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2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(6): 1209-1218, Nov.-Dec. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1340040

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: We aimed to assess failure rates of salvage interventions and changes in split kidney function (SKF) following failed primary repair of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of adult patients at an academic medical center who underwent salvage intervention following primary treatment for UPJO was performed. Symptomatic failure was defined as significant flank pain. Radiographic failure was defined as no improvement in drainage or a decrease in SKF by ≥7%. Overall failure, the primary outcome, was defined as symptomatic failure, radiographic failure, or both. Results: Between 2008-2017, 34 patients (median age 38 years, 50% men) met study criteria. UPJO management was primary pyeloplasty/secondary endopyelotomy for 21/34 (62%), primary pyeloplasty/secondary pyeloplasty for 6/34 (18%), and primary endopyelotomy/secondary pyeloplasty for 7/34 (21%). Median follow-up was 3.3 years following secondary intervention. Patients undergoing primary pyeloplasty/secondary endopyelotomy had significantly higher overall failure than those undergoing primary pyeloplasty/secondary pyeloplasty (16/21 [76%] vs. 1/6 [17%], p=0.015). Among patients undergoing secondary endopyelotomy, presence of a stricture on retrograde pyelogram, stricture length, and SKF were not associated with symptomatic, radiographic, or overall failure. Serial renography was performed for 28/34 (82%) patients and 2/28 (7%) had a significant decline in SKF. Conclusions: Following failed primary pyeloplasty, secondary endopyelotomy had a greater overall failure rate than secondary pyeloplasty. No radiographic features assessed were associated with secondary endopyelotomy failure. Secondary intervention overall failure rates were higher than reported in the literature. Unique to this study, serial renography demonstrated that significant functional loss was overall infrequent.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Ureteral Obstruction/surgery , Ureteral Obstruction/diagnostic imaging , Laparoscopy , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Retrospective Studies , Kidney Pelvis/surgery , Kidney Pelvis/diagnostic imaging
4.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(6): 1189-1194, Nov.-Dec. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1340022

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: The 24-hour bladder diary is considered to be the gold standard for evaluating maximum voided volume (MVV). However, we observed that patients often have a greater MVV during office uroflowmetry than that seen in the bladder diary. The purpose of this study is to compare these two non-invasive methods by which MVV can be determined - at the time of uroflowmetry (Q-MVV), or by 24hour bladder diary (BD-MVV). Materials and Methods: This was an Institutional Review Board approved retrospective study of patients evaluated for LUTS who completed a 24hour bladder diary and contemporaneous uroflowmetry. For Q-MVV, the patient was instructed to wait to void until their bladder felt full. Sample means were compared, and Pearson's correlations were calculated between the Q-MVV and BD-MVV data across the total sample, women, and men. Results: Seven hundred seventy one patients with LUTS completed bladder diaries. Of these, 400 patients, 205 women and 195 men, had contemporaneous Q-MVV. Mean BD-MVV was greater than mean Q-MVV. However, Q-MVV was larger in a sizable minority of patients. There was a weak correlation between BD-MVV and Q-MVV. Furthermore, there was a difference ≥50% between Q-MVV and BD-MVV in 165 patients (41%). Conclusions: The data suggest that there is a difference between the two measurement tools, and that the BD-MVV was greater than Q-MVV. For a more reliable assessment of MVV, this study suggests that both Q-MVV and BD-MVV should be assessed and that the larger of the two values is a more reliable assessment of MVV.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Urodynamics , Urinary Bladder , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Urination , Retrospective Studies
5.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(6): 1277-1278, Nov.-Dec. 2021.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1340016

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background: High risk upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is typically managed with radical nephroureterectomy, however, renal preservation can be attempted when UTUC is localized to the distal ureter in the presence of chronic kidney disease (1-3). Distal ureterectomy is typically managed with a ureteral reimplantation and psoas hitch in order to maintain urothelial continuity, to avoid comprising the contralateral ureter, and reducing risk of chronic urinary tract infections and electrolyte abnormalities (4). We present our case of distal ureteral UTUC managed robotically with a distal ureterectomy with ureteral reimplantation. Technique and Follow-Up: Initially, an Orandi needle on a resectoscope circumscribed the left ureteral orifice. Next, robotically, the retroperitoneum was exposed and a left sided pelvic lymphadenectomy was completed. The left ureter was mobilized and the diseased ureteral segment was transected. The mobilized bladder was sutured to psoas fascia. After a cystotomy, the ureter was re-anastomosed to the bladder. The patient was discharged on postoperative day three and re-evaluated one week later with a cystogram. Final pathology was downgraded to non-invasive low-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma with negative lymph nodes and margins. Conclusion: High risk UTUC localized to the distal ureter in the setting of chronic kidney disease can be managed with a distal ureterectomy (3). Robotic distal ureterectomy with ureteral reimplantation can be assisted by an Orandi needle to achieve negative margins. Utilizing a robotic technique can offer challenges with the ureteral spatulation and reanastomosis (5-7). By fixating the ureter to the bladder prior to reanastomosis, our technique offers a solution for these difficulties.


Subject(s)
Humans , Ureter/surgery , Ureteral Neoplasms/surgery , Laparoscopy , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Replantation , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Treatment Outcome
8.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(3): 584-593, May-June 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1154495

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: The aim of the present prospective-randomized study was to compare perioperative outcomes and complications of bipolar and monopolar TURBT for lateral wall-located non-muscle invasive bladder cancers (NMIBC) under obturator nerve block (ONB). Patients and Methods: 80 patients who underwent TURBT for lateral wall-located primary bladder tumors under ONB from March, 2016 to November, 2019 were included in the present study. The patients were randomized equally into two groups; monopolar TUR (M-TURBT) and bipolar TUR (B-TURBT). The primary and secondary outcomes were safety (obturator jerk and bladder perforation) and efficacy (complete tumor resection and sampling of the deep muscle tissue). Results: Obturator jerk was detected in 2 patients (5%) in M-TURBT while obturator jerk was not observed during B-TURBT (p=0.494). Bladder perforation was not observed in both groups. All of the patients underwent complete tumor resection. There was no significant difference in muscle tissue sampling (67.5% vs. 72.5%, p=0.626) and thermal tissue damage rates (12.5% vs. 25%, p=0.201). The majority of complications were low-grade and the differences in Clavien grade 1-3 complications between groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: In the treatment of lateral-wall located NMIBCs, either M-TURBT or B-TURBT can be safely and effectively performed by combining spinal anesthesia with ONB. Even so, it should be taken into consideration that low-grade postoperative hemorrhagic complications may occur in patients who undergo M-TURBT.


Subject(s)
Humans , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Cystectomy , Prospective Studies , Obturator Nerve
9.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 47(3): 551-557, May-June 2021. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1154496

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: False-negative urodynamic findings may mislead or prevent planned treatments due to unmatched findings with the clinical presentation. We hypothesized that the absence of urodynamic demonstration of SUI or OAB on urodynamics would interfere with clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods: Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 124 women with (94) or without (30) demonstrable SUI after sling operations. Similarly, 64 women with OAB syndrome with (38) or without (26) demonstrable DO were also compared after treatment with anticholinergic agents. Patients were assessed with the UDI-6 and IIQ-7 questionnaires 3 and 6 months after treatment. Results: Only 76% of SUI patients demonstrated urine leakage during urodynamics. The UDI-6 score was higher in the demonstrable-SUI and demonstrable-DO groups, while the IIQ-7 score was comparable within the incontinence or urgency/frequency groups. Demonstrable and non-demonstrable SUI-operated patients showed similar outcomes. Patients with urgency syndromes with or without demonstrable DO had a similar rate of improvement with anticholinergic therapy. Conclusions: Women with clinical complaints of SUI objectively demonstrated on urodynamics presented the same subjective clinical outcome as those with SUI lacking objective demonstration when measured by the UDI-6 and IIQ-7 questionnaires. Similarly, patients with OAB syndrome with or without demonstrable DO had similar clinical improvement when treated with anticholinergics and measured using the same questionnaires.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Urinary Incontinence , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/drug therapy , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Syndrome , Urodynamics , Treatment Outcome
10.
Rev. argent. urol. (1990) ; 86(1): 30-34, 20210000. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS, BINACIS, UNISALUD | ID: biblio-1141498

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCCIÓN/OBJETIVO: La estrechez uretral puede causar síntomas miccionales, dolor, disfunción vesical y eyaculatoria. La tasa de complicaciones en uretroplastía anterior es baja. El principal objetivo es evaluar complicaciones del posoperatorio (pop) inmediato (dentro de los 30 días pop). El objetivo secundario es valorar la relación entre complicaciones y la tasa de recaída. MATERIALES Y MÉTODO: Se realizó una revisión retrospectiva de las uretroplastías anteriores realizadas entre octubre del 2012 y junio del 2017. Se valoró: reinternación, reingreso a cirugía, infarto agudo de miocardio, tromboembolismo de pulmón, trombosis venosa profunda, óbito, infecciones, dehiscencia de herida, hematomas, sangrados, etc. Se definió recaída a la necesidad de realizar cualquier instrumentación uretral secundaria a la uretroplastía. Las variables se analizaron estadísticamente con Chi square y Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTADOS: Se incluyeron 92 pacientes, con un seguimiento mínimo de 12 meses. Las edades fueron de 18 a 88 años (mediana, 61,5 años). En 58 pacientes, se utilizaron transferencia de tejidos (27 injertos y 31 colgajos). La longitud de la estrechez fue desde 1-15 cm (media, 3,25 cm). La iatrogénica (56%) fue la etiología más frecuente. 56 pacientes (63%) tenían tratamientos previos. La tasa de complicaciones pop inmediato fue del 32%, las infecciones fueron las más frecuentes. Según Clavien, se clasificaron: I: 40%; II: 47%; III: 10%; IV: 3%. Hubo 17 recaídas (18%), 13 dentro de los primeros 6 meses del pop. De los pacientes que presentaron complicaciones, recayó el 23%; solo 16% de los que no las presentaron (p: 0,4). Aquellos pacientes con complicaciones graves presentaron mayor tasa de recaída (p: 0,2). CONCLUSIÓN: La tasa de complicaciones pop inmediata de uretroplastía anterior fue de 32%; las infecciones fueron las más frecuentes. La mayoría fue Clavien I y II. La recaída fue mayor en aquellos pacientes que sufrieron complicaciones en pop inmediato.


INTRODUCCION/OBJECTIVE: Urethral stenosis can cause mictional symptoms, pain, bladder dysfunction and ejaculatory problems. Complications rate in anterior urethroplasty is low. Main objetive is to evaluate early post operatory complications Secondary objetive is to assess the relationship between complications and recurrence rate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a restrospective review of our anterior urethroplasty database between October 2012 and June 2017. We recorded: patients readmission, return to operating room, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis, death, infections, wound dehiscense, hematomas, bleedings, etc. We defined recurrence as any urethral instrumentation after urethroplasty. Variables were analyzed using Chi Square and Mann Whitney U test. RESULTS: 92 patients were included in the study with at least 12 months follow up. Age range was between 18-88 years. (median 61,5 years) Substitution urethroplasty were performed in 58 patients (grafts 27 and flaps 31) Urethral stenosis lenght range was between 1 and 15 cm (mean 3,25cm) Most frequent cause of urethral stenosis was iatrogenic (56%) 56 patients underwent previous treatment (63%) Complication rate in early post operative period was 32%, most of them infections. Clavien clasiffication: I: 40%; II: 47%; III: 10%; IV: 3%. There were 17 recurrences (18%), 13 during the first 6 months after surgery. 23 % of patients with complications had recurrence and only 16% of patients without, had recurrence (p:0,4) Patients with serious complications had greater recurrence rate (p: 0,2) CONCLUSION: Recurrence rate in early complications of anterior urethroplasty was 32%, most of them infections. Clavien I and II are the most frequent. Recurrence was greater in patients who suffered early complications


Subject(s)
Humans , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Recurrence , Urologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Urethral Stricture/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
11.
Rev. bras. ginecol. obstet ; 43(2): 131-136, Feb. 2021. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1156098

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective To evaluate whether performing preoperative urodynamic study influences postoperative urinary symptoms of women with stress urinary incontinence that underwent transobturator sling. Methods Retrospective analysis of patients treated for stress urinary incontinence by transobturator sling from August 2011 to October 2018. Predictor variables included preoperative urodynamic study, age, incontinence severity, body mass index, preoperative storage symptoms and previous anti-urinary incontinence procedure. Outcome variables were postoperative subjective continence status, storage symptoms and complications. Logistic regression after propensity score was employed to compare outcomes between patients who underwent or not pre-operative urodynamic study. Results The present study included 88 patients with an average follow-up of 269 days. Most patients (n = 52; 59.1%) described storage symptoms other than stress urinary incontinence, and 38 patients (43.2%) underwent preoperative urodynamic studies. Logistic regression after propensity score did not reveal an association between urinary continence outcomes and performance of preoperative urodynamic study (odds ratio 0.57; confidence interval [CI]: 0.11-2.49). Among women that did not undergo urodynamic study, there was a subjective improvement in urinary incontinence in 92% of the cases versus 87% in those that underwent urodynamic study (p = 0.461). Furthermore, postoperative storage symptoms were similar between women who did not undergo urodynamic study and those who underwent urodynamic study, 13.2% versus 18.4%, respectively (p = 0.753). Conclusion Preoperative urodynamic study had no impact on urinary incontinence cure outcomes as well as on urinary storage symptoms after the transobturator sling in women with stress urinary incontinence.


Resumo Objetivo Avaliar a influência do estudo urodinâmico pré-operatório nos resultados miccionais pós-operatórios em mulheres com incontinência urinária de esforço submetidas a sling transobturador. Métodos Análise retrospectiva de mulheres com incontinência urinária de esforço submetidas a sling transobturador entre agosto de 2011 e outubro de 2018. As variáveis preditoras pré-operatórias, entre outras, foram a realização do estudo urodinâmico, gravidade da incontinência e sintomas urinários de armazenamento. As variáveis de desfecho pós-operatórias foram o status subjetivo da continência, sintomas de armazenamento urinário e complicações cirúrgicas. A regressão logística após o escore de propensão foi empregada para comparar os resultados entre os pacientes que foram submetidos ou não ao estudo urodinâmico pré-operatório. Resultados Foram incluídas no presente estudo 88 pacientes com um seguimento médio de 269 dias. A maioria das pacientes apresentava sintomas miccionais de armazenamento (n = 52; 59,1%) concomitantes à incontinência urinária de esforço. Um pouco menos da metade das pacientes (n = 38; 43,2%) foram submetidas a estudo urodinâmico pré-operatório. A regressão logística após o escore de propensão não revelou associação entre os resultados de continência urinária e a realização de estudo urodinâmico pré-operatório (odds ratio 0,57; intervalo de confiança [IC]: 0,11-2,49). Além disso, os sintomas de armazenamento urinário pós-operatórios foram similares entre as pacientes que não realizaram e aquelas que realizaram o estudo urodinâmico, 13,2% e 18,4% respectivamente (p = 0,753). Conclusão O estudo urodinâmico pré-operatório não teve impacto nos resultados de continência urinária, bem como nos sintomas de armazenamento urinário após o sling transobturatório.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/surgery , Urodynamics , Preoperative Period , Postoperative Complications , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Treatment Outcome , Suburethral Slings , Middle Aged
13.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(6): 1042-1071, Nov.-Dec. 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134250

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on clinical practice, income, health and lifestyle behavior of Brazilian urologists during the month of April 2020. Materials and Methods A 39-question, web-based survey was sent to all urologist members of the Brazilian Society of Urology. We assessed socio-demographic, professional, health and behavior parameters. The primary goal was to evaluate changes in urologists' clinical practice and income after two months of COVID-19. We also looked at geographical differences based on the incidence rates of COVID-19 in different states. Results Among 766 urologists who completed the survey, a reduction ≥ 50% of patient visits, elective and emergency surgeries was reported by 83.2%, 89.6% and 54.8%, respectively. An income reduction of ≥ 50% was reported by 54.3%. Measures to reduce costs were implemented by most. Video consultations were performed by 38.7%. Modifications in health and lifestyle included weight gain (32.9%), reduced physical activity (60.0%), increased alcoholic intake (39.9%) and reduced sexual activity (34.9%). Finally, 13.5% of Brazilian urologists were infected with SARS-CoV-2 and about one third required hospitalization. Urologists from the highest COVID-19 incidence states were at a higher risk to have a reduction of patient visits and non-essential surgeries (OR=2.95, 95% CI 1.86 - 4.75; p< 0.0001) and of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 (OR=4.36 95%CI 1.74-10.54, p=0.012). Conclusions COVID-19 produced massive disturbances in Brazilian urologists' practice, with major reductions in patient visits and surgical procedures. Distressing consequences were also observed on physicians' income, health and personal lives. These findings are probably applicable to other medical specialties.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Workload , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Urologists/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Life Style , Quality of Life , Urologic Diseases/complications , Urologic Diseases/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Brazil , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Urologists/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19
14.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(supl.1): 215-221, July 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134295

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Known laparoscopic and robotic assisted approaches and techniques for the surgical management of urological malignant and benign diseases are commonly used around the World. During the global pandemic COVID-19, urology surgeons had to reorganize their daily surgical practice. A concern with the use of minimally invasive techniques arose due to a proposed risk of viral transmission of the coronavirus disease with the creation of pneumoperitoneum. Due to this, we reviewed the literature to evaluate the use of laparoscopy and robotics during the pandemic COVID-19. A literature review of viral transmission in surgery and of the available literature regarding the transmission of the COVID-19 virus was performed up to April 30, 2020. We additionally reviewed surgical society guidelines and recommendations regarding surgery during this pandemic. Few studies have been performed on viral transmission during surgery. No study has been made regarding this area during minimally invasive urology cases. To date there is no study that demonstrates or can suggest the ability for a virus to be transmitted during surgical treatment whether open, laparoscopic or robotic. There is no society consensus on restricting laparoscopic or robotic surgery. However, there is expert consensus on modification of standard practices to minimize any risk of transmission. During the pandemic COVID-19 we recommend the use of specific personal protective equipment for the surgeon, anesthesiologist and nursing staff in the operating room. Modifications of standard practices during minimally invasive surgery such as using lowest intra-abdominal pressures possible, controlled smoke evacuation systems, and minimizing energy device usage are recommended.


Subject(s)
Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Urology/standards , Urology/trends , Laparoscopy/methods , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Pandemics , Robotic Surgical Procedures/methods , Urologists , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/trends , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Workflow , Robotic Surgical Procedures/trends , Betacoronavirus , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19
15.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(supl.1): 201-206, July 2020. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134282

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Proposal: To highlight the indications for emergency surgery during the 2019 Coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) that support recommendations published in midMarch 2020 by the American Confederation of Urology on its website. Materials and Methods: A bibliographic search was conducted in PubMed and Cochrane Library to perform a non-systematic review, using key words: Urology, Emergency and COVID-19, to determine recommendations for patients that should receive emergency care due to urological pathology. Results: The main recommendations and protocols in the management of different urological emergencies during the COVID-19 pandemic are reviewed and discussed. Conclusions: We are living a new condition with the COVID-19 pandemic, which obliges urologists to conform to the guidelines that appear on a daily basis formulated by multidisciplinary surgical groups to manage urological emergencies. Consequently, in this time of health crisis, we must adapt to the resources available, implementing all biosecurity measures to protect patients and all health personnel who are in charge of patient management.


Subject(s)
Humans , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urology/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pandemics , Urologists/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Urology/trends , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19
16.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(supl.1): 156-164, July 2020. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134280

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: To explore the current situation faced by Latin American urology departments during the COVID-19 Outbreak in terms of knowledge, actions, prioritization of urology practices, and implementation of internal clinical management protocols for inpatients and outpatients. Material and Methods: A non-validated, structured, self-administered, electronic survey with 35 closed multiple choice questions was conducted in Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and English and Deutsch versions from April 1st to April 30th, 2020. The survey was distributed through social networks and the official American Confederation of Urology (CAU) website. It was anonymous, mainly addressed to Latin American urologists and urology residents. It included 35 questions exploring different aspects: 1) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and internal management protocols for healthcare providers; 2) Priority surgeries and urological urgencies and 3) Inpatient and outpatient care. Results: Of 864 surveys received, 846 had at least 70% valid responses and were included in the statistical analyses. Surveys corresponded to South America in 62% of the cases, Central America and North America in 29.7%. 12.7% were residents. Regarding to PPE and internal management protocols, 88% confirmed the implementation of specific protocols and 45.4% have not received training to perform a safe clinical practice; only 2.3% reported being infected with COVID-19. 60.9% attended urgent surgeries. The following major uro-oncologic surgeries were reported as high priority: Radical Nephrectomy (RN) 58.4%, and Radical Cystectomy (RC) 57.3%. When we associate the capacity of hospitalization (urologic beds available) and percentage of high-priority surgery performed, we observed that centers with fewer urological beds (10-20) compared to centers with more urological beds (31-40) performed more frequently major urologic cancer surgeries: RN 54.5% vs 60.8% (p=0.0003), RC 53.1% vs 64.9% (p=0.005) respectively. Conclusions: At the time of writing (May 13th 2020) our data represents a snapshot of COVID-19 outbreak in Latin American urological practices. Our findings have practical implications and should be contextualized considering many factors related to patients and urological care: The variability of health care scenarios, institutional capacity, heterogeneity and burden of urologic disease, impact of surgical indications and decision making when prioritizing and scheduling surgeries in times of COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urology/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Latin America
19.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(3): 322-327, May-June 2020.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1090614

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Robotic surgery has been slow to be fully accepted in the world of pediatric urology largely because of its initial application directed towards adult use and because of the inherent high cost associated with it. However, as previously shown, it has now become the gold standard for adolescent pyeloplasty in The United States. As the adoption of robotic surgery in children has become more widespread, its use has been applied to a broader spectrum of procedures with similar success rates to standard laparoscopy. These procedures include nephrectomy, heminephrectomy, ureteral reimplantation, and ureteroureterostomy. However, it has also shown feasibility and comparable success when compared to open surgery in procedures that were previously deemed too complex to be done by standard laparoscopy. For example, bladder neck reconstruction with Mitrofanoff and Malone procedure as well as bladder augmentation. This review objective is to provide an overview of robotic surgery in pediatric urology, with a focus on the more common cases such as pyeloplasty and reimplantation as well as more complex bladder reconstruction procedures.


Subject(s)
Humans , Child , Adolescent , Adult , Urology , Robotics , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Laparoscopy , Nephrectomy
20.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(2): 203-213, Mar.-Apr. 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1090574

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the familiarity of Brazilian urology residents with laparoscopy, methods of training and perspectives. Material and methods a questionnaire with 23 questions was sent by e-mail to all urological residents of 86 Urology Residence Programs certified by the Brazilian Society of Urology (BSU). Results 225 valid answers (85% of all residents) responded. Most residences belong to academic hospitals mainly in the Southeast region of Brazil. Women account for 5% of residents and 82% of programs perform less than 100 procedures per year. Residents have access to LESS, RAL and 98% to surgical laparoscopy and 87% of these participate actively at the surgery, but 84.9% do not have access to RAL. The most common laparoscopic procedure is radical nephrectomy (73.2%), but only 28.8% of residents acted as surgeons, and third year residents (R3) are those that mainly performed this procedure (statistical significance, p <0.05). 61% of residents do not participate in hands-on courses or fellowship in laparoscopy, among those who attended these fellowships, 23.47% were sponsored by BSU in equal regions of the country. Although there are several opportunities of training in laparoscopy, 42% of residents do not have access to any kind of preparation and 52% have no structured specific program. R3 perception of laparoscopy experience is significantly higher than R2 and R1 residents. Almost 30% of them affirms that they are prepared for professional life regarding urologic laparoscopy. Conclusion Brazilian urologic residents have access to laparoscopy and actively participate in the learning process. Robotic surgery is expanding in the country, although still very far from residents. Brazilian resident, at the end of medical residency, is motivated to perform laparoscopic procedures.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Urologic Surgical Procedures/education , Clinical Competence , Laparoscopy/education , Robotic Surgical Procedures/education , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Brazil , Surveys and Questionnaires
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