Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 33
Filter
1.
Rev. argent. salud publica ; 13: 1-7, 5/02/2021.
Article in Spanish | LILACS, BINACIS, ARGMSAL | ID: biblio-1284450

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCCIÓN: Los envenenamientos producidos por escorpiones son un problema de salud pública en constante aumento en Argentina y el mundo. Por diversas causas, los ensambles de animales venenosos de una región varían en el tiempo. El objetivo de este trabajo fue presentar la información reciente y actualizar el elenco de escorpiones de la provincia de Misiones. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo observacional a partir de la revisión de los ejemplares depositados en la Colección de Herpetología y Arácnidos del Instituto Nacional de Medicina Tropical. RESULTADOS: Se obtuvieron los primeros registros para la provincia de Tityus confluens, mientras que nuevos registros de accidentes con Tityus trivittatus ampliaron la zona de presencia de la especie en la provincia. El ensamble de escorpiones de Misiones reúne a las cuatro especies de interés médico del país. DISCUSIÓN: La detección del elenco de escorpiones de interés médico más importante del país fue consecuencia del trabajo conjunto entre los especialistas de los distintos grupos de animales ponzoñosos y los profesionales de la salud. Es importante generar y profundizar los espacios de interacción de saberes, con el objetivo de mejorar la Vigilancia de la Salud


Subject(s)
Scorpions , Toxicology , Travel Medicine , Public Health Surveillance , Ecoepidemiology
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765054

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pre-travel medical consultation is essential to reduce health impairment during travel. Yellow fever vaccination (YFV) is mandatory to enter some endemic countries. In this study, we evaluated the factors that affect compliance with appropriate prevention of infectious diseases in travelers who visited clinic for YFV. METHODS: For this retrospective study, chart reviews for 658 patients who visited a travel clinic for YFV before travel were conducted. The period of this study was from January 2016 to September 2018. The associations between appropriate vaccination and factors such as travel duration, destination, time of visiting clinic before departure, and purpose of travel were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 658 patients who got YFV during the study period, 344 patients (52.3%) received additional vaccination or malaria prophylaxis following a physician's recommendation. Travelers who visited the clinic more than 21 days before departure were more compliant than those who visited 14 days or fewer before departure (odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23–2.93; P = 0.004). Travelers visiting Africa were more compliant than were those traveling to South and Central America (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.34–2.90; P = 0.001). Travelers in age groups of 40-49 years and over 70 years were less compliant than the 18–29 years old population (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.28–0.93; P = 0.027 and OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.04–0.84; P = 0.03, respectively). Also, those who traveled for tour or to visit friends or relatives were more compliant than those who departed for business (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 1.03–3.56; P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: For appropriate vaccination, pre-travel consultation at least 3 weeks before departure is crucial. Travelers should be aware of required vaccination and malaria prophylaxis before visiting South and Central America and Asia. Plans to enhance compliance of the elderly and business travelers should be contrived.


Subject(s)
Africa , Aged , Asia , Central America , Commerce , Communicable Diseases , Compliance , Friends , Humans , Malaria , Patient Compliance , Retrospective Studies , Travel Medicine , Vaccination , Yellow Fever , Yellow Fever Vaccine
4.
Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop ; 51(2): 125-132, Mar.-Apr. 2018. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-897061

ABSTRACT

Abstract Providing advice for travelers embarking on long-term trips poses a challenge in travel medicine. A long duration of risk exposure is associated with underuse of protective measures and poor adherence to chemoprophylaxis, increasing the chances of acquiring infections. Recently, in our clinic, we observed an increase in the number of travelers undertaking round-the-world trips. These individuals are typically aged around 32 years and quit their jobs to embark on one-to-two-year journeys. Their destinations include countries in two or more continents, invariably Southeast Asia and Indonesia, and mostly involve land travel and visiting rural areas. Such trips involve flexible plans, increasing the challenge, especially with regard to malaria prophylaxis. Advising round-the-world travelers is time-consuming because of the amount of information that must be provided to the traveler. Advisors must develop strategies to commit the traveler to his/her own health, and verify their learnings on disease-prevention measures. Contacting the advisor after the appointment or during the trip can be helpful to clarify unclear instructions or diagnosis made and prescriptions given abroad. Infectious diseases are among the most frequent problems affecting travelers, many of which are preventable by vaccines, medicines, and precautionary measures. The dissemination of counterfeit medicines, particularly antibiotics and antimalarial medicines, emphasizes the need for travelers to carry medicines that they may possibly need on their trip. Additional advice on altitude, scuba diving, and other possible risks may also be given. Considering the difficulties in advising this group, we present a review of the main recommendations on advising these travelers.


Subject(s)
Humans , Travel , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Travel Medicine/trends , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Counseling
5.
Epidemiology and Health ; : e2018043-2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-721238

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The 2017 guideline for the prevention of travelers' diarrhea (TD) by the International Society of Travel Medicine suggested that ‘there is insufficient evidence to recommend the use of commercially available prebiotics or probiotics to prevent or treat TD.’ However, a meta-analysis published in 2007 reported significant efficacy of probiotics in the prevention of TD (summary relative risk [sRR], 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 0.91). This study aimed to synthesize the efficacy of probiotics on TD by updating the meta-analysis of double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized human trials. METHODS: The search process was conducted by the adaptive meta-analysis method using the ‘cited by’ and ‘similar articles’ options provided by PubMed. The inclusion criteria were double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized human trials with hypotheses of probiotics as intervention and TD as an outcome. The adaptive meta-analysis was conducted using Stata software using the csi, metan, metafunnel, and metabias options. RESULTS: Eleven articles were selected for the meta-analysis. The sRR was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.91) and showed statistical significance. There was no heterogeneity (I-squared=28.4%) and no publication bias. CONCLUSIONS: Probiotics showed statistically significant efficacy in the prevention of TD.


Subject(s)
Diarrhea , Humans , Methods , Population Characteristics , Prebiotics , Probiotics , Publication Bias , Travel Medicine
6.
Epidemiology and Health ; : 2018043-2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786831

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The 2017 guideline for the prevention of travelers' diarrhea (TD) by the International Society of Travel Medicine suggested that ‘there is insufficient evidence to recommend the use of commercially available prebiotics or probiotics to prevent or treat TD.’ However, a meta-analysis published in 2007 reported significant efficacy of probiotics in the prevention of TD (summary relative risk [sRR], 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 0.91). This study aimed to synthesize the efficacy of probiotics on TD by updating the meta-analysis of double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized human trials.METHODS: The search process was conducted by the adaptive meta-analysis method using the ‘cited by’ and ‘similar articles’ options provided by PubMed. The inclusion criteria were double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized human trials with hypotheses of probiotics as intervention and TD as an outcome. The adaptive meta-analysis was conducted using Stata software using the csi, metan, metafunnel, and metabias options.RESULTS: Eleven articles were selected for the meta-analysis. The sRR was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.91) and showed statistical significance. There was no heterogeneity (I-squared=28.4%) and no publication bias.CONCLUSIONS: Probiotics showed statistically significant efficacy in the prevention of TD.


Subject(s)
Diarrhea , Humans , Methods , Population Characteristics , Prebiotics , Probiotics , Publication Bias , Travel Medicine
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-751153

ABSTRACT

@#As air travelling now becomes cheaper and available to almost all people of any walk of life, travelling across international borders is fast becoming a lifestyle of many. Having travel health service as part of health care services is important to address the issues of travel related illnesses among travellers. However, lacks of published guidelines pertaining to travel health service rendering many countries to overlook its importance. The aim of this paper is to review published literatures and authoritative websites on the components needed to develop guideline to establish travel health services. A systematic literature search was done using pre-specified keywords for literatures published between years 2000 – 2016. Literatures written in English and fully accessible were all included. No exclusion criteria was set before the search. Online authoritative websites pertaining to travel health were also referred. A total of six literatures ranging from expert opinion, review paper and original study, together with three authoritative websites related to travel health were reviewed. Among the important components needed to be considered for developing the guideline for establishing travel health services are to prioritise pre-travel health service, to set up specialised travel health clinic, to produce travel health/medicine specialist, to emphasize on continuous education and training of the practitioners and to apply multiagency and multidisciplinary approach with adequate fund for research in travel health. As a conclusion, policy makers should prioritise and select the most important components in developing guideline for travel health service.


Subject(s)
Travel Medicine
9.
Weekly Epidemiological Monitor. 2017; 10 (27): 1
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-187419

ABSTRACT

Middle East respiratory syndrome [MERS] is a global health concern given that the origin and transmissibility pattern of the MERS coronavirus is, as yet, unclear. Since April 2012, around 224 MERS cases including 40 associated deaths [CFR–17.9%] have been reported in 19 countries outside the Arabian Peninsula [Bahrain, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen] where patients had a history of travel to, or were secondary to patients with a history of travel to the Arabian Peninsula


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adult , Travel Medicine , Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-70883

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Travel-related risks for infectious diseases vary depending on travel patterns such as purpose, destination, and duration. In this study, we describe the patterns of travel and prescription of vaccines as well as malaria prophylaxis medication (MPM) at a travel clinic in South Korea to identify the gaps to fill for the optimization of pre-travel consultation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cohort of travel clinic visitors in 2011 was constructed and early one-third of the visitors of each month were reviewed. During the study period, 10,009 visited the travel clinic and a retrospective chart review was performed for 3,332 cases for analysis of travel patterns and prescriptions. RESULTS: People receiving yellow fever vaccine (YFV) (n = 2,933) were traveling more frequently for business and tourism and less frequently for providing non-medical service or research/education compared to the 399 people who did not receive the YFV. Overall, most people were traveling to Eastern Africa, South America, and Western Africa, while South-Eastern Asia was the most common destination for the non-YFV group. Besides YFV, the typhoid vaccine was the most commonly prescribed (54.2%), while hepatitis A presented the highest coverage (74.7%) considering the natural immunity, prior and current vaccination history. Additionally, 402 (82.5%) individuals received a prescription for MPM among the 487 individuals travelling to areas with high-risk of malaria infection. Age over 55 was independently associated with receiving MPM prescription, while purpose of providing service and travel duration over 10 days were associated with no MPM prescription, despite travelling to high-risk areas. CONCLUSION: Eastern Africa and South America were common travel destinations among the visitors to a travel clinic for YFV, and most of them were travelling for tourism and business. For the individuals who are traveling to areas with high-risk for malaria, more proactive approach might be required in case of younger age travelers, longer duration, and travel purpose of providing service to minimize the risk of malaria infection.


Subject(s)
Africa, Eastern , Africa, Western , Antibiotic Prophylaxis , Asia , Cohort Studies , Commerce , Communicable Diseases , Hepatitis A , Immunity, Innate , Korea , Malaria , Prescriptions , Retrospective Studies , South America , Travel Medicine , Typhoid-Paratyphoid Vaccines , Vaccination , Vaccines , Yellow Fever Vaccine , Yellow Fever
11.
Neurointervention ; : 1-4, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-730295

ABSTRACT

Since the 3rd WIN meeting in 1982 more than 500 participants join the meeting in Val D'Isere every year [1]. One of our authors has attended the meeting more than 10 times. He experienced many physical illnesses while travelling from South Korea to Val D'Isere in France, which is located in the Alps mountain near the border between France and Italy. In order to get there, it is necessary to take airplane, train, and/or bus with a heavy suitcase. During the trip which usually takes more than 15 hours, he experienced headache, gastrointestinal trouble, sleep disturbance and other additional physical illnesses. Therefore, we reviewed the itinerary to Val D'Isere and presented physical illnesses which occurred during a long trip for an academic activity by specialized professionals such as university hospital professors. In addition, we discussed the mechanism of such illnesses and offered possible solutions including medical treatment.


Subject(s)
Aircraft , France , Headache , Italy , Korea , Travel Medicine
12.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-224834

ABSTRACT

Travel-related health problems such as febrile illness have been reported in many travelers going to developing countries. With the emergence of new infectious diseases occurring in many parts of the world and their spread worldwide, early diagnosis of emerging infectious diseases or tropical diseases has become a very important part of controlling these diseases. In doing so, the itinerary of the ill returning traveler is crucial to formulating a differential diagnosis because exposure to pathogens differs depending on the area of travel. With up-to-date information on infectious diseases occurring worldwide, a differential diagnosis can be made by adding information on duration of travel, incubation period, underlying medical illness, history of prophylactic vaccines received, and knowledge of the patient's exposures during travel including insect bites, contaminated food or water, or freshwater swimming. Some travelers may have specific symptoms and signs such as fever, rash, or hemorrhagic manifestations. For example, eosinophilia suggests a possible helminth infection. In this article, the general approach to returnning travelers with suspected tropical disease will be described.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases , Communicable Diseases, Emerging , Dengue , Developing Countries , Diagnosis, Differential , Early Diagnosis , Eosinophilia , Exanthema , Fever , Fresh Water , Helminths , Insect Bites and Stings , Malaria , Swimming , Travel Medicine , Vaccines , Water
13.
Weekly Epidemiological Monitor. 2016; 09 (27): 1
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-187367

ABSTRACT

The Ministry of Health of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia [KSA] has issued health requirements and recommendations for travelers to Saudi Arabia in connection with performing hajj for the year 2016 [1437 H]


Subject(s)
Humans , Travel Medicine , Consultants , Aedes/pathogenicity , Crowding
14.
RBM rev. bras. med ; 72(5): 209-216, maio 2015.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-749114

ABSTRACT

Introdução: O número de viagens nacionais e internacionais cresceu muito nos últimos anos, tanto pelo turismo como por interesses comerciais, militares e/ou humanísticos. Neste contexto, surge a Medicina de Viagem que visa reduzir a morbi-mortalidade associada às viagens utilizando a conscientização e medidas preventivas. Os objetivos do estudo foram avaliar a situação atual da Medicina de Viagem no mundo, identificando as doenças e medidas profiláticas relacionadas à saúde do viajante, os profissionais atuantes e relatar os principais obstáculos enfrentados pelos centros de atendimento aos viajantes. Métodos: Pesquisa sistemática e estruturada da literatura científica, utilizando três bases de dados em ciências da saúde: Lilacs, Medline e SciELO,utilizando-se os seguintes descritores "travel and medicine", "travel and prevention", "travel and disease and Medicine" e "traveler and medicine". Selecionou-se artigos publicados em inglês, espanhol e português, de 2004 e 2008. Resultados: Foram encontrados 1.301 artigos, sendo 184 (14,1%) da Lilacs, 1.087 (83,6%) da Medline e 30 (2,3%) da SciELO. A aplicação do teste de relevância I resultou na seleção de 197 artigos para análise da obra completa. O teste de relevância II, aplicado às 177 obras completas encontradas, resultou na exclusão de 105 artigos. Conclusões: A Medicina de Viagem ainda enfrenta muitos obstáculos, devido principalmente à deficiência de instrumentos de orientação e capacitação e a resistência de profissionais de saúde e viajantes. Devem-se elaborar planos que envolvam entidades de Medicina de Viagem e órgãos governamentais, pois grande parte das doenças que acometem os viajantes pode ser prevenida com medidas simples e de baixo custo.


Subject(s)
Disease , Travel Medicine , Disease Prevention
15.
Rev. med. Risaralda ; 20(2): 134-135, jul.-dic. 2014.
Article in Spanish | LILACS, COLNAL | ID: lil-760948

ABSTRACT

La medicina del viajero es una disciplina que se ha constituido y afianzado en el mundo entero durante los últimos 20 años y América Latina no ha sido la excepción (1-4). En la región se organizó, en 2008, el Primer Congreso Latinoamericano de Medicina del Viajero, que marcó la consolidación de la creación de la Sociedad Latinoamericana de Medicina del Viajero (SLAMVI), la cual es una organización científica de alcance latinoamericano dedicada a tratar la problemática de la salud en los viajeros, preservando la salud individual, de las comunidades emisoras y receptoras, y promoviendo el cuidado del medio ambiente (5).


Travel medicine is a discipline that has been established and consolidated throughout the world during the last 20 years and Latin America has not been the exception (1-4). In the region, the First Latin American Congress of Traveler's Medicine was organized in 2008, which marked the consolidation of the creation of the Latin American Society of Traveler's Medicine (SLAMVI), which is a Latin American scientific organization dedicated to treating the health problems in travelers, preserving the health of the individual, the sending and receiving communities, and promoting care for the environment (5).


Subject(s)
Humans , Travel Medicine , Soccer , Communicable Diseases , Environment
16.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-62936

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Providing proper emergency medical services (EMS) for domestic or international visitors to popular destinations is becoming increasingly important. Jeju Island is the most visited spot in South Korea. The number of people visiting Jeju Island has increased every year, and this was over ten times the registered population on Jeju Island. The purpose of this study was to describe EMS use behavior and to estimate demand for EMS for visitors on Jeju Island. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was conducted on Jeju Island, with 580,000 citizens. EMS is a fire-based system with a single tiered intermediate service level by a single centralized dispatch center, 29 ambulances, and approximately 130 EMS providers. We collected all ambulance run-sheet data, which included comprehensive information as well as patients' address identification, monthly number of visitors, and census data of Jeju Island from January, 2010 to December, 2012. RESULTS: Among 90,674 EMS transports, 7,209 (8%) were excluded because of unknown address of patients, and of all 83,456 (100%) patients using EMS, 9,733 (12%) were visitors and 73,732 (88%) were residents. The percentage of females was higher for visitors than residents (45% vs. 43%, p<0.001) and the mean age was younger in visitors (38+/-19 vs. 54+/-22, p<0.001). Injury was much higher for visitors than residents (63% vs. 38%, p<0.001). The estimated monthly number of EMS use per 10,000 people was 3.7 (95% CI 3.5 to 3.9) in visitors and 35.7 (95% CI 34.9 to 36.5) in residents, with a ratio of 0.104 (95% CI 0.099 to 0.108). The trend of ratio by year was not significant (p=0.630). The correlation between monthly EMS use in visitors and monthly number of unregistered population was significant (Pearson's correlation 0.844). CONCLUSION: Determining EMS use behavior and the demand of EMS in visitors is a critical task. Our results are of interest in preparing and providing the provision of EMS for visitors.


Subject(s)
Ambulances , Censuses , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Korea , Needs Assessment , Observational Study , Retrospective Studies , Travel Medicine
17.
EMHJ-Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal. 2013; 19 (4): 389-392
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-158881

ABSTRACT

The Islamic Hajj to Makkah [Mecca] has been associated with outbreaks of invasive meningpcoccal disease and the global spread of Neisseria Heningitidis serogroup W-135. For Hajj pilgrims the quadrivalent vaccination against serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y is a mandatory requirement. Novel conjugate vaccines may provide benefits for the community by reduction of carriage. With the introduction of the new generation of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines [Menveo, Menactra, and other pending license] and their recent implementation in Saudi Arabia, experts from 11 countries in the Middle East region met at a Meningococcal Leadership Forum [MLF], in Dubai in May 2010 to exchange opinions on meningococcal disease and prevention strategies. These experts discussed the importance of introducing conjugate vaccines for pilgrims and travellers, and elaborated a consensus recommendation to support healthcare professionals and decision-makers


Subject(s)
Consensus , Islam , Travel Medicine , Meningitis , Travel , Neisseria meningitidis , Vaccines, Conjugate
18.
Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health. 2013; 3 (1): 23-30
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-126202

ABSTRACT

All applicants for work and/or residence in Abu Dhabi are screened for tuberculosis at the time of issuing or renewing their residence visa. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of TB among visa applicants and the likelihood of testing positive among different subgroups. Data from the electronic visa screening system was used for a total of 948,504 applicants screened for residence in Abu Dhabi from January to December 2010. The screening identified 4577 suspected cases of pulmonary tuberculosis [PTB]; 1558 people with chest X-ray findings suggestive of prior PTB; 235 smear-positives; and 132 culture-positive cases. The prevalence of active PTB was 39/100,000, with new applicants significantly more likely to test positive compared with renewals [OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.5-2.7, P < .001]. People coming from African countries had the highest prevalence of TB compared with people from other regions [OR: 21.25, 95% CI: 6.72-67.17, P < .001]. The number of active PTB cases among applicants for visa screening is still of a real concern. Without a rigorous screening system, the disease can spread to the community and hit other people. Certain subgroups were more likely to have the disease; this could provide the scientific foundation for future amendments in the screening requirements


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Male , Prevalence , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Travel Medicine
20.
Rev. chil. infectol ; 29(3): 273-277, jun. 2012. ilus, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-645594

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Although Buenos Aires is the biggest province in Argentina, there was no program for Travel Medicine in any public hospital until 2008, when the Travel Medicine Center (CEMEVI) was established in our hospital. Objective: To analyze the first 24 months of experience in the CEMEVI. Results: A total of 278 travelers were assisted. Most of them consulted before traveling (pre-travel visits). The most common destinations were countries in South America and urban as well as rural areas. Travelling to malaria and yellow fever endemic countries represented 35% and 16% of the total of destinations, respectively. Only 4% were post-travel interviews. Conclusion: It is feasible and frutful to implement a Travel Medicine Center in the public health system.


Introducción: La Provincia de Buenos Aires, a pesar de ser la mayor de nuestro país, no contaba con ningún sitio de asesoramiento al viajero instalado en un hospital público, hasta que en el año 2008 se crea el Centro de Medicina del Viajero (CEMEVI) en nuestro hospital. Objetivo: analizar de manera retrospectiva los primeros 24 meses de experiencia en el CEMEVI. Resultados: Recibimos un total de 278 consultas, la mayoría durante el pre-viaje, a países de América del Sur, a sitios urbanos- rurales, de los cuales 35 y 16% de los viajeros visitaron zonas de riesgo para malaria y fiebre amarilla, respectivamente. Sólo 4% de las consultas fueron en el post-viaje. Conclusión: Es posible y fructífero implementar un Centro de Medicina del Viajero en el sector público de salud.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Hospitals, Public/organization & administration , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/organization & administration , Travel Medicine/organization & administration , Argentina , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Public/statistics & numerical data , Immunization/statistics & numerical data , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Travel Medicine/statistics & numerical data
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL