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1.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(1): 10-22, Jan.-Feb. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-989974

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: To systematically assess the effectiveness and safety of retrograde flexible ureteroscopy (FURS) versus percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in treating intermediate-size renal stones (2-3cm). Materials and Methods: PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and EMBASE were researched to identify relevant studies up to May 2018. Article selection was performed through the search strategy based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses criteria. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was applied to assess the methodological quality of case-control studies. Results: Six retrospective case-controlled trials were included for meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that PCNL was associated with a higher initial stone-free rate (SFR). After more complementary treatments, FURS provided a final SFR (OR: 1.69; 95% CI, 0.93-3.05; P = 0.08) comparable to that achieved by PCNL. PCNL was associated with a higher rate of overall intraoperative complications (OR: 1.48; 95% CI, 1.01-2.17; P = 0.04) and longer hospital stay (MD: 2.21 days; 95% CI, 1.11 to 3.30; P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis by Clavien-graded complication showed PCNL had significantly higher rates of minor complications (OR: 1.58; 95% CI, 1.04-2.41; P = 0.03). No significant difference was noted in major complications (OR: 1.14; 95% CI, 0.53-2.45; P = 0.73) or operative times (MD: −9.71 min; 95% CI, −22.02 to 2.60; P = 0.12). Conclusions: Multisession FURS is an effective and safe alternative to PCNL for the management of intermediate-size renal stones (2-3cm). It is advisable to balance the benefits and risks according to the individual characteristics of patients and to decide with patients by discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each procedure.


Subject(s)
Humans , Kidney Calculi/surgery , Ureteroscopy/methods , Nephrolithotomy, Percutaneous/adverse effects , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Operative Time
2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(4): 750-757, July-Aug. 2018. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-954080

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To assess outcomes of ureteroscopy for treatment of stone disease in the elderly. Ureteroscopy (URS) is an increasingly popular treatment modality for urolithiasis and its applications are ever expanding with the development of newer technologies. Its feasibility and outcomes within the elderly population to our knowledge remain under-reported. Materials and Methods: We examined the patient demographics and surgical outcomes from our prospective database for patients ≥70 years who underwent URS for urolithiasis, in a 5-year period between March 2012 and December 2016. Results: A total of 110 consecutive patients underwent 121 procedures (1.1 procedure/patient) with a mean age of 77.2 years (range: 70-91 years). Stone location was in the kidney/ pelviureteric junction (PUJ) in 29%, ureter in 37% and in multiple locations in 34%. The initial and final stone free rate (SFR) was 88% and 97% respectively. While 73% were done as true day case procedures, 89% patients were discharged within 24 hours. Eleven patients (9%) underwent complications of which 10 were Clavien I/II including acute urinary retention, urinary tract infection, stent symptoms and pneumonia. One patient underwent Clavien IV complication where they needed intensive care unit admission for urosepsis but fully recovered and were discharged home subsequently. Conclusion: Ureteroscopy is a safe and effective method of managing urolithiasis in elderly patients. Although most patients are discharged within 24-hours, consideration needs to be made for patients where social circumstances can impact their discharge planning.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ureteroscopy/methods , Urolithiasis/surgery , Postoperative Complications , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Age Factors , Treatment Outcome , Lithotripsy, Laser/methods , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Ureteroscopy/statistics & numerical data , Operative Time , Nephrolithotomy, Percutaneous/methods , Intraoperative Complications , Length of Stay
3.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(4): 717-725, July-Aug. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-954064

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: To compare the perioperative outcomes and complications of monopolar and bipolar transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and Methods: A total of 90 CAD patients with newly diagnosed bladder cancer who underwent TURBT were randomized into monopolar TURBT (M-TURBT) and bipolar TURBT (B-TURBT) groups. Primary outcome was safety of the procedures including obturator jerk, bladder perforation, clot retention, febrile urinary tract infection and TUR syndrome. The secondary outcome was the efficacy of TURBT procedures, including complete tumor resection, sampling of the deep muscle tissue and sampling of the qualified tissues without any thermal damage. Results: Mean ages of the patients in M-TURBT and B-TURBT groups were 71.36±7.49 and 73.71±8.15 years, respectively (p=0.157). No significant differences were found between M-TURBT and B-TURBT groups regarding complete tumor resection (76.2% vs. 87.5%, p=0.162) and muscle tissue sampling rates (71.4% vs. 64.6%,p=0.252). Obturator jerk was detected in 16.7% of the patients in M-TURBT group and 2.1% in B-TURBT group (p=0.007). No statistically significant differences were found between the groups regarding intraoperative and postoperative complications. Conclusions: Both monopolar and bipolar systems can be used safely and effectively during TURBT procedure in CAD patients. Due to the more frequently seen obturator jerk in M-TURBT than B-TURBT, careful surgical approach is needed during M-TURBT.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery , Coronary Artery Disease/complications , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Ureteroscopy/methods , Postoperative Complications , Prognosis , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/pathology , Coronary Artery Disease/physiopathology , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome , Operative Time , Middle Aged
4.
Rev. cuba. med. mil ; 46(4): 327-336, oct.-dic. 2017. tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS, CUMED | ID: biblio-960578

ABSTRACT

Introducción: la ureteroscopía constituye, en la actualidad, una de las principales opciones de tratamiento para la litiasis renoureteral. Objetivo: describir los resultados del tratamiento, mediante ureteroscopía rígida retrógrada, en una serie de pacientes con litiasis del tracto urinario superior. Métodos: estudio observacional, descriptivo, longitudinal y prospectivo, en una muestra de 53 pacientes con litiasis renal o ureteral, que recibieron tratamiento mediante ureteroscopía rígida retrógrada. Las variables estudiadas fueron: edad, sexo, localización de la litiasis, modalidad de litotricia realizada, técnicas complementarias empleadas y complicaciones presentadas. Los resultados fueron analizados mediante estadística descriptiva. Resultados: prevalecieron los pacientes de la sexta década de la vida. El promedio de edad fue de 50,2 años con predominio del sexo masculino, con 36 pacientes, para un 67,9 por ciento. La litiasis preponderante fue la ureteral con 67,9 por ciento, y la mayoría localizadas en su porción distal con un tamaño de entre 10 y 20 mm. La modalidad de litotricia más utilizada fue la neumática en 46 pacientes (86,8 por ciento). La técnica complementaria más usada fue la litofragmentación (96,2 por ciento). Presentaron complicaciones 8 enfermos (15 por ciento), y todas en grados II y III de la clasificación de Clavien-Dindo. Conclusiones: la ureteroscopía rígida retrógrada, complementada con otros procederes endourológicos, constituye una modalidad terapéutica eficazy segura para el tratamiento de la litiasis renoureteral, y con un bajo índice de complicaciones(AU)


Introduction: Ureteroscopy is at present, one of the main treatment options for renal and ureteral lithiasis. Objective: To describe the results of the treatment, by rigid retrograde ureteroscopy, in a series of patients with upper urinary tract lithiasis. Methods: observational, descriptive, longitudinal and prospective study, in a sample of 53 patients with renal or ureteral lithiasis, who received treatment by rigid retrograde ureteroscopy. The variables studied were: age, sex, location of lithiasis, lithotripsy modality performed, complementary techniques used and complications presented. The results were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: Patients of the sixth decade of life predominated. The average age was 50.2 years with predominance of males, with 36 patients, for 67.9 percent. The predominant lithiasis was the ureteral with 67.9 percent, and most located in its distal portion with a size between 10 and 20 mm. The most used lithotripsy modality was pneumatic in 46 patients (86.8 percent. The most used complementary technique was lithofragmentation (96.2 percent). There were complications in 8 patients (15 percent), and all in grades II and III of the Clavien-Dindo classification. Conclusions: Rigid retrograde ureteroscopy, complemented with other endourological procedures, constitutes an effective and safe therapeutic modality for the treatment of renoureteral lithiasis, and with a low rate of complications(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Lithotripsy/methods , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Nephrolithiasis/diagnosis , Urolithiasis/epidemiology , Epidemiology, Descriptive , Data Collection/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Longitudinal Studies , Observational Study
5.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(5): 887-895, Sept.-Oct. 2017. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-892897

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Aim: URS is a very commonly used procedure for treatment of ureter stones. Increased hydrostatic pressure in the collecting system linked to fluids used during the procedure may cause harmful effects on the kidney. The aim of this study is to determine whether the URS procedure has a negative effect on the kidney by investigating NGAL, KIM-1, FABP and Cys C levels in urine. Material and Methods: This study included 30 patients undergoing ureterorenoscopy (URS) for ureter stones. Urine samples were collected 5 times; before the URS procedure (control) and at 1, 3, 5 and 12 hours following the procedure. NGAL, KIM-1, FBAP and Cys C levels were measured in urine and compared with the control values. Results: The NGAL levels in urine before the procedure and at 1, 3, 5 and 12 hours after the procedure were 34.59±35.34; 62.72±142.32; 47.15±104.48; 45.23±163.16 and 44.99±60.79ng/mL, respectively (p=0.001). Similarly, the urinary KIM-1, FABP and Cys C levels were found to increase compared to control values; however this increase did not reach statistical significance (p >0.05). Conclusions: After the URS procedure, there were important changes in NGAL, FABP, KIM-1 and Cys C levels. These changes reached statistical significance for NGAL, but did not reach significance for the other parameters. In conclusion, the URS procedure significantly affects the kidney; however, this effect disappears over time.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/urine , Ureteral Calculi/surgery , Ureteroscopy/methods , Middle Aged , Ureteral Calculi/urine , Cystatins/urine , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins/urine , Lipocalin-2/urine , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1/analysis
6.
Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. (1992) ; 63(8): 717-721, Aug. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-896384

ABSTRACT

Summary Introduction: It is generally advised to have a safety guidewire (SGW) present during ureteroscopy (URS) to manage possible complications. However, it increases the strenght needed to insert and retract the endoscope during the procedure, and, currently, there is a lack of solid data supporting the need for SGW in all procedures. We reviewed the literature about SGW utilization during URS. Method: A review of the literature was conducted through April 2017 using PubMed, Ovid, and The Cochrane Library databases to identify relevant studies. The primary outcome was to report stone-free rates, feasibility, contraindications to and complications of performing intrarenal retrograde flexible and semi-rigid URS without the use of a SGW. Results: Six studies were identified and selected for this review, and overall they included 1,886 patients where either semi-rigid or flexible URS was performed without the use of a SGW for the treatment of urinary calculi disease. Only one study reported stone-free rates with or without SGW at 77.1 and 85.9%, respectively (p=0.001). None of the studies showed increased rates of complications in the absence of SGW and one of them showed more post-endoscopic ureteral stenosis whenever SGW was routinely used. All studies recommended utilization of SGW in complicated cases, such as ureteral stones associated with significant edema, ureteral stricture, abnormal anatomy or difficult visualization. Conclusion: Our review showed a lack of relevant data supporting the use of SGW during retrograde URS. A well-designed prospective randomized trial is in order.


Resumo Introdução: O uso de fio guia de segurança (FGS) costuma ser recomendado para a realização de ureteroscopia para prevenir e solucionar complicações durante o procedimento. Seu uso, porém, aumenta a força necessária para manipular o aparelho endoscópico dentro da luz ureteral e, atualmente, existe uma carência de dados consistentes que indiquem o uso do FGS em todos os procedimentos. Método: Uma revisão da literatura foi realizada em abril de 2017 utilizando as ferramentas PubMed, Ovid e The Cochrane Library para identificar estudos relevantes. O desfecho primário da análise foi reportar taxas de resolução dos cálculos, viabilidade, contraindicações e complicações relacionadas ao não uso do FGS. Resultados: Seis estudos foram incluídos na análise, totalizando 1.886 pacientes, nos quais foi realizada ureteroscopia semirrígida ou flexível sem o uso do FGS no tratamento de cálculos renais ou ureterais. Somente um estudo relatou taxa livre de cálculos com ou sem FGS, sendo 77,1 e 85,9%, respectivamente (p=0.001). Todos os estudos mostraram não haver aumento da taxa de complicação na ausência do FGS e um deles relatou aumento de estenose ureteral pós-endoscopia no grupo que utilizou o FGS. Todos os estudos recomendam o uso do FGS em casos complicados, como cálculos ureterais associados a edema de mucosa, estenose ureteral, anomalias anatômicas ou dificuldade de visualização do cálculo. Conclusão: Nossa revisão mostrou que faltam dados relevantes para justificar o uso do FGS durante a ureteroscopia.


Subject(s)
Humans , Kidney Calculi/surgery , Ureteral Calculi/surgery , Ureteroscopy/instrumentation , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Ureteroscopy/methods
7.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(2): 367-370, Mar.-Apr. 2017. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-840820

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT A 34 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with left flank pain. A non-contrast enhanced computerized tomography (NCCT) revealed a 1.5x2cm left proximal ureter stone. Patient was scheduled for ureterorenoscopy (URS) and stone removal. She was submitted to retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS). At the postoperative 1st day, the patient began to suffer from left flank pain. A NCCT was taken, which revealed a subcapsular hematoma and perirenal fluid. The patient was managed conservatively with intravenous fluid, antibiotic and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and was discharged at the postoperative 6th day. Two weeks after the discharge the patient was admitted to emergency department with severe left flank pain, palpitation and malaise. KUB (kidney-ureter-bladder) radiography showed double-J stent (DJS) to be repositioned to the proximal ureter. Patient was evaluated with contrast enhanced CT which revealed an 8cm intraparenchymal hematoma/abscess in the middle part of the kidney. A percutaneous drainage catheter was inserted into the collection. The percutaneous drainage catheter and the DJS were removed at the 10th day of second hospitalization. RIRS surgery is an effective and feasible choice for renal stones with high success and acceptable complication rates. However, clinician should be alert to possible complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Ureteroscopes/adverse effects , Ureterolithiasis/surgery , Parenchymal Tissue/injuries , Hematoma/etiology , Kidney Diseases/etiology , Postoperative Complications/diagnostic imaging , Pressure , Stents/adverse effects , Ureterolithiasis/complications , Parenchymal Tissue/diagnostic imaging , Hematoma/diagnostic imaging , Kidney Diseases/diagnostic imaging
8.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 42(5): 967-972, Sept.-Oct. 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-796892

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background: We analyzed the outcome and complications of rigid (R-URS) and flexible (F-URS) ureteroscopic lithotripsy for treatment of proximal ureteric stone (PUS). Subjects and methods: Retrospective data of 135 patients (93 males and 42 females) submitted to R-URS and F-URS for treatment of PUS in the period between July 2013 and January 2015 were investigated. (R-URS, group 1) was performed in 72 patients while 63 patients underwent (F-URS, group 2).We compared the 2 groups for success, stone characteristics, operative time, intraoperative and postoperative complications. Results: The overall stone free rate (SFRs) was 49/72 (68%) in group 1 and 57/63 (91%) patients in group 2, (P=0.005). The operative time was shorter in group 1 in comparison to group 2 with statistically significant difference (P=0.005). There was not any statistically significant difference between 2 groups in complication rate (P=0.2). Conclusıon: Both R-URS and F-URS could be a feasible option for treatment of PUS. R-URS is less successful for treatment of PUS and should be used cautiously and with availability of F-URS.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Lithotripsy/methods , Ureteral Calculi/therapy , Ureteroscopy/methods , Postoperative Complications , Lithotripsy/adverse effects , Lithotripsy/instrumentation , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Ureteroscopy/instrumentation , Disease-Free Survival , Operative Time , Intraoperative Complications , Length of Stay , Middle Aged
9.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 42(4): 734-739, July-Aug. 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-794690

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify perioperative predictors of immediate pain after ureteroscopy, specifically evaluating the impact of hydrodistention from irrigation on pain. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively identified patients who underwent ureteroscopy for the treatment of calculi. Data recorded for these patients included their maximum pain score in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), average flow rate of irrigant used during the procedure, patient and stone characteristics, operative procedure, and details of patients' immediate, post-operative course. Spearman's rho was used to determine the relationship between non-parametric, continuous variables. Then, a linear regression was performed to assess which variables could predict the peak pain score. Results: A total of 131 patients were included in the study. A non-parametric correlation analysis revealed that maximum pain score was negatively correlated with being male (r = −0.18, p=0.04), age (r = −0.34, p<0.001), and post-op foley placement (r = −0.20, p=0.02) but positively correlated with the preoperative pain score (r = 0.41, p<0.001), time in the PACU (r = 0.19, p = 0.03), and the morphine equivalent dose (MED) of narcotics administered in the PACU (r = 0.67, p<0.001). On linear regression, the significant variables were age, preoperative pain score, and stent placement. For every ten-year increase in age post-operative pain score decreased by 4/10 of a point (p = 0.03). For every 1 point increase in preoperative pain score there was a 3/10 of a point increase in the maximum pain score (p = 0.01), and leaving a stent in place post-operatively was associated with a 1.6 point increase in the maximum pain score. Conclusions: Hydrodistention does not play a role in post-ureteroscopy pain. Patients who are younger, have higher preoperative pain scores, or who are stented will experience more post-operative pain after ureteroscopy.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Aged , Pain, Postoperative/etiology , Kidney Calculi/surgery , Ureteral Calculi/surgery , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Linear Models , Retrospective Studies , Postanesthesia Nursing , Preoperative Period , Therapeutic Irrigation , Middle Aged
10.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 42(4): 727-733, July-Aug. 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-794679

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the impact of Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy on urinary symptoms and pain in patients with indwelling ureteral stents Patients and Methods: A total of 239 patients with ureteral stone-related hydronephrosis who underwent a double-J stent insertion after ureteroscopic lithotripsy were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive doxazosin cotrolled release 4 mg once daily for 4 weeks or matching placebo. Patients completed the brief-form Chinese version Ureteric Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ) and quality of life (QoL) score 2 weeks and 4 weeks after stent placement and 4 weeks after stent withdrawal. The analgesic use was also recorded during the stenting period. Results: Patients in Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy group, in the first 2 weeks and second 2 weeks with the stent in situ, expressed significant lower daytime frequency (p=0.028 and p=0.038), nocturia (p=0.021 and p=0.008) and urgency (p=0.012 and p=0.014), respectively. Similarly, flank pain score, QoL score and analgesic use were also significant less in the stenting period. There was no significant difference in scores of urinary symptoms, pain and QoL during the post-stent period between two cohorts. Conclusions: Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy reduced stent-related urinary symptoms, pain and the negative impact on QoL.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Aged , Pain/drug therapy , Quality of Life , Stents/adverse effects , Doxazosin/administration & dosage , Adrenergic alpha-1 Receptor Antagonists/administration & dosage , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/drug therapy , Postoperative Period , Lithotripsy/methods , Administration, Oral , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Middle Aged
11.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 42(3): 479-486, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-785743

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose The aim of this study was to describe the outcomes and the complications of retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for renal stones in a multi-institutional working group. Materials and Methods From 2012 to 2014, we conducted a prospective study including all RIRS performed for kidney stones in 4 European centers. Demographic information, disease characteristics, and perioperative and postoperative data were gathered. Patients and stone data, procedure characteristics, results and safety outcomes were analyzed and compared by descriptive statistics. Complications were reported using the standardized Clavien system. Results Three hundred and fifty-six patients underwent 377 RIRS with holmium laser lithotripsy for renal stones. The RIRS was completed in all patients with a mean operative time of 63.5 min. The stone-free status was confirmed endoscopically and through fluoroscopic imaging after the first procedure in 73.6%. The second procedure was performed in twenty patients (5.6%) achieving an overall stone free rate of 78.9%. The overall complication rate was 15.1%. Intra-operative and post-operative complications were seen in 24 (6.7%) and 30 (8.4%) cases, respectively. Conclusions RIRS is a minimally invasive procedure with good results in terms of stone-free and complications rate.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Aged , Kidney Calculi/surgery , Lithotripsy, Laser/methods , Ureteroscopy/instrumentation , Ureteroscopy/methods , Ureteroscopes , Postoperative Complications , Fluoroscopy/methods , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Lithotripsy, Laser/instrumentation , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Equipment Design , Europe , Operative Time , Length of Stay , Middle Aged
12.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 42(1): 160-164, Jan.-Feb. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-777322

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction Complete ureteral avulsion is one of the most serious complications of ureteroscopy. The aim of this report was to look for a good solution to full-length complete ureteral avulsion. Case presentation A 40-year-old man underwent ureteroscopic management. Full-length complete avulsion of ureter occurred during ureteroscopy. Pyeloureterostomy plus greater omentum investment outside the avulsed ureter and ureterovesical anastomosis were performed 6 hours after ureteral avulsion. The patient was followed-up during 34 months. Double-J tube was removed at 3 months after operation. Twenty three months after the first operation, the patient developed hydronephrosis because of a new ureter upside stone, then rigid ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy were used successfully. Conclusion Pyeloureterostomy plus greater omentum investment outside the avulsed ureter and ureterovesical anastomosis may be a good choice for full-length complete ureteral avulsion.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adult , Ureter/injuries , Ureteral Diseases/surgery , Ureteral Diseases/etiology , Ureterostomy/methods , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Omentum/surgery , Anastomosis, Surgical , Treatment Outcome , Disease Management , Urolithiasis/surgery , Hydronephrosis/surgery
13.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 49(1): 00703, 2016. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-765007

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to evaluate the effect of preoperative imaging techniques on the success and complication rates of ureteroscopy. We performed a retrospective analysis of 736 patients (455 males and 281 females), with a mean age of 45.5±15.2 years (range, 1-88 years), who underwent rigid ureteroscopic procedures for removal of ureteral stones. Patients were divided into 4 groups according to the type of imaging modality used: group I, intravenous urography (n=116); group II, computed tomography (n=381); group III, computed tomography and intravenous urography (n=91), and group IV, ultrasonography and abdominal plain film (n=148). Patients’ demographics, stone size and location, prior shock wave lithotripsy, lithotripsy technique, operation time, success rate, and rate of intraoperative complications were compared among the groups. There were no significant differences in success and complication rates among the groups. The stone-free rate after primary ureteroscopy was 87.1% in group I, 88.2% in group II, 96.7% in group III, and 89.9% in group IV (P=0.093). The overall incidence of intraoperative complications was 11.8%. According to the modified Satava classification system, 6.1% of patients had grade 1, 5.1% had grade 2, and 0.54% had grade 3 complications. Intraoperative complications developed in 12.1% of patients in group I, 12.6% of patients in group II, 7.7% of patients in group III, and 12.2% of patients in group IV (P=0.625). Our findings clearly demonstrate that ureteroscopic treatment of ureteral stones can be safely and effectively performed with no use of contrast study imaging, except in doubtful cases of anatomical abnormalities.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Contrast Media , Intraoperative Complications/epidemiology , Ureteral Calculi/diagnosis , Ureteroscopy/methods , Incidence , Lithotripsy/adverse effects , Lithotripsy/methods , Preoperative Period , Retrospective Studies , Radionuclide Imaging/methods , Statistics, Nonparametric , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Ureteral Calculi/surgery , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Urography/methods
14.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 41(5): 920-926, Sept.-Oct. 2015. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-767057

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate renal function and to identify factors associated with renal function deterioration after retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for kidney stones. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with renal stones treated by RIRS between January 2010 and June 2013 at a single institute. We used the National Kidney Foundation classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to classify Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) in 5 groups. The baseline creatinine level was systematically pre-operatively and post-operatively evaluated. All patients had a creatinine blood measurement in June 2013. A change toward a less or a more favorable GFR group following RIRS was considered significant. Results: We included 163 patients. There were 86 males (52.8%) and 77 females (47.3%) with a mean age of 52.8±17 years. After a mean follow-up of 15.5±11.5 months, median GFR was not significantly changed from 84.3±26.2 to 84.9±24.5 mL/min (p=0.675). Significant renal function deterioration occurred in 8 cases (4.9%) and significant renal function amelioration occurred in 23 cases (14.1%). In univariate analysis, multiple procedures (p=0.023; HR: 5.4) and preoperative CKD (p=0.011; HR: 6.8) were associated with decreased renal function. In multivariate analysis these factors did not remain as predictive factors. Conclusion: Stone management with RIRS seems to have favorable outcomes on kidney function; however, special attention should be given to patients with multiple procedures and preoperative chronic kidney disease.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Kidney Calculi/therapy , Kidney/physiopathology , Lithotripsy, Laser/methods , Ureteroscopy/methods , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Kidney Calculi/physiopathology , Lithotripsy, Laser/adverse effects , Multivariate Analysis , Perioperative Period , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Postoperative Complications/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/etiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects
15.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 41(4): 791-795, July-Aug. 2015. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-763048

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACTObjective:We aimed to evaluate the possible effects of ureteroscopic procedures on the sexual function of both genders.Materials and Methods:A total of 102 sexually active cases (60 male, 42 female) undergoing ureteroscopic procedures were included in this study. Sexual function has been evaluated in detail by using International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) in male and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) forms in female cases both before and 1-month after the procedures. Pre-and postoperative data were evaluated in a comparative manner.Results:The pre-and postoperative mean IIEF scores were 57.86±2.26 and 54.57±2.48 (p=0.19) in males and the mean FSFI scores were 13.58±1.46 and 14.46±1.52 (p=0.41), respectively in females. Evaluation of these values showed that regarding the effects of this procedure on male cases although the total scores for sexual function were not influenced it was observed a significant reduction in the intercourse satisfaction sub-domain (IIEF-IS) in males (p<0.05). In female cases however, unlike the male cases no statistically significant alterations with respect to these scores were noted (p=0.418).Conclusion:Ureteroscopic interventions could have some adverse effects on the sexual function particularly in male cases. However, it is clear that further prospective studies in both genders with large population of cases are certainly needed in order to outline this unresolved but important subject.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Reproductive Health/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/etiology , Ureteral Diseases/surgery , Ureteroscopy/rehabilitation , Coitus/psychology , Orgasm/physiology , Personal Satisfaction , Postoperative Period , Preoperative Period , Penile Erection/physiology , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-148908

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Urinary calculi is a familiar disease. A well-known complication of endourological treatment for impacted ureteral stones is the formation of ureteral strictures, which has been reported to occur in 14.2% to 24% of cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective study. Ureterotripsy treatment was used on patients with impacted ureteral stones. Then, after 3 months and 6 months, the condition of these patients was assessed by means of a kidney-ureter-bladder (KUB) ultrasound. If the KUB ultrasound indicated moderate to serious hydronephrosis, the patient was further assessed by means of a computed tomography intravenous urogram or retrograde pyelogram to confirm the occurrence of ureteral strictures. RESULTS: Of the 77 patients who participated in the study, 5 developed ureteral strictures. Thus, the stricture rate was 7.8%. An analysis of the intraoperative risk factors including perforation of the ureter, damage to the mucous membrane, and residual stone impacted within the ureter mucosa revealed that none of these factors contributed significantly to the formation of the ureteric strictures. The stone-related risk factors that were taken into consideration were stone size, stone impaction site, and duration of impaction. These stone factors also did not contribute significantly to the formation of the ureteral strictures. CONCLUSIONS: This prospective study failed to identify any predictable factors for ureteral stricture formation. It is proposed that all patients undergo a simple postoperative KUB ultrasound screening 3 months after undergoing endoscopic treatment for impacted ureteral stones.


Subject(s)
Constriction, Pathologic/diagnosis , Humans , Hydronephrosis/diagnosis , Kidney/diagnostic imaging , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Ureter/pathology , Ureteral Calculi/therapy , Ureterolithiasis/surgery , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Urinary Bladder/diagnostic imaging
17.
Rev. chil. urol ; 79(4): 43-46, 2014. tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-785414

ABSTRACT

La instalación de catéteres ureterales tipo Doble J o “pigtail” es una práctica habitual en urología, el principal problema de su instalación radica en que gran parte de los pacientes presentan diferentes tipos de molestias en relación a su uso. Existen algunas alternativas de tratamiento médico que han probado ser efectivas en disminuir parcialmente estos síntomas; sin embargo, pocos estudios han evaluado la posibilidad de terapias locales, y estos reclutaron pocos pacientes por lo que no pudieron demostrar grandes diferencias.


The use of Double J ureteral stents or also called “pigtail” is common practice in urology; the main problem with its use is that a large number of patients develop discomfort with indwelling stents. To diminish them there are medical treatments that have been proven useful, however, few studies have assessed local therapies, and this studies include a small number of patients.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anesthetics, Local/administration & dosage , Bupivacaine/administration & dosage , Pain/prevention & control , Stents , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects
18.
Arq. bras. med. vet. zootec ; 64(6): 1504-1510, Dec. 2012. ilus, tab
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: lil-660217

ABSTRACT

O presente relato apresenta a primeira descrição de ectopia ureteral congênita na raça Teckel Dachshund, diagnosticada em uma cadela com pelagem arlequim. O animal, aos dois meses de idade, apresentava sinais de incontinência urinária e cistite bacteriana, sendo submetido a um plano diagnóstico para confirmação de ureter ectópico. A urografia excretora revelou hidroureter direito com desembocadura caudal ao trígono da bexiga. O exame físico do animal evidenciou ainda hérnia inguinal bilateral, o que reforçou a caracterização da origem congênita das alterações. Aspectos de bem-estar animal são também discutidos.


The present work reports the first description of congenital ureteral ectopy in the canine breed Teckel Dachshund, diagnosed in a female dog with merle colour pattern. The two month old animal, presented with continuous dribbling of urine and bacterial cystitis, was subjected to a diagnostic plan for ectopic ureter. The excretory urography showed a right hidroureter, which had an orifice located caudally to the trigone of the bladder. The animal also presented a bilateral inguinal hernia, which confirmed the case description as a multiple congenital anomaly condition. Animal welfare aspects are also discussed.


Subject(s)
Animals , Dogs , Ureter/abnormalities , Ureteroscopy/veterinary , Congenital Abnormalities/veterinary , Pulmonary Atelectasis/surgery , Pulmonary Atelectasis/veterinary , Urinary Incontinence/complications , Urinary Incontinence/veterinary , Urinary Tract Infections/complications , Urinary Tract Infections/veterinary , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Ureteroscopy
19.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 38(3): 298-306, May-June 2012. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-643028

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The management of urolithiasis in patients on anticoagulants presents a challenge to the endourologist. Due to multiple comorbidities, it may be impossible to safely discontinue the anticoagulant treatment. Other modalities such as shock wave lithotripsy and PCNL are contraindicated in these patients, so ureteroscopic treatment may be the only option. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to look at the safety and efficacy of ureteroscopic management in these patients. METHODS: Systematic review and quantitative meta-analysis was performed using studies identified by a systematic electronic literature search from January 1990 to August 2011. All articles reporting on treatment for stones in patients with a bleeding diathesis using ureteroscopy and a Holmium:YAG laser were included. Two reviewers independently extracted the data from each study. The data was included into a meta-analysis and discussed. RESULTS: Three studies were identified reporting on 70 patients (73 procedures). All patients had stone fragmentation using Holmium laser. The mean stone size was 13.2mm with a range of 5-35mm. The quality of the included studies was modest. Stone free status was achieved in sixty-four patients (87.7%). There were no major complications and only 11% of the patients developed minor complications with only 4% rate of minor bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: Retrograde stone treatment using ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy can be safely performed in patients with bleeding diathesis with a low complication rate.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Hemorrhagic Disorders/complications , Lithotripsy, Laser/methods , Ureteroscopy/methods , Urinary Calculi/therapy , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Disease Susceptibility , Lasers, Solid-State/therapeutic use , Lithotripsy, Laser/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects
20.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 38(2): 195-203, Mar.-Apr. 2012. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-623333

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Patients with coagulopathy are at increased risk of peri-operative hemorrhage. The aim of the present study was to compare ureteroscopy (URS) in these high risk patients to those with normal bleeding profile. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with coagulopathies (Group I) undergoing 17 URS were included in the study [3 for biopsy of ureteral lesions and 9 for Holmium Laser Lithotripsy (HLL)]. A patient had Child B (MELD 11) cirrhosis, 6 patients were on warfarin, 3 patients on ASA, 1 patient on ASA and clopidogrel, and the last patient was on heparin. URS in Group I was performed without correction of coagulopathy. Group II consisted of 32 patients with normal bleeding profile who underwent 34 URS concurrently. RESULTS: Group I included 4 ureteral biopsies in 3 patients with suspicious ureteral lesions and 13 URS for HLL in 9 patients with nephrolithiasis. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of patient age, sex, percent of renal stones, median operative and fluoroscopy times. When compared with Group II, Group I had significantly larger median stone size (9.2 vs. 14.0 mm, p = 0.01) and significantly lower stone-free rate after first URS (94.1% vs. 69.2%, p = 0.04). However, after second URS, stone-free rates were comparable in both groups (92.3% vs. 100%, p = 0.9). Two (16.7%) patients with coagulopathy were readmitted due to gross hematuria. There were no post-operative complications in Group II. CONCLUSIONS: Although URS in selected patients with coagulopathies is safe, it is associated with significantly lower stone-free rates and higher readmissions due to gross hematuria.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Blood Coagulation Disorders/complications , Hematuria/etiology , Kidney Calculi/surgery , Lithotripsy, Laser/methods , Ureteroscopy/adverse effects , Biopsy , Case-Control Studies , Kidney Calculi/pathology , Preoperative Period , Retrospective Studies , Risk , Ureter/injuries
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