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1.
Einstein (Säo Paulo) ; 20: eRC5743, 2022. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1360396

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Migration of foreign bodies into the urinary tract is a rare event. In certain instances, to unravel the way that objects arrived in the urinary tract is not easy. We report the case of an accidentally swallowed wooden toothpick that migrated and was found in the left ureterovesical junction, protruding into the bladder. Even though the computed tomography scan is widely employed to evaluate the urinary tract, this resource does not have a good sensitivity for detecting foreign bodies. Our report presents an insight into the best imaging approach if wooden toothpicks are suspected. In the present case, the endoscopic treatment was possible with an uneventful outcome and a complete resolution of symptoms.


Subject(s)
Humans , Ureter/surgery , Ureter/diagnostic imaging , Foreign Bodies/surgery , Foreign Bodies/complications , Foreign Bodies/diagnostic imaging , Intestinal Perforation , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder/diagnostic imaging
2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(6): 1277-1278, Nov.-Dec. 2021.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1340016

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background: High risk upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is typically managed with radical nephroureterectomy, however, renal preservation can be attempted when UTUC is localized to the distal ureter in the presence of chronic kidney disease (1-3). Distal ureterectomy is typically managed with a ureteral reimplantation and psoas hitch in order to maintain urothelial continuity, to avoid comprising the contralateral ureter, and reducing risk of chronic urinary tract infections and electrolyte abnormalities (4). We present our case of distal ureteral UTUC managed robotically with a distal ureterectomy with ureteral reimplantation. Technique and Follow-Up: Initially, an Orandi needle on a resectoscope circumscribed the left ureteral orifice. Next, robotically, the retroperitoneum was exposed and a left sided pelvic lymphadenectomy was completed. The left ureter was mobilized and the diseased ureteral segment was transected. The mobilized bladder was sutured to psoas fascia. After a cystotomy, the ureter was re-anastomosed to the bladder. The patient was discharged on postoperative day three and re-evaluated one week later with a cystogram. Final pathology was downgraded to non-invasive low-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma with negative lymph nodes and margins. Conclusion: High risk UTUC localized to the distal ureter in the setting of chronic kidney disease can be managed with a distal ureterectomy (3). Robotic distal ureterectomy with ureteral reimplantation can be assisted by an Orandi needle to achieve negative margins. Utilizing a robotic technique can offer challenges with the ureteral spatulation and reanastomosis (5-7). By fixating the ureter to the bladder prior to reanastomosis, our technique offers a solution for these difficulties.


Subject(s)
Humans , Ureter/surgery , Ureteral Neoplasms/surgery , Laparoscopy , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Replantation , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Treatment Outcome
4.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(4): 821-826, Jul.-Aug. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1286783

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: Symptomatic duplex kidneys usually present with recurrent urinary tract infection due to ureteral obstruction (megaureter, ureterocele or ectopic ureter) and/or vesicoureteral reflux. Upper-pole nephrectomy is a widely accepted procedure to correct symptomatic duplex systems with poor functioning moieties, also known as upper or proximal approach. The distal ureteral stump syndrome (DUSS) can be a late complication of this approach. There is no consensus upon the length of ureteral dissection and the better approach to symptomatic disease in duplex systems, so we aim to identify if extended ureteral dissection can prevent DUSS in top-down approach. Materials and Methods: Forty-four consecutive patients with symptomatic duplex system were retrospectively classified into two groups: those with limited ureteral excision after heminephrectomy (HN) (group-1) and those with extended ureterectomy after HN (group-2). Patients were followed-up for at least 36 months regarding outcomes of distal ureteral stump. Results: Overall complication was 20%. A total of 8 patients required unplanned further surgery in Group-1 (30%) whereas only 1 patient required unplanned surgery in group 2 (6%) (p=0.07). Subgroup analysis showed that Group-1 presented more DUSS requiring surgery during follow-up than group-2 (p=0.04). Factors possibly affecting complications incidence (such as ureterocele or ectopic ureter) did not differ between groups (p=0.72 and p=0.78). Conclusion: Upper pole nephrectomy should be performed with extended distal ureteral dissection to prevent ureteral stump complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Infant , Ureter/surgery , Vesico-Ureteral Reflux/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Kidney , Nephrectomy
6.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(3): 610-614, May-June 2021. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1154483

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT We describe a step by step technique for open distal ureteroureterostomy (UU) in infants less than 6 months presenting with duplex collecting system and upper pole ectopic ureter in the absence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR).


Subject(s)
Humans , Infant , Ureter/surgery , Ureter/diagnostic imaging , Ureteral Obstruction , Vesico-Ureteral Reflux/surgery , Vesico-Ureteral Reflux/diagnostic imaging , Ureterostomy , Kidney Pelvis
8.
Acta cir. bras ; 35(11): e351108, 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1141939

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To develop a model for simulated training of ureteropyelic anastomosis in laparoscopicpyeloplasty. Methods: Longitudinal and experimental study, with 16 participants. A synthetic instrument was produced to simulate the renal pelvis and the proximal portion of the ureter positioned on a platform within laparoscopic simulators, thereby resulting in the realistic simulation of the ureteropelvic anastomosis. A step-by-step guide was also developed for the accomplishment of the ureteropelvic anastomosis training model. Results: In the evaluation of all participants' suture training, a decrease was found in the time needed to perform the anastomosis, with a median of 17.83 min in the 1st step and 14.21 min in the last one (p = 0.01). Regarding the knots, in the 1st step, 5% of them were considered firm, with an evolution to 30% in the last step (p = 0.011). Conclusion: We noticed improvement in the ability to perform the ureteropelvic anastomosis by participants with no experience with it. Therefore, even unexperienced participants can improve their skills with this training. Moreover, we observed the effectiveness of the model use, confirmed by the participants' opinion and its validation by expert surgeons.


Subject(s)
Humans , Ureter/surgery , Ureteral Obstruction/surgery , Laparoscopy , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Anastomosis, Surgical , Kidney Pelvis/surgery
9.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(3): 624-628, May-June 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-954045

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To present our technique of ureteroileal bypass to treat uretero-enteric stric- tures in urinary diversion. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty-one medical records were reviewed from patients submitted to radical cystectomy to treat muscle-invasive bladder cancer between 2013 and 2015. Twelve (8.5%) patients developed uretero-enteric anastomotic stricture during follow-up. Five patients were treated with endoscopic dilatation and double J placement. Four were treated surgically with standard terminal-lateral im- plantation. Three patients with uretero-enteric anastomotic stricture were treated at our institution by "ureteroileal bypass", one of them was treated with robotic surgery. Results: All patients had the diagnosis of uretero-enteric anastomotic stricture via computerized tomography and DTPA renal scan. Time between cystectomy and diag- nosis of uretero-enteric anastomotic stricture varied from five months to three years. Mean operative time was 120±17.9 minutes (98 to 142 min) and hospital stay was 3.3±0.62 days (3 to 4 days). Mean follow-up was 24±39.5 months (6 to 72 months). During follow-up, all patients were asymptomatic and presented improvement in ure-terohydronephrosis. Serum creatinine of all patients had been stable. Conclusions: Latero-lateral ureter re-implantation is feasible by open or even robotic surgery with positive results, reasonable operation time, and without complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Aged , Postoperative Complications/surgery , Ureter/surgery , Ureteral Obstruction/surgery , Urinary Diversion/adverse effects , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Ileum/surgery , Urinary Diversion/methods , Anastomosis, Surgical/adverse effects , Anastomosis, Surgical/methods , Urinary Catheterization/methods , Cystectomy/methods , Reproducibility of Results , Follow-Up Studies , Treatment Outcome , Constriction, Pathologic/surgery , Operative Time , Urinary Catheters , Length of Stay , Medical Illustration
10.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(3): 524-535, May-June 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-954034

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: Ureteral access sheaths (UAS) facilitate flexible ureteroscopy in the treat- ment of urolithiasis. The physical properties of UAS vary by manufacturer and model. We compared three new UAS: Glideway (GW, Terumo, 11/13Fr, 12/14Fr), Pathway (PW, Terumo 12/14F) and Navigator HD (NHD, Boston Scientific, 11/13Fr, 12/14Fr) in the domains of safety characteristics, positioning characteristics, lubricity and radio- opacity. Materials and Methods: In vitro testing of the three UAS included safety testing-tip perforation force, sheath edge deformation and dilator extraction forces. Positioning characteristics tested included tip bending, stiffness (resistance to coaxial buckling forces), kinking (resistance to perpendicular forces), and insertion forces. Lubricity was assessed by measured frictional forces of the outer sheath. Finally, radio-opacity was tested utilizing fluoroscopic imaging of the three 12F sheaths and inner dilators. Results: The PW (0.245 lb) and GW (0.286 lb) required less force for tip perforation compared to the NHD (0.628 lb). The NHD sheath edge deformation was mild compared to more severe deformation for the PW and GW. The PW (1.008 lb) required greater force than the GW (0.136 lb) and NHD (0.043 lb) for inner dilator removal. The GW (3.69 lbs) and NHD (4.17 lb) had similar inner dilator tip stiffness when bent, while the PW had the weakest inner dilator tip, 1.91 lbs. The PW (0.271 lb) was most susceptible to buckling and kinking (1.626 lb). The most lubricious UAS was the NHD (0.055 lbs for 12F). The NHD (0.277 lbs) required the least insertional force through a biological model and possessed the greatest radio-opacity. Conclusions: Comparison of different commercially available UAS in various sizes reveals that there are mechanical differences in sheaths that may play a role clinically. The Terumo sheaths' (GW and PW) were outperformed by the Boston Scientific NHD in simulating safety, ease of use and radio-opacity.


Subject(s)
Animals , Ureteroscopy/instrumentation , Equipment Design , Reference Values , Swine , Ureter/surgery , Materials Testing , Analysis of Variance , Friction , Ureteroscopy/methods , Ureteroscopes , Dilatation/instrumentation , Lubrication
11.
Acta cir. bras ; 33(5): 408-414, May 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-949346

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the clinical stenosis or precursor histological changes that ureteral access sheaths commonly used in ureteroscopic surgeries may cause in the long term in ureter. Methods: In this study, the animals were divided into 9 groups and according to their groups, ureters of the rabbits were endoscopically fitted with 2F and 3F ureter catheters. The catheters were left in place and withdrawn after a specified period of time. All the ureters were excised and evaluated macroscopically, microscopically and histologically. Ureter diameters were measured and FGF-2 (+) labeled fibroblasts were counted in connective tissue as stenosis precursors. Results: Macroscopically or microscopically, no stenosis was found in any group. The ureter diameter of the group that were catheterized for the longest time with the catheter that had the widest diameter was significantly lower than the group with the shorter duration and the catheter with the narrower diameter and the control group. When the groups were compared in terms of their FGF values, there was a significant difference in FGF-2 counts at all three ureter levels (p <0.05). Conclusion: The use of ureteral access sheath may lead to histological changes, as its diameter and duration increase.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Ureter/surgery , Urologic Diseases/surgery , Urinary Catheterization/instrumentation , Ureteroscopy/instrumentation , Ureter/pathology , Statistics, Nonparametric , Disease Models, Animal
12.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(5): 917-924, Sept.-Oct. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-892885

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction and Objective: Multiple options exist for the surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). We report on our 10-year experience using the inguinal approach to extravesical ureteral reimplantation (EVR). Materials and Methods: Patient characteristics of age, gender, and reflux grade were obtained and outcomes of operative time, hospital stay, and radiographic resolution were assessed. Results: 71 girls and 20 boys with a mean age of 74 months (range 14-164) underwent inguinal EVR via a 3.5-cm inguinal mini-incision. Mean follow up was 10.9 months (range 0.4-69.7). Average grade of reflux was 2.80. Average operative time was 91 minutes (range 51-268). The procedure was successful in 87 of 91 patients (95.6%). The 3 cases of reflux that persisted were all grade 1 and managed expectantly. Contralateral reflux developed in 9 cases, all of which resolved after treatment with either Deflux or ureteral reimplant. There were 4 case of urinary retention that resolved after a brief period of CIC or indwelling catheterization. There were no cases of ureteral obstruction. Most patients were discharged on post-operative day 1 (85/91) and no hospitalization extended beyond 3 days. Conclusions: The inguinal approach to extravesical ureteral reimplantation should be considered as a potentially minimally invasive alternative to endoscopic and robotic treatment of VUR with a success rate more comparable to traditional open approaches. We feel it is the method of choice in cases of unilateral VUR requiring surgical correction.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Replantation/methods , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Ureter/surgery , Vesico-Ureteral Reflux/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Cohort Studies , Treatment Outcome , Operative Time , Inguinal Canal/surgery , Length of Stay
13.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(1): 104-111, Jan.-Feb. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-840803

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose Ureteral obstruction in cervical cancer occurs in up to 11% of patients, many of whom undergo ureteral stenting. Our aim was to describe the patient burden of chronic ureteral stenting in a population-based cohort by detailing two objectives: (1) the frequency of repeat procedures for ureteral obstruction; and, (2) the frequency of urinary adverse effects (UAEs) (e.g., lower urinary tract symptoms, flank pain). Materials and Methods From SEER-Medicare, we identified 202 women who underwent ureteral stent placement prior to or following cervical cancer treatment. The frequency of repeat procedures and rate ratios were compared between treatment modalities. The rates and rate ratios of UAEs were compared between our primary cohort (stent + cervical cancer) and the following groups: no stent + cervical cancer, stent + no cancer, and no stent + no cancer. The “no cancer” group was drawn from the 5% Medicare sample. Results 117/202 women (58%) underwent >1 stent procedure. The frequency of additional procedures was significantly higher in patients who received radiation as part of their treatment. UAEs were very common in women with stent + cancer. The rate of UTI was 190 (per 100 person-years), 67 for LUTS, 42 for stones, and 6 for flank pain. These rates were 3-10 fold higher than in the no stent + no cancer control group; rates were also higher than in the no stent + cancer and the stent + no cancer women. Conclusions The burden of disease associated with ureteral stents is higher than expected and urologists should be actively involved in stent management, screening for associated symptoms and offering definitive reconstruction when appropriate.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ureteral Obstruction/etiology , Ureteral Obstruction/therapy , Stents/adverse effects , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/complications , Time Factors , Ureter/surgery , Risk Factors , Cohort Studies , Treatment Outcome , Flank Pain/etiology , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/etiology
14.
MedicalExpress (São Paulo, Online) ; 4(1)Jan.-Feb. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-841468

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Ureteral Reimplant is commonly used in pediatric and gyne-cologic surgery. Most techniques demand an experienced surgeon and lasts 2-3 hours. There is no consensus about the preferred technique until today. We report a simple modification of the Taguchi to reduce duration and make it more suitable for laparoscopic approach. METHOD: Three patients underwent distal ureteral reimplant, based on our modified Taguchi minimally invasive approach technique. Cystography and ultrasonography were performed on the 30th, 90th and 180th postoperative days to monitor kidneys; a one-year follow-up for recurrence or clinical symptoms was also performed. RESULTS: Operative time for ureteral reimplant using our technique was 15-25 minutes. The results of the performed exams on postoperative days showed normal kidneys without hydro-nephrosis. At the one-year follow-up no signs of recurrence or clinical symptoms were present. CONCLUSION: Our modifications allowed a faster and easier management of distal ureteral reimplant, with excellent perioperative and post-operative outcomes. To our knowledge this is the first detailed description of this technique through minimally invasive approach. However, further studies and a longer follow up will be necessaries to confirm the long-term outcomes and clinical benefits of our technical proposal.


JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O reimplante ureteral é comumente utilizado em cirurgia pediátrica e ginecológica. A maioria das técnicas exigem um cirurgião experiente e dura 2-3 horas. Não há consenso sobre a técnica preferida até hoje. Relatamos uma modificação simples do Taguchi para reduzir sua duração e torná-lo mais adequado para a abordagem laparoscópica. MÉTODO: Três pacientes foram submetidos a reimplante ureteral distal, com base na técnica de abordagem minimamente invasiva de Taguchi modificada. Cistografia e ultra-sonografia foram realizadas no 30º, 90º e 180º dias de pós-operatório para monitorização dos rins; um acompanhamento de um ano para recorrência ou sintomas clínicos também foi realizado. RESULTADOS: O tempo operatório para o reimplante ureteral utilizando a nossa técnica foi de 15-25 minutos. Os resultados dos exames realizados nos dias pós-operatórios mostraram rins normais sem hidronefrose. No seguimento de um ano não houve sinais de recorrência ou sintomas clínicos. CONCLUSÃO: Nossas modificações permitiram um manejo mais rápido e fácil do reimplante ureteral distal, com excelentes resultados peri- e pós-operatórios. Tanto quanto sabemos, esta é a primeira descrição detalhada desta técnica através de abordagem minimamente invasiva. No entanto, estudos adicionais e um acompanhamento mais longo serão necessários para confirmar os resultados a longo prazo e os benefícios clínicos da técnica proposta.


Subject(s)
Humans , Replantation , Ureter/surgery , Laparoscopy/methods , Ultrasonography , Environmental Monitoring , Cystography
16.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 42(4): 842-844, July-Aug. 2016. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-794691

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Associated congenital anomalies are seen in 21% of retrocaval ureter patients; among them, associated contralateral renal agenesis is a very rare entity. We report one such case of right circumcaval ureter with left renal agenesis, diagnosed after febrile UTI. Surgical correction with uretero-ureterostomy was successful. In literature very few such cases are reported and only one case with renal failure was reported. Unilateral renal agenesis cases complicated by associated such anomalies need definitive management and lifelong clinical monitoring to diagnose and prevent chronic kidney disease.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Congenital Abnormalities/diagnostic imaging , Retrocaval Ureter/diagnostic imaging , Kidney/abnormalities , Kidney Diseases/congenital , Ureter/surgery , Vena Cava, Inferior , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Retrocaval Ureter/surgery , Hydronephrosis/diagnostic imaging , Kidney/diagnostic imaging , Kidney Diseases/diagnostic imaging
17.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 42(4): 645-654, July-Aug. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-794680

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: To provide a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing semi-rigid ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URS) with laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (LU) for the treatment of the large proximal ureteral stone. Materials and methods: A systematic literature review was performed in June 2015 using the PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases to identify relevant studies. Article selection proceeded according to the search strategy based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis criteria. Results: Six RCT including 646 patients were analyzed, 325 URS cases (50.3%) and 321 LU cases (49.7%). URS provided a significantly shorter operative time (weighted mean difference [WMD] = −31.26 min; 95%CI −46.88 to −15.64; p<0.0001) and length of hospital stay (WMD = −1.48 days; 95%CI −2.78 to −0.18; p=0.03) than LU. There were no significant differences in terms of overall complications (OR = 0.78; 95%CI 0.21-2.92; p=0.71) and major complications – Clavien ≥3 – (OR = 1.79; 95%CI 0.59-5.42; p=0.30). LU led to a significantly higher initial stone-free rate (OR = 8.65; 95%CI 4.18-17.91; p<0.00001) and final stone-free rate (OR = 6.41; 95%CI 2.24-18.32; p=0.0005) than URS. There was a significantly higher need for auxiliary procedures in URS cases (OR = 6.58; 95%CI 3.42-12.68; p<0.00001). Conclusions: Outcomes with LU for larger proximal ureteral calculi are favorable compared to semi-rigid URS and should be considered as a first-line alternative if flexible ureteroscopy is not available. Utilization of flexible ureteroscopy in conjunction with semi-rigid ureteroscopy may impact these outcomes, and deserves further systematic evaluation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Lithotripsy/methods , Ureteral Calculi/surgery , Laparoscopy/methods , Ureteroscopy/methods , Time Factors , Ureter/surgery , Ureteral Calculi/pathology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome , Evidence-Based Medicine/classification
18.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 42(3): 501-506, tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-785736

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Ureterocalycostomy can be performed in patients in whom desired methods of treating secondary PUJ (Pelvi-Ureteric Junction) obstructions either failed or could not be used. In our study, one child and two adults in whom one redo-ureterocalycostomy and two ureterocalycostomies were performed for severely scarred PUJ. The causes for secondary PUJ obstruction were post-pyelolithotomy in one case, post-pyeloplasty and ureterocalycostomy for PUJ obstruction in the second patient and the third patient had long upper ureteric stricture post-ureteropyeloplasty due to tuberculosis. In all these cases ureterocalycostomy proved to be salvage/final resort for preserving functional renal unit


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child, Preschool , Adult , Young Adult , Ureter/surgery , Ureteral Obstruction/surgery , Ureterostomy/methods , Multicystic Dysplastic Kidney/surgery , Hydronephrosis/congenital , Kidney Calices/surgery , Reproducibility of Results , Follow-Up Studies , Treatment Outcome , Hydronephrosis/surgery
19.
Med. infant ; 23(2): 117-120, junio 2016. tab, ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-882272

ABSTRACT

Antecedentes y Objetivos: La práctica de la colocación de stent en la anastomosis ureteral en trasplante es controvertido. Los beneficios del stent incluyen: descompresión continua del uréter con menor tensión anastomótica y alineamiento ureteral que protege de la obstrucción. Las desventajas: infección urinaria, obstrucción a largo plazo de la unión ureterovesical, hematuria por erosión mucosa y el retiro del mismo bajo sedación por vía endoscópica. Es nuestro objetivo investigar la incidencia de complicaciones con la utilización de stent ureteral vs. tutor ureteral en el trasplante renal pediátrico. Material y Métodos: Valoración retrospectiva de pacientes trasplantados renales en nuestra institución con técnica de Lich-Gregoir en el implante ureteral en el período febrero 2008 a marzo 2014. Dos grupos de pacientes para investigar complicaciones: aquellos con tutor ureteral por período de 5 dias vs. los pacientes en los que se utilizó catéter doble jota (stent) por período de 30 días. Se identificaron los pacientes con uropatía y nefropatía como causa de insuficiencia renal crónica terminal (IRCT) y se asociaron a las complicaciones que fueron divididas en no infecciosas (urológicas) y en infecciosas (infección urinaria). Resultados: Se evaluaron 183 pacientes. En el grupo con tutor ureteral (n=68) se presentaron complicaciones urológicas en 8 pacientes (11.76%), 2 urópatas y 6 nefrópatas y las complicaciones infecciosas se observaron en 15 pacientes (22.06%). En el grupo stent (n=115) se presentaron complicaciones urológicas en 3 casos (2,61%), 2 urópatas y un nefrópata y las complicaciones infecciosas se observaron en 43 pacientes (37.39%). Conclusiones: La asociación de la técnica de Lich Gregoir con stent mejora la morbilidad evitando complicaciones no infecciosas, pero aumenta la incidencia de complicaciones infecciosas independiente del origen de la causa de la IRCT (AU)


Background and aims: Stent placement in ureteral anastomosis is controversial. Benefits of the stent include: continuous decompression of the ureter with less anastomotic tension and ureteral alignment with better protection from ureteral narrowing. Disadvantages: urinary infection, long-term stricture of the vesicoureteral junction, hematuria due to mucosal erosion and its endoscopic removal under sedation. Our aim was to assess the incidence of complications of the use of a ureteral stent vs. ureteral splint in pediatric kidney transplantation. Material and methods: Retrospective assessment of kidney transplant patients in whom the Lich-Gregoir technique was used for ureteral implantation between February 2008 and March 2014. Two groups of patients were selected to assess complications: Patients with a ureteral splint for 5 days vs. patients in whom a double J catheter (stent) was used for 30 days. Patients with uropathy and nephropathy due to end-stage chronic renal failure (ESRD) were identified and associated complications were divided into non-infectious (urological) and infectious (urinary infection) complications. Results: 183 patients were evaluated. In the ureteral splint group (n=68), urological complications were observed in 8 patients (11.76%), 2 uropathic and 6 nephropathic, and infectious complications were observed in 15 patients (22.06%). In the stent group (n=115), urological complications were observed in 3 cases (2.61%), 2 uropathic and 1 nephropathic, and infectious complications were seen in 43 patients (37.39%). Conclusions: The association of the Lich Gregoir technique with stent placement improves morbidity avoiding non-infectious complications, but increases the incidence of infectious complications regardless of the cause of ESRD (AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Child , Adolescent , Anastomosis, Surgical , Kidney Transplantation , Postoperative Complications , Replantation , Stents/adverse effects , Ureter/surgery , Urinary Catheters , Retrospective Studies
20.
Acta cir. bras ; 31(supl.1): 8-12, 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-779767

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE : Bladder augmentation is an effective surgical procedure for increasing bladder capacity and reducing pressure on the urinary system. It is indicated for patients with anomalies such as spina bifida, myelomeningocele, urethral valve and bladder exstrophy, who progress with low tolerance of medication. CASES : This was a retrospective study conducted on pediatric patients submitted to bladder augmentation from 2000 to 2011. RESULTS : 34 patients aged 4 to 17 years were submitted to bladder augmentation, 30 of them with an ileal loop and 4 with a ureter.A continent urinary shunt was performed in 16 patients, the Mitrofanoff conduit was associated in 15, and the Macedo technique was used in one. Mean follow-up was 34.35 months (1 to 122 months). Mean creatinine was 1.5 ng/ml (0.4 to 7.5 ng/ml) preoperatively and 1.78 ng/ml postoperatively. Three patients required a renal transplant during follow-up. There was improvement or resolution of vesicoureteral reflux in 83.5% of the kidneys on the right and in 75% on the left. Bladder capacity increased, on average, from 152.5 ml to 410 ml. The main complications were vesical lithiasis in 3 patients and conduit perforation in one. CONCLUSION : Bladder augmentation showed good results in this series, preserving renal function in most of the patients.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Urinary Bladder Diseases/surgery , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Time Factors , Ureter/surgery , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Catheterization/adverse effects , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Follow-Up Studies , Treatment Outcome
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