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1.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 371-372, March-Apr. 2022.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364945

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: Tissue transfer has been used in urethral reconstruction for decades, and several grafts have been described (1, 2). The ideal graft would have optimal tissue characteristics and lead to minimal morbidity at the donor site. Urethroplasty using bladder mucosa was first described by Memmelaar in 1947 (3). The main limitation in using bladder mucosal grafts has been the invasiveness of open harvesting (4). We describe an endoscopic technique using Holmium: YAG laser to harvest bladder mucosal graft for substitution urethroplasty. Methodology: A 33-year-old male with no history of urethral instrumentation, trauma, or infection presented with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms. On retrograde urethrogram a 6cm bulbar urethral stricture was identified. Several options were discussed, and the patient opted for a one-sided onlay dorsal urethroplasty (5) using a bladder mucosal graft. Equipment used to harvest the graft included an 18.5Fr continuous flow laser endoscope with a Kuntz working element (RZ) and a 60W Holmium Laser (Quanta) with 550μm laser fiber. The procedure was started by making a perineal incision, urethral mobilization and incision of the stricture segment. The laser endoscope was then introduced via the perineum. Settings of 0.5J, 30 Hz, and long pulse were used and a 7 x 2.5cm graft was harvested from the posterior bladder wall. Hemostasis of the harvest site was performed. The bladder mucosal graft was thinned in similar fashion to a buccal mucosal graft and sutured as per previously described techniques. Conclusion: Endoscopic Holmium Laser harvesting of bladder mucosal graft is feasible and may allow this graft to become an alternative to buccal mucosa. Further studies are required to define its role in urethral reconstruction.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adult , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Lasers, Solid-State/therapeutic use , Urethra/surgery , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Mouth Mucosa/transplantation
2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(1): 78-86, Jan.-Feb. 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1356292

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: Posterior urethral valves (PUVs) are the most common cause of congenital bladder obstruction in boys. Our aim was to assess the impact of early diagnosis and fulguration of PUVs on bladder function and compare their functional and urodynamic outcome with children who underwent delayed intervention. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 153 patients who underwent primary valve ablation from two tertiary hospitals between 2001 and 2018. Patients have been divided into 2 groups, group 1 included 69 patients who were detected antenatally and underwent early fulguration of PUVs while group 2 included 84 children presented postnatally and underwent delayed valve ablation. The recorded data throughout follow-up in renal function tests, urodynamics and changes in the upper urinary tracts were evaluated and compared. Results: Median age at time of valve ablation was 10 days in group 1 and 7 months in group 2. The median follow-up period was 6.5 and 7 years in group 1 and 2, respectively. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) developed in 15 (22%) boys in group 1 while in group 2 it was observed in 31 (37%), p=0.04. While Q-max, mean bladder capacity and post-void residual (PVR) volumes were comparable in both groups, percent PVR was significantly higher in group 2 (3.27 vs. 1.44, p=0.002). Detrusor overactivity was slightly different in both groups (p = 0.07). Conclusions: Compared to delayed intervention, primary ablation of PUVs during the early neonatal life possibly provides the optimum chance to have optimum renal function without impact on bladder function.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Pregnancy , Infant, Newborn , Child , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder Diseases , Urethra/surgery , Urodynamics , Retrospective Studies
3.
Chinese Journal of Oncology ; (12): 209-218, 2022.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-927318

ABSTRACT

Objective: Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in urology. Urothelial carcinoma accounts for about 90% of all bladder malignancies. According to whether the tumor invades the bladder muscle, it can be divided into non-muscle invasive bladder cancer and muscle invasive bladder cancer. Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer patients and high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients who have failed Bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment. Due to the comorbidity of bladder cancer and the potential deterioration of the quality of life after surgery, many patients were not suitable or refused for radical cystectomy. Therefore, it is vital to find a bladder-preserving treatment that can achieve cure other than radical cystectomy. Bladder-preserving therapy that balances tumor control and quality of life serves as an alternative and supplement to radical cystectomy. This consensus is based on contemporary evidence-based medicine, combined with the native clinical practice of bladder preservation in a multidisciplinary treatment manner. To some extent, this consensus serves as a guidance for bladder-preservation therapy of bladder cancer in China. Several issues are extensively discussed here, including organizational structure and workflow of multidisciplinary treatment, the selection of patients for bladder-preserving therapy, treatment options and regimens, follow-up, as well as regimen choices of recurrence after bladder-preserving therapy.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell/surgery , Combined Modality Therapy , Consensus , Humans , Neoplasm Invasiveness/pathology , Quality of Life , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery
4.
Einstein (Säo Paulo) ; 20: eRC5743, 2022. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1360396

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Migration of foreign bodies into the urinary tract is a rare event. In certain instances, to unravel the way that objects arrived in the urinary tract is not easy. We report the case of an accidentally swallowed wooden toothpick that migrated and was found in the left ureterovesical junction, protruding into the bladder. Even though the computed tomography scan is widely employed to evaluate the urinary tract, this resource does not have a good sensitivity for detecting foreign bodies. Our report presents an insight into the best imaging approach if wooden toothpicks are suspected. In the present case, the endoscopic treatment was possible with an uneventful outcome and a complete resolution of symptoms.


Subject(s)
Humans , Ureter/surgery , Ureter/diagnostic imaging , Foreign Bodies/surgery , Foreign Bodies/complications , Foreign Bodies/diagnostic imaging , Intestinal Perforation , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder/diagnostic imaging
6.
Acta cir. bras ; 35(12): e351208, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1152684

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To describe the anatomy of the swine urinary system using computed tomography and to discuss the role of this animal as an experimental model for urological procedures. Methods: Three male Landrace pigs underwent computed tomography and the anatomy of the urinary system and renal circulation was analyzed and described. Results: In all animals, 2 kidneys, 2 ureters and one bladder were identified. Each kidney presented a single renal artery vascularization, with a mean diameter on the right of 4.45 and 5.31 mm on the left (p < 0.0001) and single renal vein drainage, with a mean diameter on the right of 5.78 and 5.82 mm on the left (p = 0.0336). The average renal length was 9.85 cm on the right and 10.30 cm on the left (p < 0.0001). The average renal volume was 113.70 cm3 on the right and 109.70 cm3 on the left (p < 0.0001). The average length of the ureter was 19.78 cm on the right and 22.08 cm on the left (p < 0.0001). The average bladder volume was 423.70 cm3. Conclusions: The data obtained show similarities with human anatomy, suggesting the viability of the swine model for planning preclinical trials, basic research, refinement in experimental surgery and surgical training for urological procedures.


Subject(s)
Animals , Ureter , Renal Artery , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Swine , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder/diagnostic imaging , Kidney/surgery , Kidney/diagnostic imaging
7.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(4): 681-685, July-Aug. 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1019875

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective The objective of bladder augmentation (BA) is to create a low-pressure reservoir with adequate capacity. Despite its benefits, the use of intestinal patches in bladder enlargement provides a high risk of developing complications and BA with demucosalised bowel represents a potential alternative. Therefore, this study evaluated urological parameters and long-term clinical follow-up of patients submitted to non-secretory BA in a single center with 25 years of experience. Materials and Methods Patients treated with BA underwent urological evaluation, which included history, physical examination and urodynamic study. The main urodynamic parameters (bladder capacity and bladder compliance) were assessed in the pre and postoperative moments, and compared by the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. The main long-term complications were described. Results 269 patients (mean age 14±13 years, 47% male) underwent BA with the use of demucolised intestinal segments. Among the patients in the sample, 187 (69.52%) had neurogenic bladder, 68 (25.28%) had bladder exstrophy, nine had tuberculosis (3.34%), four had a posterior urethral valve (1.49%) and one with hypospadia (0.37%). After the surgical procedure, a significant increment in both urodynamic parameters was found, with a 222% increase in bladder capacity and 604% in bladder compliance (p <0.001 in both analyzes). Mean follow-up time ranged from 2 to 358 months, with a median of 72 months (IQR 74-247). Among all patients, 5 presented spontaneous perforation. Conclusion The study showed statistically significant increase in both compliance and bladder capacity after non-secretory BA, with a low rate of severe complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Adult , Young Adult , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder Diseases/surgery , Postoperative Period , Urodynamics , Urinary Bladder/physiopathology , Urinary Bladder Diseases/physiopathology , Urinary Bladder Diseases/rehabilitation , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , Follow-Up Studies , Treatment Outcome , Statistics, Nonparametric , Middle Aged
8.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(4): 853-853, July-Aug. 2019.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1040056

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction Urological surgery is estimated to be the third most common cause of iatrogenic-retained foreign bodies 1. Presentation A 76-year old man was undergoing a transurethral resection of bladder tumor with a 26-Ch continuous flow resectoscope (Karl Storz, Germany). Before starting resection, a detachment of resectoscope sheath tip was noted. The ceramic tip was free-floating in the bladder lumen, and it would not fit within the sheath, making direct extraction using the loop impossible. An attempt was made to break it with a stone punch, but it was unsuccessful due to impossibility of closing it in the branches. Therefore, we decided to fragment the tip with holmium laser (RevoLix®, LISA Laser products, Germany), using an 800-micron, front-firing fiber. Laser device was settled at with 2.5 J energy and 5 Hz frequency. Ceramic appeared very hard, but it was difficult to carry on breaking with this setting because of tip retropulsion. Then, laser setting was switched to lower energy and higher frequency (1 J and 13 Hz). This setting guaranteed the same power of 13 W, but with minimal retropulsion. Results Tip was fragmented against the posterior bladder wall in seven pieces, which were retrieved trough the outer sheath. A total 5.62 kJ were used to fragment it. At the end, superficial lesions of the posterior bladder wall were highlighted. Surgical time was 55 minutes. Patient was discharged home next day without problems. Conclusions Holmium laser fragmentation is a safe and effective approach to remove foreign bodies from the bladder.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Aged , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Ceramics/radiation effects , Equipment Failure , Lasers, Solid-State/therapeutic use , Foreign Bodies/surgery , Radiation Dosage , Time Factors , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery , Treatment Outcome , Operative Time
9.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(2): 408-409, Mar.-Apr. 2019.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1040053

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT A healthy 37 - year - old woman referred to our clinic with one - year history of recurrent urinary tract infection, dysuria and frequency. Her past medical history informed us that an IUD (Copper TCu380A) had been inserted 11 years ago. Eleven months after the IUD insertion she had become pregnant, unexpectedly. At that time, she had undergone gynecological examination and abdominal ultrasound study. However, the IUD had not been found, and the gynecologist had made the diagnosis of spontaneous fall out of the IUD. She had experienced normal pregnancy and caesarian section with no complications. On physical examination, pelvic examination was normal and no other abnormalities were noted. Urinalysis revealed microhematuria and pyuria. Urine culture was positive for Escherichia coli. Ultrasound study revealed a calculus of about 10 mm in the bladder with a hyperdense lesion. A plain abdominal radiograph was requested which showed a metallic foreign body in the pelvis. We failed to remove the IUD by cystoscopic forceps because it had strongly invaded into the uterine and bladder wall. Despite previous papers suggesting open or laparoscopic surgeries in this situation (1, 2), we performed a modified cystoscopic extraction technique. We made a superficial cut in the bladder mucosa and muscle with J - hook monopolar electrocautery and extracted it completely with gentle traction. This technique can decrease the indication of open or laparoscopic surgery for extraction of intravesical IUDs. In the other side of the coin, this technique may increase the risk of uterovesical fistula. Therefore, the depth of incision is important and the surgeon should cut the bladder wall superficially with caution. Although present study is a case report which is normally classified as with low level of evidence, it seems that our modified cystoscopic extraction technique is a safe and useful method for extraction of partially intravesical IUDs.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Device Removal/instrumentation , Cystoscopy/methods , Intrauterine Devices/adverse effects , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Foreign-Body Migration/surgery , Laparoscopy/methods
10.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(2): 253-261, Mar.-Apr. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1002195

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate safety, efficacy and functional outcomes after open vesicourethral re - anastomosis using different approaches based on previous urinary continence. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of patients treated from 2002 to 2017 due to vesicourethral anastomosis stricture (VUAS) post radical prostatectomy (RP) who failed endoscopic treatment with at least 3 months of follow-up. Continent and incontinent patients post RP were assigned to abdominal (AA) or perineal approach (PA), respectively. Demographic and perioperative variables were registered. Follow-up was completed with clinical interview, uroflowmetry and cystoscopy every 4 months. Success was defined as asymptomatic patients with urethral lumen that allows a 14 French flexible cystoscope. Results: Twenty patients underwent open re-anastomosis for VUAS after RP between 2002 and 2017. Mean age was 63.7 years (standard deviation 1.4) and median follow-up was 10 months (range 3 - 112). The approach distribution was PA 10 patients (50%) and AA 10 patients (50%). The mean surgery time and median hospital time were 246.2 ± 35.8 minutes and 4 days (range 2 - 10), respectively with no differences between approaches. No significant complication rate was found. Three patients in the AA group had gait disorder with favorable evolution and no sequels. Estimated 2 years primary success rate was 80%. After primary procedures 89.9% remained stenosis - free. All PA patients remained incontinent, and 90% AA remained continent during follow-up. Conclusion: Open vesicourethral re - anastomosis treatment is a reasonable treatment option for recurrent VUAS after RP. All patients with perineal approach remained incontinent while incontinence rate in abdominal approach was rather low.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatectomy/methods , Urethra/surgery , Urethral Stricture/etiology , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Prostatectomy/adverse effects , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Urinary Incontinence/etiology , Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction/surgery , Anastomosis, Surgical , Retrospective Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Treatment Outcome , Erectile Dysfunction/etiology , Middle Aged
11.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(4): 826-830, July-Aug. 2018. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-954088

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Prostatic utricle cyst is a rare congenital anomaly. Symptomatic cysts require treatment. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, but is challenging due to close proximity to vas deferens, ejaculatory ducts, bladder, prostate, rectum and pelvic nerves. Complications include rectal injury, ureteral injury, impotence, infertility and faecal incontinence. We here report a rare complication in which bladder was accidentally removed during laparoscopic excision of prostatic utricle cyst. To best of our knowledge such a complication has never been reported previously. We also describe the possible cause of this accident and suggest ways to prevent this disastrous complication.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Diseases/surgery , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Cystectomy , Laparoscopy/adverse effects , Cysts/surgery , Intraoperative Complications/etiology , Prostatic Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Urinary Bladder/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Cysts/diagnostic imaging , Intraoperative Complications/diagnostic imaging
12.
Acta cir. bras ; 33(8): 673-683, Aug. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-949378

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of the cellulosic exopolysaccharide membrane (CEM) as a urethral reinforcement for urethrovesical anastomosis. Methods: Twenty eight rabbits were submitted to urethrovesical anastomosis with or without CEM reinforcement. The animals were divided into 4 groups: C7, CEM7, C14 and CEM14: (C= only anastomosis or CEM = anastomosis + CEM), evaluated after 7 weeks, and 14 weeks. The biointegration and biocompatibility of CEM were evaluated according to stenosis, fistula, urethral wall thickness, urethral epithelium, rate of inflammation and vascularization. Results: Between the two experimental groups, the difference in the number of stenosis or urinary fistula was not statistically significant. The morphometric analysis revealed preservation of urethral lumen, well adhered CEM without extrusion, a controlled inflammatory process and implant vascularization. The urothelium height remained constant over time after CEM reinforcement and the membrane wall was thicker, statistically, after 14 weeks. Conclusion: The absence of extrusion, stenosis or urinary fistula after 14 weeks of urethrovesical anastomosis demonstrates cellulosic exopolysaccharide membrane biocompatibility and biointegration with tendency to a thicker wall.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rabbits , Urethra/surgery , Biocompatible Materials/therapeutic use , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Cellulose/therapeutic use , Polysaccharides, Bacterial/therapeutic use , Time Factors , Urethra/pathology , Urinary Bladder/pathology , Industrial Microbiology/methods , Materials Testing , Anastomosis, Surgical , Cellulose/biosynthesis , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Translational Research, Biomedical , Neovascularization, Pathologic
13.
Acta cir. bras ; 33(8): 713-722, Aug. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-949379

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To develop a model and curriculum for simulated training of an effective and well accepted laparoscopic vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA). Methods: Experimental longitudinal study of quantitative character. The sample consisted of 12 general surgery residents and 6 urology residents (R3). The training consisted of making twelve VUAs on synthetic organs. The training was divided into four sessions and accompanied by an instructor who performed positive feedback. The evaluation of the anastomoses considered the time and the analysis of the operative technique through the global evaluation scale Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). Results: Residents showed a reduction in operative time and evolution in the surgical technique statistically significant (p<0.01). The best-rated items were the facilitator positive feedback and the fact that the training was carried out at the teaching hospital premises. Conclusions: The proposed training model was well accepted and proved to be effective in reducing operative time and improving laparoscopic skills. The training should be fractionated (4 sessions in 3 weeks), repetitive (12 anastomoses) and have positive feedback.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Urethra/surgery , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Laparoscopy/education , Simulation Training/methods , Time Factors , Anastomosis, Surgical/education , Analysis of Variance , Longitudinal Studies , Clinical Competence , Statistics, Nonparametric , Internship and Residency , Models, Anatomic
14.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(3): 624-628, May-June 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-954045

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To present our technique of ureteroileal bypass to treat uretero-enteric stric- tures in urinary diversion. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty-one medical records were reviewed from patients submitted to radical cystectomy to treat muscle-invasive bladder cancer between 2013 and 2015. Twelve (8.5%) patients developed uretero-enteric anastomotic stricture during follow-up. Five patients were treated with endoscopic dilatation and double J placement. Four were treated surgically with standard terminal-lateral im- plantation. Three patients with uretero-enteric anastomotic stricture were treated at our institution by "ureteroileal bypass", one of them was treated with robotic surgery. Results: All patients had the diagnosis of uretero-enteric anastomotic stricture via computerized tomography and DTPA renal scan. Time between cystectomy and diag- nosis of uretero-enteric anastomotic stricture varied from five months to three years. Mean operative time was 120±17.9 minutes (98 to 142 min) and hospital stay was 3.3±0.62 days (3 to 4 days). Mean follow-up was 24±39.5 months (6 to 72 months). During follow-up, all patients were asymptomatic and presented improvement in ure-terohydronephrosis. Serum creatinine of all patients had been stable. Conclusions: Latero-lateral ureter re-implantation is feasible by open or even robotic surgery with positive results, reasonable operation time, and without complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Aged , Postoperative Complications/surgery , Ureter/surgery , Ureteral Obstruction/surgery , Urinary Diversion/adverse effects , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Ileum/surgery , Urinary Diversion/methods , Anastomosis, Surgical/adverse effects , Anastomosis, Surgical/methods , Urinary Catheterization/methods , Cystectomy/methods , Reproducibility of Results , Follow-Up Studies , Treatment Outcome , Constriction, Pathologic/surgery , Operative Time , Urinary Catheters , Length of Stay , Medical Illustration
15.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(2): 384-389, Mar.-Apr. 2018. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-892983

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction The appropriate closure of the urinary bladder is important to many urologic procedures to avoid the formation of fistulas and strictures by excessive fibrosis. This paper presents the alterations in the bladder healing process of rats after the topical use of Copaiba oil (Copaifera reticulata). Material and Methods Ten male Wistar rats were used and randomly divided into two groups: Control group (CG): injected 1ml/kg of saline solution on the suture line; and Copaiba group (CpG): 0.63ml/kg of copaiba oil applied to the suture line. Euthanasia was performed on the seventh day after surgery. The criteria observed were adherences formation, histopathological modifications and stereology for collagen. Results Both groups showed adhesions to the bladder, with no statistically significant difference (p=0.1481). The microscopic evaluation revealed a trend to more severe acute inflammation process on the CpG, but there was statistical difference only in the giant cells reaction (p=0.0472) and vascular proliferation (p=0.0472). The stereology showed no difference. Conclusion The copaiba oil modified the healing process, improving the quantity of giant cells and vascular proliferation, but not interfered in the collagen physiology.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Wound Healing/drug effects , Urinary Bladder/drug effects , Plant Oils/pharmacology , Fabaceae/chemistry , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder/pathology , Plant Oils/administration & dosage , Random Allocation , Administration, Topical , Rats, Wistar , Disease Models, Animal
16.
Arq. bras. med. vet. zootec. (Online) ; 70(5): 1397-1402, set.-out. 2018. ilus
Article in Portuguese | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-946864

ABSTRACT

O presente trabalho tem como objetivo relatar a realização de cistectomia total associada à ureterostomia abdominal, uma técnica ainda pouco descrita na veterinária, bem como descrever as complicações pós-operatórias observadas. Um canino da raça Akita, macho, 11 anos, castrado, foi atendido com histórico de prostração, hiporexia, disúria, hematúria e incontinência urinária havia aproximadamente 10 dias. No exame clínico, foi observada leve algia abdominal; demais parâmetros estavam dentro da normalidade. Os exames complementares de imagem revelaram presença de massa envolvendo grande parte da vesícula urinária. O paciente foi submetido à cirurgia de cistectomia total associada à implantação cutânea abdominal dos ureteres, e o exame histopatológico chegou ao diagnóstico de carcinoma de células de transicionais (CCT) infiltrativo não papilar. No pós-operatório, o paciente desenvolveu dermatite urêmica leve no local de inserção dos ureteres e estenose ureteral em região distal, de maneira que reintervenções cirúrgicas foram necessárias para a correção. Além disso, observaram-se pielonefrite e hidronefrose secundárias ao quadro obstrutivo. Devido às complicações pós-operatórias, a tutora optou pela eutanásia do cão. Dessa maneira, conclui-se que a estenose ureteral e a pielonefrite são possíveis complicações da técnica de cistectomia associada à implantação abdominal dos ureteres.(AU)


This study aims to report the technique of total cystectomy associated with abdominal ureterostomy, a technique -little described in veterinary medicine, as well as to describe the postoperative complications observed. A male Akita canine, 11 years old, castrated, was attended with a history of prostration, hyporexia, dysuria, hematuria, and urinary incontinence for approximately ten days. The clinical examination revealed mild abdominal pain and other parameters within the normal range. Complementary imaging studies revealed the presence of mass involving a large part of the urinary bladder. The patient underwent total cystectomy surgery associated with abdominal cutaneous implantation of the ureters and histopathological examination led to a diagnosis of non-papillary infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma. In the postoperative period, the patient developed mild uremic dermatitis at the insertion site of the ureters and ureteral stenosis in the distal region, so that surgical reinterventions were necessary for correction. In addition, pyelonephritis and hydronephrosis secondary to the obstructive condition were observed. Due to the postoperative complications, the tutor chose to euthanize the dog. Thus, it is concluded that ureteral stenosis and pyelonephritis are possible complications of the cystectomy technique associated with abdominal implantation of the ureters.(AU)


Subject(s)
Animals , Dogs , Cystectomy/veterinary , Dogs/abnormalities , Neoplasms/surgery , Ureterostomy/veterinary , Urethral Stricture , Urinary Bladder/surgery
17.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(6): 1176-1184, Nov.-Dec. 2017. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1040037

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: Robotic assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) presents challenges for the surgeon, especially during the initial learning curve. We aimed to evaluate early and mid-term functional outcomes and complications related to vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA), in patients who underwent RARP, during the initial experience in an academic hospital. We also assessed possible predictors of postoperative incontinence and compared these results with the literature. Materials and Methods: We prospectively collected data from consecutive patients that underwent RARP. Patients with at least 6 months of follow-up were included in the analysis for the following outcomes: time to complete VUA, continence and complications related to anastomosis. Nerve-sparing status, age, BMI, EBL, pathological tumor staging, and prostate size were evaluated as possible factors predicting early and midterm continence. Results were compared with current literature. Results: Data from 60 patients was assessed. Mean time to complete VUA was 34 minutes, and console time was 247 minutes. Continence in 6 months was 90%. Incidence of urinary leakage was 3.3%, no patients developed bladder neck contracture or postoperative urinary retention. On multivariate analysis, age and pathological staging was associated to 3-month continence status. Conclusion: Our data show that, during early experience with RARP in a public university hospital, it is possible to achieve good results regarding continence and other outcomes related to VUA. We also found that age and pathological staging was associated to early continence status.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Aged , Prostatectomy/methods , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Urethra/surgery , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Robotic Surgical Procedures/methods , Postoperative Complications , Prostatectomy/adverse effects , Anastomosis, Surgical/adverse effects , Anastomosis, Surgical/methods , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Robotic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Hospitals, University , Middle Aged
18.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(6): 1152-1159, Nov.-Dec. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-892912

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Aim: To investigate the histopathologic changes in native bladder and gastrointestinal segment, the relation between histopathologic changes, type of operation and the period passed over operation in patients with bladder augmentation. Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. Histopathologic evaluation of the cystoscopic mucosal biopsies from native bladder and enteric augment was performed in all patients. Results: Active or chronic non-specific inflammation of various degrees was found in all specimens except two. Metaplastic changes were detected in 3 patients. Two patients had squamous metaplasia (one focal, one extensive) and one patient had intestinal metaplasia. All metaplastic changes were found in native bladder specimens. The type of augmentation in patients with metaplastic changes were ileocystoplasty and sigmoidocystoplasty. No signs of malignancy were detected in any patient. Conclusion: The complexity of the disorders requiring bladder augmentation does not let the surgeons to draw a clear line between different groups of complications including malignancy formation. However, due to challenging course of the augmentation procedure itself, surgeons should be well aware of the possibility of malignancy development.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child , Adolescent , Adult , Young Adult , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder Diseases/surgery , Ileum/surgery , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/pathology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Biopsy , Urinary Bladder/pathology , Urinary Bladder Diseases/pathology , Ileum/pathology
19.
Acta cir. bras ; 32(4): 297-306, Apr. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-837697

ABSTRACT

Abstract Purpose: To evaluated the effects of L-lysine on the intestinal and urothelial epithelia in cystoplasty in rats. Methods: Twenty-eight 9-week-old rats were assigned to 4 groups: Group A (n=8) cystoplasty followed by administration of L-lysine (150 mg/kg body weight by gavage) for 30 weeks; Group B (n=8) cystoplasty + water for 30 weeks; Group C (n=6) L-lysine for 30 weeks; Group D (n=6) water for 30 weeks. Results: On histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin, mild to moderate hyperplasia transitional was observed in at the site of anastomosis in all animals submitted to cystoplasty (Groups A and B), but "transitional metaplasia" of the intestinal glandular epithelium was more accentuated in Group A (p=0.045). No inflammatory cells, dysplasia or abnormalities were observed. Staining with Alcian blue revealed a substantial reduction of goblet cells and mucins in the colon segment (Groups A and B). Conclusion: The administration of L-lysine to rats accelerated the development of transitional metaplasia in the epithelium of the colon segment in cystoplasty.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Rats , Carcinogenesis/chemically induced , Intestinal Mucosa/surgery , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Lysine/adverse effects , Urinary Diversion , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Disease Models, Animal , Carcinogenesis/pathology , Lysine/administration & dosage , Metaplasia/chemically induced , Metaplasia/pathology
20.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 43(1): 155-162, Jan.-Feb. 2017. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-840802

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction The surgical correction of bladder exstrophy remains challenging. In our institution, the repair has evolved from a staged repair to one-stage reconstruction. The one-stage reconstruction includes; bladder closure, Cantwell-Ransley neourethroplasty and abdominoplasty using groin flaps, without the need of pelvic ostheotomies. Repair of urinary continence (UC) and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is done after development of the infant. Objective To present our experience of our modified one-stage reconstruction of bladder exstrophy in male patients. Materials and Methods Medical records of male patients submitted to one-stage reconstruction of bladder exstrophy were analyzed retrospectively. Fifteen exstrophy bladder patients with mean age 4.2±7 years were treated at our institution between 1999-2013. Results 2 5 Conclusions One-stage reconstruction minimizes the number of surgical procedures required to achieve UC and potentiates bladder-neck function. The advantages of using groin flaps over current techniques for complete repair are the small risk for penile tissue loss and the avoidance of ostheotomies.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Young Adult , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Bladder Exstrophy/surgery , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods , Surgical Flaps , Time Factors , Medical Records , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Age Factors , Treatment Outcome , Operative Time , Length of Stay
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