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1.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190720, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1134776

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective This study evaluated the clinical effect of violet LED light on in-office bleaching used alone or combined with 37% carbamide peroxide (CP) or 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP). Methodology A total of 100 patients were divided into five groups (n=20): LED, LED/CP, CP, LED/HP and HP. Colorimetric evaluation was performed using a spectrophotometer (ΔE, ΔL, Δa, Δb) and a visual shade guide (ΔSGU). Calcium (Ca)/phosphorous (P) ratio was quantified in the enamel microbiopsies. Measurements were performed at baseline (T 0 ), after bleaching (T B ) and in the 14-day follow-up (T 14 ). At each bleaching session, a visual scale determined the absolute risk (AR) and intensity of tooth sensitivity (TS). Data were evaluated by one-way (ΔE, Δa, ΔL, Δb), two-way repeated measures ANOVA (Ca/P ratio), and Tukey post-hoc tests. ΔSGU and TS were evaluated by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney, and AR by Chi-Squared tests (a=5%). Results LED produced the lowest ΔE (p<0.05), but LED/HP promoted greater ΔE, ΔSGU and Δb (T 14 ) than HP (p<0.05). No differences were observed in ΔE and ΔSGU for LED/CP and HP groups (p>0.05). ΔL and Δa were not influenced by LED activation. After bleaching, LED/CP exhibited greater Δb than CP (p>0.05), but no differences were found between these groups at T 14 (p>0.05). LED treatment promoted the lowest risk of TS (16%), while HP promoted the highest (94.4%) (p<0.05). No statistical differences of risk of TS were found for CP (44%), LED/CP (61%) and LED/HP (88%) groups (p>0.05). No differences were found in enamel Ca/P ratio among treatments, regardless of evaluation times. Conclusions Violet LED alone produced the lowest bleaching effect, but enhanced HP bleaching results. Patients treated with LED/CP reached the same efficacy of HP, with reduced risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity and none of the bleaching protocols adversely affected enamel mineral content.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Phototherapy/methods , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Carbamide Peroxide/administration & dosage , Hydrogen Peroxide/administration & dosage , Light , Reference Values , Spectrophotometry , Surface Properties/drug effects , Surface Properties/radiation effects , Risk Factors , Analysis of Variance , Treatment Outcome , Colorimetry , Combined Modality Therapy , Statistics, Nonparametric , Dental Enamel/drug effects , Dental Enamel/radiation effects , Dentin Sensitivity/chemically induced
2.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20170367, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-954509

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives: To study the intensity of inflammatory infiltrate and production of interleukin-1β (ll-1β), tumor necrosis factor-β (TNF-β), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and osteocalcin in response to in-office tooth bleaching in rats. Material and Methods: Twenty male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups (n=5) according to the received treatment (tooth bleaching or no treatment - control) and the period of euthanasia after treatment (24 h or 10 days). We performed tooth bleaching using a 38% hydrogen peroxide gel on maxillary and mandibular incisors. After euthanasia, incisors (20 per group) were processed for histological analysis, immunohistochemistry staining of ll-1β, TNF-β, FGF-2 and GPX and osteocalcin by immunofluorescence. We analyzed data using the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn tests (p<0.05). Results: The bleached groups presented statistically significant differences regarding the pulp inflammation stage compared with the control groups. Bleached teeth showed moderate/severe inflammatory infiltrate and control groups presented absent inflammatory cells or a negligible number of mononuclear cells (p<0.001) at two times (24 h and 10 days). There was strong staining for ll-1β, TNF-β, and GPX in bleached groups at 24 h and strong staining for ll-1β, TNF-β, GPX and FGF-2 at 10 days. After 10 days of tooth bleaching, the bleached group showed a statistically superior amount of osteocalcin than the other groups (p<0.01). Conclusions: Tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide causes severe pulp inflammation, but characteristics of tissue repair after 10 days.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Pulpitis/chemically induced , Pulpitis/pathology , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Hydrogen Peroxide/adverse effects , Pulpitis/metabolism , Time Factors , Immunohistochemistry , Random Allocation , Osteocalcin/biosynthesis , Fibroblast Growth Factor 2/biosynthesis , Lymphotoxin-alpha/biosynthesis , Rats, Wistar , Interleukin-1beta/biosynthesis , Glutathione Peroxidase/biosynthesis , Microscopy, Fluorescence
3.
J. appl. oral sci ; 26: e20170573, 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-954500

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives A single-blinded, randomized, parallel clinical trial evaluated the use of 37% carbamide peroxide (CP) on bleaching effectiveness and tooth sensitivity reported by patients undergoing in-office tooth bleaching, in comparison with the results of using 35% hydrogen peroxide. Material and Methods Forty patients were allocated to receive two sessions of in-office tooth bleaching using either 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) or 37% CP. Each patient's sensitivity level was evaluated during and up to 24 h after bleaching. The effectiveness of the bleaching procedures was evaluated with a spectrophotometer one week after each session and 30 days after the last session. The impact of tooth bleaching on the patients' perceptions regarding smile changes, in addition to the bleaching procedures and their results, were also recorded. Absolute and relative sensitivity risks were calculated. Data on sensitivity level were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney or T-test, and data from the color evaluation were subjected to 2-way repeated measures ANOVA. Results The use of CP reduced the risk and level of tooth sensitivity to values close to zero, whereas the difference between the bleaching agents disappeared after 24 h. An increased bleaching effect was observed for HP, mainly due to an improved reduction of redness and yellowness. Participants perceived improved tooth bleaching for HP and reduced sensitivity for CP, but no differences regarding the comfort of the techniques were noted. Conclusions In our study, 37% CP resulted in reduced tooth sensitivity but decreased the tooth bleaching effectiveness. However, both bleaching agents resulted in high levels of patient satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Young Adult , Peroxides/administration & dosage , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Urea/analogs & derivatives , Dentin/drug effects , Dentin Sensitivity/prevention & control , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Hydrogen Peroxide/administration & dosage , Peroxides/adverse effects , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Urea/administration & dosage , Urea/adverse effects , Single-Blind Method , Reproducibility of Results , Risk Factors , Analysis of Variance , Treatment Outcome , Statistics, Nonparametric , Risk Assessment , Dentin Sensitivity/chemically induced , Tooth Bleaching Agents/adverse effects , Visual Analog Scale , Carbamide Peroxide , Hydrogen Peroxide/adverse effects
4.
J. appl. oral sci ; 24(2): 171-180, Mar.-Apr. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-779901

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Hydrogen Peroxide/administration & dosage , Time Factors , Cell Count , Reproducibility of Results , Rats, Wistar , Models, Animal , Dental Pulp/pathology , Dental Pulp Cavity , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Gels , Odontoblasts/drug effects
5.
J. appl. oral sci ; 24(1): 95-104, Jan.-Feb. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-777358

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Dental materials, in general, are tested in different animal models prior to their clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals (control) were untreated. The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell counting in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. The counting of fibroblasts was also performed. Scores were attributed to the odontoblastic layer and to vascular changes. The tertiary dentin area and the pulp chamber central area were histomorphometrically measured. Data were compared by the analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the occlusal third of the coronal pulp until the time of 15 min for both concentrations of bleaching gels. In 30 and 45 min groups of each concentration, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, a reduction in the pulp chamber central area and an enlargement of tertiary dentin area were observed without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extra coronal bleaching showed to be adequate for bleaching protocols studies, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and in the tooth structure caused by different concentrations and periods of application of bleaching agents.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Hydrogen Peroxide/administration & dosage , Time Factors , Cell Count , Reproducibility of Results , Rats, Wistar , Models, Animal , Dental Pulp/pathology , Dental Pulp Cavity , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Gels , Odontoblasts/drug effects
6.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 29(1): 1-7, 2015. tab, ilus
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-777205

ABSTRACT

The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of in-office bleaching and associated tooth sensitivity on application of nano-calcium phosphate paste as desensitizing agent. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel in 40 patients who were randomly divided into placebo and nano-calcium phosphate paste groups. Bleaching efficacy (BE) was evaluated using a value-oriented Vita shade guide. Tooth sensitivity was recorded using a numeric rating scale (0–4) during bleaching and up to 48 h after each session. The primary outcome of absolute risk of tooth sensitivity was compared using the Fisher’s exact test (α = 0.05). The intensity of tooth sensitivity and the efficacy of in-office bleaching were also statistically evaluated. No significant differences in absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity were detected between the groups (p = 1.0 and p = 0.53, respectively). BE was also found to be similar between the groups (p = 0.67). Although the use of a nano-calcium phosphate paste associated with fluoride and potassium nitrate did not influence the whitening outcome, but it also did not reduce bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Calcium Phosphates/administration & dosage , Dentin Desensitizing Agents/administration & dosage , Dentin Sensitivity/chemically induced , Hydrogen Peroxide/administration & dosage , Nitrates/administration & dosage , Potassium Compounds/administration & dosage , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Calcium Phosphates/adverse effects , Double-Blind Method , Hydrogen Peroxide/adverse effects , Nitrates/adverse effects , Potassium Compounds/adverse effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/adverse effects , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Discoloration/drug therapy
7.
Salusvita ; 34(2)2015. ilus, tab
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-775832

ABSTRACT

Frente aos efeitos deletérios da reabsorção cervical externa, é de grande importância a confecção do tampão cervical quando do clareamento de dentes despolpados. Objetivo: este estudo avaliou a influência do perborato de sódio (PS) e o número de aplicações na desadaptação marginal do tampão cervical. Metodologia: Vinte e quatro pré-molares inferiores foram divididos em três grupos (n=8), de acordo com o material utilizado na confecção do tampão: Cimento de Ionômero de Vidro (CIV), Bioplic (BP) e Agregado de Trióxido Mineral branco (MTA B). Após a aplicação dos materiais, os espécimes foram aplainados e registrados por uma câmera fotográfica acoplada ao Esteromicroscópio. O PS diluído em soro fisiológico foi acomodado sobre os tampões e em seguida selados por 15 dias. Em seguida, o PS foi removido e novas imagens realizadas no Estereomicroscópio. Este ciclo foi repetido, determinando três períodos de avaliação. A desadaptação marginal foi calculada por meio do Software Image J, e os dados submetidos ao teste estatístico de Kruskal-wallis com post-hoc de Dunn para comparação intergrupos (α menor ou igual a 0,05), e teste de Friedman para comparação intragrupos (α menor ou igual a 0,05). Resultados: Verificou-se um aumento significativo na desadaptação marginal do BP e CIV entre os períodos controle e 2ª sessão. Na comparação intergrupos, o MTA B apresentou maior desadaptação quando comparado ao BP em todos os períodos. Conclusão: o PS foi capaz de aumentar a desadaptação marginal de dois materiais após 30 dias, e o MTA B seria o material menos indicado para confecção do tampão cervical...


Due to the deleterious effects of the external cervical resorption, it is extremely important the use of an appropriate cervical barrier in non-vital bleaching. Objective: this study evaluated the influence of sodium perborate (SP) and the number of its application on cervical barrier marginal misfit. Methods: twenty- four human premolars were divided into 3 groups (n=8) according to the material used in manufacture of barrier: Glass Ionomer cement (GIC), Bioplic (BP) and white Mineral Trioxide aggregate (W MTA). After the application of the materials, specimens were planed and registered with a camera mounted in a stereomicroscope. SP diluted in saline was accommodated on the barrier and then sealed for 15 days. Afterwards SP was removed and images were again obtained with stereomicroscope. This cycle was repeated once more, determine three periods of evaluation. Marginal misfit was obtained through Image J software, and the data was subjected to two-way analysis of variance, followed by Tukey post-hoc test (α or less 0,05). Results: there was a significant increase in the marginal misfit of BP and CIV between periods control and 2nd session. In the intergroup comparison, the MTA B showed larger marginal misfit when compared to BP in all periods. Conclusion: the PS was able to increase marginal misfit of 2 materials after 30 days, and the MTA B would be less suitable for making the cervical barrier...


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Hydrogen Peroxide/adverse effects , Root Resorption
8.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-154523

ABSTRACT

Context: The possibility of bleaching vital teeth with peroxide-based products considerably revolutionized esthetic dentistry. Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate tooth color change and dental sensitivity after exposure to preloaded film containing a 10% hydrogen peroxide whitening system (Opalescence Trθswhite Supreme). Materials and Methods: A total of 13 volunteers, aged 18 to 25 years, participated in this study. The patients used the whitening system once a day for 60 minutes during the 8-day study. For maxillary incisors and canines, the color change was visually evaluated with the Vita color scale before, immediately, and six months after the treatment. Tooth sensitivity was evaluated during the daily gel applications. All whitening applications were done in office and under the supervision of a dental professional. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were analyzed using the Friedman Test (nonparametric repeated measures ANOVA) at a level of 5%, and Dunn's Multiple Comparison Test at the level of 5%. Results: It was verified that the original mean color values observed at the baseline analysis differed significantly from those observed immediately after bleaching, as well as from those seen in the analysis at six months ( P = 0.001). There was no significant difference between the mean color values observed in the immediate time and in the analysis at six months ( P = 0.474). No tooth sensitivity was observed in any patients. Conclusion: It was concluded that the bleaching technique using the 10% hydrogen peroxide system was effective in a short period of time without tooth sensitivity during applications.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Clinical Trials as Topic , Dentin Sensitivity/etiology , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage
9.
J. appl. oral sci ; 21(3): 265-270, May/Jun/2013. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-679333

ABSTRACT

Light-activated tooth bleaching with a high hydrogen peroxide (HP; H2O2) concentration has risks and the actual role of the light source is doubtful. The use of conventional light might result in an increase in the temperature and cause thermal damage to the health of the tooth tissue. Objective This study investigated the efficacy of tooth bleaching using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NAPP) with 15% carbamide peroxide (CP; CH6N2O3) including 5.4% HP, as compared with conventional light sources. Material and Methods Forty human teeth were randomly divided into four groups: Group I (CP+NAPP), Group II (CP+plasma arc lamp; PAC), Group III (CP+diode laser), and Group IV (CP alone). Color changes (∆E) of the tooth and tooth surface temperatures were measured. Data were evaluated by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's tests. Results Group I showed the highest bleaching efficacy, with a ∆E value of 1.92-, 2.61 and 2.97-fold greater than those of Groups II, III and IV, respectively (P<0.05). The tooth surface temperature was maintained around 37°C in Group I, but it reached 43°C in Groups II and III. Conclusions The NAPP has a greater capability for effective tooth bleaching than conventional light sources with a low concentration of HP without causing thermal damage. Tooth bleaching using NAPP can become a major technique for in-office bleaching in the near future. .


Subject(s)
Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Plasma Gases/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Analysis of Variance , Hydrogen Peroxide/administration & dosage , Laser Therapy , Lasers, Semiconductor , Light , Random Allocation , Reproducibility of Results , Temperature , Time Factors , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage
10.
Belo Horizonte; s.n; 2012. 95 p. ilus, graf.
Thesis in Portuguese | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-715979

ABSTRACT

Embora eficientes quanto ao aspecto estético, as técnicas de clareamento endógeno ainda apresentam graus variáveis de toxidade e muitas vezes podem levar ao desenvolvimento de reabsorção cervical inflamatória. Neste estudo, avaliou-se a resposta imune aos efeitos da aplicação de agentes clareadores tradicionalmente utilizados na clínica, assim como os de agentes reparadores utilizados no tratamento destas alterações. Inoculou-se, os agentes clareadores, perborato de sódio misturado ao peróxido de hidrogênio...


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Osteoclasts , Peroxides/administration & dosage , Root Resorption/chemically induced , Immunity, Mucosal , Bone Resorption/therapy
11.
Braz. dent. j ; 22(1): 32-36, 2011. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-582398

ABSTRACT

This study evaluated the influence of bleaching protocols on intrapulpal temperature and fracture strength of the bleached teeth. Ninety maxillary incisors were assigned to 9 groups (n=10): G1: 35 percent carbamide peroxide (35 percent CP), G2: 38 percent hydrogen peroxide (38 percent HP), G3: halogen light, G4: LED-laser, G5: 35 percent CP + halogen light, G6: 38 percent HP + halogen light, G7: 35 percent CP + LED-laser, G8: 38 percent HP + LED-laser, and G9: no treatment (control). Pulp space was widened, a thermocouple was introduced through the apex up to the pulp chamber and the temperature was recorded (°C). The fracture strength (kN) was determined using an Instron machine. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05). The halogen light alone (1.10 ± 0.24) (G3) and associated with 38 percent HP (1.15 ± 0.30) (G6) produced the highest temperature increase, statistically different (p<0.05) from the other groups. G1 (0.15 ± 0.06) and G6 (0.19 ± 0.07) produced the lowest values, statistically different (p<0.05) from G5 (0.65 ± 0.49). The bleaching protocols increased the temperature, but no increment exceeded the critical value of 5.6°C. Neither 35 percent CP nor 38 percent HP or the light sources alone altered the fracture strength of the teeth.


Este estudo avaliou a influência de protocolos de clareamento na temperatura intrapulpar e resistência à fratura de dentes clareados. Noventa incisivos superiores foram divididos em 9 grupos (n=10): G1: peróxido de carbamida a 35 por cento (PC 35 por cento), G2: peróxido de hidrogênio a 38 por cento (PH 38 por cento), G3: luz halógena, G4: LED-laser, G5: PC 35 por cento + luz halógena, G6: PH 38 por cento + luz halógena, G7: PC 35 por cento + LED-laser, G8: PH 38 por cento + LED-laser e G9: sem tratamento (controle). O canal radicular foi alargado, um termopar foi introduzido no ápice até a câmara pulpar e a temperatura foi calculada (°C). A resistência à fratura (kN) foi determinada em máquina Instron. Os dados foram analisados por análise de variância e teste de Tukey (p>0,05). A luz halógena utilizada isoladamente (1,10 ± 0,24) (G3) e associada ao PH 38 por cento (1,15 ± 0,30) (G6) proporcionaram os maiores valores de temperatura, sendo estatisticamente diferentes dos demais grupos (p<0,05). O G1 (0,15 ± 0,06) e o G6 (0,19 ± 0,07) produziram os menores valores de resistência à fratura, sendo estatisticamente diferentes (p<0,05) do G5 (0,65 ± 0,49). Os protocolos de clareamento aumentaram a temperatura, mas nenhum incremento excedeu o valor crítico de 5,6oC. O PC 35 por cento, PH 38 por cento e as fontes de luz utilizadas isoladamente não alteraram a resistência à fratura dos dentes.


Subject(s)
Humans , Body Temperature/drug effects , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Fractures/prevention & control , Curing Lights, Dental , Dental Stress Analysis , Dental Pulp/physiology , Hydrogen Peroxide/administration & dosage , Incisor/drug effects , Lasers, Semiconductor , Maxilla , Peroxides/administration & dosage , Tooth Bleaching Agents/adverse effects , Tooth Bleaching/adverse effects , Tooth Fractures/etiology , Urea/administration & dosage , Urea/analogs & derivatives
12.
Braz. dent. j ; 22(2): 117-121, 2011. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-583799

ABSTRACT

This study evaluated the fracture resistance of teeth submitted to internal bleaching and restored with different procedures. Forty maxillary incisors were endodontically treated and assigned to 4 groups (n=10): G1- restored with composite resin (CR), G2- bleached with hydrogen peroxide (HP) and restored with CR, G3- restored with CR and fiberglass posts (CR + posts) and G4- bleached and restored with CR + posts. HP was applied in the buccal surface and pulp chamber 3 times at each one of 2 sessions with an interval of 7 days between them. Additional 10 sound incisors were subjected to fracture strength test (gold standard). The fracture strength (kN) was determined in an Instron machine. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test (α=0.05). The untreated teeth (gold standard) showed the highest (p<0.05) fracture strength (0.43 ± 0.16). Teeth restored with CR (G1) without internal bleaching had the lowest (p<0.05) fracture strength (0.23 ± 0.11). Teeth bleached and restored with CR (G2) (0.26 ± 0.10), restored with CR + posts ithout internal bleaching (G3) (0.31 ± 0.17) and, bleached and restored with CR + posts (G4) (0.33 ± 0.12) had intermediate values, sometimes similar to the group with the highest value, sometimes similar to the group with the lowest value. In conclusion, as far as the fracture strength is concerned, teeth subjected to internal bleaching can be restored with composite resin alone, as the use of posts in these teeth did not increase their resistance.


Este estudo avaliou a resistência à fratura de dentes submetidos ao clareamento interno restaurados com diferentes procedimentos. Quarenta incisivos superiores foram tratados endodonticamente e divididos em 4 grupos (n = 10): G1- restaurados com resina composta (RC), G2- clareados com peróxido de hidrogênio (PH) e restaurados com o RC, G3- restaurado com RC e pinos de fibra de vidro (RC + pinos) e G4- clareados e restaurados com RC + pinos. O PH foi aplicado na superfície vestibular e câmara pulpar 3 vezes por sessão, por 2 sessões com intervalo de 7 dias entre elas. Dez dentes hígidos adicionais foram submetidos a teste fratura (padrão ouro). A resistência à fratura (kN) foi determinada em máquina Instron. Os dados foram analisados por Análise de Variânica e teste de Tukey-Krammer (α= 0,05). Os dentes não tratados (padrão ouro) apresentaram a maior resistência à fratura (0,43 ± 0,16) (p <0,05). Os dentes restaurados com RC (G1) apresentaram a menor resistência à fratura (0,23 ± 0,11) (p <0,05). Os dentes clareados e restaurados com RC (G2) (0,26 ± 0,10), restaurado com RC + pinos (G3) (0,31 ± 0,17) e os clareados e restaurados com RC + pinos (G4) (0,33 ± 0,12) apresentaram valores intermediários, ora semelhantes ao do grupo com o maior valor, ora similares ao grupo de valores mais baixos. Pode-se concluir que os dentes submetidos ao clareamento interno podem ser restaurados com apenas resina composta.


Subject(s)
Humans , Dental Restoration, Permanent/methods , Post and Core Technique , Tooth Bleaching/methods , Tooth Fractures/prevention & control , Tooth, Nonvital/physiopathology , Analysis of Variance , Composite Resins , Dental Restoration Failure , Dental Stress Analysis , Glass , Hydrogen Peroxide/administration & dosage , Statistics, Nonparametric , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Tooth Fractures/etiology
13.
Acta odontol. latinoam ; 23(3): 249-256, Dec. 2010. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-949671

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching agents (10% and 16% carbamide peroxide) on the roughness of two dental ceramics in vitro, and to analyze the surface by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Two bleaching agents (10% and 16% / Whiteness, FGM Gel) and two microparticle feldspathic ceramics (Vita VM7 and Vita VM13) were used. Forty disks of Vita VM7 and Vita VM13 ceramic were manufactured, measuring 4mm in diameter and 4mm high, in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and were divided into 4 groups (n=10): (1) VM7 + Whiteness 10%; (2) VM7 + Whiteness 16%; (3) VM13 + Whiteness 10%; (4) VM13 + Whiteness 16%. The bleaching agent was applied for 8 hours a day for 15 days and during the intervals the test specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C. The roughness (Ra) of the test specimens was evaluated before and after exposure to the bleaching agents using a laser roughness meter and the topographic description was analyzed by SEM. The statistical analysis of roughness data showed significant differences in the VM7 groups, using paired t-test, p=0.05 (VM7 + Whiteness 10%: p=0.002; VM7 + Whiteness 16%: p=0.001) and two-sample t-test (VM7 p=0,047), and no significant difference was found among VM13 groups. The qualitative SEM analysis showed different degrees of surface changes. The results suggest that the roughness of the tested ceramic surfaces increased after exposure to the bleaching agents.


O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar o efeito de agente clareador (10% e 16% de peroxido de carbamida) na rugosidade de duas ceramicas dentais in vitro e analisar a superficie atraves da microscopia eletronica de varredura (SEM). Foram utilizados dois agentes clareadores (10% e 16% / Whiteness, FGM Gel) e duas ceramicas feldspaticas microparticuladas (Vita VM7 e Vita VM13). Foram confeccionados quarenta discos de ceramica Vita VM7 e Vita VM13, com 4mm de diametro e 4mm de altura, de acordo com as recomendacoes do fabricante, sendo divididos em 4 grupos (n=10): G1- VM7 + Whiteness 10%, G2- VM7 + Whiteness 16%, G3- VM13 + Whiteness 10% e G4- VM13 + Whiteness 16%. O agente clareador foi aplicado por 8 horas durante 15 dias e durante os intervalos os corpos de prova (cp) ficavam armazenados em agua destilada a 37°C. A rugosidade (Ra) dos cp foi avaliada antes e apos a exposicao aos agentes clareadores utilizando o rugosimetro a laser Perthomether S8P, e a descricao topografica foi analisada no MEV. A analise estatistica na rugosidade mostrou diferenca significante entre os grupos da VM7, usando o teste pareado, p=0.05 (VM7 + Whiteness 10%: p=0.002; VM7 + Whiteness 16%: p=0.001) e nao foi encontrado diferenca estatistica para os grupos da VM13. A descricao qualitativa no SEM evidenciou alteracao nas superficies em diferentes graus. Os resultados sugeriram que as superficies das ceramicas testadas aumentaram a rugosidade apos a exposicao ao agente clareador.


Subject(s)
Humans , Peroxides/chemistry , Urea/analogs & derivatives , Dental Porcelain/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/chemistry , Peroxides/administration & dosage , Surface Properties , Temperature , Time Factors , Urea/administration & dosage , Urea/chemistry , Materials Testing , Water/chemistry , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Ceramics/chemistry , Potassium Compounds/chemistry , Aluminum Silicates/chemistry , Tooth Bleaching Agents/administration & dosage , Carbamide Peroxide , Gels , Lasers
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