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1.
Arch. endocrinol. metab. (Online) ; 60(6): 582-586, Nov.-Dec. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-827786

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective The current study was aimed at analyzing sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (Serca2) and ryanodine receptor type 2 (Ryr2) gene expression in rats subjected to surgery that induced HF and were subsequently treated with T4 using physiological doses. Materials and methods HF was induced in 18 male Wistar rats by clipping the ascending thoracic aorta to generate aortic stenosis (HFS group), while the control group (9-sham) underwent thoracotomy. After 21 weeks, the HFS group was subdivided into two subgroups. One group (9 Wistar rats) with HF received 1.0 µg of T4/100 g of body weight for five consecutive days (HFS/T4); the other group (9 Wistar rats) received isotonic saline solution (HFS/S). The animals were sacrificed after this treatment and examined for signs of HF. Samples from the left ventricles of these animals were analyzed by RT-qPCR for the expression of Serca2 and Ryr2 genes. Results Rats with HF developed euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS) and treatment with T4 restored the T3 values to the Sham level and increased Serca2 and Ryr2 gene expression, thereby demonstrating a possible benefit of T4 treatment for heart function in ESS associated with HF. Conclusion The T4 treatment can potentially normalize the levels of T3 as well elevated Serca2 and Ryr2 gene expression in the myocardium in heart failure rats with euthyroid sick syndrome.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Thyroxine/administration & dosage , Euthyroid Sick Syndromes/drug therapy , Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/drug effects , Aortic Valve Stenosis/complications , Thyroxine/therapeutic use , Triiodothyronine/drug effects , Euthyroid Sick Syndromes/complications , Euthyroid Sick Syndromes/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Gene Expression/drug effects , Rats, Wistar , Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/genetics , Models, Animal , Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases/drug effects , Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases/genetics , Heart Failure/complications
2.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 47(11): 960-965, 11/2014. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-723901

ABSTRACT

In cardiomyocytes, calcium (Ca2+) release units comprise clusters of intracellular Ca2+ release channels located on the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and hypertension is well established as a cause of defects in calcium release unit function. Our objective was to determine whether endurance exercise training could attenuate the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release unit components and Ca2+ sparks in left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats. Male Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (4 months of age) were divided into 4 groups: normotensive (NC) and hypertensive control (HC), and normotensive (NT) and hypertensive trained (HT) animals (7 rats per group). NC and HC rats were submitted to a low-intensity treadmill running protocol (5 days/week, 1 h/day, 0% grade, and 50-60% of maximal running speed) for 8 weeks. Gene expression of the ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6) increased (270%) and decreased (88%), respectively, in HC compared to NC rats. Endurance exercise training reversed these changes by reducing RyR2 (230%) and normalizing FKBP12.6 gene expression (112%). Hypertension also increased the frequency of Ca2+ sparks (HC=7.61±0.26 vs NC=4.79±0.19 per 100 µm/s) and decreased its amplitude (HC=0.260±0.08 vs NC=0.324±0.10 ΔF/F0), full width at half-maximum amplitude (HC=1.05±0.08 vs NC=1.26±0.01 µm), total duration (HC=11.51±0.12 vs NC=14.97±0.24 ms), time to peak (HC=4.84±0.06 vs NC=6.31±0.14 ms), and time constant of decay (HC=8.68±0.12 vs NC=10.21±0.22 ms). These changes were partially reversed in HT rats (frequency of Ca2+ sparks=6.26±0.19 µm/s, amplitude=0.282±0.10 ΔF/F0, full width at half-maximum amplitude=1.14±0.01 µm, total duration=13.34±0.17 ms, time to peak=5.43±0.08 ms, and time constant of decay=9.43±0.15 ms). Endurance exercise training attenuated the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release units of left ventricular myocytes.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Calcium/physiology , Heart Ventricles/metabolism , Hypertension/therapy , Motor Activity/physiology , Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism , Physical Conditioning, Animal/methods , Calcium Signaling/physiology , Exercise Test/methods , Heart Ventricles/cytology , Hypertension/metabolism , Rats, Inbred SHR , Rats, Wistar , Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/genetics , Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/metabolism , Tacrolimus Binding Proteins/genetics , Tacrolimus Binding Proteins/metabolism
3.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 660-668, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-58592

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The underlying cause of myasthenia gravis (MG) is unknown, although it likely involves a genetic component. However, no common genetic variants have been unequivocally linked to autoimmune MG. We sought to identify the genetic variants associated with an increased or decreased risk of developing MG in samples from a Korean Multicenter MG Cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To determine new genetic targets related to autoimmune MG, a whole genome-based single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) analysis was conducted using an Axiom(TM) Genome-Wide ASI 1 Array, comprising 598375 SNPs and samples from 109 MG patients and 150 neurologically normal controls. RESULTS: In total, 641 SNPs from five case-control associations showed p-values of less than 10(-5). From regional analysis, we selected seven candidate genes (RYR3, CACNA1S, SLAMF1, SOX5, FHOD3, GABRB1, and SACS) for further analysis. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that a few genetic polymorphisms, such as in RYR3, CACNA1S, and SLAMF1, might be related to autoimmune MG. Our findings also encourage further studies, particularly confirmatory studies with larger samples, to validate and analyze the association between these SNPs and autoimmune MG.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD/genetics , Asian Continental Ancestry Group/genetics , Calcium Channels/genetics , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Genotype , Humans , Male , Myasthenia Gravis/etiology , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/genetics
4.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-73297

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is genetically heterogeneous, with mutations in the gene encoding the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) at 19q13.1 accounting for up to 80% of the cases. However, the search for known and novel mutations in the RYR1 gene is hampered by the fact that the gene contains 106 exons. We aimed to analyze mutations from the entire RYR1 coding region in Korean MH families. METHODS: We investigated seven affected MH individuals and their family members. The entire RYR1 coding region from the genomic DNA was sequenced, and RYR1 haplotyping and mutational analysis were carried out. RESULTS: We identified nine different RYR1 mutations or variations from seven Korean MH families. Among these, five previously reported mutations (p.Gly248Arg, p.Arg2435His, p.Arg2458His, p.Arg2676Trp, and p.Leu4838Val) and four novel variations of unknown significance (p.Arg2508Cys, p.Met4022Val, p.Glu2669Lys, and p.Ala4295Val) were identified. In two families, two variations (R2676W & M4022V, R2435H & A4295V, respectively) were identified simultaneously. Four of the observed nine mutations or variations were located outside the hotspot region of RYR1 mutations. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that RYR1 is a main candidate gene in Korean MH families, and that comprehensive screening of the entire coding sequence of the RYR1 gene is necessary for molecular genetic investigations in MH-susceptible individuals, owing to the presence of RYR1 mutations or variations outside of the hotspot region.


Subject(s)
Adult , Asian Continental Ancestry Group/genetics , Child , DNA Mutational Analysis , Exons , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Haplotypes , Humans , Male , Malignant Hyperthermia/genetics , Middle Aged , Mutation, Missense , Pedigree , Republic of Korea , Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/genetics , Sequence Analysis, DNA
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-192815

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Underlying cardiac pathology and atrial fibrillation (AF) affect the molecular remodeling of ion channels in the atria. Changes in the expression of these molecules have not been demonstrated in Korean patients with mitral valvular heart disease. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze ion channel expression in patients with chronic AF and mitral valvular heart disease. METHODS: A total of 17 patients (eight males and nine females; mean age, 57 +/- 14 years [range, 19 to 77]) undergoing open-heart surgery were included in the study. Twelve patients (seven with coronary artery disease and five with aortic valvular disease) had sinus rhythm, and five patients (all with mitral valvular disease) had chronic, permanent AF. A piece of right atrial appendage tissue (0.5 g) was obtained during surgery. RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of L-type Ca2+ channels, ryanodine receptor (RyR2), sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2), gene encoding the rapid component of the delayed rectifier Ikr (HERG), gene encoding calcium-independent transient outward current I(to1) (Kv4.3), gene encoding the ultrarapid component of the delayed rectifier Iku (Kv1.5), K+ channel-interacting protein 2 (KChIP2), hyperpolarization-activated cation channel 2 associated with the pacemaker current If (HCN2), and gene encoding Na+ channel (SCN5A). RESULTS: Reduced L-type Ca2+ channel, RyR2, SERCA2, Kv1.5, and KChIP2 expression and borderline increased HCN2 expression were observed in the patients with AF and mitral valvular heart disease. Left atrial diameter was negatively correlated with RyR2 and KChIP2 expression. Fractional area shortening of the left atrium was positively correlated with RyR2 and KChIP2 expression. CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in ion channel expression and the anatomical substrate may favor the initiation and maintenance of AF in patients with mitral valvular heart disease.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Aortic Valve Stenosis/metabolism , Atrial Fibrillation/metabolism , Calcium/metabolism , Chronic Disease , Coronary Artery Disease/metabolism , Female , Heart Valve Diseases/metabolism , Humans , Ion Channels/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Mitral Valve , Potassium Channels/genetics , Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/genetics , Sodium Channels/genetics
6.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 42(12): 1218-1224, Dec. 2009. tab, ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-532288

ABSTRACT

Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disease triggered in susceptible individuals by the administration of volatile halogenated anesthetics and/or succinylcholine, leading to the development of a hypermetabolic crisis, which is caused by abnormal release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, through the Ca2+ release channel ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1). Mutations in the RYR1 gene are associated with MH in the majority of susceptible families. Genetic screening of a 5-generation Brazilian family with a history of MH-related deaths and a previous MH diagnosis by the caffeine halothane contracture test (CHCT) in some individuals was performed using restriction and sequencing analysis. A novel missense mutation, Gly4935Ser, was found in an important functional and conserved locus of this gene, the transmembrane region of RyR1. In this family, 2 MH-susceptible individuals previously diagnosed with CHCT carry this novel mutation and another 24 not previously diagnosed members also carry it. However, this same mutation was not found in another MH-susceptible individual whose CHCT was positive to the test with caffeine but not to the test with halothane. None of the 5 MH normal individuals of the family, previously diagnosed by CHCT, carry this mutation, nor do 100 controls from control Brazilian and USA populations. The Gly4932Ser variant is a candidate mutation for MH, based on its co-segregation with disease phenotype, absence among controls and its location within the protein.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Malignant Hyperthermia/genetics , Mutation, Missense/genetics , Pedigree , Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/genetics , Brazil , Contracture , Caffeine , Family , Genetic Testing , Halothane , Malignant Hyperthermia/diagnosis
7.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 40(1): 27-31, Jan. 2007. graf, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-439677

ABSTRACT

We have shown that myocardial dysfunction induced by food restriction is related to calcium handling. Although cardiac function is depressed in food-restricted animals, there is limited information about the molecular mechanisms that lead to this abnormality. The present study evaluated the effects of food restriction on calcium cycling, focusing on sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2), phospholamban (PLB), and ryanodine channel (RYR2) mRNA expressions in rat myocardium. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats, 60 days old, were submitted to ad libitum feeding (control rats) or 50 percent diet restriction for 90 days. The levels of left ventricle SERCA2, PLB, and RYR2 were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Body and ventricular weights were reduced in 50 percent food-restricted animals. RYR2 mRNA was significantly decreased in the left ventricle of the food-restricted group (control = 5.92 ± 0.48 vs food-restricted group = 4.84 ± 0.33, P < 0.01). The levels of SERCA2 and PLB mRNA were similar between groups (control = 8.38 ± 0.44 vs food-restricted group = 7.96 ± 0.45, and control = 1.52 ± 0.06 vs food-restricted group = 1.53 ± 0.10, respectively). Down-regulation of RYR2 mRNA expressions suggests that chronic food restriction promotes abnormalities in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Calcium-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Down-Regulation/physiology , Food Deprivation/physiology , Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/metabolism , Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases/metabolism , Calcium-Binding Proteins/genetics , Down-Regulation/genetics , Rats, Inbred WKY , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/genetics , Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases/genetics
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