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1.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 1271-1275, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-79764

ABSTRACT

Mycoplasma hominis (M. hominis) and Ureaplasma urealyticum (U. urealyticum) are important opportunistic pathogens that cause urogenital infections and complicate pregnancy. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence, effects on pregnancy outcomes, and antimicrobial susceptibilities of M. hominis and U. urealyticum. We tested vaginal swabs obtained from 1035 pregnant women for the presence of genital mycoplasmas between June 2009 and May 2014. The laboratory and clinical aspects of genital mycoplasmas infection were reviewed retrospectively, and the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of genital mycoplasmas were determined using the Mycoplasma IST-2 kit. A total of 571 instances of M. hominis and/or U. urealyticum were detected. Of them, M. hominis was detected in two specimens, whereas U. urealyticum was detected in 472 specimens. The remaining 97 specimens were positive for both M. hominis and U. urealyticum. Preterm deliveries were frequently observed in cases of mixed infection of M. hominis and U. urealyticum, and instances of preterm premature rupture of membrane were often found in cases of U. urealyticum. The rates of non-susceptible isolates to erythromycin, empirical agents for pregnant women, showed increasing trends. In conclusion, the prevalence of M. hominis and/or U. urealyticum infections in pregnant women is high, and the resistance rate of antimicrobial agents tends to increase. Therefore, to maintain a safe pregnancy, it is important to identify the isolates and use appropriate empirical antibiotics immediately.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Mycoplasma Infections/drug therapy , Mycoplasma hominis/drug effects , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Ureaplasma Infections/drug therapy , Ureaplasma urealyticum/drug effects , Young Adult
2.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-43498

ABSTRACT

The efficacy and safety of a single 1 g oral dose of azithromycin was evaluated in 100 male patients with non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU). Enrolled were men with > or = 5 polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL)/high power field (HPF) (x 1000 magnification) in a Gram-stained smear of urethral discharge with or without symptoms and signs of NGU. Of the 66 evaluable patients, Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from 18 cases (27.3%) and Ureaplasma urealyticum from 12 cases (18.2%). After treatment, signs and symptoms disappeared from 59 cases (89.4%). Forty-four cases (66.7%) showed reduced PMNL/HPF. C. trachomatis was eradicated in 18 cases (100%) and U. urealyticum in 12 cases (83.3%). One patient complained of mild dizziness, moderate nausea, and palpitations. Single 1 g oral dose of azithromycin appears to be effective and safe for treating chlamydial, non-chlamydial, and ureaplasmal NGU. In addition, its ease of use encourages patient compliance.


Subject(s)
Administration, Oral , Adolescent , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , Chlamydia Infections/drug therapy , Chlamydia trachomatis/isolation & purification , Humans , Male , Ureaplasma Infections/drug therapy , Ureaplasma urealyticum/isolation & purification , Urethritis/drug therapy
3.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-38745

ABSTRACT

From May 1995 to May 1996, thirty-six females with chlamydial cervicitis were enrolled at Bangrak Hospital's Venereal Disease Clinic in an open study to assess the efficacy and safety of a single, 1-gram oral dose of azithromycin. Thirty-five had positive C. trachomatis and one had a positive Gen-probe test. Twenty-two returned for their first and second follow-ups and 18 came back for their final follow-up (visit 4). Eradication rate was 100 per cent on all visits. Fourteen patients were excluded from the final analysis- three had dropped out from the beginning, ten had sexual intercourse without a condom and one had a positive Gen-probe test but negative C. trachomatis culture. U. urealyticum was isolated from the vaginal wall of 15 of the 36 cases and eradication rate was 0 per cent at visit 2 and visit 4. In conclusion, this study shows that a single, 1-gram oral dose of azithromycin is an effective and well-tolerated alternative therapy for chlamydial cervicitis.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Chlamydia Infections/drug therapy , Chlamydia trachomatis/isolation & purification , Female , Humans , Treatment Outcome , Ureaplasma Infections/drug therapy , Ureaplasma urealyticum/isolation & purification , Uterine Cervicitis/drug therapy , Vagina/microbiology
4.
EJMM-Egyptian Journal of Medical Microbiology [The]. 1993; 2 (2): 337-341
in English | IMEMR | ID: emr-27815

ABSTRACT

Mycoplasma hominis [M. hominis] and Urea plasma urealyticum [U. urealyticum] were documented to play a significant role in recurrent urinary tract infections [UTI] in Egyptian patients especially when associated with urinary schistosomiasis. Doxycycline is the drug of choice used to treat these infections at TBRI [100 mgtwice daily for 2 weeks] and this study was conducted to evaluate its efficacy. Fifty six patients with M. hominis and/or U. urealyticum UTI were included and classified into two groups according to association with urinary schistosomiasis. Cure rates of 39.4% and 34.8% were achieved after one course of treatment in group [I] [schistosomal] and in group [II] [non-schistosomal] patients respectively. Higher rates were achieved after a second course of doxycycline in resistant cases [88% and 91% respectively] Test-of-cure cultures obtained 10-15 days after completion of therapy showed treatment failure in only 6 patients [10.9%], four of them had urinary tract stones and their urine samples grew U. urealyticum, three of these patients were schistosomal. It is concluded that a high cure rate [89%] could be achieved by repeating the doxycycline course. Patients with urinary stones should be managed operatively before successful doxycycline therapy


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology , Mycoplasma Infections/drug therapy , Ureaplasma Infections/drug therapy , Doxycycline
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