced fluoride release into deionized water. In contrast, uptake by glass carbomer did not lead to increased fluoride release, although it was substantially higher than the uptake by both types of glass ionomer. Conclusions Glass carbomer resembles glass ionomer cements in its fluoride uptake behavior but differs when considering that its fluoride uptake does not lead to increased fluoride release.


Subject(s)
Apatites/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Fluorides/chemistry , Glass Ionomer Cements/chemistry , Reference Values , Resins, Synthetic/chemistry , Sodium Fluoride/chemistry , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Water/chemistry , Analysis of Variance , Aluminum Silicates/chemistry
18.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20170449, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975886

ABSTRACT

Abstract The stable long-term performance of resin cement under oral environmental conditions is a crucial factor to obtain a satisfactory success of the allceramic dental restoration. Objective: This study aimed at evaluating and comparing the surface morphology and mechanical property of conventional and self-adhesive resin cement after aqueous aging. Materials and Methods: Disc-shaped specimens of 3 conventional (C1: Multilink N, C2: Duolink, C3: Nexus 3) and 3 self-adhesive (S1: Multilink Speed, S2: Biscem, S3: Maxcem) types of resin cements were subjected to irradiation. After 24 h, the Knoop microhardness of each resin cement was evaluated. The specimens were immersed separately in distilled water and maintained at 37°C. A total of 5 specimens of each resin cement were collected at the following time intervals of immersion: 1, 6, 12 and 18 months. The samples were used to evaluate the Knoop parameters of microhardness, sorption and solubility. The surface morphology of the specimens after 18 months of immersion was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The sorption and solubility data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. The Knoop microhardness was tested by the ANOVA repeated measures (P<0.05). Results: The sorption and solubility parameters of C1 and S1 exhibited significant fluctuations during the aqueous aging. The hardness of the S1 and S2 specimens decreased significantly after an 18-month water immersion. The S1, S2 and S3 specimens indicated higher filler exposure and stripping and apparent pores and cracks compared to specimens C1, C2 and C3, respectively. Conclusion: The surface of selfadhesive resin cements is more susceptible to aqueous damage than that of the conventional resin cements.


Subject(s)
Water/chemistry , Composite Resins/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Solubility , Surface Properties , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Hardness Tests , Immersion
19.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180126, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975877

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding strength of non-simplified dentin bonding systems (DBS) to dentin irradiated with a diode laser (970 nm) immediately and after 12 months of water storage following either primer or bond application. Material and methods: The experimental design included three different factors: DBS type [AdperTM Scotchbond Multipurpose (MP) and Clearfil™ SE Bond (CSE)], irradiation [without irradiation - control (C), irradiation after primer application (AP), and irradiation after bond application (AB)], and time [initial (I) and after 12 months of water storage (12 m)]. Sixty sound human third molars (n = 10) were obtained, and their flat occlusal dentin areas were prepared and standardized. Laser irradiation was performed in the contact mode perpendicular to the dental surface over an automatically selected scanning area at a pulse energy of 0.8 W, frequency of 10 Hz, and energy density of 66.67 J/cm2. After 7 days of treatment, the specimens were cut, and half of them were subjected to microtensile testing (500 N/0.05 mm/min), whereas the remaining sticks were examined after 12 months of water storage. The obtained data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by a Tukey test (p<0.05). The observed fracture modes were investigated using a portable digital microscope with a magnification of 40x. Results: Among the utilized DBS, MP generally exhibited higher bond strengths, but did not always differ from CSE under similar conditions. The irradiation factor was statistically significant only for the MP/AB groups. After 12 months of storage, all groups demonstrated a significant reduction in the bond strength, whereas the results of fracture analysis showed a predominance of the adhesive type. Conclusions: The laser treatment of non-simplified DBS was not able to stabilize their bonding characteristics after 12 months.


Subject(s)
Humans , Dental Bonding/methods , Dentin-Bonding Agents/radiation effects , Resin Cements/radiation effects , Dentin/radiation effects , Lasers, Semiconductor , Reference Values , Surface Properties/radiation effects , Tensile Strength , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Water/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Dentin-Bonding Agents/chemistry , Microscopy, Atomic Force , Resin Cements/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Polymerization/radiation effects
20.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e083, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1019613

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study evaluated the influence of activation modes, on Diametral Tensile Strength (DTS) of dual cured resin cements subjected to a Mechanical Fatigue test (MF). Four dual-cured resin cements (RelyX UNICEM [U], RelyX ARC [A], ENFORCE [E] and Nexus 2 [N]) were activated by three different curing modes as follows: Self-Curing (SC), Dual Cure activation with photoactivation executed directly (DC) and Dual Cure activation with Photoactivation Through Porcelain (DCTP). After 24 hours, half of the sample was subjected to 30.000 fatigue cycles at 1 Hz frequency and 12 N load. Then, all specimens were subjected to DTS test in Instron Universal Testing Machine and data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey's Test (5%). The results of DTS test means (MPa) and standard deviation, for each cement factor activated by SC, DC and DCTP was respectively: U (28.12 ± 5.29; 37.44 ± 6.49 and 40.10 ± 4.39), A (49.68 ± 8.42; 55.12 ± 5.16 and 63.43 ± 6.92), E (49.12 ± 3.89; 56.42 ± 8.88 and 56.96 ± 6.45) and N (61.89 ± 11.21; 59.26 ± 9.47 and 62.56 ± 10.93). Turkey's test indicated that DC is related to the highest DTS values; Nexus 2 DTS remained the same independently of activation mode and that the Porcelain disk interposition enhanced DTS only for RelyX ARC the ANOVA statistical test indicated that MF didn't alter the DTS values for all experimental groups. MF results clinical implication is that all cements tested exhibited, in an immediate loading, good cross linked bonds quality.


Subject(s)
Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry , Polymethacrylic Acids/chemistry , Ceramics/chemistry , Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Reference Values , Tensile Strength , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Self-Curing of Dental Resins/methods , Light-Curing of Dental Adhesives/methods
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