Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 151
Filter
1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-921331

ABSTRACT

Objective@#The expression patterns of ribosomal large subunit protein 23a (RPL23a) in mouse testes and GC-1 cells were analyzed to investigate the potential relationship between RPL23a expression and spermatogonia apoptosis upon exposure to X-ray.@*Methods@#Male mice and GC-1 cells were irradiated with X-ray, terminal dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL) was performed to detect apoptotic spermatogonia @*Results@#Ionizing radiation (IR) increased spermatogonia apoptosis, the expression of RPL11, MDM2 and p53, and decreased RPL23a expression in mice spermatogonia @*Conclusion@#These results suggested that IR reduced RPL23a expression, leading to weakened the RPL23a-RPL11 interactions, which may have activated p53, resulting in spermatogonia apoptosis. These results provide insights into environmental and clinical risks of radiotherapy following exposure to IR in male fertility. The graphical abstract was available in the web of www.besjournal.com.


Subject(s)
Animals , Apoptosis/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Male , Mice , Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Spermatogonia/radiation effects
2.
Int. j. morphol ; 37(3): 1132-1141, Sept. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1012409

ABSTRACT

Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have self-renewal and differentiation capacity essential for sperm production throughout the male reproductive life. The electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin (PCL/Gel) nanofibrous scaffold mimics important features of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which can provide a promising technique for the proliferation and differentiation of SSCs in vitro. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of PCL/Gel nanofibrous scaffold on the propagation and differentiation of neonate mouse SSCs (mSSCs). mSSCs were enzymatically isolated, and the cells were purified by differential plating method and seeded on scaffold. After 2 weeks, viability, colony number and diameter, and expression of specific spermatogonial cell genes were investigated. After mSSCs propagation, the cells were cultivated in a differentiation medium on the scaffold for another 2 weeks, and differentiating cells were analyzed by real-time PCR. The number of mSSC colony (P<0.01) and expression levels of specific spermatogonial genes Plzf and Inga6 (P<0.01) and also differentiation genes c-Kit, Tp1 and Ptm1 (P<0.05) were higher in scaffold group compared with control during the culture period. We conclude that mSSCs can be expanded and can differentiate toward spermatid cells on PCL/Gel nanofibrous scaffold with improved developmental parameters.


Las células madre espermatogónicas (CME) tienen capacidad de auto renovación y diferenciación esenciales para la producción de esperma a lo largo de la vida reproductiva masculina. El «scaffold¼ nanofibroso de policaprolactona / gelatina (PCL / Gel) electrohilado imita características importantes de la matriz extracelular (MEC), que puede proporcionar una técnica prometedora para la proliferación y diferenciación de CME in vitro. El objetivo del presente estudio fue investigar los efectos del «scaffold¼ nanofibroso PCL / Gel en la propagación y diferenciación de CME de ratones neonatos (mSSC). Los mSSC se aislaron enzimáticamente y las células se purificaron mediante un método de siembra diferencial y se sembraron en un «scaffold¼. Después de 2 semanas, se investigaron la viabilidad, el número y el diámetro de las colonias y la expresión de genes específicos de células espermatogónicas. Después de la propagación de mSSC, las células se cultivaron en un medio de diferenciación en el «scaffold¼ durante otras 2 semanas, y las células se analizaron mediante PCR en tiempo real. El número de colonias mSSC (P <0,01) y los niveles de expresión de los genes espermatogónicos específicos Plzf e Inga6 (P <0,01) y también los genes de diferenciación c-Kit, Tp1 y Ptm1 (P <0,05) fueron mayores en el grupo de «scaffold¼ en comparación con el control durante el período de cultivo. Concluimos que los mSSC pueden expandirse y diferenciarse en células espermátidas en un «scaffold¼ de nanofibras PCL / Gel con parámetros de desarrollo mejorados.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Mice , Spermatogonia/cytology , Spermatogonia/metabolism , Cell Differentiation/physiology , Cell Proliferation/physiology , Polyesters/chemistry , Cell Differentiation/genetics , Cell Survival , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Cell Proliferation/genetics , Tissue Scaffolds , Nanofibers/chemistry , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Animals, Newborn
3.
Biol. Res ; 52: 16, 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1011418

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sperm production is one of the most complex biological processes in the body. In vitro production of sperm is one of the most important goals of researches in the field of male infertility treatment, which is very important in male cancer patients treated with gonadotoxic methods and drugs. In this study, we examine the progression of spermatogenesis after transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells under conditions of testicular tissue culture. RESULTS: Testicular tissue samples from azoospermic patients were obtained and then these were freeze-thawed. Spermatogonial stem cells were isolated by two enzymatic digestion steps and the identification of these cells was confirmed by detecting the PLZF protein. These cells, after being labeled with DiI, were transplanted in azoospermia adult mice model. The host testes were placed on agarose gel as tissue culture system. After 8 weeks, histomorphometric, immunohistochemical and molecular studies were performed. The results of histomorphometric studies showed that the mean number of spermatogonial cells, spermatocytes and spermatids in the experimental group was significantly more than the control group (without transplantation) (P < 0.05) and most of the cells responded positively to the detection of DiI. Immunohistochemical studies in host testes fragments in the experimental group express the PLZF, SCP3 and ACRBP proteins in spermatogonial cells, spermatocyte and spermatozoa, respectively, which confirmed the human nature of these cells. Also, in molecular studies of PLZF, Tekt1 and TP1, the results indicated that the genes were positive in the test group, while not in the control group. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the slow freezing of SSCs can support the induction of spermatogenesis to produce haploid cells under the 3-dimensional testicular tissue culture.


Subject(s)
Humans , Animals , Male , Mice , Spermatogenesis/physiology , Spermatogonia/transplantation , Testis/cytology , Cryopreservation/methods , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods
4.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-773493

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To explore the effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated CEP55 gene silencing on the proliferation of mouse spermatogonia.@*METHODS@#Six patients with azoospermia diagnosed to have maturation arrest (3 cases) or normal spermatogenesis (3 cases) based on testicular biopsy between January 1 and December 31, 2017 in our center were examined for differential proteins in the testicular tissue using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), and CEP55 was found to differentially expressed between the two groups of patients. We constructed a CEP55 siRNA for transfection in mouse spermatogonia and examined the inhibitory effects on CEP55 expressions using Western blotting and qPCR. The effect of CEP55 gene silencing on the proliferation of mouse spermatogonia was evaluated with CCK8 assay.@*RESULTS@#In the testicular tissues from the 6 patients with azoospermia, iTRAQ combined with LC/MS/MS analysis identified over two hundred differentially expressed proteins, among which CEP55 showed the most significant differential expression between the patients with maturation arrest and those with normal spermatogenesis. The cell transfection experiment showed that compared with the cells transfected with the vehicle or the negative control sequence, the mouse spermatogonia transfected with CEP55 siRNA showed significantly lowered expressions of CEP55 mRNA and protein ( < 0.05) and significantly decreased proliferation rate as shown by CCK8 assay ( < 0.05).@*CONCLUSIONS@#CEP55 may play a key role in spermatogenesis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for non-obstructive azoospermia with maturation arrest.


Subject(s)
Animals , Azoospermia , Genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins , Genetics , Gene Silencing , Humans , Male , Mice , Nuclear Proteins , Genetics , Spermatogenesis , Spermatogonia , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , Transfection
5.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 558-561, 2018.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-689691

ABSTRACT

Nanos2, a member of the Nanos2 gene family, is a specific gene in male germ cells and encodes an evolutionarily conserved RNA binding protein expressed in male primordial germ cells (PGCs) during the embryonic period as well as in the spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) of the testis. In the embryonic period, Nanos2 promotes the development of male PGCs and inhibits them from meiosis. In the process of spermatogenesis, Nanos2 suppresses the differentiation of SSCs in the testis and maintains the stability of the SSC pool. The knockout of Nanos2 may cause the disappearance of germ cells and sterility in male mice while its overexpression in the testis may lead to accumulation of SSCs in seminiferous tubules. Besides, Nanos2 is involved in the degradation of specific RNAs and possibly associated with some diseases of the male reproductive system. This review focuses on the recent progress in the studies of Nanos2 in the male reproductive system.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cell Differentiation , Gene Knockout Techniques , Male , Meiosis , Mice , RNA , Metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins , Genetics , Metabolism , Spermatogenesis , Physiology , Spermatogonia , Spermatozoa , Testis , Cell Biology
6.
Laboratory Animal Research ; : 264-269, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-101371

ABSTRACT

Successful male germ cell transplantation requires depletion of the host germ cells to allow efficient colonization of the donor spermatogonial stem cells. Although a sterilizing drug, busulfan, is commonly used for the preparation of recipient models before transplantation, the optimal dose of this drug has not yet been defined in dogs. In this study, 1-year-old mongrel dogs were intravenously injected with three different concentrations of busulfan (10, 15, or 17.5 mg/kg). Four weeks after busulfan treatment, no fully matured spermatozoa were detected in any of the busulfan-treated groups. However, small numbers of PGP9.5-positive spermatogonia were detected in all treatment groups, although no synaptonemal complex protein-3-positive spermatocytes were detected. Of note, acrosin-positive spermatids were not detected in the dogs treated with 15 or 17.5 mg/kg busulfan, but were detected in the other group. Eight weeks after busulfan treatment, the dogs treated with 10 mg/kg busulfan fully recovered, but those in the other groups did not. PGP9.5-positive spermatogonia were detected in the 10 mg/kg group, and at a similar level as in the control group, but these cells were rarely detected in the 15 and 17.5 mg/kg groups. These results suggest that a dose of 15-17.5 mg/kg is optimal for ablative treatment with busulfan to prepare the recipient dogs for male germ cell transplantation. At least eight weeks should be allowed for recovery. The results of this study might facilitate the production of recipient dogs for male germ cell transplantation and can also contribute to studies on chemotherapy.


Subject(s)
Animals , Busulfan , Colon , Dogs , Drug Therapy , Germ Cells , Humans , Male , Spermatids , Spermatocytes , Spermatogonia , Spermatozoa , Stem Cell Transplantation , Stem Cells , Synaptonemal Complex , Testis , Tissue Donors
7.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 262-266, 2017.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-812775

ABSTRACT

Fertility preservation is a hotspot of research in reproductive medicine, and that of male adolescent cancer patients is drawing even more attention from reproductive and oncologic clinicians. Both cancer and its treatment can decrease semen quality and even induce irreversible damage to fertility. Sperm cryopreservation is an effective method for fertility preservation. In the past few years, marked advances have been made in the cryopreservation, transplantation, and in vitro culture of testis tissue and stem spermatogonial cells. Although still experimental, these approaches may offer some options to those with no mature sperm in the testis. Unfortunately, very few people know and participate in the studies of fertility preservation and the utilization rate of cryopreserved sperm remains low. Therefor reproductive physicians and oncologists are required to make more efforts to search for effective fertility preservation methods for male adolescent cancer patients.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Cryopreservation , Fertility Preservation , Methods , Humans , Male , Neoplasms , Therapeutics , Semen Analysis , Semen Preservation , Methods , Spermatogonia , Testis , Cell Biology
8.
Rev. biol. trop ; 64(4): 1597-1609, oct.-dic. 2016. tab, ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-958237

ABSTRACT

Abstract:The tropical gar A. tropicus plays an important ecological role as it regulates other fish stocks in different water bodies in Southeastern México. Nevertheless, wild populations are declining, and one conservation alternative is the aquaculture production and basic knowledge of reproductive biology; for males, this requires the study of germ and somatic structures of testes, to characterize the reproductive cycle, and to provide basic knowledge for exploitation and conservation models and strategies. With this aim, a total of 24 males with an average sL = 47.2 cm were collected from wild populations from the Laguna Pomposú, municipality of Jalpa de Mendez (18°19' - 93°01'12" W), Tabasco, Mexico. Fish were collected with a trawl net and were transported live to the Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory, División Académica de Ciencias Biológicas (DACBiol), Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco (UJAT). Males were killed by prolonged immersion in MS222. Testes samples were collected from each specimen and were processed using the standard histological procedures, that consisted of dehydration in an ascending ethanol series, xylol, embedding in paraffin, sectioning at 7 µm, and staining with hematoxylin-eosin (HE). The diameter of 20 seminiferous tubules (Dst), height of germinal epithelium (Hge), gonadosomatic index (GSI) and gonad volume (gV) were determined monthly. Based on morphometric and morpho-physiological characteristics, the testes consisted of a network of anastomosed tubules with non-restricted cystic spermatogenesis, and a permanent germinal epithelium. This is the first report of a permanent germinal epithelium in A. tropicus. Five reproductive classes were histologically identified: Class I Regressed; Class II Early Maturation; Class III Mid Maturation; Class IV Late Maturation; Class V Regression. Monthly GSI, gV and Dst values were lower in January and February, the testis showed spermatozoa remains and a regenerating discontinuous germinal epithelium. In March spermiogenesis increased and proliferation of spermatogonia decreased. Male tropical gar followed a seasonal reproductive cycle, indicated by the monthly variation of the reproductive classes and the reproductive season processes observed, and for which temperature and rainfall seem to stimulate reproductive activity and spermiation. Rev. Biol. Trop. 64 (4): 1597-1609. Epub 2016 December 01.


Resumen:A. tropicus tiene un papel ecológico importante, como regulador de otras poblaciones de peces, en los cuerpos de agua de México, pero sus poblaciones silvestres se reducen. Una alternativa de conservación es el cultivo, el cual requiere caracterizar el ciclo reproductivo por medio del estudio de estructuras germinales y somáticas de los testículos, conocimientos que son básicos para formar modelos de aprovechamiento y conservación. Se capturaron mensualmente tres machos sexualmente maduros (N = 24), con un promedio de sL = 47.2 cm en Laguna de Pomposú, Jalpa de Méndez (18°19´59" N - 93°01´12" W), Tabasco, México, de octubre 2009 a septiembre 2010. La técnica de captura fue red de arrastre, se transportaron vivos al laboratorio de acuicultura tropical, DACBiol, UJAT. Los machos recolectados se sacrificaron con baños de inmersión en sobredosis de MS222, los testículos se procesaron para análisis histológico. Se determinó mensualmente el diámetro de 20 túbulos seminíferos (Dst), altura de epitelio germinal (Hge), índice gonadosomático (GSI) y volumen de gónada (gV). Características morfo-fisiológicas del testículo muestran que está constituido de una red de túbulos anastomosados con espermatogénesis quística no restringida, y un epitelio germinal permanente, de nuestro conocimiento es la primera vez que se reporta este tipo de epitelio en Holostei (Lepisosteiformes: Lepisosteidae). Se identificaron cinco clases reproductivas: Clase I Recrudescencia, Clase II Madurez temprana, Clase III Madurez intermedia, Clase IV Maduración tardía, Clase V Regresión, que al contrastarlo con el valor mensual de los indicadores sexuales "GSI, gV, Dst" muestra un patrón de variación; durante enero-febrero se presentan valores bajos, se observa un epitelio germinal discontinuo en regeneración; durante marzo se incrementa la proliferación de espermatogonias disminuyendo la espermatogénesis. Los machos de A. tropicus muestran una actividad reproductora estacional anual, explicado por las variaciones mensuales de los indicadores reproductores, donde la temperatura y la precipitación parecen tener un papel importante como factores que estimulan la actividad reproductora y por tanto la espermiación.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Reproduction/physiology , Testis/anatomy & histology , Testis/physiology , Fishes/physiology , Reference Values , Seasons , Sexual Maturation/physiology , Spermatogenesis/physiology , Spermatogonia/physiology , Time Factors , Epithelium/physiology , Mexico
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-88589

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have been suggested as a potential choice for treatment of male infertility. Yet, the effects of MSCs on regeneration of germinal epithelium of seminiferous tubules and recovery of spermatogenesis have remained controversial. In this research, we have evaluated and compared the fate of autologous bone marrow (BM)-MSCs during three different periods of time- 4, 6 and 8 weeks after transplantation into the testes of busulfan-induced infertile male rats. METHODS: Rats BM samples were collected from tibia bone under anesthesia. The samples were directly cultured in culture medium. Isolated, characterized and purified BM-MSCs were labeled with PKH26, and transplanted into the testes of infertile rats. After 4, 6 and 8 weeks, the testes were removed and underwent histological evaluations. RESULTS: Immunohistochemical analysis showed that transplanted BM-MSCs survived in all three groups. Some of the cells homed at the germinal epithelium and expressed spermatogonia markers (Dazl and Stella). The number of homed spermatogonia-like cells in 4-week testes, was more than the 6-week testes. The 8-week testes had the least numbers of homed cells (p<0.05). Immunostaining for vimentin showed that BM-MSCs did not differentiate into the sertoli cells in the testes. CONCLUSIONS: From our results, it could be concluded that, autologous BM-MSCs could survive in the testis, migrate onto the seminiferous tubules basement membrane and differentiate into spermatogonia. Although, no more differentiation was observed in the produced spermatogonia, generation of such endogenous GCs would be a really promising achievement for treatment of male infertility using autologous stem cells.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Animals , Basement Membrane , Bone Marrow , Epithelium , Germ Cells , Humans , Infertility, Male , Male , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Rats , Regeneration , Seminiferous Tubules , Sertoli Cells , Spermatogenesis , Spermatogonia , Stem Cells , Testis , Tibia , Transplantation , Vimentin
10.
Laboratory Animal Research ; : 257-266, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-221830

ABSTRACT

Transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in experimental animal models has been used to study germ line stem cell biology and to produce transgenic animals. The species-specific recipient model preparation is important for the characterization of SSCs and the production of offspring. Here, we investigated the effects of surgically induced cryptorchidism in dog as a new recipient model for spermatogonial stem cell transplantation. Artificially unilateral or bilateral cryptorchidism was induced in ten mature male dogs by surgically returning the testis and epididymis to the abdominal cavity. The testes and epididymides were collected every week after the induction of artificial cryptorchidism (surgery) for one month. To determine the effect of surgical cryptorchidism, the seminiferous tubule diameter was measured and immunohistochemistry using PGP9.5 and GATA4 antibodies was analyzed. The diameters of the seminiferous tubules of abdominal testes were significantly reduced compared to those of the scrotal testes. Immunohistochemistry results showed that PGP9.5 positive undifferentiated spermatogonia were significantly reduced after surgical cryptorchidism induction, but there were no significant changes in GATA-4 positive sertoli cells. To evaluate the testis function recovery rate, orchiopexy was performed on two dogs after 30 days of bilateral cryptorchidism. In the orchiopexy group, SCP3 positive spermatocytes were detected, and spermatogenesis was recovered 8 weeks after orchiopexy. In this study, we provided optimum experimental conditions and time for surgical preparation of a recipient canine model for SSC transplantation. Additionally, our data will contribute to recipient preparation by using surgically induced cryptorchidism in non-rodent species.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Cavity , Animals , Animals, Genetically Modified , Antibodies , Biology , Cryptorchidism , Dogs , Epididymis , Germ Cells , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Male , Models, Animal , Orchiopexy , Recovery of Function , Seminiferous Tubules , Sertoli Cells , Spermatocytes , Spermatogenesis , Spermatogonia , Stem Cell Transplantation , Stem Cells , Testis
11.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 856-860, 2016.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-262281

ABSTRACT

RNA binding proteins (RBPs) regulate the function of cells by interacting with nascent transcripts and therefore are receiving increasing attention from researchers for their roles in tissue development and homeostasis. The polypyrimidine tract binding (PTB) protein family of RBPs are important posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. Further investigations on the post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms and isoforms of PTB proteins in the spermatogenesis show that PTB protein 1 (Ptbp1) is a predominant isoform in mitotic cells (spermatogonia), while Ptbp2 predominates in meiotic spermatocytes and postmeiotic spermatids and binds to the specific 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (Pgk-2) mRNA, which helps to stabilize Pgk-2 mRNA in male mouse germ cells. In case of Ptbp2 inactivation in the testis, the differentiation of germ cells arrests in the stage of round spermatids, with proliferation of multinucleated cells in the seminiferous tubule, increased apoptosis of spermatocytes, atrophy of seminiferous tubules, and lack of elongating spermatids, which consequently affects male fertility. This article presents an overview on the structure of the PTB protein and its role in regulating mammalian spermatogenesis.


Subject(s)
Animals , Atrophy , Gene Expression Regulation , Physiology , Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins , Metabolism , Physiology , Homeostasis , Isoenzymes , Metabolism , Male , Mice , Nerve Tissue Proteins , Metabolism , Physiology , Phosphoglycerate Kinase , Metabolism , Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein , Metabolism , Physiology , RNA, Messenger , Metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins , Seminiferous Tubules , Pathology , Spermatids , Metabolism , Spermatocytes , Metabolism , Spermatogenesis , Physiology , Spermatogonia , Metabolism , Testis , Metabolism
12.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 491-495, 2016.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-304713

ABSTRACT

<p><b>Objective</b>To investigate the influence of cellphone electromagnetic radiation (CER) on the testicular ultrastructure and the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells in male rats.atability, feasibility, applicability, and controllability in the construction of experimental animal models, we compared the major anatomic features of the penis of 20 adult beagle dogs with those of 10 adult men. Using microsurgical techniques, we performed cross-transplantation of the penis in the 20 (10 pairs) beagle dogs and observed the survival rate of the transplanted penises by FK506+MMF+MP immune induction. We compared the relevant indexes with those of the 10 cases of microsurgical replantation of the amputated penis.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Thirty adult male SD rats were equally randomized into a 2 h CER, a 4 h CER, and a normal control group, the former two groups exposed to 30 days of 900 MHz CER for 2 and 4 hours a day, respectively, while the latter left untreated. Then the changes in the ultrastructure of the testis tissue were observed under the transmission electron microscope and the apoptosis of the spermatogenic cells was determined by TUNEL.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Compared with the normal controls, the rats of the 2 h CER group showed swollen basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, separated tight junction of Sertoli cells, increased cell intervals, apparent vacuoles and medullization in some mitochondria, and increased apoptosis of spermatogenic cells, mainly the apoptosis of primary spermatocytes (P<0.05 ). In comparison with the 2 h CER group, the animals of the 4 h CER group exhibited swollen basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, more separated tight junction of Sertoli cells, wider cell intervals, incomplete membrane of spermatogonial cells, fragments of cytoplasm, nuclear pyknosis and notch, slight dilation of perinuclear space, abnormalities of intracellular mitochondria with vacuoles, fuzzy structure, and fusion or disappearance of some cristae, and increased damage of mitochondria and apoptosis of spermatogenic cells, including the apoptosis of spermatogonial cells, primary spermatocytes, and secondary spermatocytes (P<0.05 ).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>CER can damage the testicular ultrastructure and increase the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells of the male rat in a time-dependent manner, and the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells may be associated with the damage to mitochondria.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Apoptosis , Cell Phone , Electromagnetic Radiation , Male , Mitochondria , Radiation Effects , Random Allocation , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Seminiferous Tubules , Radiation Effects , Sertoli Cells , Radiation Effects , Spermatocytes , Radiation Effects , Spermatogonia , Radiation Effects , Testis , Radiation Effects
13.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 200-207, 2015.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-319519

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To study the dynamic changes in the protein marker expression in the spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) of mice at different ages by iTRAQ protein mass spectrometry and to screen new markers using the bioinformatic proteome database.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Based on the postnatal weeks, we divided 80 healthy male C57BL/6 mice into eight age groups of equal number, harvested their testicular tissues, extracted proteins following purification of the SSCs by compound enzyme digestion and magnetic-activated cell sorting. Then we analyzed and identified proteins using two-dimensional electrophoresis, protein mass spectrometry, and protein database information.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Totally, 248,510 mass spectra were obtained from the MS experiment and 1132 proteins were identified. By the criteria of >1.2-fold for protein abundance difference and P value <0.05, we identified 298 differentially expressed proteins and 9 currently known makers of SSCs (PCNA, GFRalpha1, CDH1, Annexin A7, UCHL1, VASA, CD49f, CD29, and PLZf). Compara- tive analysis showed different expressions of the proteins in the SSCs of the mice of different ages, and the differences in the expressions of GFRalpha1, CD49f, and CD29 were consistent with the findings in other published literature. Ten proteins (P63, CD71, CD98, K19, ACE, K18, K15, K17, SH2, and SH3) were selected as SSC markers to be further studied.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The proteins in SSCs are differentially expressed in mice of different ages. The technology of iTRAQ protein mass spectrometry can be used to analyze and compare the proteome information of mouse SSCs, obtain differentially expressed proteins in mice of different ages, and thus offers a new ap- proach to further analysis and study of the function and roles of these differential proteins.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult Stem Cells , Cell Biology , Metabolism , Age Factors , Animals , Biomarkers , Metabolism , Cell Separation , Methods , Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional , Male , Mass Spectrometry , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Proteins , Metabolism , Spermatogonia , Cell Biology
14.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 208-213, 2015.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-319518

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To isolate, identify and culture human spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and then obtain purified and enriched human SSCs for research and application.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>We detected the expression of CD90 in the human testis using the immunofluorescence technique and isolated human testicular spermatogenic cells by two-step enzymatic digestion, followed by differential plating and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) with CD90 as an SSC marker. Then we identified the isolated CD90-positive spermatogenic cells by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry, and meanwhile cocultured them with Sertoli cells in SG medium in vitro.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The isolated CD90-positive cells showed a relatively homogeneous characteristic in size and morphology and expressed the genes specific for human SSCs, with high expressions (90.5%) of GFRA1, GPR125, and UCHL1. After coculture with Sertoli cells in the SG medium for 2 weeks, the isolated CD90-positive cells maintained a good activity.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>CD90 can be regarded as a speci- fic marker for human SSCs and used to obtain highly enriched human SSCs by differential plating and MACS. Furthermore, the isolated human SSCs can be cultured in SG medium in vitro.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult Stem Cells , Cell Biology , Biomarkers , Metabolism , Cell Separation , Methods , Cell Shape , Cell Size , Coculture Techniques , Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptors , Metabolism , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Male , Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled , Metabolism , Sertoli Cells , Spermatogonia , Cell Biology , Testis , Metabolism , Thy-1 Antigens , Metabolism , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase , Metabolism
15.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-239245

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To establish an in vitro model of cultured mouse testis using rotary aerobic culture.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Rotary aerobic incubation with optimized culture conditions was used for in vitro culture of mouse testis, and the morphology of the cultured testicular tissues was compared with that cultured in Transwell chambers. The changes in the testicular tissue structure were examined using HE staining, and the cell proliferation was assessed with BrdU staining. Testosterone concentrations in the culture medium were tested with radioimmunoassay and the expression of the functionally related proteins in the testis was detected using immunohistochemistry.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The testicular tissue cultured by optimized rotary aerobic culture presented with more intact histological structure with the size of the testis ranged from 0.3 to 0.8 mm(3). In the two culture systems, the prolifeation index of the spermatogonia increased and that of Sertoli cells decreased with time, and such changes in spermatogonia and Sertoli cell proliferation indices became statistically significant at 3 days (P<0.05) and 5 days (P<0.05) of culture, respectively, as compared with those at 1 day. The concentration of testoerone in the culture media decreased significantly with incubation time (P<0.05). At 3 days of culture, the protein expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase and cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme was detected in Leydig cell cytoplasm and vimentin expression in Sertoli cell cytoplasm.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>An in vitro model of cultured mouse testis has been successfully established using rotary aerobic incubation.</p>


Subject(s)
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases , Metabolism , Animals , Cholesterol Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme , Metabolism , Culture Media , Chemistry , Leydig Cells , Cell Biology , Male , Mice , Organ Culture Techniques , Radioimmunoassay , Sertoli Cells , Cell Biology , Spermatogonia , Cell Biology , Testis , Testosterone , Chemistry , Vimentin , Metabolism
16.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 391-395, 2015.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-276087

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To identify the expression characteristics of the 1700001022RIK (RIKEN cDNA 1700001022) gene in mice and explore its function by bioinformatic analysis.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Using the expression profile of gene microarray, we detected the expression of a new testis-specific gene, 1700001022RIK, in mice. We analyzed its expression characteristics in the testis tissue and their changes in different developmental stages of the testis by RT-PCR, real-time RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We performed bioinformatic analysis using a bioinformatic software.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The 1700001022RIK gene was specifically expressed in the mouse testis in an age-dependent manner, most highly in the adult mice. The 1700001022RIK protein was mainly expressed in the spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids of the adult mice. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the 1700001022RIK protein amino acid sequence had a high similarity in human and mice, which indicated that this gene was highly conserved in mammals.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>1700001022RIK is a testis-specific gene mainly expressed in the spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids of seminiferous tubules, which might be involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis.</p>


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Animals , Blotting, Western , Computational Biology , DNA, Complementary , Gene Expression , Genomics , Male , Mice , Molecular Chaperones , Genetics , Seminiferous Tubules , Spermatids , Spermatocytes , Spermatogenesis , Genetics , Spermatogonia , Testis
17.
Cell Journal [Yakhteh]. 2014; 16 (1): 79-90
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-148450

ABSTRACT

Spermatogonial stem cells [SSCs] are the only cell type that can restore fertility to an infertile recipient following transplantation. Much effort has been made to develop a protocol for differentiating isolated SSCs in vitro. Recently, three-dimensional [3D] culture system has been introduced as an appropriate microenvironment for clonal expansion and differentiation of SSCs. This system provides structural support and multiple options for several manipulation such as addition of different cells. Somatic cells have a critical role in stimulating spermatogenesis. They provide complex cell to cell interaction, transport proteins and produce enzymes and regulatory factors. This study aimed to optimize the culture condition by adding somatic testicular cells to the collagen gel culture system in order to induce spermatogenesis progression. In this experimental study, the disassociation of SSCs was performed by using a two-step enzymatic digestion of type I collagenase, hyaluronidase and DNase. Somatic testicular cells including Sertoli cells and peritubular cells were obtained after the second digestion. SSCs were isolated by Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting [MACS] using GDNF family receptor alpha-1 [Gfr Alpha -1] antibody. Two experimental designs were investigated. 1. Gfr Alpha -1 positive SSCs were cultured in a collagen solution. 2. Somatic testicular cells were added to the Gfr Alpha -1 positive SSCs in a collagen solution. Spermatogenesis progression was determined after three weeks by staining of synaptonemal complex protein 3 [SCP3]-positive cells. Semi-quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR was undertaken for SCP3 as a meiotic marker and, Crem and Thyroid transcription factor-1 [TTF1] as post meiotic markers. For statistical analysis student t test was performed Testicular supporter cells increased the expression of meiotic and post meiotic markers and had a positive effect on extensive colony formation. Collagen gel culture system supported by somatic testicular cells provides a microenvironment that mimics seminiferous epithelium and induces spermatogenesis in vitro


Subject(s)
Animals, Laboratory , Cell Culture Techniques , Collagen , Testis/cytology , Spermatogonia , Mice, Inbred BALB C
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-70421

ABSTRACT

Male pseudohermaphroditism is not commonly reported in veterinary medicine. Here, a 3-year-old Maltese/poodle mixed dog presented with malformed external genitalia and episodic hematuria. Inspection and palpation of the external genitals showed a malformed penis, shortened prepuce, external urethral orifice, and cryptorchidism. There was no urethral meatus at the tip of the penis. The urethral opening was situated between the prepuce and the penis. The anterior half of the prepuce was absent, and the penis was free and exposed to both trauma and licking. Plain radiographic examination showed absence of an os penis in the penis. A double-contrast cystograph showed the suspected uterus as well as the cystic calculi. A hypoechoic space was seen at the dorsal portion of the urinary bladder. The space was suspected to be the uterus. A sagital ultrasonograph showed cystic calculi in the urinary bladder. During surgery to remove cystic calculi, hypoplastic testes as well as the uterus were observed. Histological examination of the testes showed the seminiferous tubules and interstitial cells. The sertoli cells and spermatogonia were adjacent to the basement membrane. No evidence of spermatogenesis was found. Striated squamous epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells were found in the uterus. This dog had vestigial oviducts as well as a uterus with male-appearing external genitals.


Subject(s)
Disorder of Sex Development, 46,XY , Animals , Basement Membrane , Calculi , Child, Preschool , Cryptorchidism , Disorders of Sex Development , Dogs , Epithelial Cells , Genitalia , Hematuria , Humans , Male , Myocytes, Smooth Muscle , Oviducts , Palpation , Penis , Seminiferous Tubules , Sertoli Cells , Spermatogenesis , Spermatogonia , Testis , Urinary Bladder , Uterus , Veterinary Medicine
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-351044

ABSTRACT

The effects of over-expression of testis-specific expressed gene 1 (TSEG-1) on the viability and apoptosis of cultured spermatogonial GC-1spg cells were investigated, and the immortal spermatogonial cell line GC-1spg (CRL-2053™) was obtained as the cell model in order to explore the function of TSEG-1. We transfected the eukaryotic vector of TSEG-1, named as pEGFP-TSEG-1 into cultured spermatogonial GC-1spg cells. Over-expression of TSEG-1 inhibited the proliferation of GC-1spg cells, and arrested cell cycle slightly at G0/G1 phase. Transfection of TSEG-1 attenuated the transcript levels of Ki-67, PCNA and cyclin D1. In addition, over-expression of TSEG-1 induced early and late apoptosis, and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential of GC-1spg cells. Moreover, transfection of TSEG-1 significantly enhanced the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and transcript levels of caspase 9, and decreased the expression of Fas and caspase 8 in GC-1spg cells. These results indicated over-expression of TSEG-1 suppresses the proliferation and induces the apoptosis of GC-1spg cells, which establishes a basis for further study on the function of TSEG-1.


Subject(s)
Animals , Caspase 8 , Genetics , Cell Line , Cyclin D1 , Genetics , G1 Phase , Physiology , Histones , Genetics , Metabolism , Ki-67 Antigen , Genetics , Male , Mice , Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen , Genetics , Resting Phase, Cell Cycle , Physiology , Spermatogonia , Cell Biology , Metabolism , bcl-2-Associated X Protein , Genetics
20.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 387-391, 2014.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-309702

ABSTRACT

Spermatogenesis is a process consisting of spermatogonial proliferation, spermatocytic meiosis, and spermiogenesis, and is also considered to be a process in which heterochromatins gradually aggregate and finally reach a highly condensed formation in the sperm head. Recent studies show that epigenetic regulation plays a key role in spermatogenesis. This review discusses the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in spermatogenesis in three aspects, DNA methylation, histone modification, and noncoding RNAs. These factors are essential for spermatogenesis, fertilization, and embryogenesis by mutual regulation as well as by gene expression regulation, transposon activation, sex chromosome inactivation, and genome imprinting.


Subject(s)
DNA Methylation , Embryonic Development , Epigenesis, Genetic , Physiology , Genomic Imprinting , Humans , Male , Meiosis , Spermatogenesis , Genetics , Spermatogonia , Cell Biology , Physiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL