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1.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(1): 78-86, Jan.-Feb. 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1356292

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: Posterior urethral valves (PUVs) are the most common cause of congenital bladder obstruction in boys. Our aim was to assess the impact of early diagnosis and fulguration of PUVs on bladder function and compare their functional and urodynamic outcome with children who underwent delayed intervention. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 153 patients who underwent primary valve ablation from two tertiary hospitals between 2001 and 2018. Patients have been divided into 2 groups, group 1 included 69 patients who were detected antenatally and underwent early fulguration of PUVs while group 2 included 84 children presented postnatally and underwent delayed valve ablation. The recorded data throughout follow-up in renal function tests, urodynamics and changes in the upper urinary tracts were evaluated and compared. Results: Median age at time of valve ablation was 10 days in group 1 and 7 months in group 2. The median follow-up period was 6.5 and 7 years in group 1 and 2, respectively. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) developed in 15 (22%) boys in group 1 while in group 2 it was observed in 31 (37%), p=0.04. While Q-max, mean bladder capacity and post-void residual (PVR) volumes were comparable in both groups, percent PVR was significantly higher in group 2 (3.27 vs. 1.44, p=0.002). Detrusor overactivity was slightly different in both groups (p = 0.07). Conclusions: Compared to delayed intervention, primary ablation of PUVs during the early neonatal life possibly provides the optimum chance to have optimum renal function without impact on bladder function.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Pregnancy , Infant, Newborn , Child , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder Diseases , Urethra/surgery , Urodynamics , Retrospective Studies
3.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(1): 31-51, Jan.-Feb. 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1356283

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: Defective closure of the neural tube affects different systems and generates sequelae, such as neurogenic bladder (NB). Myelomeningocele (MMC) represents the most frequent and most severe cause of NB in children. Damage of the renal parenchyma in children with NB acquired in postnatal stages is preventable given adequate evaluation, follow-up and proactive management. The aim of this document is to update issues on medical management of neurogenic bladder in children. Materials and Methods: Five Pediatric Urologists joined a group of experts and reviewed all important issues on "Spina Bifida, Neurogenic Bladder in Children" and elaborated a draft of the document. All the members of the group focused on the same system of classification of the levels of evidence (GRADE system) in order to assess the literature and the recommendations. During the year 2020 the panel of experts has met virtually to review, discuss and write a consensus document. Results and Discussion: The panel addressed recommendations on up to date choice of diagnosis evaluation and therapies. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) should be implemented during the first days of life, and antimuscarinic drugs should be indicated upon results of urodynamic studies. When the patient becomes refractory to first-line therapy, receptor-selective pharmacotherapy is available nowadays, which leads to a reduction in reconstructive procedures, such as augmentation cystoplasty.


Subject(s)
Humans , Child , Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic/therapy , Spinal Dysraphism , Meningomyelocele/complications , Meningomyelocele/therapy , Intermittent Urethral Catheterization , Urodynamics
4.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(6): 1189-1194, Nov.-Dec. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1340022

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: The 24-hour bladder diary is considered to be the gold standard for evaluating maximum voided volume (MVV). However, we observed that patients often have a greater MVV during office uroflowmetry than that seen in the bladder diary. The purpose of this study is to compare these two non-invasive methods by which MVV can be determined - at the time of uroflowmetry (Q-MVV), or by 24hour bladder diary (BD-MVV). Materials and Methods: This was an Institutional Review Board approved retrospective study of patients evaluated for LUTS who completed a 24hour bladder diary and contemporaneous uroflowmetry. For Q-MVV, the patient was instructed to wait to void until their bladder felt full. Sample means were compared, and Pearson's correlations were calculated between the Q-MVV and BD-MVV data across the total sample, women, and men. Results: Seven hundred seventy one patients with LUTS completed bladder diaries. Of these, 400 patients, 205 women and 195 men, had contemporaneous Q-MVV. Mean BD-MVV was greater than mean Q-MVV. However, Q-MVV was larger in a sizable minority of patients. There was a weak correlation between BD-MVV and Q-MVV. Furthermore, there was a difference ≥50% between Q-MVV and BD-MVV in 165 patients (41%). Conclusions: The data suggest that there is a difference between the two measurement tools, and that the BD-MVV was greater than Q-MVV. For a more reliable assessment of MVV, this study suggests that both Q-MVV and BD-MVV should be assessed and that the larger of the two values is a more reliable assessment of MVV.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Urodynamics , Urinary Bladder , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Urination , Retrospective Studies
6.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(3): 551-557, May-June 2021. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1154496

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: False-negative urodynamic findings may mislead or prevent planned treatments due to unmatched findings with the clinical presentation. We hypothesized that the absence of urodynamic demonstration of SUI or OAB on urodynamics would interfere with clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods: Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 124 women with (94) or without (30) demonstrable SUI after sling operations. Similarly, 64 women with OAB syndrome with (38) or without (26) demonstrable DO were also compared after treatment with anticholinergic agents. Patients were assessed with the UDI-6 and IIQ-7 questionnaires 3 and 6 months after treatment. Results: Only 76% of SUI patients demonstrated urine leakage during urodynamics. The UDI-6 score was higher in the demonstrable-SUI and demonstrable-DO groups, while the IIQ-7 score was comparable within the incontinence or urgency/frequency groups. Demonstrable and non-demonstrable SUI-operated patients showed similar outcomes. Patients with urgency syndromes with or without demonstrable DO had a similar rate of improvement with anticholinergic therapy. Conclusions: Women with clinical complaints of SUI objectively demonstrated on urodynamics presented the same subjective clinical outcome as those with SUI lacking objective demonstration when measured by the UDI-6 and IIQ-7 questionnaires. Similarly, patients with OAB syndrome with or without demonstrable DO had similar clinical improvement when treated with anticholinergics and measured using the same questionnaires.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Urinary Incontinence , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/drug therapy , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Syndrome , Urodynamics , Treatment Outcome
9.
Rev. bras. ginecol. obstet ; 43(2): 131-136, Feb. 2021. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1156098

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective To evaluate whether performing preoperative urodynamic study influences postoperative urinary symptoms of women with stress urinary incontinence that underwent transobturator sling. Methods Retrospective analysis of patients treated for stress urinary incontinence by transobturator sling from August 2011 to October 2018. Predictor variables included preoperative urodynamic study, age, incontinence severity, body mass index, preoperative storage symptoms and previous anti-urinary incontinence procedure. Outcome variables were postoperative subjective continence status, storage symptoms and complications. Logistic regression after propensity score was employed to compare outcomes between patients who underwent or not pre-operative urodynamic study. Results The present study included 88 patients with an average follow-up of 269 days. Most patients (n = 52; 59.1%) described storage symptoms other than stress urinary incontinence, and 38 patients (43.2%) underwent preoperative urodynamic studies. Logistic regression after propensity score did not reveal an association between urinary continence outcomes and performance of preoperative urodynamic study (odds ratio 0.57; confidence interval [CI]: 0.11-2.49). Among women that did not undergo urodynamic study, there was a subjective improvement in urinary incontinence in 92% of the cases versus 87% in those that underwent urodynamic study (p = 0.461). Furthermore, postoperative storage symptoms were similar between women who did not undergo urodynamic study and those who underwent urodynamic study, 13.2% versus 18.4%, respectively (p = 0.753). Conclusion Preoperative urodynamic study had no impact on urinary incontinence cure outcomes as well as on urinary storage symptoms after the transobturator sling in women with stress urinary incontinence.


Resumo Objetivo Avaliar a influência do estudo urodinâmico pré-operatório nos resultados miccionais pós-operatórios em mulheres com incontinência urinária de esforço submetidas a sling transobturador. Métodos Análise retrospectiva de mulheres com incontinência urinária de esforço submetidas a sling transobturador entre agosto de 2011 e outubro de 2018. As variáveis preditoras pré-operatórias, entre outras, foram a realização do estudo urodinâmico, gravidade da incontinência e sintomas urinários de armazenamento. As variáveis de desfecho pós-operatórias foram o status subjetivo da continência, sintomas de armazenamento urinário e complicações cirúrgicas. A regressão logística após o escore de propensão foi empregada para comparar os resultados entre os pacientes que foram submetidos ou não ao estudo urodinâmico pré-operatório. Resultados Foram incluídas no presente estudo 88 pacientes com um seguimento médio de 269 dias. A maioria das pacientes apresentava sintomas miccionais de armazenamento (n = 52; 59,1%) concomitantes à incontinência urinária de esforço. Um pouco menos da metade das pacientes (n = 38; 43,2%) foram submetidas a estudo urodinâmico pré-operatório. A regressão logística após o escore de propensão não revelou associação entre os resultados de continência urinária e a realização de estudo urodinâmico pré-operatório (odds ratio 0,57; intervalo de confiança [IC]: 0,11-2,49). Além disso, os sintomas de armazenamento urinário pós-operatórios foram similares entre as pacientes que não realizaram e aquelas que realizaram o estudo urodinâmico, 13,2% e 18,4% respectivamente (p = 0,753). Conclusão O estudo urodinâmico pré-operatório não teve impacto nos resultados de continência urinária, bem como nos sintomas de armazenamento urinário após o sling transobturatório.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/surgery , Urodynamics , Preoperative Period , Postoperative Complications , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Treatment Outcome , Suburethral Slings , Middle Aged
10.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887501

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To observe the effect of moxibustion on postpartum urodynamics and recovery of pelvic floor function based on the pelvic floor muscle function training.@*METHODS@#A total of 150 puerperal women were randomly divided into an observation group (75 cases, 15 cases dropped off) and a control group (75 cases, 15 cases dropped off). The control group was treated with pelvic floor muscle function training, twice a day. Based on the treatment in the control group, the observation group was treated with @*RESULTS@#Compared before treatment, the levels of FUL, MUCP, BC, Pdet Qmax and SLPP in the observation group after treatment were increased (@*CONCLUSION@#The moxibustion combined with pelvic floor muscle function training could improve postpartum urodynamics and pelvic floor muscle strength.


Subject(s)
Exercise Therapy , Female , Humans , Moxibustion , Pelvic Floor , Postpartum Period , Urinary Incontinence, Stress , Urodynamics
11.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(3): 419-424, May-June 2020. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1090623

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate the lower urinary tract symptoms, classified by the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), urodynamic results (Watts Factor (WF), Bladder Contractility Index (BCI), and post void residual (PVR), in order to differentiate Detrusor Underactivity (DU) from Bladder Outlet Obstruction (BOO). Methods: Retrospective observational study performed from 2011 to 2018 at the Hospital das Clínicas of Unicamp. Two phases were done: first, to estimate sample size, and second, to evaluate the predicted parameters. Male patients with range age from 40 to 80 years were included. Patients were divided into two groups: Group 1, without BOO and with DU; Group 2, with BOO. Variables analyzed: age, comorbidities, symptoms, urodynamic data (BCI and WF) and PVR. Results: Twenty-two patients were included in each group, with medians of 68 (Group 1) and 67.5 years old (Group 2) (p = 0.8416). There was no difference for comorbidities. In relation to IPSS, medians were: 16.5 and 20.5, respectively (p = 0.858). As for symptoms, there was predominance of combination of storage and voiding symptoms in the two groups (p = 0.1810). Regarding PVR, 15 patients in Group 1 and 16 in Group 2 presented PVR> 30mL (p = 0.7411). BCI presented median values of 75 and 755.50 for Group 1 and Group 2, respectively (p <0.0001), while WF had medians of 22.42 and 73.85 (p <0.0001). Conclusion: Isolated symptoms, classified by IPSS and PVR, could not differentiate patients with DU from those with BOO, but it was possible using urodynamic data.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Aged , Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction , Urodynamics , Retrospective Studies , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Urinary Bladder, Underactive
14.
Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. (1992) ; 66(2): 153-159, Feb. 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, SES-SP | ID: biblio-1136178

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY OBJECTIVES To prospectively investigate the alterations and normal ranges of ureteral jet dynamics after double-J-stent (DJS) removal in patients who underwent renal transplantation (RTx). METHODS Patients who underwent RTx were prospectively evaluated between November 2017 and June 2018. After RTx, Doppler ultrasonography (D-US) was performed on all patients after DJS removal. Renal artery resistive index (RA-Ri), renal pelvis anterior-posterior diameter (RP-APD), pelvicalyceal system dilation (PCSD), and ureteral jet flow dynamics (maximum and average velocity; JETmax and JETave) were measured by D-US. Also, patients' demographics, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) levels, and acute rejection were investigated in the study. Patients were assessed two different times by D-US, about 6 and 12 weeks after DJS removal, and the two different measurements were compared with the Wilcoxon test and Chi-square test. RESULTS A total of 25 patients were evaluated in the study. Nonobstructive PCSD rate (12% vs 8%), JETave (18.8 vs 12.9 cm/sec), and JETmax (29.2 vs 20 cm/sec) levels were significantly decreased (p values are 0.01, 0.010 and 0.014, respectively). In addition, monophasic and square pattern rates were significantly observed to increase over time (p=0.035); however, ureteral jet patterns were correlated between the two different D-US measurements (R=0.225, p=0.032). CONCLUSION After RTx, dilation rate and ureteral jet flow velocities were significantly decreased, and monophasic and square JETpattern rates were significantly increased over time. Ureteral jet dynamics can provide useful information about the follow-up of peristaltic activity in the pelvic-ureteric system.


RESUMO OBJETIVOS Investigar prospectivamente as alterações e as variações normais da dinâmica do jato ureteral após a remoção do J-stent duplo (DJS) em pacientes submetidos a transplante renal (RTx). MÉTODOS Pacientes submetidos a RTx foram avaliados prospectivamente entre novembro de 2017 e junho de 2018. Após o RTx, o D-US foi realizado em todos os pacientes após a remoção do DJS. Índice de resistência da artéria renal (RA-Ri), diâmetro ântero-posterior da pelve renal (AP-DPR), dilatação do sistema pelvicaliceal (PCSD) e dinâmica do jato ureteral (velocidade máxima e média; JETmax e JETave) foram medidos por D-US. Além disso, a demografia dos pacientes, os níveis estimados de taxa de filtração glomerular (eGFR) e a rejeição aguda foram investigados no estudo. Os pacientes foram avaliados em dois momentos diferentes pelo D-US, cerca de 6 e 12 semanas após a remoção do DJS, e as duas medidas diferentes foram comparadas com o teste de Wilcoxon e o teste do qui-quadrado. RESULTADOS Um total de 25 pacientes foi avaliado no estudo. Taxa de PCSD não obstrutiva (12% vs. 8%), JETave (18,8 vs. 12,9 cm/seg) e JETmax (29,2 vs. 20 cm/seg), os níveis foram significativamente diminuídos (valores de p são 0,01, 0,010 e 0,014, respectivamente). Além disso, as taxas de padrão monofásico e quadrado foram significativamente observadas para aumentar ao longo do tempo (p=0,035); no entanto, padrões de jato ureteral foram correlacionados entre as duas diferentes medidas D-US (R=0,225, p=0,032). CONCLUSÃO Após o RTx, a velocidade de dilatação e as velocidades de fluxo do jato ureteral foram significativamente diminuídas e as taxas de JET padrão monofásico e quadrado foram significativamente aumentadas ao longo do tempo. A dinâmica do jato ureteral pode fornecer informações úteis sobre o acompanhamento da atividade peristáltica no sistema pélvico-ureteral.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Young Adult , Ureter/physiopathology , Urodynamics/physiology , Urinary Catheterization/adverse effects , Stents/adverse effects , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Time Factors , Ureter/diagnostic imaging , Prospective Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Ultrasonography, Doppler/methods , Statistics, Nonparametric , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Middle Aged
15.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(4): 798-806, July-Aug. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1019869

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objectives To determine the differences between voiding symptoms obtained by open anamnesis (VS-Open) versus voiding symptoms obtained by directed anamnesis (VS-Directed) to predict voiding dysfunction in women. Materials and Methods Retrospective study of women with prior anti-incontinence surgery evaluated during 5 years. In a standardized clinical history taking, each patient was asked to answer question number five of the UDI-6 questionnaire ("Do you experience any difficulty emptying your bladder?"). If the answer was positive, the following voiding symptoms spontaneously described by the patient were documented: slow urine stream, straining to void, intermittent stream and feeling of incomplete bladder emptying, which were considered VS-Open. If the answer to this question was negative or if the patient had not reported the four voiding symptoms, she was asked in a directed manner about the presence of each o Ninety-one women are analyzed. Eighteen patients presented voiding dysfunction (19.8%), There was a statistical association between voiding dysfunction and the presence of any VS-Open (p = 0.037) and straining to void obtained by open anamnesis (p = 0.013). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio, respectively, were 44.4% and 27.8%, 80.8% and 94.5%, 36.3% and 55.6%, 85.5% and 84.1%, 2.324 and 5.129, and 0.686 and 0.764. There was no statistical association between voiding dysfunction and VS-Directed. Conclusions VS-Open may predict better voiding dysfunction than VS-Directed in women.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Urination Disorders/diagnosis , Urination Disorders/physiopathology , Medical History Taking/methods , Reference Values , Urinary Incontinence/surgery , Urodynamics , Urinary Bladder/physiopathology , Predictive Value of Tests , Surveys and Questionnaires , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Middle Aged
16.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(4): 681-685, July-Aug. 2019. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1019875

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective The objective of bladder augmentation (BA) is to create a low-pressure reservoir with adequate capacity. Despite its benefits, the use of intestinal patches in bladder enlargement provides a high risk of developing complications and BA with demucosalised bowel represents a potential alternative. Therefore, this study evaluated urological parameters and long-term clinical follow-up of patients submitted to non-secretory BA in a single center with 25 years of experience. Materials and Methods Patients treated with BA underwent urological evaluation, which included history, physical examination and urodynamic study. The main urodynamic parameters (bladder capacity and bladder compliance) were assessed in the pre and postoperative moments, and compared by the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. The main long-term complications were described. Results 269 patients (mean age 14±13 years, 47% male) underwent BA with the use of demucolised intestinal segments. Among the patients in the sample, 187 (69.52%) had neurogenic bladder, 68 (25.28%) had bladder exstrophy, nine had tuberculosis (3.34%), four had a posterior urethral valve (1.49%) and one with hypospadia (0.37%). After the surgical procedure, a significant increment in both urodynamic parameters was found, with a 222% increase in bladder capacity and 604% in bladder compliance (p <0.001 in both analyzes). Mean follow-up time ranged from 2 to 358 months, with a median of 72 months (IQR 74-247). Among all patients, 5 presented spontaneous perforation. Conclusion The study showed statistically significant increase in both compliance and bladder capacity after non-secretory BA, with a low rate of severe complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Adult , Young Adult , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Urinary Bladder/surgery , Urinary Bladder Diseases/surgery , Postoperative Period , Urodynamics , Urinary Bladder/physiopathology , Urinary Bladder Diseases/physiopathology , Urinary Bladder Diseases/rehabilitation , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , Follow-Up Studies , Treatment Outcome , Statistics, Nonparametric , Middle Aged
19.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(4): 775-781, July-Aug. 2019. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1019893

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose To identify how the most frequently used parameters in daily clinical practice diagnosing bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) due to benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) correlate to each other. Materials and methods The study included 452 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) of the UNICAMP urology outpatient clinic of LUTS. Inclusion criteria: patients with BOO due to BPH who agreed to participate in the study. Exclusion criteria: patients with urinary tract infection, neurological diseases that compromised the lower urinary tract, prior prostatic surgery, radiotherapy or urethral stenosis. Patient assessment: history, international prostate symptoms score (IPSS), nocturnal quality of life score (NQoL) questionnaires, physical and digital rectal examination (DRE), PSA, transabdominal ultrasound with intravesical prostate protrusion (IPP), post-mictional residue and free uroflowmetry. Results There was no strong Spearman correlation among the studied variables. The only moderate correlations occurred between IPSS and NQoL (p <0001; c=0.56) and between IPP and prostate volume (p <0001; c=0.57). Weak correlations between IPP and post-mictional residue (p <0001; c=0.31) and free uroflowmetry (p <0001; c=-0.26); and between IPSS and free uroflowmetry (p <0001, c=-0.21) were observed. Conclusion In this study, we found moderate, weak, very weak and absent correlation among the various parameters used in the diagnosis and management of BOO due to BPH. As the value of these tools is variable, the creation of a logical and objective algorithm was not possible and the treatment is based on the interpretation of clinical symptoms.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Prostatic Hyperplasia/diagnosis , Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction/diagnosis , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/diagnosis , Organ Size , Prostate/pathology , Prostatic Hyperplasia/physiopathology , Prostatic Hyperplasia/pathology , Quality of Life , Reference Standards , Urination/physiology , Urodynamics/physiology , Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction/physiopathology , Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction/pathology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Regression Analysis , Ultrasonography/methods , Statistics, Nonparametric , Digital Rectal Examination , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/physiopathology , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/pathology , Middle Aged
20.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 45(2): 347-353, Mar.-Apr. 2019. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1002202

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Study design: Retrospective cohort of patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) that have been hospitalized for physical-functional rehabilitation purposes. Objectives: To compare the incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) after urodynamic study (UDS) in three hospitals that adopted different protocols with regard to the preparation of patients. Setting: Sarah Network of Rehabilitation Hospitals, Brazil. Materials and Methods: Between 2014 and 2015, 661 patients from three units of the same hospital network, one of which does not use antimicrobial prophylaxis independently of urine culture results, were evaluated after having undergone UDS. The results were compared in both univariate and multivariate analyses (logistic regression). Results: The global rate of UTI after UDS was that of 3.18% (IC 95% 2.1-4.8), with no differences between the units. In the univariate analysis the only variable that was associated with UTI after UDS was that of T6 injuries or above (P = 0.029). The logistic regression has confirmed this result, with an adjusted odds ratio of 3.06 (IC 95% 1.01 to 9.26; P = 0.0476). The use of antimicrobial prophylaxis did not alter that risk. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated that the use of antimicrobials does not prevent UTI after UDS. Patients with T6 traumatic SCI or above have got three times more chance of developing UTI after UDS if compared to those with a T7 injury or below, independently of the use of antimicrobials. Even in these patients the use of antimicrobials would not be justified.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Spinal Cord Injuries/physiopathology , Urinary Tract Infections/prevention & control , Antibiotic Prophylaxis/methods , Bacteriuria/prevention & control , Bacteriuria/epidemiology , Urinary Tract Infections/epidemiology , Urodynamics , Brazil/epidemiology , Asymptomatic Infections , Middle Aged
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