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1.
Rev. Asoc. Odontol. Argent ; 108(2): 46-51, mayo-ago. 2020. tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1121108

ABSTRACT

Objetivos: Comparar ex vivo la eficacia del instrumento XP-endo Finisher y del sistema EndoActivator en la reducción/eliminación del biofilm microbiano en conductos radiculares infectados. Materiales y métodos: Se utilizaron 23 premolares inferiores humanos extraídos cuya longitud fue estandarizada en 17 mm. Todos los conductos se prepararon con el sistema WaveOne Gold Medium (#35.06). Los dientes se esterilizaron, se inocularon con Enterococcus faecalis y se separaron en dos grupos experimentales de 10 piezas cada uno. De los 3 dientes remanentes, 1 fue utilizado como control positivo y 2, como controles negativos. En el grupo 1, las soluciones irrigantes se agitaron con XP-endo Finisher. En el grupo 2, se utilizó EndoActivator. Se tomaron muestras antes de la contaminación, luego de esta y después de la agitación de los irrigantes mediante conos de papel estériles. La carga microbiana fue sembrada en agar sangre y los conos se cultivaron en caldo tripteína de soja. La remoción de la carga microbiana se determinó por la presencia o ausencia de turbiedad del medio. Las unidades formadoras de colonias (UFC) remanentes se cuantificaron y los resultados se categorizaron como R1 (≤10 UFC) o R2 (>10 UFC). Los datos fueron analizados mediante la prueba de Fisher. Resultados: No hubo diferencias significativas entre XP-endo Finisher y EndoActivator (P>0,05). El número de usos no influyó sobre la capacidad operativa de ambos instrumentos (AU)


Aim: To compare ex vivo the effectiveness of the XP-endo Finisher and the EndoActivator in biofilm reduction/ removal from infected root canals. Materials and methods: Twenty three extracted human single-rooted lower premolars were selected and standardised to 17 mm in length. All the canals were prepared with WaveOne Gold Medium reciprocating files (#35.06). The teeth were autoclaved and inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis. The infected teeth were then assigned to 2 experimental groups of 10 teeth each according to the final irrigation/agitation protocol. Of the three remaining teeth, one was used as a positive control, and the other two were used as negative controls. In Group 1 the irrigating solutions were agitated with XP-endo Finisher while in Group 2 the EndoActivator was used. All root canals were sampled before and after contamination, and again after irrigant agitation with sterile paper points. The microbial load was spread on blood agar plates and the paper points were cultured in sterile trypticase soy broth. The removal of the microbial load was determined by visual observation of the turbidity of the media and by quantification of the number of colony-forming units (UFC). The results were categorized as R1 (≤10 UFC) or R2 (>10 UFC). Data were analysed by the Fisher's exact test at P<0.05. Results: No significant differences was found between XP-endo Finisher and EndoActivator (P>0.05) regarding their effectiveness in the reduction/removal of the microbial biofilm. The number of uses of both instruments did not affect their operative performance (AU) Conclusion: XPF and EA were both equally effective for microbial biofilm reduction/removal from ex vivo infected root canals (AU)


Subject(s)
Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Dental High-Speed Equipment , Biofilms , Dental Instruments , Dental Pulp Cavity/microbiology , In Vitro Techniques , Colony Count, Microbial/methods , Efficacy , Statistical Analysis , Enterococcus faecalis/isolation & purification , Culture Media
2.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 34: e020, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1089398

ABSTRACT

Abstract: This in vitro study aimed to assess the effects of different pretreatments used to adapt glass-fiber posts cemented to root canals with different resin cements, regarding porosity percentage and bond strength. Twelve bovine incisor roots were prepared with Largo drills. After post space preparation, the specimens were randomized into two types of pretreatment groups (n = 3): water-wet bonding and ethanol-wet bonding. After the post were cemented, the roots were stored in 100% humidity at room temperature for 7 days. The samples were scanned by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Images were reconstructed by NRecon software, and CTAn software was used to analyze the porosity percentage (%) at the luting interface. Evaluation of the push-out bond strength was performed by serially cutting the roots, and submitting the slices to testing. Additionally, the resin cement post-gel shrinkage values (%) were measured using the strain-gauge method (n = 10). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA, Tukey's test and Student's t test (a = 0.05). The roots prepared with ethanol-wet bonding using RelyX™ U200 had significantly lower porosity in the coronal and apical thirds (p < 0.05). The group prepared with ethanol-wet bonding using RelyX™ ARC presented better bond strength results in the coronal and apical thirds (p < 0.05). RelyX™ ARC (0.97%) produced a higher post-gel shrinkage value than RelyX™ U200 (0.77%). Canals pretreated with ethanol-wet bonding presented better outcomes in regard to porosity percentage and push-out bond strength.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Tooth Root/drug effects , Post and Core Technique , Dentin-Bonding Agents/pharmacology , Resin Cements/chemistry , Ethanol/pharmacology , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Materials Testing , Cattle , Porosity , Dental Bonding , Dental Materials/chemistry , Dental Pulp Cavity , X-Ray Microtomography , Glass
3.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190005, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1056579

ABSTRACT

Abstract Chitosan is a natural, biocompatible chelating substance with potential for dental use. This study compared the effects of final canal irrigation with chitosan and EDTA on dentin microhardness, sealer dentin tubules penetration capacity, and push-out strength. Methodology: Fifty canine roots were distributed according to the final irrigation protocol (n=10): G1- 15% EDTA with conventional irrigation; G2- 15% EDTA with Endovac; G3- 0.2% chitosan with conventional irrigation; G4- 0.2% chitosan with Endovac; and G5- without irrigation. Specimens were obturated (AH Plus) and sectioned in 3 slices per root third. The first slice was used for microhardness and sealer penetration assessments under a laser confocal microscope. The second was utilized in a push-out strength test. The third slice was discarded. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (α<0.05). Failure mode was determined at x40 magnification. Results: Microhardness reduction was more significant in groups G2 and G4 (p<0.05). Sealer penetration through dentin was significantly greater in group G2 (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between groups G1, G3, and G4 (p>0.05). In general, all experimental groups presented similar bond resistance (p>0.05) that significantly differed from the control (p<0.001). Mixed type failures were predominant. Conclusions: In general, 0.2% chitosan and 15% EDTA solutions act in a similar manner with regard to the variables studied. The use of Endovac potentiates the effect of these solutions.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Chelating Agents/chemistry , Dental Bonding/methods , Edetic Acid/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Chitosan/chemistry , Reference Values , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Surface Properties/drug effects , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Microscopy, Confocal , Shear Strength , Epoxy Resins/chemistry , Hardness Tests , Middle Aged
4.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190516, 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1090775

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study investigated the effect of a calcium hydroxide (CH) paste (CleaniCal®) containing N-2-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) as a vehicle on Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) biofilms compared with other products containing saline (Calasept Plus™) or propylene glycol (PG) (Calcipex II®). Methodology Standardized bovine root canal specimens were used. The antibacterial effects were measured by colony-forming unit counting. The thickness of bacterial microcolonies and exopolysaccharides was assessed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Morphological features of the biofilms were observed using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Bovine tooth blocks covered with nail polish were immersed into the vehicles and dispelling was observed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (p<0.05). Results CleaniCal® showed the highest antibacterial activity, followed by Calcipex II® (p<0.05). Moreover, NMP showed a higher antibacterial effect compared with PG (p<0.05). The thickness of bacteria and EPS in the CleaniCal® group was significantly lower than that of other materials tested (p<0.05). FE-SEM images showed the specimens treated with Calasept Plus™ were covered with biofilms, whereas the specimens treated with other medicaments were not. Notably, the specimen treated with CleaniCal® was cleaner than the one treated with Calcipex II®. Furthermore, the nail polish on the bovine tooth block immersed in NMP was completely dispelled. Conclusions CleaniCal® performed better than Calasept Plus™ and Calcipex II® in the removal efficacy of E. faecalis biofilms. The results suggest the effect might be due to the potent dissolving effect of NMP on organic substances.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Pyrrolidinones/pharmacology , Root Canal Irrigants/pharmacology , Calcium Hydroxide/pharmacology , Enterococcus faecalis/drug effects , Biofilms/drug effects , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Potassium Chloride/pharmacology , Potassium Chloride/chemistry , Pyrrolidinones/chemistry , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Materials Testing , Calcium Chloride/pharmacology , Calcium Chloride/chemistry , Calcium Hydroxide/chemistry , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Sodium Chloride/pharmacology , Sodium Chloride/chemistry , Colony Count, Microbial , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Sodium Bicarbonate/pharmacology , Sodium Bicarbonate/chemistry , Statistics, Nonparametric , Microscopy, Confocal , Drug Combinations
5.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e057, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1011660

ABSTRACT

Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of peracetic acid (PAA) as a single irrigant on the smear layer, on the intraradicular dentinal bond strength, and on the penetrability of an epoxy-based resin sealer into the dentinal tubules. A total of 120 roots were distributed into 4 groups according to the irrigant used in root canal preparation: 1% PAA (PAA); 2.5% NaOCl followed by final irrigation with 17% EDTA and 2.5% NaOCl (NaOCl-EDTA-NaOCl); 2.5% NaOCl (NaOCl); and saline solution (SS). The smear layer was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The bond strength of an epoxy-based resin sealer (AH Plus) to root dentin was evaluated by the push-out test and penetrability of the sealer into dentinal tubules was observed by confocal laser microscopy. The results were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn post-test (α = 0.05). The use of 1% PAA as single root canal irrigant provided smear layer removal and improved the penetrability and bond strength of AH Plus to root dentin in a manner similar to that of the NaOCl-EDTA-NaOCl group (p > 0.05). The NaOCl and SS groups had higher values of smear layer and lower values of sealer penetrability and dentin bond strength than the PAA and NaOCl-EDTA-NaOCl groups (p < 0.05). Thus, 1% PAA has the potential to be used as a single irrigant in root canals.


Subject(s)
Humans , Peracetic Acid/chemistry , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Smear Layer/chemistry , Dental Pulp Cavity/drug effects , Dentin/drug effects , Epoxy Resins/chemistry , Reference Values , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Reproducibility of Results , Dental Bonding/methods , Edetic Acid/chemistry , Microscopy, Confocal , Dental Pulp Cavity/chemistry , Dentin/chemistry
6.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 33: e005, 2019. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-989474

ABSTRACT

Abstract The objective of this study was to assess the influence of chlorhexidine (liquid and gel) and zinc oxide in calcium hydroxide (CH) pastes on root pH in simulated external resorption. One hundred human anterior teeth with a single root canal were selected. After decoronation and root canal instrumentation, the specimens were divided into 4 experimental groups and 1 control group (without intracanal paste): CH + saline (CH+S), CH + 2% chlorhexidine liquid (CH+ CHX), CH + 2% chlorhexidine gel (CH+ CHXg), and CH + 2% chlorhexidine gel + zinc oxide (CH+ CHXg+ZnO). pH was measured using a microelectrode at 3 and 24 h, and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after inserting intracanal pastes. Data were analyzed statistically using an ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). The CH+CHXg+ZnO group had the highest pH values throughout (p<0.05). The CH+S and CH+ CHX groups had the highest pH values after 1 week and the CH+ CHXg group after 2 weeks. CH+ CHXg maintained the highest pH until the fourth week compared with CH+ CHX (p < 0.05). The control group remained at a neutral pH at all evaluated times. It can be concluded that chlorhexidine solution or gel maintained the alkaline pH of CH, and chlorhexidine gel allowed a slower decrease in pH over time. CH+ CHXg+ZnO showed the highest pH values and was an effective intracanal medication for maintaining alkaline root pH in the area of resorption.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Tooth Root/drug effects , Zinc Oxide/chemistry , Calcium Hydroxide/chemistry , Chlorhexidine/chemistry , Ointments , Reference Values , Root Resorption/drug therapy , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Statistics, Nonparametric , Gels , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
7.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180420, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1012513

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: This in vitro study aimed to compare the efficacy of irrigants using various irrigation activation methods to the push-out bond strengths of fiber post to root canal luted with self-adhesive resin cement (SARC). Methodology: Forty-eight decoronated human canines were used. The specimens were divided into four groups corresponding with the post-space irrigation process and were treated as follows: distilled water (DW) (Control) group received 15 mL of DW; sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)+ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) group was treated with 5 mL of 5.25% NaOCl, 5 mL of 17% EDTA, and 5 mL of DW; passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) group was treated with 5 mL of 5.25% NaOCl, 5 mL of 17% EDTA, and 5 mL of DW, and each irrigant was agitated with an ultrasonic file; and laser activated irrigation (LAI) group was treated with 5 mL of 5.25% NaOCl, 5 mL of 17% EDTA, and 5 mL of DW, and each irrigant was irradiated with Nd: YAG laser. Fiber posts were luted with SARC, and a push-out test was performed. Data was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD test. Results: The bond strength values for the groups obtained were as follows: Control (10.04 MPa), NaOCl+EDTA (11.07 MPa), PUI (11.85 MPa), and LAI (11.63 MPa). No statistically significant differences were found among all experimental groups (p>0.05). The coronal (12.66 MPa) and middle (11.63 MPa) root regions indicated a significantly higher bond strength compared with the apical (9.16 MPa) region (p<0.05). Conclusions: Irrigant activation methods did not increase the bond strength of fiber post to canal.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Irrigants/radiation effects , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Ultrasonic Therapy/methods , Post and Core Technique , Lasers, Solid-State , Self-Curing of Dental Resins/methods , Reference Values , Sodium Hypochlorite/radiation effects , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Surface Properties , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Edetic Acid/radiation effects , Edetic Acid/chemistry , Root Canal Preparation/methods , Dental Restoration Failure , Dental Pulp Cavity/drug effects , Dental Pulp Cavity/radiation effects , Dentin/drug effects , Dentin/radiation effects
8.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180157, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975884

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of surfactants 0.2% or 0.1% cetrimide (Cet) or 0.008% benzalkonium chloride (BAK) on 2.5% calcium hypochlorite (Ca(OCl)2), and compare to sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), regarding the properties of pH, free chlorine content, surface tension, contact angle, pulp dissolution and antimicrobial activity. Material and Methods The pH and free chlorine content were evaluated by digital pHmeter and by titration, respectively. Surface tension was measured by the platinum ring technique with a Du Noüy tensiometer. The solution's contact angle in human dentin surfaces was checked by Drop Shape Analyzer software. Bovine pulps were used for pulp dissolution analysis and the dissolving capacity was expressed by percent weight loss. Antimicrobial activity over Enterococcus faecalis was evaluated by the agar diffusion method. Results Surfactants addition to Ca(OCl)2 and NaOCl did not alter the pH, free chlorine content and pulp dissolution properties. Ca(OCl)2 had the highest surface tension among all tested solutions. When surfactants were added to Ca(OCl)2 and NaOCl, there was a significant reduction of surface tension and contact angle values. The addition of 0.2% or 0.1% Cet enhanced antimicrobial activity of both Ca(OCl)2 and NaOCl. Conclusion Surfactant addition to 2.5% Ca(OCl)2 has shown acceptable outcomes for pH, free chlorine content, surface tension, contact angle, pulp dissolution and antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, the addition of 0.2% Cet showed better results for all tested properties.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Cattle , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Surface-Active Agents/chemistry , Benzalkonium Compounds/chemistry , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Cetrimonium/chemistry , Reference Values , Sodium Hypochlorite/pharmacology , Surface-Active Agents/pharmacology , Surface Properties , Benzalkonium Compounds/pharmacology , Materials Testing , Chlorine/analysis , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Enterococcus faecalis/drug effects , Calcium Compounds/pharmacology , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Dentin/drug effects , Cetrimonium/pharmacology , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
9.
J. appl. oral sci ; 27: e20180045, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-975882

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective To evaluate the efficacy of different sonic and ultrasonic devices in the elimination of debris from canal irregularities in artificial root canals. Materials and Methods A resin model of a transparent radicular canal filled with dentin debris was used. Five groups were tested, namely: Group 1 - ultrasonic insert 15.02; Group 2 - ultrasonic insert 25/25 IRRI K; Group 3 - ultrasonic insert 25/25 IRRI S; Group 4 - sonic insert 20/28 Eddy on a vibrating sonic air-scaler handpiece; Group 5 - 20.02 K-file inserted on a Safety M4 handpiece. Two different irrigants (5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA) and 3 different times of activation (20, 40, and 60 seconds) were tested. Means and standard deviations were calculated and statistically analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests (p<0.05). Results No statistically significant differences were found between the two irrigants used. Group 4 removed more debris than the other groups (p<0.05). Groups 1, 2, and 3 removed more debris than group 5 (p<0.05). A statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was found for the time of activation in all groups and at all canal levels, except between 40 and 60 seconds in group 4 at coronal and middle third level (p>0.05). Conclusions No significant differences were found between 5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA. When the time of activation rises, the dentin debris removal increases in all groups. Both sonic and ultrasonic activation demonstrate high capacity for dentin debris removal.


Subject(s)
Humans , Ultrasonic Therapy/instrumentation , Root Canal Preparation/instrumentation , Dental Instruments/standards , Therapeutic Irrigation/instrumentation , Reference Values , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Sonication/instrumentation , Sonication/methods , Surface Properties , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Edetic Acid/chemistry , Statistics, Nonparametric , Root Canal Preparation/methods , Dentin , Therapeutic Irrigation/methods
10.
Braz. dent. j ; 29(5): 446-451, Sept.-Oct. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974176

ABSTRACT

Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of post-space irrigation with NaOCl and CaOCl at different concentrations on the bond strength of posts cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement. Eighty premolars were sectioned 14 mm from the apex, and endodontically treated. The root canal filling was partially removed. Specimens were randomly assigned into 8 groups (n=10), according to the irrigant for post-space irrigation: SS - 0.9% saline solution (control group); CHX - 2% chlorhexidine; 1% NaOCl - 1% sodium hypochlorite; 2.5% NaOCl - 2.5% sodium hypochlorite; 5% NaOCl - 5% sodium hypochlorite; 1% CaOCl - 1% calcium hypochlorite; 2.5% CaOCl - 2.5% calcium hypochlorite; and 5% CaOCl - 5% calcium hypochlorite. For each group, irrigation was performed continuously with 2 ml of solution. The post-spaces were dried with paper points (#80), and glass fiber posts were cemented using a self-adhesive resin cement. The specimens were sectioned perpendicularly and the push-out test was performed. Optical microscopy was used to analyze the failure mode. ANOVA and Bonferroni tests analyzed the bond strength data. NaOCl and CaOCl presented similar bond strength regardless the concentration used to irrigate the post-space (p>0.05). SS showed the highest bond strength (11.47 MPa) (p<0.05). Adhesive failures at the cement/dentin interface were predominant (58.33%). Saline solution should be irrigant of choice to irrigate the post-space before fiber post cementation with self-adhesive resin cement. NaOCl and CaOCl negatively affect the bond strength values.


Resumo O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito da irrigação do espaço preparado para o pino com NaOCl e CaOCl em diferentes concentrações na resistência adesiva de pinos cimentados com um cimento resinoso autoadesivo. Oitenta pré-molares foram seccionados 14 mm do ápice e endodonticamente tratado. As obturações foram parcialmente removidas. Os espécimes divididos randomicamente em 8 grupos (n=10) de acordo com o irrigante usado para irrigação do espaço preparado para pino: SF - soro fisiológico 0,9% (grupo controle); CHX - clorexidina 2%; NaOCl 1% - hipoclorito de sódio 1%; NaOCl 2,5% - hipoclorito de sódio 2,5%; NaOCl 5% - hipoclorito de sódio 5%; CaOCl 1% - hipoclorito de cálcio 1%; CaOCl 2,5% - hipoclorito de cálcio 2,5%; CaOCl 5% - hipoclorito de cálcio 5%. Para cada grupo, irrigação foi realizada com 2 mL de solução. O espaço preparado para pino foi seco com cone de papel absorvente (#80) e os pinos de fibra foram cimentados com cimento resinoso autoadesivo. Os espécimes foram seccionados perpendicularmente e o teste de push-out foi realizado. Microscopia óptica foi usada para analisar o padrão de falha. Os testes de ANOVA e Bonferroni analisaram os dados de resistência adesiva. NaOCl e CaOCl apresentaram similar resistência adesiva, independentemente da concentração usada para irrigar o espaço preparado para pino (p>0,05). SF apresentou os maiores valores de resistência adesiva (11,47 MPa) (p<0,05). Falhas adesivas na interface cimento/dentina foram predominantes (58,33%). Soro fisiológico deve ser o irrigante de escolha para irrigar o espaço preparado para pino antes da cimentação de pinos de fibra com cimentos resinosos autoadesivos. NaOCl e CaOCl afetam negativamente os valores de resistência adesiva.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Chlorhexidine/chemistry , Post and Core Technique , Dental Bonding , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Bicuspid , In Vitro Techniques , Sodium Chloride/chemistry , Root Canal Preparation , Therapeutic Irrigation/methods
11.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 32: e121, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-974461

ABSTRACT

Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of radiation therapy on root canal sealer push-out bond strength (BS) to dentin and the sealer/dentin interface after different final irrigation solutions (NaOCl, EDTA, and chitosan). Sixty-four maxillary canines were distributed into two groups (n=30): non-irradiated and irradiated with 60 Gy. Canals were prepared with Reciproc-R50 and subdivided (n=10) for final irrigation (NaOCl, EDTA, chitosan) and filled. Three dentin slices were obtained from each root third. The first slice of each third was selected for BS evaluation, and the failure mode was determined by stereomicroscopy. SEM analysis of the sealer-dentin interface was performed in the remaining slices. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05) were used. Lower BS (P<0.0001) was obtained after irradiation (2.07±0.79 MPa), regardless of the final irrigation solution used. The NaOCl group (P<0.001) had the lowest BS in the irradiated (1.68±0.72) and non-irradiated (2.39±0.89) groups, whereas the EDTA (irradiated: 2.14±0.77 and non-irradiated: 3.92±1.54) and chitosan (irradiated: 2.37±0.73 and non-irradiated: 3.51±1.47) groups demonstrated a higher BS (P<0.05). The highest values were observed in the coronal third (3.17±1.38) when compared to the middle (2.74±1.36) and apical ones (2.09±0.97)(P<0.0001). There were more cohesive failures and more gaps in irradiated specimens, regardless of the final solution. The present study showed that radiation was associated with a decrease in BS, regardless of the final solution used, whereas chitosan increased BS in teeth subjected to radiation therapy.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Filling Materials/radiation effects , Root Canal Irrigants/radiation effects , Dental Bonding/methods , Dentin/drug effects , Dentin/radiation effects , Epoxy Resins/radiation effects , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Surface Properties/drug effects , Surface Properties/radiation effects , Tooth Root/drug effects , Tooth Root/radiation effects , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Edetic Acid/chemistry , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Restoration Failure , Chitosan/chemistry , Epoxy Resins/chemistry , Head and Neck Neoplasms/radiotherapy
12.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20170374, 2018. tab
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893735

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives To determine the concentration of calcium, iron, manganese and zinc ions after the application of chelator to Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Material and Methods Fifty bovine maxillary central incisors were prepared and inoculated with E. faecalis for 60 days. The following were used as irrigation solutions: 17% EDTA (pH 3, 7 and 10), 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) combined with 17% EDTA (pH 3, 7 and 10), distilled water (pH 3, 7 and 10), and 2.5% NaOCl. Each solution was kept in the root canal for five minutes. Fifteen uncontaminated root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (pH 3, 7 and 10). Six teeth were used as bacterial control. The number of calcium, iron, manganese and zinc ions was determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) values were used for descriptive statistics. Results Calcium chelation using 17% EDTA at pH 7 was higher than at pH 3 and 10, regardless of whether bacterial biofilm was present. The highest concentration of iron occurred at pH 3 in the presence of bacterial biofilm. The highest concentration of manganese found was 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA at pH 7 in the presence of bacterial biofilm. Zinc levels were not detectable. Conclusions The pH of chelating agents affected the removal of calcium, iron, and manganese ions. The concentration of iron ions in root canals with bacterial biofilm was higher after the use of 17% EDTA at pH 3 than after the use of the other solutions at all pH levels.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Chelating Agents/pharmacology , Enterococcus faecalis/drug effects , Biofilms/drug effects , Dental Pulp Cavity/drug effects , Dental Pulp Cavity/microbiology , Root Canal Irrigants/pharmacology , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Sodium Hypochlorite/pharmacology , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Spectrophotometry, Atomic , Materials Testing , Water/chemistry , Chelating Agents/chemistry , Calcium/analysis , Edetic Acid/pharmacology , Edetic Acid/chemistry , Enterococcus faecalis/chemistry , Dental Pulp Cavity/chemistry , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Ions , Iron/analysis , Manganese/analysis
13.
Rev. clín. periodoncia implantol. rehabil. oral (Impr.) ; 10(3): 145-148, dic. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-900296

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Aim: The objective of this work was to determine the concentrations of irrigating solutions and the residual content of parachloroaniline (PCA) formed after endodontic irrigation, using 5% NaOCl, 0.9% NaCl, 10% EDTA and 2% CHX 2%. Methodology Twenty premolars were used and 13 samples were collected per tooth from each of the treatment phases. Samples of: NaOCl, EDTA, CHX and PCA were quantified by UV and visible spectrophotometry. Results: Sodium hypochlorite decreased its concentration from 3.8% to 3.4% in phases 1 to 4. In phases 5, 6 and 7, residual NaOCl was measured with concentrations of 0.007%, 0.003% and 0.001% %. The concentration of EDTA decreased to 8.85% in phase 8. In phases 9, 10 and 11, irrigated with serum, EDTA was quantified with concentrations of 0.013% to 0.002% and NaOCl values of 0.0011% to 0, 0006%. In phases 12 and 13, CHX concentrations were 1.850% and 1.812% and PCA values were 0.0005% and 0.0007%. PCA formation occurred in presence of 2% CHX and residual NaClO and was detected colorimetrically in phases 12 and 13. Conclusions. During endodontic irrigation the concentration of 5% NaOCl decreases significantly in the first four phases and the concentrations of EDTA and CHX also decrease. There is PCA training in the last stages of the procedure.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Chlorhexidine/chemistry , Aniline Compounds/analysis , Root Canal Irrigants/administration & dosage , Sodium Hypochlorite/administration & dosage , Spectrophotometry , Chlorhexidine/administration & dosage , Edetic Acid/chemistry , Drug Interactions , Endodontics
14.
J. appl. oral sci ; 25(3): 290-298, May-June 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-893628

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of laser-activated irrigation (LAI), XP-endo Finisher, CanalBrush, Vibringe, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), and conventional syringe irrigation systems on the removal of calcium hydroxide (CH) from simulated root canal irregularities. Material and Methods The root canals of one hundred and five extracted single-rooted teeth were instrumented using Reciproc rotary files up to size R40. The teeth were split longitudinally. Two of the three standard grooves were created in the coronal and apical section of one segment, and another in the middle part of the second segment. The standardized grooves were filled with CH and the root halves were reassembled. After 14 days, the specimens were randomly divided into 7 experimental groups (n=15/group). CH was removed as follows: Group 1: beveled needle irrigation; Group 2: double side-vented needle irrigation; Group 3: CanalBrush; Group 4: XP-endo Finisher; Group 5: Vibringe; Group 6: PUI; Group 7: LAI. The amount of remaining CH in the grooves was scored under a stereomicroscope at 20× magnification. Statistical evaluation was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni-Correction Mann-Whitney U tests. Results Groups 1 and 2 were the least efficient in eliminating CH from the grooves. Groups 6 and 7 eliminated more CH than the other protocols; however, no significant differences were found between these two groups (P>.05). Conclusions Nevertheless, none of the investigated protocols were able to completely remove all CH from all three root regions. LAI and PUI showed less residual CH than the other protocols from artificial grooves.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Ultrasonic Therapy/methods , Calcium Hydroxide/chemistry , Root Canal Preparation/instrumentation , Root Canal Preparation/methods , Lasers, Solid-State/therapeutic use , Reference Values , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Surface Properties , Time Factors , Materials Testing , Reproducibility of Results , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Pulp Cavity/drug effects , Laser Therapy/methods , Therapeutic Irrigation/instrumentation , Therapeutic Irrigation/methods
15.
J. appl. oral sci ; 25(2): 234-242, Mar.-Apr. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-841184

ABSTRACT

Abstract Regenerative endodontic procedure (REP) has been proposed as a new approach to treat immature permanent teeth. However, materials used in REP for root canal disinfection or cervical sealing may induce tooth discoloration. Objectives To assess tooth crown’s color after intracanal treatment with triple antibiotic paste (TAP) or calcium hydroxide (CH); cervical sealing with glass ionomer cement (GIC) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA); and bleaching with carbamide peroxide. Material and Methods After pulp removal and color spectrophotometer measurement, 50 bovine incisors were divided into 4 experimental groups and one control (untreated). Experiments were performed in phases (Ph). Ph1: TAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, minocycline), TAPM (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, amoxicillin), DAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole), or CH treatment groups. After 1 and 3 days (d); 1, 2, 3 weeks (w); and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months (m), color was measured and medications were removed. Ph2: GIC or MTA cervical sealing, each using half of the specimens from each group. Color was assessed after 1d, 3d; 1w, 2w, 3w; 1m and 2m. Ph3: Two bleaching sessions, each followed by color measurement. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and post-hoc Holm-Sidak method. Results Ph1: Specimens of TAP group presented higher color alteration (ΔE) mean than those of TAPM group. No significant difference was found among TAP or TAPM and CH, DAP or Control groups. Ph2: cervical sealing materials showed no influence on color alteration. Ph3: Different ΔE means (from different groups), prior to bleaching, became equivalent after one bleaching session. Conclusions TAP induces higher color alteration than TAPM; color alteration increases over time; cervical sealing material has no influence on color alteration; and, dental bleaching was able to recover, at least partially, the tooth crown’s color.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Root Canal Therapy/methods , Tooth Discoloration/chemically induced , Tooth Crown/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Oxides/chemistry , Peroxides/chemistry , Reference Values , Spectrophotometry , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Urea/analogs & derivatives , Urea/chemistry , Materials Testing , Calcium Hydroxide/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Silicates/chemistry , Prosthesis Coloring , Calcium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Compounds/chemistry , Drug Combinations , Glass Ionomer Cements/chemistry
16.
J. appl. oral sci ; 25(1): 101-111, Jan.-Feb. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-841163

ABSTRACT

Abstract The quality of the dentin root is the most important factor for restoration resin sealing and drives the outcome of endodontic treatment. Objective This study evaluated the effect of different filling pastes and cleaning agents on the root dentin of primary teeth using Fourier-transformed Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (µ-EDXRF) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. Material and Methods Eighty roots of primary teeth were endodontically prepared and distributed into 4 groups and filled according to the following filling pastes: Control-no filling (CP), Calen®+zinc oxide (CZ), Calcipex II® (CII), Vitapex® (V). After seven days, filling paste groups were distributed to 4 subgroups according to cleaning agents (n=5): Control-no cleaning (C), Ethanol (E), Tergenform® (T), 35% Phosphoric acid (PA). Then, the roots were sectioned and the dentin root sections were internally evaluated by FT-Raman, µ-EDXRF and SEM. Data was submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results Regarding filling pastes, there was no significant difference in organic content. CP provided the lowest calcium values and, calcium/phosphoric ratio (Ca/P), and the highest phosphoric values. For cleaning agents there was no difference in organic content when compared to the C; however, T showed significantly higher calcium and Ca/P than PA. All groups showed similar results for phosphorus. The dentin smear layer was present after use of the cleaning agents, except PA. Conclusion The filling pastes changed the inorganic content, however they did not change the organic content. Cleaning agents did not alter the inorganic and organic content. PA cleaned and opened dentin tubules.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Dental Pulp Cavity/drug effects , Dentin/drug effects , Phosphoric Acids/chemistry , Silicones/chemistry , Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission , Spectrum Analysis, Raman , Surface Properties/drug effects , Time Factors , Tooth, Deciduous/drug effects , Zinc Oxide/chemistry , Calcium Hydroxide/chemistry , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Analysis of Variance , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared , Ethanol/chemistry
17.
Bauru; s.n; 2017. 159 p. ilus, tab, graf.
Thesis in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-883792

ABSTRACT

Besides of the desired effects, the chemical solutions used to assist the endodontic instruments in the cleanliness and disinfection of the root canal system can also cause changes in the physicochemical properties of dentin, and consequently affect the adhesion of endodontic sealers and microorganisms to the root canal walls. However, the effects of new irrigators and irrigation protocols remain unknown. The objectives of this thesis were to verify the alterations in the properties of some irrigants when used combined in mixtures, to define the time necessary for the smear layer removal by a new irrigant, to determine the organic matter dissolution capacity and the effects in the physicochemical properties of dentin of some irrigation solutions and protocols, and to evaluate the adhesion of microorganisms and AH Plus sealer to dentin after its submission to different irrigation sequences. In all experiments with dentin, the samples used were obtained from bovine teeth. In the analysis performed in this thesis, the following solutions were tested isolated and combined in different irrigation protocols: saline solution (control), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), trisodium (EDTAHNa3), alkaline ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid tetrasodium (EDTANa4), chlorhexidine (CHX), peracetic acid (PAA), and etidronic acid (HEDP). The EDTAHNa3 and EDTANa4 were tested in relation to their effects on the free chlorine content of NaOCl. The solutions were mixed in a 1:1 ratio and the iodometric titration of the mixtures performed in different time intervals. The time necessary for smear layer removal from dentin samples by solutions of EDTAHNa3 and different concentrations of EDTANa4 isolated and mixed with NaOCl was determined with the aid of the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The capacity of NaOCl to dissolve organic matter was determined by weighting fragments of bovine muscle before and after immersion in solutions of 1%, 2.5%, and 5% of NaOCl in different periods of time. Also, the effects of EDTAHNa3, EDTANa4 and HEDP on the organic matter dissolution by NaOCl were evaluated. The alterations produced by all solutions isolated and some irrigation protocols in the organic and inorganic components of the dentin surface were analysed by the attenuated total reflectance of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) technique. Absorbance spectra were collected from the dentin surface before and after immersion of samples in the irrigants and the ratios of the amide III/phosphate and carbonate/phosphate bands were calculated. To quantify the adhesion of CHX to mineralized dentin and to dentin demineralized by different irrigation protocols, the areas of the band associated with CHX with the peak in 1492 cm−1 were determined in spectra obtained by ATR-FTIR. The effects of different irrigation protocols in the roughness and wettability of dentin surface were measured with a benchtop roughness tester and the sessile drop technique, respectively. For the assays of microorganisms' adhesion, samples were prepared and treated the same way and with the same irrigation protocols used in the roughness and wettability tests. Following, Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis were maintained in contact with the dentin for 2 hours and the samples were analyzed on the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Tests of push-out were performed to determine the impact of different irrigation protocols on the dentin bonding strength of AH Plus sealer over time. Canals of bovine incisors teeth were instrumented, irrigated and following obturated using only the sealer AH Plus. Half of the samples were submitted to pushout assessment 7 days after the obturation and the other half 20 months later. The results of the experiments showed that the EDTAHNa3 caused an almost complete and immediate loss of free available chlorine from NaOCl, whilst EDTANa4 promoted a slow and concentration-dependent decline. The smear layer was removed only by decalcifying solutions and in about 1 min by the 17% EDTAHNa3 and 5 min by the EDTANa4, both isolated or mixed with NaOCl. The increase in NaOCl concentration and contact time with the samples intensified the dissolution of organic matter. The mixtures of NaOCl with EDTANa4 and HEDP were able to dissolve the fragments of bovine muscle over-time, however, the EDTAHNa3 strongly affected the NaOCl dissolution capacity when they were mixed. The results of ATR-FTIR experiments showed that the increase in the NaOCl concentration intensified the deproteination of the dentin collagen with a reduction in the amide III/phosphate ratio. For the same decalcifying agent, the higher the concentration and immersion time the greater the removal of phosphate, exposure of the collagen matrix and consequently the increases in amide III/phosphate ratio. The PAA caused greater increases in amide III/phosphate ratio, followed by EDTAHNa3, EDTANa4 and HEDP and this order was maintained in the protocols in which NaOCl was used before the decalcifying agents. NaOCl required approximately 0.5 min to deproteinate the collagen matrix exposed after phosphate removal by EDTAHNa3 and PAA. The carbonate/phosphate ratio decreased after 30 s of samples immersion in solutions of NaOCl at 1%, 2.5% and 5% with no more alterations over time. The carbonate of the dentine was removed faster than phosphate by all decalcifying agents employed alone and in the irrigation protocols in which the use of the NaOCl was followed by the use of the EDTAHNa3, PAA and HEDP. For irrigation protocols that associate NaOCl with chelating solutions, the last irrigant used defined the final dentine amide III/phosphate and carbonate/phosphate ratios. For the ATR-FTIR analysis of CHX adhesion, the results showed that the adsorption of this irrigant to the dentin was potentiated when chelating agents were used prior to the CHX. In relation to the experiments of surface roughness, the saline solution, NaOCl, HEDP and CHX did not alter the roughness of the dentin, but EDTAHNa3 and PAA increased it. The wettability of the surface increased after the use of all irrigants, being the HEDP to cause the greater increases. In the assays of microorganisms' adhesion, the smear layer and collagen exposed by the chelating agents favored the adhesion of E. faecalis. The C. albicans adhesion was major in surfaces with smear layer and more mineral. The use of CHX as the final irrigant reduced the adhesion of both microorganisms. The wettability did not influence the microorganisms' adhesion, while increases in roughness seems to potentiate the adherence of E. faecalis. The experiments of bond strength of AH Plus to the dentin showed that the irrigation with NaOCl and mixture of NaOCl + EDTANa4 produced the lowest push-out bond strength values in 7 days compared to NaOCl + EDTAHNa3, NaOCl + EDTAHNa3 + NaOCl, NaOCl + EDTAHNa3 + CHX and the mixture of NaOCl + HEDP. After 20 months the lowest values were obtained in the groups irrigated with NaOCl and NaOCl + EDTAHNa3. The groups of NaOCl + EDTAHNa3 + NaOCl, mixture NaOCl + HEDP, and mixture NaOCl + EDTANa4 presented values of push-out bond strength in 20 months similar to the values in 7 days. It was possible to conclude that the irrigation solutions tested in this study have different effects in the organic and inorganic matter and some of them can affect the action of each other when mixed. Independent of being used isolated or combined in irrigation protocols, these irrigants cause modifications in the dentin physicochemical properties that influence the adhesion of AH Plus sealer in short and long term and the microorganisms' adherence to the surface in cases of recontaminations.(AU)


Além dos efeitos desejados, as soluções químicas utilizadas para auxiliar os instrumentos endodônticos na limpeza e desinfecção do sistema radiculares podem causar alterações nas propriedades físico-químicas da dentina e consequentemente afetar a adesão de cimentos endodônticos e microrganismos às paredes do canal radicular. Contudo, os efeitos de novos irrigantes e protocolos de irrigação ainda são desconhecidos. Os objetivos desta tese foram verificar as alterações nas propriedades de alguns irrigantes quando utilizados combinados em misturas, definir o tempo necessário para a remoção da camada de smear layer por um novo irrigante, determinar a capacidade de dissolução de matéria orgânica e os efeitos de algumas soluções e protocolos de irrigação nas propriedades físico-químicas de dentina e avaliar a adesão de microrganismos e cimento AH Plus à dentina após a submissão desta a diferentes sequências de irrigação. Em todos os experimentos com dentina as amostras utilizadas foram obtidas a partir de dentes bovinos. Nas análise realizadas nesta tese as seguintes soluções foram testadas isoladas e combinadas em diferentes protocolos de irrigação: solução salina (controle), hipoclorito de sódio (NaOCl), ácido etilenodiaminotetraacético trisódico (EDTAHNa3), ácido etilenodiaminotetracético tetrassódico alcalino (EDTANa4), clorexidina (CHX), ácido peracético (PAA) e ácido etidrônico (HEDP). O EDTAHNa3 e o EDTANa4 foram testados em relação aos seus efeitos sobre o teor de cloro livre do NaOCl. As soluções foram misturadas em uma proporção de 1:1 e a titulação iodométrica das misturas realizada em diferentes intervalos de tempo. O tempo necessário para a remoção da smear layer de amostras de dentina pela solução de EDTAHNa3 a 17% e diferentes concentrações de EDTANa4 isoladas e misturadas com NaOCl foi determinado com o auxílio do microscópio eletrônico de varredura (SEM). A capacidade de dissolução de matéria orgânica pelo NaOCl foi determinada pesando fragmentos de músculo bovino antes e depois da imersão em soluções de 1%, 2,5% e 5% de NaOCl em diferentes períodos de tempo. Além disso, os efeitos do EDTAHNa3, EDTANa4 e HEDP na dissolução de matéria orgânica pelo NaOCl foram avaliados. As alterações produzidas por todas as soluções isoladas e alguns protocolos de irrigação nos componentes orgânicos e inorgânicos da superfície da dentina foram analisadas pela técnica de reflexão total atenuada em espectroscopia no infravermelho por transformação de Fourier (ATRFTIR). Espectros de absorbância foram coletados da superfície da dentina antes e após a imersão das amostras nos irrigantes, e foram calculadas as razões das bandas de amida III/fosfato e carbonato/fosfato. Para quantificar a adesão da CHX à dentina mineralizada e à dentina desmineralizada por diferentes protocolos de irrigação, foram determinadas as áreas da banda associada a CHX com pico em 1492 cm−1 em espectros obtidos por ATR-FTIR. Os efeitos de diferentes protocolos de irrigação na rugosidade e molhabilidade da superfície da dentina foram medidos com um rugosímetro de bancada e a técnica de gota séssil, respectivamente. Para os ensaios de adesão de microrganismos, amostras foram preparadas e tratadas da mesma maneira e com os mesmos protocolos de irrigação utilizados nos testes de rugosidade e molhabilidade. Em seguida, Candida albicans e Enterococcus faecalis foram mantidos em contato com a dentina por 2 horas e as amostras foram analisadas no microscópio confocal de varredura laser (CLSM). Testes de push-out foram realizados para determinar o impacto de diferentes protocolos de irrigação na resistência de união à dentina do cimento AH Plus ao longo do tempo. Canais de dentes incisivos de bovinos foram instrumentados, irrigados e em seguida obturados utilizando apenas o cimento AH Plus. Metade das amostras foi submetida a avaliação de push-out 7 dias após a obturação e a outra metade após 20 meses. Os resultados dos experimentos mostraram que o EDTAHNa3 causou uma perda quase completa e imediata do cloro livre do NaOCl, enquanto o EDTANa4 promoveu um declínio lento e concentração dependente. A smear layer foi removida apenas por soluções descalcificantes e em cerca de 1 min pelo EDTAHNa3 a 17% e em 5 min pelo EDTANa4, tanto isolados ou misturados com o NaOCl. O aumento da concentração de NaOCl e do tempo de contato com os fragmentos de músculo bovino intensificou a dissolução da matéria orgânica. As misturas de NaOCl com EDTANa4 e HEDP foram capazes de dissolver as amostras de músculo ao longo do tempo, no entanto, o EDTAHNa3 afetou fortemente a capacidade de dissolução do NaOCl quando eles foram misturados. Os resultados dos experimentos com ATR-FTIR mostraram que o aumento da concentração do NaOCl intensificou a desproteinização do colágeno da dentina com redução da relação amida III/fosfato. Para o mesmo agente de descalcificação, quanto maior a concentração e o tempo de imersão, maior a remoção de fosfato, exposição da matriz de colágeno e consequentemente o aumento da proporção amida III/fosfato. O PAA causou os maiores aumentos na relação amida III/fosfato, seguido de EDTAHNa3, EDTANa4 e HEDP e esta ordem foi mantida nos protocolos em que o NaOCl foi usado antes dos agentes descalcificantes. O NaOCl necessitou aproximadamente 0,5 min para desproteinizar a matriz de colágeno exposta após a remoção de fosfato pelo EDTAHNa3 e o PAA. A relação carbonato/fosfato diminuiu após 30 s de imersão das amostras em soluções de NaOCl a 1%, 2,5% e 5%, sem mais alterações ao longo do tempo. O carbonato da dentina foi removido mais rápido do que o fosfato por todos os agentes descalcificantes empregados sozinhos e nos protocolos de irrigação em que o uso do NaOCl foi seguido pelo uso do EDTAHNa3, PAA e HEDP. Para os protocolos de irrigação que associam o NaOCl com soluções quelantes, o último irrigante utilizado definiu as proporções finais de amida II/fosfato e carbonato/fosfato da dentina. Para as análises da adesão da CHX em ATR-FTIR, os resultados mostraram que a adsorção deste irrigante à dentina foi potencializada quando agentes quelantes foram utilizados antes da CHX. Em relação aos experimentos de rugosidade da superfície, a solução salina, o NaOCl, o HEDP e a CHX não alteraram a rugosidade da dentina, mas o EDTAHNa3 e o PAA a aumentaram. A molhabilidade da superfície aumentou após o uso de todos os irrigantes, sendo que o HEDP causou os maiores aumentos. Nos ensaios de adesão dos microrganismos, a smear layer e o colágeno exposto pelos agentes quelantes favoreceram a adesão de E. faecalis. A adesão da C. albicans foi maior em superfícies com smear layer ou mais mineral. O uso de CHX como irrigante final reduziu a adesão de ambos os microrganismos. A molhabilidade não influenciou a adesão dos microrganismos, enquanto o aumento da rugosidade parece potencializar a adesão do E. faecalis. Os experimentos de resistência de união do AH Plus à dentina mostraram que a irrigação com NaOCl e a mistura de NaOCl + EDTANa4 produziram valores de resistência de união em 7 dias mais baixos em comparação com NaOCl + EDTAHNa3, NaOCl + EDTAHNa3 + NaOCl, NaOCl + EDTAHNa3 + CHX e a mistura de NaOCl + HEDP. Após 20 meses, os valores mais baixos foram obtidos nos grupos irrigados com NaOCl e NaOCl + EDTAHNa3. Os grupos de NaOCl + EDTAHNa3 + NaOCl, mistura de NaOCl + HEDP e mistura de NaOCl + EDTANa4 apresentaram valores de força de união por push-out em 20 meses semelhante aos valores em 7 dias. Foi possível concluir que as soluções de irrigação testadas neste estudo têm diferentes efeitos na matéria orgânica e inorgânica e elas podem afetar as ações umas das outras quando misturadas. Independentemente de serem utilizadas isoladas ou combinadas em protocolos de irrigação, os irrigantes causam modificações nas propriedades físico-químicas dentinárias que influenciam na adesão do cimento AH Plus a curto e longo prazo e na adesão de microrganismos à superfície em casos de recontaminação.(AU)


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Dentin/drug effects , Dentin/microbiology , Epoxy Resins/chemistry , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Candida albicans/drug effects , Chlorhexidine/chemistry , Edetic Acid/chemistry , Etidronic Acid/chemistry , Peracetic Acid/chemistry , Reproducibility of Results , Smear Layer/drug therapy , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Time Factors
18.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 31: e29, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-839514

ABSTRACT

Abstract This study evaluates the influence of root dentin treatment with NaOCl alone and combined with EDTA, with and without ultrasound activation, on the push-out bond strength (BS) of fiber-reinforced posts in weakened roots, cemented with RelyX or Panavia. The root canals of 42 maxillary canines were instrumented with Reciproc and 2.5% NaOCl. In the coronal 12mm of all canals, experimental weakening of the roots was produced by reducing dentin thickness with 2.44mm diameter diamond burs. The roots were assigned to 3 groups (n = 14) according to root dentin treatment: 2.5% NaOCl; 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA; and 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, with solutions agitated using passive ultrasonic irrigation. After cementation of the fiber-reinforced posts the roots were divided in thirds. The first slice of each third was used for the push-out BS test, the second slice for confocal laser scanning microscopy and dentin microhardness (Knoop) analysis. Data were analysed by a two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (a = 0.05). NaOCl + EDTA provided highest BS values than NaOCl (p < 0.0001). Specimens cemented with Panavia presented significantly higher BS than those with RelyX in the three root thirds (p < 0.0001). The highest BS values occurred in the cervical third (p < 0.001). Ultrasound-activated NaOCl + EDTA promoted the greatest reduction in dentin microhardness, followed by NaOCl/EDTA and NaOCl. Ultrasonic activation of NaOCl and EDTA reduced root dentin microhardness, but did not improve the push-out BS of resin-based cements. Panavia presented higher BS than RelyX. RelyX was not influenced by the root dentin treatment protocols.


Subject(s)
Humans , Dental Bonding/methods , Dentin/drug effects , Edetic Acid/chemistry , Resin Cements/chemistry , Sodium Hypochlorite/chemistry , Tooth Root/drug effects , Acid Etching, Dental/methods , Analysis of Variance , Dental Restoration Failure , Dentin/radiation effects , Hardness Tests , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Confocal , Post and Core Technique , Random Allocation , Reference Values , Reproducibility of Results , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Root Canal Preparation/methods , Statistics, Nonparametric , Surface Properties/drug effects , Tooth Root/radiation effects , Ultrasonic Therapy
19.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 31: e114, 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952083

ABSTRACT

Abstract: The aim of this study was to compare two irrigation techniques and four devices for endodontic sealer placement into the dentinal tubules. Ninety-nine single-rooted human teeth were instrumented and allocated to either the control (CO) (n=11) or experimental groups according to the irrigation method: syringe and NaveTip needle (NT) (n=44), and EndoActivator (EA) (n=44). These groups were subdivided according to sealer placement into K-File (KF), lentulo spiral (LS), Easy Clean (EC), and EndoActivator (EA) subgroups. Moreover, the distances of 5 mm and 2 mm from the apex were analyzed. The teeth were obturated with AH Plus and GuttaCore X3. Analyses were performed by scanning electron microscopy associated to cathodoluminescence. The percentage and maximum depth of sealer penetration were measured. Data were evaluated by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Games-Howell test (p<0.05). EA was superior to NT in percentage of sealer penetration. EC was significantly superior to EA (subgroup) for sealer penetration, and both improved the percentage of sealer penetration when compared to LS. Better sealer penetration was observed at the distance of 5 mm from the apex. Sealer penetration into the dentinal tubules was significantly improved by sonic irrigant activation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Root Canal Obturation/methods , Root Canal Preparation/methods , Dentin/drug effects , Therapeutic Irrigation/methods , Rhodamines , Root Canal Filling Materials/therapeutic use , Root Canal Irrigants/therapeutic use , Root Canal Obturation/instrumentation , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Reproducibility of Results , Analysis of Variance , Microscopy, Confocal , Root Canal Preparation/instrumentation , Dental Pulp Cavity/drug effects , Dental Pulp Cavity/ultrastructure , Dentin/ultrastructure , Epoxy Resins/therapeutic use , Epoxy Resins/chemistry , Therapeutic Irrigation/instrumentation
20.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 31: e113, 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-952123

ABSTRACT

Abstract: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of passive ultrasonic irrigation and EasyClean for removing residual filling material in retreatment. Twenty-two maxillary lateral incisors with apical curvature were instrumented with ProTaper files and filled with Endofill using the lateral compactation technique. Removal of filling material was performed with Reciproc, Mtwo and ProDesign Logic 50/.01 files. The teeth were inserted in a silicone mould, which was placed in a metal muffle, and split to visualize the residual filling material. The samples were divided into two groups (n = 11) according to the irrigation protocol: Passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI group) with 3 activations of 20 seconds and EasyClean (Easy Equipamentos Odontológicos, Belo Horizonte, Brazil) (EC group) used in continuous rotation with 3 activations of 20 seconds, both using NaOCl and EDTA. Environmental scanning electron microscopic images of the apical, middle, and cervical thirds were taken before and after the irrigant activation. The Kappa test was used to determine interexaminer agreement. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests (p < 0.05). PUI and EC improved the removal of remnant filling material in all root canal thirds (p < 0.05). PUI and EC presented similar performance in the final step of retreatment (p > 0.05). No significant difference was observed in the removal of filling material in the apical, middle, and cervical thirds in both groups (p > 0.05). EasyClean in continuous rotary motion is useful in retreatment and was shown to be as effective as ultrasonic activation in the removal of remnant filling material.


Subject(s)
Humans , Root Canal Filling Materials , Root Canal Irrigants/chemistry , Root Canal Therapy/instrumentation , Ultrasonic Therapy/instrumentation , Reference Values , Root Canal Irrigants/therapeutic use , Root Canal Therapy/methods , Time Factors , Ultrasonic Therapy/methods , Materials Testing , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Reproducibility of Results , Statistics, Nonparametric , Retreatment/instrumentation , Therapeutic Irrigation/instrumentation , Therapeutic Irrigation/methods
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