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2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742304

ABSTRACT

This study was undertaken to determine the complete mitochondrial DNA sequence and structure of the mitochondrial genome of Spirometra ranarum, and to compare it with those of S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens. The aim of this study was to provide information of the species level taxonomy of Spirometra spp. using the mitochondrial genomes of 3 Spirometra tapeworms. The S. ranarum isolate originated from Myanmar. The mitochondrial genome sequence of S. ranarum was compared with that of S. erinaceieuropaei (GenBank no. KJ599680) and S. decipiens (Gen-Bank no. KJ599679). The complete mtDNA sequence of S. ranarum comprised 13,644 bp. The S. ranarum mt genome contained 36 genes comprising 12 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs. The mt genome lacked the atp8 gene, as found for other cestodes. All genes in the S. ranarum mitochondrial genome are transcribed in the same direction and arranged in the same relative position with respect to gene loci as found for S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens mt genomes. The overall nucleotide sequence divergence of 12 protein-coding genes between S. ranarum and S. decipiens differed by 1.5%, and 100% sequence similarity was found in the cox2 and nad6 genes, while the DNA sequence divergence of the cox1, nad1, and nad4 genes of S. ranarum and S. decipiens was 2.2%, 2.1%, and 2.6%, respectively.


Subject(s)
Base Sequence , Cestoda , Classification , DNA, Mitochondrial , Genes, vif , Genome , Genome, Mitochondrial , Myanmar , RNA, Transfer , Spirometra
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786638

ABSTRACT

In the present study, a Spirometra species of Tanzania origin obtained from an African leopard (Panthera pardus) and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) was identified based on molecular analysis of cytochrome c oxidase I (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (nad1) as well as by morphological observations of an adult tapeworm. One strobila and several segments of a Spirometra species were obtained from the intestine of an African male leopard (Panthera pardus) and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) in the Maswa Game Reserve of Tanzania. The morphological characteristics of S. theileri observed comprised 3 uterine loops on one side and 4 on the other side of the mid-line, a uterine pore situated posterior to the vagina and alternating irregularly either to the right or left of the latter, and vesicular seminis that were much smaller than other Spirometra species. Sequence differences in the cox1 and nad1 genes between S. theileri (Tanzania origin) and S. erinaceieuropaei were 10.1% (cox1) and 12.0% (nad1), while those of S. decipiens and S. ranarum were 9.6%, 9.8% (cox1) and 13.0%, 12.6% (nad1), respectively. The morphological features of the Tanzania-origin Spirometra specimens coincided with those of S. theileri, and the molecular data was also consistent with that of S. theileri, thereby demonstrating the distribution of S. theileri in Tanzania. This places the leopard (Panthera pardus) and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) as new definitive hosts of this spirometrid tapeworm.


Subject(s)
Adult , Animals , Cestoda , Electron Transport Complex IV , Humans , Hyaenidae , Intestines , Male , NADH Dehydrogenase , Panthera , Spirometra , Tanzania , Vagina
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761778

ABSTRACT

Mitochondrial DNA sequence variability of Spirometra erinaceieuropaei in GenBank was observed by reinvestigation of mitochondrial cox1 and cytb sequences. The DNA sequences were analyzed in this study, comprising complete DNA sequences of cox1 (n=239) and cytb (n=213) genes. The 10 complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of Spirometra species were compared with those of Korea, China and Japan. The sequences were analyzed for nucleotide composition, conserved sites, variable sites, singleton sites and parsimony-informative sites. Phylogenetic analyses was done using neighbor joining, maximum parsimony, Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood on cox1 and cytb sequences of Spirometra species. These polymorphic sites identified 148 (cox1) and 83 (cytb) haplotypes within 239 and 213 isolates from 3 Asian countries. Phylogenetic tree topologies were presented high-level confidence values for the 2 major branches of 2 Spirometra species containing S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens, and S. decipiens sub-clades including all sequences registered as S. erinaceieuropaei in cox1 and cytb genes. These results indicated that mitochondrial haplotypes of S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens were found in the 3 Asian countries.


Subject(s)
Asians , Base Sequence , China , Databases, Nucleic Acid , DNA, Mitochondrial , Haplotypes , Humans , Japan , Korea , Mitochondria , Spirometra , Trees
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761774

ABSTRACT

Human sparganosis is a food-borne zoonosis mainly caused by the plerocercoid belonging to the genus Spirometra. The most common clinical sign of sparganosis is a subcutaneous mass in the trunk including abdominal or chest wall. The mass may be mistaken for a malignant tumor, thereby causing difficulty in terms of diagnosis and treatment. A 66-year-old woman visited our clinic for the removal of a lipoma-like mass. It was movable, hard, and painless. We identified 2 white mass, measuring 0.2×4 cm and 0.2×1 cm. Pathologic findings indicated the white mass was a sparganum. She recalled having eaten a raw frog approximately 60 years before. A 35-year-old who lived North Korea was also presented to our clinic with an asymptomatic nodule on her abdomen. Intraoperatively, we found sparganum approximately 24 cm size. Subcutaneous masses are associated with clinical signs of inflammation or they may mimic a soft tissue neoplasm. While the incidence rate of sparganosis has decreased with economic development and advancements in sanitation, surgeons still encounter patients with sparganosis in the clinical setting. Therefore, a careful history is required in order to diagnose sparganosis.


Subject(s)
Abdomen , Adult , Aged , Democratic People's Republic of Korea , Diagnosis , Economic Development , Female , Humans , Incidence , Inflammation , Lipoma , Sanitation , Soft Tissue Neoplasms , Sparganosis , Sparganum , Spirometra , Subcutaneous Tissue , Surgeons , Thoracic Wall
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761736

ABSTRACT

Spargana were collected from human and frogs in Liaoning and Hubei Provinces, China. PCR amplification and direct sequencing of A cox1 fragment was PCR-amplified from genomic DNA extracted from 7 specimens (5 from humans and 2 from frogs). The cox1 fragment (390 bp) showed 97–100% similarity to the reference sequence of S. erinaceieuropaei and 88–89% to the reference sequence of S. decipiens. There were 1–12 bases different between these worms, but no obvious genetic variation (0–3.3%) to the references. There was little difference of cox1 gene between sparganum samples of humans and frogs (1–3%). This study is the first report on S. erinaceieuropaei spargana from humans in Liaoning and Hubei Provinces.


Subject(s)
China , DNA , Genetic Variation , Humans , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sparganum , Spirometra
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761722

ABSTRACT

Sparganosis is a parasitic infestation caused by sparganum, a plerocercoid tapeworm larva of the genus Spirometra. Since the first case of human sparganosis reported in 1908, sparganosis has been a global disease, and is common in China, Japan, and Southeast Asian countries. Consumption of raw snakes, frogs, fish, or drinking contaminated beverages are sources of human infections. Human sparganosis usually manifests in subcutaneous fat in areas such as the abdomen, genitourinary tract, and limbs. Breast sparganosis cases are rare, representing less than 2% of total cases of human infections. Complete surgical extraction of the sparganum is the treatment of choice. Because of the rarity of the disease, clinical suspicion is vital to reach the diagnosis of breast sparganosis. Here we report 2 rare cases of breast sparganosis presenting with a painless breast lump, both treated with surgical excision and sparganum extraction.


Subject(s)
Abdomen , Asians , Beverages , Breast , Cestoda , China , Diagnosis , Drinking , Extremities , Humans , Japan , Larva , Snakes , Sparganosis , Sparganum , Spirometra , Subcutaneous Fat
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742263

ABSTRACT

The taxonomy of Spirometra species has been controversial despite the medical and veterinary importance. Currently, only a few Spirometra species are considered valid species in the genus Spirometra. In the present study, the distribution of Spirometra species obtained from animals in Korea were identified by molecular analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (cox1) gene. A total of 28 Spirometra species specimens were analyzed. These were all collected between 1973 and 2008 in the Republic of Korea. Mitochondrial cox1 sequences were examined for a total of 28 specimens comprising 14 S. decipiens and 14 S. ranarum. The difference in partial cox1 sequences (316 bp) between S. erinaceieuropaei (KJ599680) and S. ranarum (this study) was 9.3%, while that between S. decipiens (KJ599679) and S. ranarum (this study) was 2.2%. Genetic analyses identified 2 Spirometra species in animals such as cat, leopard cat, dog, duck and snake in Korea as S. decipiens and S. ranarum. S. decipiens and S. ranarum were present in Gyeongnam Province (P), Jeonnam P, Gangwon P, Chungbuk P, and Seoul. S. decipiens was found in tadpoles, snakes, ducks, cats, leopard cats and dogs, while S. ranarum was found in cats and dogs. The ratio of S. decipiens:S. ranarum calculated from the molecular data was 14:14 (or 1:1). These results indicate that S. decipiens and S. ranarum are sympatrically distributed in Korea.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cats , Classification , Dogs , Ducks , Electron Transport Complex IV , Korea , Larva , Molecular Biology , Panthera , Republic of Korea , Seoul , Snakes , Spirometra
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742259

ABSTRACT

The present study was performed with morphological and molecular analysis (cox1 and nad1 mitochondrial genes) to identify the proglottids of spirometrid tapeworm found in the stool of an African lion, Panthera leo, in the Serengeti plain of Tanzania. A strand of tapeworm strobila, about 75 cm in length, was obtained in the stool of a male African lion in the Serengeti National Park (34° 50′ E, 02° 30′ S), Tanzania, in February 2012. The morphological features of the adult worm examined exhibited 3 uterine coils with a bow tie appearance and adopted a diagonal direction in the second turn. The posterior uterine coils are larger than terminal uterine ball and the feature of uteri are swirling rather than spirally coiling. The sequence difference between the Spirometra species (Tanzania origin) and S. erinaceieuropaei (GenBank no. KJ599680) was 9.4% while those of S. decipiens (GenBank no. KJ599679) differed by 2.1% in the cox1 and nad1 genes. Phylogenetic tree topologies generated using the 2 analytic methods were identical and presented high level of confidence values for the 3 major branches of the 3 Spirometra species in the cox1 gene. The morphological and molecular findings obtained in this study were nearly coincided with those of S. ranarum. Therefore, we can know for the first time that the African lion, Panthera leo, is to the definitive host of this tapeworm.


Subject(s)
Adult , Cestoda , Humans , Lions , Male , Panthera , Parks, Recreational , Spirometra , Tanzania , Trees , Uterus
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742250

ABSTRACT

In the present study, we identified a Spirometra species of Myanmar origin (plerocercoid) by molecular analysis using mitochondrial cox1 and nad1 genes, as well as by morphological observations of an adult tapeworm. Spargana specimens were collected from a paddy-field in Taik Kyi Township Tarkwa Village, Yangon, Myanmar in December 2017. A total of 5 spargana were obtained from 20 frogs Hoplobatrachus rugulosus; syn: Rana rugulosa (Wiegmann, 1834) or R. tigrina (Steindachner, 1867). The plerocercoids were used for experimental infection of a dog. After 4 weeks of infection, an adult tapeworm was recovered from the intestine of the dog. Morphologically, the distinct features of Spirometra sp. (Myanmar origin) relative to S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens include a uterine morphology comprising posterior uterine coils that larger than the terminal uterine ball and coiling of the uteri diagonally (swirling) rather than spirally. The cox1 sequences (1,566 bp) of the Myanmar-origin Spirometra species showed 97.9% similarity to a reference sequence of S. decipiens (GenBank no. KJ599679) and 90.5% similarity to a reference sequence of S. erinaceieuropaei (GenBank no. KJ599680). Phylogenetic tree topologies were identical and presented high confidence level of values for the 3 major branches of the 3 Spirometra species in cox1 and nad1 genes. These results indicated that Myanmar-origin Spirometra species coincided with those of S. ranarum and may be considered as a valid species.


Subject(s)
Adult , Animals , Cestoda , Dogs , Genes, vif , Humans , Intestines , Myanmar , Ranidae , Spirometra , Trees , Uterus
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742246

ABSTRACT

Human sparganosis was diagnosed by morphological and genetic analyses in Korea. The complete mitochondrial genomes of Spirometra erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens isolated in Korea have been recorded. Present study was performed to provide information to diagnose the etiologic agent of sparganosis by multiplex PCR using mitochondrial genome sequences of S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens. In an effort to examine the differential diagnosis of spirometrid tapeworms, multiplex PCR assays were performed on plerocercoid larvae of S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens. The PCR products obtained using species-specific primers were positively detected in all PCR assays on mixture of S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens DNA. S. erinaceieuropaei-specific bands (239 bp and 401 bp) were obtained from all PCR assays using a mixture of S. erinaceieuropaei-specific primers (Se/Sd-1800F and Se-2018R; Se/Sd-7955F and Se-8356R) and S. erinaceieuropaei template DNA. S. decipiens-specific bands (540 bp and 644 bp) were also detected in all PCR assays containing mixtures of S. decipiens-specific primers (Se/Sd-1800F and Sd-2317R; Se/Sd-7955F and Sd-8567R) and S. decipiens template DNA. Sequence analyses on these species-specific bands revealed 100% sequence identity with homologous regions of the mtDNA sequences of S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens. The multiplex PCR assay was useful for differential diagnosis of human sparganosis by detecting different sizes in species-specific bands.


Subject(s)
Cestoda , Diagnosis, Differential , DNA , DNA, Mitochondrial , Genome, Mitochondrial , Humans , Korea , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sequence Analysis , Sparganosis , Sparganum , Spirometra
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742217

ABSTRACT

Morphological and molecular characteristics of spirometrid tapeworms, Spirometra decipiens, were studied, which were recovered from a heavily infected stray cat road-killed in Eumseong-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do (Province), the Republic of Korea (=Korea). A total of 134 scolices and many broken immature and mature proglottids of Spirometra tapeworms were collected from the small intestine of the cat. Morphological observations were based on 116 specimens. The scolex was 22.8–32.6 mm (27.4 mm in average) in length and small spoon-shape with 2 distinct bothria. The uterus was coiled 3–4 times, the end of the uterus was ball-shaped, and the vaginal aperture shaped as a crescent moon was closer to the cirrus aperture than to the uterine aperture. PCR amplification and direct sequencing of the cox1 target fragment (377 bp in length and corresponding to positions 769–1,146 bp of the cox1 gene) were performed using total genomic DNA extracted from 134 specimens. The cox1 sequences (377 bp) of the specimens showed 99.0% similarity to the reference sequence of S. decipiens and 89.3% similarity to the reference sequence of S. erinaceieuropaei. In the present study, we report a stray cat heavily infected with S. decipiens identified by mitochondrial cox1 sequence analysis and morphological examinations of the adult worms.


Subject(s)
Adult , Animals , Cats , Cestoda , DNA , Humans , Intestine, Small , Moon , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Republic of Korea , Sequence Analysis , Spirometra , Uterus
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717592

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sparganosis is a larval cestodiasis caused by the plerocercoid of Spirometra spp. Since the first description of human sparganosis in 1924, several hundred cases have been reported in Korea. However, systematic approaches for literature surveys of Korean sparganosis have seldom appeared. METHODS: We searched publicly available databases such as PubMed, Research Information Sharing Service, and Korea Medical Citation Index with relevant Medical Subject Headings. RESULTS: At least 438 Korean sparganosis cases have been described from 1924 to 2015. Preoperative diagnosis has been significantly increased since the 1980s due to popularization of serological and imaging diagnostics. Cases were largely detected from fifth decades in general, but cerebral sparganosis was detected in relatively young age groups (third and fourth decades). Sparganosis was prevalent in men (75.9%). Consumption of frog/snake and drinking unfiltered water were found in 63.4% and 16.9% of patients, respectively. Most frequently affected sites were subcutaneous tissues (49.9%), followed by the central nervous system (36.2%). Involvements of visceral organs (7.6%), ocular regions (3.6%), and muscles (2.7%) were noticed. In women, breast sparganosis constituted a large proportion (34.2%). Sparganosis associated with immunocompromised patients has recently been reported. CONCLUSION: Sparganosis has been continuously reported in Korea during the past 90 years, although its incidence has decreased during the last 20 years. The disease is mostly characterized by subcutaneous nodule, but infection of the worm in vital organs often results in serious illness. Continuous awareness is warranted to monitor sparganosis occurrence and associated clinical consequences.


Subject(s)
Breast , Central Nervous System , Diagnosis , Drinking , Female , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Incidence , Information Dissemination , Korea , Male , Medical Subject Headings , Muscles , Sparganosis , Sparganum , Spirometra , Subcutaneous Tissue , Water
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-203195

ABSTRACT

Sparganosis is a parasitic infection caused by the sparganum, the plercercoid of the genus Spirometra. The preoperative diagnosis of breast sparganosis is difficult in most cases because it is a rare parasitic infection less than 2% of all cases. We report a 62-year-old woman case of breast sparganosis that were confirmed by surgical removal of worms from the right breast. The radiologic images of the patient also revealed characteristic features of breast sparganosis. The patient described the migrating palpable breast mass, which strongly suggested the possibility of breast sparganosis. The treatment of choice and confirmative diagnosis for sparganosis are complete surgical extraction of the sparganum irrespective of infected site. Inspection of the mass site with detailed medical history and radiological examinations are important for preoperative diagnosis of sparganosis patients.


Subject(s)
Breast , Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Mammography , Middle Aged , Sparganosis , Sparganum , Spirometra , Ultrasonography
15.
Rev. bras. parasitol. vet ; 25(3): 374-377, July-Sept. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-795070

ABSTRACT

Abstract Parasitic diseases reflect the health and balance of ecosystems, affecting not only individuals but also entire populations or communities. The aim of this study was to report on the diversity of parasitic helminths detected in the feces of a wild feline in southern Brazil. Parasites were obtained from fecal samples, and four techniques were used for parasitological examination: direct examination, centrifugal flotation with zinc sulfate (Faust technique), simple sedimentation (Hoffman technique) and Baermann-Moraes. The parasites were identified through micrometry and morphology, as follows: Ancylostoma sp., Toxocara sp., Trichuridae, Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, Alaria sp., and Spirometra sp. We recorded the genus Ancylostoma parasitizing L. colocolo for the first time.


Resumo Doenças parasitárias refletem a saúde e o equilíbrio dos ecossistemas, influenciando não só um indivíduo e sim uma população ou comunidade. Este trabalho teve por objetivo relatar a diversidade de helmintos encontradas nas fezes de um felino silvestre na região Sul do Brasil. Os parasitos foram obtidos a partir de amostras fecais, sendo utilizadas quatro técnicas para os exames parasitológicos: exame direto, centrífugo-flutuação com sulfato de zinco (Técnica de Faust), sedimentação simples (Técnica de Hoffman) e Baermann-Moraes. Os parasitos foram identificados através de micrometria e morfologia, sendo esses: Ancylostoma sp., Toxocara sp., Trichuridae, Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, Alaria sp. e Spirometra sp. Estudos da fauna parasitária de animais silvestres são relevantes, tanto para o equilíbrio e saúde desses animais, como para o controle e prevenção de doenças transmitidas ao homem. Ancylostoma spp. foi identificado pela primeira vez em L. colocolo.


Subject(s)
Animals , Felidae/parasitology , Feces/parasitology , Helminths/isolation & purification , Spirometra/isolation & purification , Toxocara/isolation & purification , Trichuroidea/isolation & purification , Brazil , Strongylida/isolation & purification , Ancylostoma/isolation & purification
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-99315

ABSTRACT

The genus Spirometra belongs to the family Diphyllobothriidae and order Pseudophyllidea, and includes intestinal parasites of cats and dogs. In this study, a plerocercoid labeled as Spirometra mansonoides from the USA was examined for species identification and phylogenetic analysis using 2 complete mitochondrial genes, cytochrome c oxidase I (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (nad3). The cox1 sequences (1,566 bp) of the plerocercoid specimen (USA) showed 99.2% similarity to the reference sequences of the plerocercoid of Korean Spirometra decipiens (GenBank no. KJ599679), and 99.1% similarity in regard to nad3 (346 bp). Phylogenetic tree topologies generated using 4 analytical methods were identical and showed high confidence levels with bootstrap values of 1.00, 100%, 100%, and 100% for Bayesian inference (BI), maximum-likelihood (ML), neighbor-joining (NJ), and maximum parsimony (MP) methods, respectively. Representatives of Diphyllobothrium and Spirometra species formed a monophyletic group, and the sister-genera status between these species was well supported. Trapezoic proglottids in the posterior 1/5 region of an adult worm obtained from an experimentally infected cat were morphologically examined. The outer uterine loop of the uterus coiling characteristically consisted of 2 complete turns. The results clearly indicated that the examined Spirometra specimen from the USA matched to S. decipiens very well, and indicated possible presence of the life cycle of this species in this region.


Subject(s)
Adult , Animals , Cats , Diphyllobothrium , Dogs , Electron Transport Complex IV , Genes, Mitochondrial , Humans , Life Cycle Stages , NADH Dehydrogenase , Parasites , Sparganum , Spirometra , Trees , United States , Uterus
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-57433

ABSTRACT

Human sparganosis is a zoonotic disease caused by infection with larval forms (procercoid/plerocercoid) of Spirometra spp. The purpose of this study was to identify Spirometra spp. of infected snakes using a multiplex PCR assay and phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence data from the spargana of terrestrial snakes obtained from Korea and China. A total of 283 snakes were obtained that included 4 species of Colubridae comprising Rhabdophis tigrinus tigrinus (n=150), Dinodon rufozonatum rufozonatum (n=64), Elaphe davidi (n=2), and Elaphe schrenkii (n=7), and 1 species of Viperidae, Agkistrodon saxatilis (n=60). The snakes were collected from the provinces of Chungbuk, Chungnam, and Gyeongbuk in Korea (n=161), and from China (n=122). The overall infection rate with spargana was 83% (235/283). The highest was recorded for D. rufozonatum rufozonatum (100%), followed by A. saxatilis (85%) and R. tigrinus tigrinus (80%), with a negative result for E. davidi (0%) and E. schrenkii (0%). The sequence identities between the spargana from snakes (n=50) and Spirometra erinaceieuropaei (KJ599680) or S. decipiens (KJ599679) control specimens were 90.8% and 99.2%, respectively. Pairwise genetic distances between spargana (n=50) and S. decipiens ranged from 0.0080 to 0.0107, while those between spargana and S. erinaceieuropaei ranged from 0.1070 to 0.1096. In this study, all of the 904 spargana analyzed were identified as S. decipiens either by a multiplex PCR assay (n=854) or mitochondrial cox1 sequence analysis (n=50).


Subject(s)
Agkistrodon , China , Colubridae , DNA, Mitochondrial , Humans , Korea , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sequence Analysis , Snakes , Sparganosis , Sparganum , Spirometra , Viperidae , Zoonoses
18.
Rev. chil. infectol ; 32(4): 453-456, ago. 2015. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-762643

ABSTRACT

Brain sparganosis is a non-common parasite infection by Diphyllobothrium or Spirometra mansonoides larvae. This last one is responsible for most of the infestations in humans. We report a 19 years male patient bearer of a brain sparganosis. The patient presented with headache and left hemiparesis. CT diagnosis of right thalamic lesions was made and aspiration biopsy was performed using stereotactic system, obtaining a whole and death larvae. Histopathology confirms a CNS parasitism and it was treated initially with albendazol. ELISA test confirmed Spirometra spp. infestation. The patient developed asymptomatic with total remission of the lesions. It constitutes the second report in Cuba of brain sparganosis.


Se presenta el caso clínico de un varón con 19 años de edad y el diagnóstico de una esparganosis cerebral. Consultó por cefalea y una hemiparesia izquierda. En una tomografía computarizada cerebral con contraste se observaron lesiones talámicas derechas. Se realizó una biopsia cerebral guiada por estereotaxia con aspiración completa de un verme. En el estudio histopatológico se planteó un probable parasitismo de SNC y fue tratado inicialmente con albendazol. Se confirmó la infección por Spirometra spp. por test de ELISA. Evolucionó con regresión de síntomas y remisión imagenológica de las lesiones. Este caso constituye el segundo reporte en Cuba de una infestación cerebral por este parásito y aspiración estereotáctica de la larva de Spirometra spp.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Brain Diseases/diagnosis , Neurocysticercosis/diagnosis , Stereotaxic Techniques , Sparganosis/diagnosis , Sparganum/isolation & purification , Spirometra/isolation & purification , Biopsy, Needle , Brain Diseases/parasitology , Cuba , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Larva , Neurocysticercosis/parasitology , Spirometra/anatomy & histology
19.
Rev. peru. med. exp. salud publica ; 32(2): 391-394, abr.-jun. 2015. ilus, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS, LIPECS, INS-PERU | ID: lil-753278

ABSTRACT

La plerocercoidiosis es una zoonosis parasitaria producida por la larva plerocercoide de Spirometra. Esta larva migra por el tejido de la pared intestinal, mediante la ruta subcutánea y puede llegar a diferentes áreas del cuerpo humano como la cabeza, el cerebro y la órbita ocular. Se reporta el caso de un varón de 45 años procedente de la Amazonía peruana, quien presentó ardor asociado con edema y hemorragia conjuntival en el borde ocular externo del ojo derecho, durante once meses. Se observó un helminto localizado en la cavidad orbitaria derecha, el cual se extrajo y por estudios morfológicos e histopatológicos se identificó como Spirometra mansonoides de localización ocular el que se reporta por primera vez en el Perú.


Plerocercoidosis is a parasitic zoonosis caused by plerocercoid larvae of the genus Spirometra. The larvae migrate through the intestinal wall tissue, by subcutaneous route and can reach different areas of the body like the head, the brain and the eye socket. A case is reported of a 45 year-old man from the Peruvian Amazon with burning sensation associated with conjunctival edema and hemorrhage in the outer eye border of the right eye for eleven months. A localized worm in the right orbital cavity was observed, which was extracted. Morphological and histopathological studies identified it as Spirometra mansonoides localized in the eye, which is the first case reported in Perú.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Sparganum , Spirometra , Zoonoses , Peru
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-225151

ABSTRACT

The present study was performed to compare the mitochondrial genomes between 2 Spirometra tapeworms, Spirometra erinaceieuropaei and Spirometra decipiens (Cestoidea: Diphyllobothriidae), which larval stages are important etiological agents of sparganosis in humans. For each species, the full mitochondrial genome was amplified in 8 overlapping fragments using total genomic DNA purified from a single worm as the template. The mitochondrial genomes were 13,643 bp (S. erinaceieuropaei) and 13,641 bp (S. decipiens) in length and contained 36 genes; 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA, small and large subunits), and 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs). The 12 protein-coding genes constituted 10,083 bp (S. erinaceieuropaei) and 10,086 bp (S. decipiens) of their respective mitochondrial genomes. The tRNA genes, ranging in length from 56 to 70 bp, were identified based on putative secondary structures such as the typical cloverleaf shape. A total of 23 intergenic sequences, varying from 1 to 204 bp in size, were interspersed in S. erinaceieuropaei (total, 504 bp) and S. decipiens (total, 496 bp) mtDNA. The 12 protein-coding genes of S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens differed by 12.4%, whereas the overall difference in mtDNA sequence between S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens was 12.9%. Thus, from the standpoint of the mitochondrial genome, S. decipiens represents a valid species that can be distinguished from S. erinaceieuropaei.


Subject(s)
Animals , Base Sequence , Cestode Infections/parasitology , DNA, Mitochondrial/chemistry , Genome, Helminth , Genome, Mitochondrial , Humans , Molecular Sequence Data , Nucleic Acid Conformation , Open Reading Frames , Phylogeny , Spirometra/chemistry
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