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1.
Chinese Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery ; (12): 578-587, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-986823

ABSTRACT

Objective: To document the anatomical structure of the area anterior to the anorectum passing through the levator hiatus between the levator ani slings bilaterally. Methods: Three male hemipelvises were examined at the Laboratory of Clinical Applied Anatomy, Fujian Medical University. (1) The anatomical assessment was performed in three ways; namely, by abdominal followed by perineal dissection, by examining serial cross-sections, and by examining median sagittal sections. (2) The series was stained with hematoxylin and eosin to enable identification of nerves, vessels, and smooth and striated muscles. Results: (1) It was found that the rectourethralis muscle is closest to the deep transverse perineal muscle where the longitudinal muscle of the rectum extends into the posteroinferior area of the membranous urethra. The communicating branches of the neurovascular bundle (NVB) were identified at the posterior edge of the rectourethralis muscle on both sides. The rectum was found to be fixed to the membranous urethra through the rectourethral muscle, contributing to the anorectal angle of the anterior rectal wall. (2) Serial cross-sections from the anal to the oral side were examined. At the level of the external anal sphincter, the longitudinal muscle of the rectum was found to extend caudally and divide into two muscle bundles on the oral side of the external anal sphincter. One of these muscle bundles angled dorsally and caudally, forming the conjoined longitudinal muscle, which was found to insert into the intersphincteric space (between the internal and external anal sphincters). The other muscle bundle angled ventrally and caudally, filling the gap between the external anal sphincter and the bulbocavernosus muscle, forming the perineal body. At the level of the superficial transverse perineal muscle, this small muscle bundle headed laterally and intertwined with the longitudinal muscle in the region of the perineal body. At the level of the rectourethralis and deep transverse perineal muscle, the external urethral sphincter was found to occupy an almost completely circular space along the membranous part of the urethra. The dorsal part of the external urethral sphincter was found to be thin at the point of attachment of the rectourethralis muscle, the ventral part of the longitudinal muscle of the rectum. We identified a venous plexus from the NVB located close to the oral and ventral side of the deep transverse perineal muscle. Many vascular branches from the NVB were found to be penetrating the longitudinal muscle and the ventral part of rectourethralis muscle at the level of the apex of the prostate. The rectourethral muscle was wrapped ventrally around the membranous urethra and apex of the prostate. The boundary between the longitudinal muscle and prostate gradually became more distinct, being located at the anterior end of the transabdominal dissection plane. (3) Histological examination showed that the dorsal part of the external urethral sphincter (striated muscle) is thin adjacent to the striated muscle fibers from the deep transverse perineal muscle and the NVB dorsally and close by. The rectourethral muscle was found to fill the space created by the internal anal sphincter, deep transverse perineal muscle, and both levator ani muscles. Many tortuous vessels and tiny nerve fibers from the NVB were identified penetrating the muscle fibers of the deep transverse perineal and rectourethral muscles. The structure of the superficial transverse perineal muscle was typical of striated muscle. These findings were reconstructed three-dimensionally. Conclusions: In intersphincteric resection or abdominoperineal resection for very low rectal cancer, the anterior dissection plane behind Denonvilliers' fascia disappears at the level of the apex of the prostate. The prostate and both NVBs should be used as landmarks during transanal dissection of the non-surgical plane. The rectourethralis muscle should be divided near the rectum side unless tumor involvement is suspected. The superficial and deep transverse perineal muscles, as well as their supplied vessels and nerve fibers from the NVB. In addition, the cutting direction should be adjusted according to the anorectal angle to minimize urethral injury.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Rectum/surgery , Anal Canal/anatomy & histology , Rectal Neoplasms/surgery , Proctectomy , Urethra/surgery
2.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 93-97, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-971014

ABSTRACT

Urethrocutaneous fistula may complicate hypospadias repair. We noticed that double-layered preputial dartos flaps added to tubularized incised plate urethroplasty can reduce the risk of urethrocutaneous fistula. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of tubularized incised plate urethroplasty with double-layered preputial dartos flaps to with single-layered local fascial flaps in preventing urethrocutaneous fistula. A retrospective cohort study was conducted between January 2017 and December 2020 at Jordan University Hospital (Amman, Jordan). Boys who were aged between 6 months and 5 years, diagnosed with distal hypospadias, and not circumcised were included. The primary outcome was the occurrence of urethrocutaneous fistula in patients who underwent tubularized incised plate urethroplasty with a double-layered fascial flap. The results showed a total of 163 boys with distal hypospadias; among them, 116 patients underwent tubularized incised plate urethroplasty with a single-layered fascial flap, and 47 underwent tubularized incised plate urethroplasty with a double-layered fascial flap. The development of urethrocutaneous fistula was higher in the group receiving tubularized incised plate urethroplasty with a single-layered fascial flap than in the group receiving tubularized incised plate urethroplasty with a double-layered fascial flap after 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months (6.9% vs 0, 10.3% vs 0, and 5.2% vs 0, respectively), and the difference after 6 months was statistically significant (P = 0.02).


Subject(s)
Male , Humans , Infant , Hypospadias/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male/methods , Urethra/surgery , Fistula/surgery , Treatment Outcome
3.
Chinese Journal of Traumatology ; (6): 244-248, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-981915

ABSTRACT

A locked pubic ramus body is an unusual variant of lateral compression injury. Till date, there have been only 25 cases reported in the published literature. We herein described a case where the right pubic ramus was entrapped within the opposite obturator foramen with an overlap of greater than 4 cm, with associated urethral injury. When all maneuvers of closed and instrumented reduction failed, we performed a superior pubic ramus osteotomy on the left side and unlocked the incarcerated right pubic ramus. The osteotomy site was stabilized with a 6-hole recon plate. The patient underwent delayed urethral repair 10 weeks after the index surgery. At 3-year follow-up, the patient has sexual dysfunction especially difficulty in maintaining erection, secondary urethral stricture, heterotopic ossification, and breakage of implants.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pubic Bone/injuries , Follow-Up Studies , Osteotomy, Sagittal Split Ramus , Pelvis , Urethra/surgery , Pubic Symphysis/injuries
4.
Rev. argent. cir ; 114(4): 370-374, oct. 2022. graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS, BINACIS | ID: biblio-1422951

ABSTRACT

RESUMEN La uretrografía retrógrada es la técnica de referencia (gold standard) utilizada clásicamente para hacer diagnóstico de lesiones de uretra. En este contexto se presenta un caso en el que se realizó tomografía computarizada con reconstrucción 3D con contraste intravenoso y endouretral, pudiendo reconstruir la uretra en toda su extensión en forma tridimensional. De esta manera se arribó al diagnóstico de certeza de la lesión de uretra. Como ventaja del método se menciona la posibilidad de diagnosticar ‒ con un solo estudio por imágenes‒ lesiones de todo el tracto urinario, órganos sólidos, huecos y lesión del anillo pélvico asociados al traumatismo, con una alta sensibilidad y especificidad sin necesidad de requerir otros estudios complementarios.


ABSTRACT Retrograde urethrography is the gold standard method for the diagnosis of urethral injuries. In this setting, we report the use of computed tomography with intravenous injection and urethral administration of contrast medium and 3D reconstruction of the entire urethra. The definitive diagnosis of urethral injury was made. The advantage of this method is the possibility of making the diagnosis of traumatic injuries of the entire urinary tract, solid organs, hollow viscera and of the pelvic ring within a single imaging test, with high sensitivity and specificity, with no need to perform other complementary tests.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adolescent , Urethra/injuries , Wounds and Injuries/diagnostic imaging , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Urethra/surgery , Cystostomy , Accidents, Traffic , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
5.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 365-366, March-Apr. 2022. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364944

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: A challenging situation in proximal hypospadias is the presentation of patients with successful urethroplasty but with persistent or recurrent ventral curvature (VC) after multiple hypospadias repair. Materials and Methods: We present a 13 year-old boy with 7 previous surgeries (long TIP, Duplay, meatoplasty) to treat hypospadias presenting with 60 degrees of VC, in spite of a well-accepted coronally neomeatus. We degloved the penis and artificial erection clearly appointed corporal disproportion causing curvature. We disconnected urethra from corpora. After excision of remnant fibrotic tissue, there was a residual curvature so a lenghtening corporoplasty with dermal graft from groin was performed. We have adjusted the urethral meatus position into a proximal penile shaft. We used a buccal mucosa graft placed in an inverted U-shape position planning a second stage urethroplasty (1). An indwelling silicone Foley tube was left for one week. The patient was discharged the day after surgery. Results: The aspect after corporoplasty proved satisfactory curvature correction. Patient had an excellent outcome and is scheduled for a second-stage after 6 months. Discussion: Snodgrass and Bush (2) reported that on 73 patients with an average of 2.7 operations for proximal shaft to perineal hypospadias; of which, 83% had VC at re-operation averaging 50°. We do believe that some good results with minimal dorsal plicature may recur in adolescence and therefore when these procedures may be considered, they should be performed by classic Nesbit technique (3). Otherwise, the choice for primary ventral lengthening should be taken. Conclusion: Severe curvature associated with hypospadias should undergo a major procedure at early stage to avoid decompensation after dorsal plicature in adolescence. We had a very satisfactory result, the patient awaits the second stage procedure (Figure-1). Figure 1 End aspect after complete healing of buccal mucosa. Notice that penis is straight and second stage will be performed after 6 months of interval.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Infant , Adolescent , Plastic Surgery Procedures/methods , Hypospadias/surgery , Penis/surgery , Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male/methods , Urethra/surgery , Treatment Outcome
6.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 371-372, March-Apr. 2022.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364945

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: Tissue transfer has been used in urethral reconstruction for decades, and several grafts have been described (1, 2). The ideal graft would have optimal tissue characteristics and lead to minimal morbidity at the donor site. Urethroplasty using bladder mucosa was first described by Memmelaar in 1947 (3). The main limitation in using bladder mucosal grafts has been the invasiveness of open harvesting (4). We describe an endoscopic technique using Holmium: YAG laser to harvest bladder mucosal graft for substitution urethroplasty. Methodology: A 33-year-old male with no history of urethral instrumentation, trauma, or infection presented with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms. On retrograde urethrogram a 6cm bulbar urethral stricture was identified. Several options were discussed, and the patient opted for a one-sided onlay dorsal urethroplasty (5) using a bladder mucosal graft. Equipment used to harvest the graft included an 18.5Fr continuous flow laser endoscope with a Kuntz working element (RZ) and a 60W Holmium Laser (Quanta) with 550μm laser fiber. The procedure was started by making a perineal incision, urethral mobilization and incision of the stricture segment. The laser endoscope was then introduced via the perineum. Settings of 0.5J, 30 Hz, and long pulse were used and a 7 x 2.5cm graft was harvested from the posterior bladder wall. Hemostasis of the harvest site was performed. The bladder mucosal graft was thinned in similar fashion to a buccal mucosal graft and sutured as per previously described techniques. Conclusion: Endoscopic Holmium Laser harvesting of bladder mucosal graft is feasible and may allow this graft to become an alternative to buccal mucosa. Further studies are required to define its role in urethral reconstruction.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adult , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Lasers, Solid-State/therapeutic use , Urethra/surgery , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Mouth Mucosa/transplantation
9.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(1): 198-199, Jan.-Feb. 2022.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1356291

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: The transverse vaginal septum (TVS) with congenital urethra-vaginal fistula (CUVF) is a rare anomaly of the mullerian duct (1, 2). Incomplete channelling of the vaginal plate, or an abnormality in the fusion of the vaginal component of mullerian duct with the urogenital sinus results in TVS (1, 3, 4). High CUVF occurs due to the persistent communication between the urogenital sinus and utero-vaginal primordium at the tubercle sinus, whereas low CUVF is due to excessive apoptosis of the vaginal plate during channelling (5). The principles of management of CUVF with TVS include: 1) TVS resection, 2) Create a neovagina. We present a case of CUVF with TVS managed by robotic assistance. Material and methods: A 24-year-old female, married for 3 years, presented with cyclical hematuria since menarche, dyspareunia and primary infertility. Examination revealed blind ending vagina 4cm from the introitus. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fistulous communication between urethra and vagina, and TVS. Cystourethroscopy confirmed a proximal urethra-vaginal fistula. Urethroscopy guided puncture of the TVS was performed, tract dilated and a catheter was placed across it. Robotic assisted transvaginal approach was planned. Air docking of robot was performed. Traction on the catheter was given to identify the incised edges of the septum. Vaginal flaps were raised laterally, fistulous tract was excised. Proximal vagina mucosa was identified and vaginoplasty was performed. Result: Patient's postoperative recovery was uneventful. Urethral catheter was removed after 5 days. She had normal voiding and menstruation. Vaginoscopy performed at 1st month follow-up, revealed an adequate vaginal lumen. Vaginal moulds were advised for 6 weeks during the night, following which she resumed her sexual activity. She conceived 6 months post-surgery, and delivered a child by caesarean section. Conclusion: We successfully managed this case by resection of septum, neovagina creation and thereby achieving normal menstruation and conception. The advantages of robotic approach were magnification, precision and manoeuvrability in a limited space, avoiding a vaginal release incision.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Vaginal Diseases , Vaginal Fistula/surgery , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Urethra/surgery , Urethra/diagnostic imaging , Vagina/surgery
10.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(1): 78-86, Jan.-Feb. 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1356292

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: Posterior urethral valves (PUVs) are the most common cause of congenital bladder obstruction in boys. Our aim was to assess the impact of early diagnosis and fulguration of PUVs on bladder function and compare their functional and urodynamic outcome with children who underwent delayed intervention. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 153 patients who underwent primary valve ablation from two tertiary hospitals between 2001 and 2018. Patients have been divided into 2 groups, group 1 included 69 patients who were detected antenatally and underwent early fulguration of PUVs while group 2 included 84 children presented postnatally and underwent delayed valve ablation. The recorded data throughout follow-up in renal function tests, urodynamics and changes in the upper urinary tracts were evaluated and compared. Results: Median age at time of valve ablation was 10 days in group 1 and 7 months in group 2. The median follow-up period was 6.5 and 7 years in group 1 and 2, respectively. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) developed in 15 (22%) boys in group 1 while in group 2 it was observed in 31 (37%), p=0.04. While Q-max, mean bladder capacity and post-void residual (PVR) volumes were comparable in both groups, percent PVR was significantly higher in group 2 (3.27 vs. 1.44, p=0.002). Detrusor overactivity was slightly different in both groups (p = 0.07). Conclusions: Compared to delayed intervention, primary ablation of PUVs during the early neonatal life possibly provides the optimum chance to have optimum renal function without impact on bladder function.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Pregnancy , Infant, Newborn , Child , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder Diseases , Urethra/surgery , Urodynamics , Retrospective Studies
11.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 311-316, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928538

ABSTRACT

Repairing glans dehiscence after failed hypospadias repair is challenging for pediatric surgeons. Here, we introduced and evaluated a newly modified Mathieu technique, Mathieu combined tunnel (MCT), which involves multiple custom-designed flaps for the shortage of flap source material after repeated operations; we also constructed a tunnel to avoid the glans incision that may carry new risks of dehiscence. This retrospective study included 26 patients who were consecutively admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University (Guangzhou, China) for glans dehiscence repair after failed hypospadias repair from October 2014 to October 2020; sixteen patients underwent surgery using the MCT (MCT group) and ten patients underwent surgery using the tubularized incised plate (TIP) technique (TIP group). The operative time, blood loss, postoperative complications, normal urethral meatus rate, success rate, and Hypospadias Objective Penile Evaluation (HOPE) score were compared between the two groups. The MCT group achieved an overall satisfactory penile appearance and voiding function, with a higher rate of normal urethral meatus (15/16, 93.8%) and a lower rate of glans dehiscence (1/16, 6.2%), compared with the TIP group (70.0% and 30.0%, respectively). However, these differences were not statistically significant, possibly because of the limited number of patients (all P > 0.05). Mean postoperative HOPE scores were similar in the MCT group (mean ± standard deviation: 8.83 ± 0. 89) and TIP group (8.94 ± 0.57) (P > 0.05). No significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of blood loss and success rate, nor in the rates of various complications (e.g., fistula, urethral stricture, and glans dehiscence). In conclusion, the MCT technique appears to be feasible and reliable for repairing glans dehiscence after failed hypospadias repair.


Subject(s)
Child , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Hypospadias/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Urethra/surgery , Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male/methods
12.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(5): 1032-1036, Sept.-Oct. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1286804

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT The objective of this study is describing a technique with the use of a tunica vaginalis flap (TVF) to cover the suture line during anterior urethroplasty in patients with kippered urethra due to chronic indwelling catheterization (CIC). We studied 5 patients (mean age=50.2) with a neurogenic bladder that developed urethral erosion after a long period of CIC. Foley catheter was removed on the 14th postoperative day. One patient developed wound infection and utethrocutaneous fistula, which was conservatively managed and after 12 months of follow-up all the patients didn't report difficulties in intermittent self-catheterization. In conclusion, a urethroplasty with TVF technique may be a viable method for repairing penile urethral erosions, but further studies are required with a bigger sample to confirm our results.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Fistula , Hypospadias/surgery , Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male , Surgical Flaps , Urethra/surgery
14.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(4): 829-840, Jul.-Aug. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1286765

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: The diagnosis and treatment of female urethral stricture disease (FUSD) are practiced variably due to the scarcity of data on evaluation, variable definitions, and lack of long-term surgical outcomes. FUSD is difficult to rule out solely on the basis of a successful calibration with 14F catheter. In this study, we have tried to characterize the variable clinical presentation of FUSD, the diagnostic utility of calibration, videourodynamic study(VUDS), and urethroscopy in planning surgical management. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of records of 16 patients who underwent surgical management of FUSD was analyzed. The clinical history, examination findings, and the results of all the investigations (including uroflowmetry, VUDS findings, urethroscopy) they underwent, the procedures they had undergone, and the follow-up data were studied. Results: A total of 16 patients underwent surgical management of FUSD. 13 out of 16 patients had successful calibration with 14F catheter on the initial presentation. These 13 patients on VUDS demonstrated significant BOO and had variable stigmata of stricture on urethroscopy. The mean IPSS, flow rate, and PVR at presentation and after urethroplasty were 23.88±4.95, 7.72±4.25mL/s, 117.06±74.46mL and 3.50±3.44, 22.34±4.80mL/s, and 12.50±8.50mL, respectively. (p <0.05). The mean flow rate after endo dilation(17F) (n=12) was 11.4±2.5mL/s while after urethroplasty improved to 20.30±4.19mL/s and was statistically significant(p <0.05). Conclusions: An adept correlation between clinical assessment, urethroscopy findings, and VUDS is key in objectively identifying FUSD and planning surgical management. A good caliber of the urethra is not sufficient enough to rule out a significant obstruction due to FUSD. Early urethroplasty provides significantly better outcomes in patients who have failed dilation as a treatment.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male , Urethra/surgery , Calibration , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
15.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(4): 856-860, Jul.-Aug. 2021. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1286774

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT The management of complex urethral stenosis may involve different surgical techniques. As retraction of the graft may account for surgical failure, this risk increases in patients with more extensive stenosis requiring a graft of greater diameter. Although double grafts have already been used to maximize success in these cases, we propose a modified technique for urethroplasty with longitudinal urethral incision. The hypothesis was that this technique would increase the lumen by using only a urethral incision on the dorsal surface. Two patients presenting with recurrent urethral stenosis underwent urethroplasty using a double graft of oral mucosa that preserves the integrity of the spongy tissue and allows ventral inlay graft fixation using a midline relaxing incision in the portion of the urethra with stenosis. In both cases, the urethrocystoscopy and uroflowmetry performed after surgery showed a pervious and complacent urethra. After four and six months of follow-up, the postoperative outcomes were satisfactory for both patients. Further studies involving larger numbers of patients and long-term follow-up are required to evaluate the effectiveness of this method.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male , Urethra/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Mouth Mucosa/surgery
17.
São Paulo med. j ; 139(3): 241-250, May-June 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1252244

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Vesicourethral anastomotic stenosis (VUAS) following retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) significantly worsens quality of life. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between proliferative hypertrophic scar formation and VUAS, and predict more appropriate surgical intervention for preventing recurrent VUAS. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective cross-sectional single-center study on data covering January 2009 to December 2019. METHODS: Among 573 male patients who underwent RRP due to prostate cancer, 80 with VUAS were included. They were divided into two groups according to VUAS treatment method: dilatation using Amplatz renal dilators (39 patients); or endoscopic bladder neck incision/resection (41 patients). The Vancouver scar scale (VSS) was used to evaluate the characteristics of scars that occurred for any reason before development of VUAS. RESULTS: Over a median follow-up of 72 months (range 12-105) after RRP, 17 patients (21.3%) had recurrence of VUAS. Although the treatment success rates were similar (79.5% versus 78.0%; P = 0.875), receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that dilatation using Amplatz dilators rather than endoscopic bladder neck incision/resection in patients with VSS scores 4, 5 and 6 may significantly reduce VUAS recurrence. A strong positive relationship was observed between VSS and total number of VUAS occurrences (r: 0.689; P < 0.001). VSS score (odds ratio, OR: 5.380; P < 0.001) and time until occurrence of VUAS (OR: 1.628; P = 0.008) were the most significant predictors for VUAS recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: VSS score can be used as a prediction tool for choosing more appropriate surgical intervention, for preventing recurrent VUAS.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Urethral Stricture/etiology , Urethral Stricture/prevention & control , Cicatrix, Hypertrophic , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Prostatectomy/adverse effects , Quality of Life , Urethra/surgery , Cross-Sectional Studies , Retrospective Studies , Constriction, Pathologic , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control
18.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(2): 237-250, Mar.-Apr. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1154443

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: The objective is to summarize and characterize the long-term success of anterior augmentation urethroplasty in published series. The current literature on AU consists largely of retrospective series reporting intermediate follow-up and incompletely characterize the long term outcomes of AU. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature review was performed consistent with PRISMA guidelines to characterize long-term outcomes of AU with a minimum upper limit follow-up of 100 months. Penile/preputial skin flaps and graft and oral mucosal graft urethroplasties were included. The primary outcome was stricture-free survival for one-stage AU. Secondary analysis evaluated differences in outcomes based on two failure definitions: the need for intervention versus presence of recurrent stricture on cystoscopy or urethrography. Hazard rates were induced from the reported failure rates of one-stage AU and fixed and random effect models were fitted to the data. Additional subset analysis, removing potential confounders (lichen sclerosus, hypospadias and penile skin graft), was performed. Results: Ten studies met inclusion criteria, and two studies reported separate outcomes for grafts and flaps, and thus were included separately in the analysis. The mean hazard rate across all studies was 0.0044, the corresponding survival rates at 1 year 0.948, 5 years 0.766, 10 years 0.587, and 15 years 0.45. Subset analysis of the 4 select and homogeneous studies noted 1, 5, 10, and 15 years survival rates of 0.97, 0.96, 0.74, and 0.63, respectively. Conclusions: The long-term success rates of augmentation urethroplasty are appear to be worse than previously appreciated and patients should be counseled accordingly.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male , Urethra/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Mouth Mucosa
19.
Journal of Peking University(Health Sciences) ; (6): 798-802, 2021.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-942256

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To summarize the clinical outcomes of partial pubectomy assisted anastomotic urethroplasty for male patients with pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect (PFUDD) and discuss the skills of partial pubectomy.@*METHODS@#The clinical data of 63 male patients with PFUDD were retrospective reviewed. The procedure of the anastomotic urethroplasty was as follows: (1) circumferentially mobilizing the bulbar urethra; (2) separating the corporal bodies; (3) performing the urethral anastomosis after partial pubectomy and exposure of the healthy two ends of the urethra.@*RESULTS@#The mean age of the patients was (39.2±15.6) years (range: 15-72 years). The median time between incidents and operation was 15 months (range: 3-240 months) and the mean length of stricture was (3.85±0.91) cm (range: 1.5-5.5 cm). All the patients had undergone suprapubic cystostomy in acute setting. Thirteen patients (20.6%) were re-do cases and the patients who had undergone dilation, direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU), and open primary realignment were 22 (34.9%), 8 (12.7%), and 8 (12.7%), respectively. Assisted with partial pubectomy, the anastomotic urethroplasty had been successfully performed in all the patients. The mean time of operation was (160.2±28.1) min (110-210 min), and the mean evaluated blood loss was (261.1±130.3) mL (100-800 mL). There were 3 cases (4.8%) with perioperative blood transfusions. The postoperative complications were bleeding and urinary tract infection, which were controlled conservatively. The mean maximum urine flow rate was (23.7±7.4) mL/s (15.0-48.2 mL/s) after removing the catheters 4 weeks after urethroplasty. The median follow-up was 23 months (12-37 months). The urethroscopy showed 2 cases of stricture recurrences and 1 case of iatrogenic penile urethral stricture due the symptoms of urinary tract infection and decreased urine flow and all of them were successfully managed with dilation.@*CONCLUSION@#Partial pubectomy can effectively reduce the gap between the ends of the urethra and promote tension-free anastomosis during the anastomotic urethroplsty for patients with PFUDD. The skills of the procedure include good exposure of the anterior surface of pubic symphysis between the separated corporal bodies, carefully mobilizing and securing the deep dorsal vein of the penis, removing the partial pubic bone and the harden scar beneath the pubic bone for good exposure of the proximal urethral end.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Anastomosis, Surgical , Pelvic Bones/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Urethra/surgery , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male
20.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(6): 962-970, Nov.-Dec. 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134260

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective To examine the impact of obesity on perioperative outcomes and urethral stricture recurrence after anterior urethroplasty. Material and Methods We reviewed our prospectively maintained single-surgeon database to identify men with anterior urethral strictures who had undergone anastomotic or augmentation urethroplasty between October 2012 and March 2018. In all, 210 patients were included for primary analysis of perioperative outcomes, while 193 patients with at least 12 months follow-up were included for secondary analysis of stricture recurrence. Patients grouped by BMI were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses for perioperative outcomes and log rank testing for recurrence-free survival. Results Overall, 41% (n=86) of patients were obese and 58.6% (n=123) had bulbar urethral strictures. Obese patients had significantly longer urethral strictures (mean=6.7cm±4.7) than nonobese patients (p <0.001). Though urethroplasty in obese patients was associated with increased estimated blood loss (EBL) relative to normal BMI patients on both univariate (p=0.003) and multivariate (p <0.001) analyses, there was no difference in operative time, length of stay, or complication rate between BMI groups. At a mean follow-up interval of 36.7 months, 15% (n=29) of patients had stricture recurrence, yet recurrence-free survival was not significantly different between groups (log rank p=0.299). Dorsal augmentation urethroplasty resulted in significantly fewer recurrences in obese patients compared to nonobese patients (p=0.036). Conclusion Despite the association with increased urethral stricture length and EBL, obesity is not predictive of adverse perioperative outcomes or stricture recurrence. Obese patients should be offered urethral reconstruction, but patient selection and preoperative counseling remain imperative.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adult , Aged , Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Recurrence , Urethra/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Obesity/complications
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