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1.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 2722-2731, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1007642

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#Colorectal carcinogenesis and progression are related to the gut microbiota and the tumor immune microenvironment. Our previous clinical trial demonstrated that berberine (BBR) hydrochloride might reduce the recurrence and canceration of colorectal adenoma (CRA). The present study aimed to further explore the mechanism of BBR in preventing colorectal cancer (CRC).@*METHODS@#We performed metagenomics sequencing on fecal specimens obtained from the BBR intervention trial, and the differential bacteria before and after medication were validated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We further performed ApcMin/+ animal intervention tests, RNA sequencing, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.@*RESULTS@#The abundance of fecal Veillonella parvula ( V . parvula ) decreased significantly after BBR administration ( P = 0.0016) and increased through the development from CRA to CRC. Patients with CRC with a higher V. parvula abundance had worse tumor staging and a higher lymph node metastasis rate. The intestinal immune pathway of Immunoglobulin A production was activated, and the expression of TNFSF13B (Tumor necrosis factor superfamily 13b, encoding B lymphocyte stimulator [BLyS]), the representative gene of this pathway, and the genes encoding its receptors (interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor beta) were significantly upregulated. Animal experiments revealed that V. parvula promoted colorectal carcinogenesis and increased BLyS levels, while BBR reversed this effect.@*CONCLUSION@#BBR might inhibit V. parvula and further weaken the immunomodulatory effect of B cells induced by V. parvula , thereby blocking the development of colorectal tumors.@*TRIAL REGISTRAION@#ClinicalTrials.gov, No. NCT02226185.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Berberine/therapeutic use , Carcinogenesis , Veillonella , Colorectal Neoplasms/genetics , Tumor Microenvironment
2.
Rev. peru. med. exp. salud publica ; 39(4): [408-414], oct. 2022. tab, ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1424340

ABSTRACT

Objetivos . Describir la actividad antimicrobiana in vitro del extracto metanólico de las hojas de Bixa orellana L. contra las bacterias anaerobias asociadas a la vaginosis bacteriana y Lactobacillus spp. Materiales y métodos . Se incluyeron en el estudio ocho cepas de referencia ATCC; Gardnerella vaginalis, Prevotella bivia, Peptococcus niger, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Mobiluncus curtisii, Atopobium vaginae, Veillonella parvula y Lactobacillus crispatus, y 22 aislamientos clínicos; once aislados de Gardnerella vaginalis y once aislados de Lactobacillus. La susceptibilidad antimicrobiana se determinó mediante el método de difusión en agar. La concentración mínima inhibitoria (CMI) y la concentración bactericida mínima (CBM) fueron determinadas utilizando el método de dilución en agar y un método de dilución modificado, respectivamente. Resultados . Todas las cepas de referencia ATCC tuvieron un alto nivel de susceptibilidad al extracto, con excepción de P. vibia, V. parvula y L. crispatus. Interesantemente, los aislamientos clínicos de G. vaginalis y la cepa ATCC de G. vaginalis fueron los más susceptibles al extracto dados los bajos valores de CMI (1,0 - 2,0 mg/mL) y CBM (1,0 - 4,0 mg/mL), mientras que, los aislamientos clínicos de Lactobacillus spp. y la cepa ATCC de L. crispatus fueron los menos susceptibles debido a los altos valores de CMI (32,0 mg/mL) y CBM (≥ 32,0 mg/mL). Conclusiones . Los experimentos in vitro sugieren que el extracto posee propiedades antibacterianas selectivas dada su alta actividad contra bacterias anaerobias asociadas a vaginosis bacteriana y baja actividad contra especies de Lactobacillus.


Objective. To describe the in vitro antimicrobial activity of the methanolic extract of Bixa orellana L. leaves against anaerobic bacteria associated to bacterial vaginosis and Lactobacillus spp. Materials and methods. Eight ATCC reference strains; Gardnerella vaginalis, Prevotella bivia, Peptococcus niger, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Mobiluncus curtisii, Atopobium vaginae, Veillonella parvula, and Lactobacillus crispatus, and twenty-two clinical isolates; eleven Gardnerella vaginalis and eleven Lactobacillus strains, were included in the study. The antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the agar diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by using agar dilution and a modified dilution plating method, respectively. Results. All ATCC reference strains showed high levels of susceptibility to the extract, except P. vibia, V. parvula and L. crispatus. Interestingly, all G. vaginalis clinical isolates and the G. vaginalis ATTC strain were the most susceptible to the extract, given their low MIC (1.0 - 2.0 mg/mL) and MBC (1.0 - 4.0 mg/mL) values, whereas, the Lactobacillus spp. clinical isolates and the L. crispatus ATCC strain were the least susceptible bacteria given their high MIC (32.0 mg/mL) and MBC (≥ 32.0 mg/mL) values. Conclusions. In vitro experiments suggest that the extract possesses selective antimicrobial properties given its high activity against bacterial vaginosis-associated anaerobic bacteria and low activity against Lactobacillus species.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , In Vitro Techniques , Plant Extracts , Bixa orellana , Vaginosis, Bacterial , Peptostreptococcus , Bacteria, Anaerobic , Veillonella , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Gardnerella vaginalis , Disease Susceptibility , Anti-Bacterial Agents
3.
Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Research ; : 412-429, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-811069

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Different characteristics of airway microbiome in asthmatics may lead to differential immune responses, which in turn cause eosinophilic or neutrophilic airway inflammation. However, the relationships among these factors have yet to be fully elucidated.METHODS: Microbes in induced sputum samples were subjected to sequence analysis of 16S rRNA. Airway inflammatory phenotypes were defined as neutrophils (>60%) and eosinophils (>3%), and inflammation endotypes were defined by levels of T helper (Th) 1 (interferon-γ), Th2 (interleukin [IL]-5 and IL-13), Th-17 (IL-17), and innate Th2 (IL-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) cytokines, inflammasomes (IL-1β), epithelial activation markers (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IL-8), and Inflammation (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α) cytokines in sputum supernatants was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.RESULTS: The numbers of operational taxonomic units were significantly higher in the mixed (n = 21) and neutrophilic (n = 23) inflammation groups than in the paucigranulocytic inflammation group (n = 19; p < 0.05). At the species level, Granulicatella adiacens, Streptococcus parasanguinis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Veillonella rogosae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, and Neisseria perflava levels were significantly higher in the eosinophilic inflammation group (n = 20), whereas JYGU_s levels were significantly higher in the neutrophilic inflammation group compared to the other subtypes (P < 0.05). Additionally, IL-5 and IL-13 concentrations were correlated with the percentage of eosinophils (P < 0.05) and IL-13 levels were positively correlated with the read counts of Porphyromonas pasteri and V. rogosae (P < 0.05). IL-1β concentrations were correlated with the percentage of neutrophils (P < 0.05). had a tendency to be positively correlated with the read count of JYGU_s (P = 0.095), and was negatively correlated with that of S. pneumoniae (P < 0.05).CONCLUSIONS: Difference of microbial patterns in airways may induce distinctive endotypes of asthma, which is responsible for the neutrophilic or eosinophilic inflammation in asthma.


Subject(s)
Asthma , Colony-Stimulating Factors , Cytokines , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Eosinophils , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Inflammasomes , Inflammation , Interleukin-13 , Interleukin-33 , Interleukin-5 , Microbiota , Necrosis , Neisseria , Neutrophils , Phenotype , Pneumonia , Porphyromonas , Sequence Analysis , Sputum , Streptococcus , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Veillonella
4.
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: biblio-1135530

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objective: To identify the occurrence of Veillonella spp. in children using real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and to determine its role as a risk factor for ECC in children aged 2-3 years. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted and samples from 87 children aged 2-3 years, who lived in selected villages in the Bandung City area, Indonesia, were collected. Examination for dental caries was performed using standard checks for decay, missing, and filled surfaces (dfms), and saliva samples were taken. Microbiological examination was performed using RT-PCR with primers consisting of one primary set for Veillonella spp. and one universal primary set for 16S rDNA. We performed statistical testing using the Mann Whitney rank-sum test. Results: A total of 87 children were sampled, and an ECC prevalence of 71.3% was found, with a mean dmfs of 7.1 (± 9.1). The proportion of Veillonella spp. in caries-free children was 2.13 ± 2.30, while in children with ECC, it was 3.29 ± 6.83. Conclusion: The proportion of Veillonella spp. in children with ECC was higher than in caries-free children; therefore, Veillonella spp. may be a risk factor for ECC.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child, Preschool , Veillonella , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Risk Factors , Dental Caries/prevention & control , Gram-Negative Bacteria/immunology , Epidemiologic Studies , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Statistics, Nonparametric , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Indonesia/epidemiology
5.
Annals of Laboratory Medicine ; : 110-118, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diverse microbiota exist in the lower respiratory tract. Although next generation sequencing (NGS) is the most widely used microbiome analysis technique, it is difficult to implement NGS in clinical microbiology laboratories. Therefore, we evaluated the performance of conventional culture methods together with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in identifying microbiota in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. METHODS: BAL fluid samples (n=27) were obtained from patients undergoing diagnostic bronchoscopy for lung mass evaluation. Bacterial and fungal culture was performed with conventional media used in clinical microbiology laboratories. On an average, 20 isolated colonies were picked from each agar plate and identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Microbiome analysis using 16S rRNA NGS was conducted for comparison. RESULTS: Streptococcus spp. and Neisseria spp. were most frequently cultured from the BAL fluid samples. In two samples, Enterobacteriaceae grew predominantly on MacConkey agar. Actinomyces and Veillonella spp. were commonly identified anaerobes; gut bacteria, such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Clostridium, and fungi were also isolated. NGS revealed more diverse bacterial communities than culture, and Prevotella spp. were mainly identified solely by NGS. Some bacteria, such as Staphylococcus spp., Clostridium spp., and Bifidobacterium spp., were identified solely by culture, indicating that culture may be more sensitive for detecting certain bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: Culture and NGS of BAL fluid samples revealed common bacteria with some different microbial communities. Despite some limitations, culture combined with MALDI-TOF MS might play a complementary role in microbiome analysis using 16S rRNA NGS.


Subject(s)
Humans , Actinomyces , Agar , Bacteria , Bifidobacterium , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , Bronchoscopy , Clostridium , Enterobacteriaceae , Fungi , Lactobacillus , Lung , Mass Spectrometry , Microbiota , Neisseria , Prevotella , Respiratory System , Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization , Staphylococcus , Streptococcus , Veillonella
6.
International Journal of Oral Biology ; : 123-128, 2017.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-201472

ABSTRACT

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral mucosal disorder for which no curative treatment is available. We previously reported that decreased Streptococcus salivarius and increased Acinetobacter johnsonii on the oral mucosa are associated with RAS risk. The purpose of this study was to identify antibiotics that selectively inhibit A. johnsonii but minimally inhibit oral mucosal commensals. S. salivarius KCTC 5512, S. salivarius KCTC 3960, A. johnsonii KCTC 12405, Rothia mucilaginosa KCTC 19862, and Veillonella dispar KCOM 1864 were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility test using amoxicillin, cefotaxime, gentamicin, clindamycin, and metronidazole in liquid culture. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was defined as the concentration that inhibits 90% of growth. Only gentamicin presented a higher MIC for A. johnsonii than MICs for S. salivarius and several oral mucosal commensals. Interestingly, the growth of S. salivarius increased 10~200% in the presence of sub-MIC concentrations of gentamicin, which was independent of development of resistance to gentamicin. In conclusion, gentamicin may be useful to restore RAS-associated imbalance in oral microbiota by selectively inhibiting the growth of A. johnsonii but enhancing the growth of S. salivarius.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter , Amoxicillin , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Cefotaxime , Clindamycin , Gentamicins , Mass Screening , Metronidazole , Microbiota , Mouth Mucosa , Stomatitis, Aphthous , Streptococcus , Veillonella
7.
International Journal of Oral Biology ; : 199-208, 2016.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-44705

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to identify the non-Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans bacteria grown on the tryptic soy-serum-bacitracin-vancomycin (TSBV) medium, an A. actinomycetemcomitans selective medium. A total of 82 unidentified bacterial isolates from the oral cavities of a Korean population were kindly provide by the Korean Collection for Oral Microbiology. All the clinical isolates were grown on TSBV medium and bacterial DNA purified from each isolate was subjected to PCR with universal primers specific for bacterial 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNAs) sequence. The each bacterial 16S rDNA was amplified by PCR and the nucleotide sequences of it was determined by the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. They were identified by 16S rDNA sequence comparison method at the specie-level. The data showed that Neisseria spp. (42 strains), Fusobacterium spp. (10 strains), Capnocytophaga spp. (8 strains), Propionibacterium acnes (5 strains), Aggregatibacter aprophilus (4 strains), Campylobacter spp. (5 strains), Veillonella dispar (3 strains), Streptococcus sp. (1 strain), Haemophilus parainfluenzae (1 strain), Leptotrichia wadei (1 strain), Morococcus sp./Neisseria sp. (1 strain), and Staphylococcus sp. (1 strain) were identified. These results could be used to develop a new A. actinomycetemcomitans-selective medium which is more effective than the TSBV medium in future studies.


Subject(s)
Aggregatibacter , Bacteria , Base Sequence , Campylobacter , Capnocytophaga , DNA, Bacterial , DNA, Ribosomal , Fusobacterium , Genes, rRNA , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Leptotrichia , Methods , Neisseria , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Propionibacterium acnes , Staphylococcus , Streptococcus , Veillonella
8.
International Journal of Oral Biology ; : 87-95, 2014.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-190843

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to isolate and identify bacteria from the 4 patients with non-odontogenic infectious lesions (mucormycosis, chronic inflammation from wound infection, and two actinomycosis) and determine their antimicrobial susceptibility against eight antibiotics. Bacterial culture was performed under three culture conditions (anaerobic, CO2, and aerobic incubator). The bacterial strains were identified by 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) sequence comparison analysis method. For investigating the antimicrobial susceptibility of the bacteria against eight antibiotics, penicillin G, amoxicillin, tetracycline, cefuroxime, erythromycin, clindamycin, vancomycin, and Augmentin(R) (amoxicillin + clavulanic acid), minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurement was performed using broth microdilution assay. Nosocomial pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Bacillus subtilis, and Neisseria flavescens were isolated from mucormycosis. Veillonella parvula, Enterobacter hormaechei, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus were isolated from chronic inflammatory lesion. Actinomyces massiliensis was isolated from actinomycosis in parotid gland. Capnocytophaga ochracea was isolated from actinomycosis in buccal region in anaerobic condition. There was no susceptible antibiotic to all bacteria in mucormycosis. Tetracycline was susceptible to all bacteria in chronic inflammation. C. ochracea was resistant to vancomycin and penicillin G; and other antibiotics showed susceptibility to all bacteria in actinomycosis. The results indicated that the combined treatment of two or more antibiotics is better than single antibiotic treatment in mucormycosis, and penicillin is the first recommended antibiotic to treat actinomycosis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Acinetobacter calcoaceticus , Actinomyces , Actinomycosis , Amoxicillin , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Bacillus subtilis , Bacteria , Capnocytophaga , Cefuroxime , Clindamycin , Enterobacter , Enterococcus faecalis , Erythromycin , Genes, rRNA , Inflammation , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Mucormycosis , Neisseria , Parotid Gland , Penicillin G , Penicillins , Tetracycline , Vancomycin , Veillonella , Wound Infection
9.
International Journal of Oral Science ; (4): 21-25, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-358197

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to investigate the compositional profiles and microbial shifts of oral microbiota during head-and-neck radiotherapy. Bioinformatic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was performed to assess the diversity and variation of oral microbiota of irradiated patients. Eight patients with head and neck cancers were involved in this study. For each patient, supragingival plaque samples were collected at seven time points before and during radiotherapy. A total of 147,232 qualified sequences were obtained through pyrosequencing and bioinformatic analysis, representing 3,460 species level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and 140 genus level taxa. Temporal variations were observed across different time points and supported by cluster analysis based on weighted UniFrac metrics. Moreover, the low evenness of oral microbial communities in relative abundance was revealed by Lorenz curves. This study contributed to a better understanding of the detailed characterization of oral bacterial diversity of irradiated patients.


Subject(s)
Humans , Middle Aged , Actinomyces , Classification , Radiation Effects , Actinomycetaceae , Classification , Radiation Effects , Alcaligenaceae , Classification , Radiation Effects , Bacteria , Classification , Radiation Effects , Capnocytophaga , Classification , Radiation Effects , Carnobacteriaceae , Classification , Radiation Effects , Computational Biology , Dental Plaque , Microbiology , Follow-Up Studies , Gemella , Classification , Radiation Effects , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Radiotherapy , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Neisseria , Classification , Radiation Effects , Prevotella , Classification , Radiation Effects , Propionibacteriaceae , Classification , Radiation Effects , RNA, Bacterial , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S , Streptococcus , Classification , Radiation Effects , Veillonella , Classification , Radiation Effects
10.
International Journal of Oral Biology ; : 175-180, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-166281

ABSTRACT

Xylitol is a five-carbon sugar alcohol that reduces the incidence of caries by inhibiting the growth of oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans. Since xylitol is transported via the fructose phosphotransferase system, we hypothesized that it could also affect the growth of other oral bacteria strains. We tested the effects of xylitol against non-periodontopathogenic oral bacteria frequently found in healthy subjects as well as periodontopathogens including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia. With 5% xylitol, Streptococcus vestibularis and Gemella morbillorum showed marked growth inhibition. With 10% xylitol, all of the tested periodontopathogens and Actinomyces naeslundii showed marked growth inhibition, whereas the growth inhibition of Neisseria mucosa, Neisseria sicca and Veillonella parvula was mild only. Xylitol is a widely used sweetener and the concentration used in our experiment is easily achieved in the oral cavity. If xylitol reduces the growth of periodontopathogens more preferentially, it could also reduce the prevalence of these pathogens and have clinical utility in the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease.


Subject(s)
Actinomyces , Bacteria , Forsythia , Fructose , Gemella , Incidence , Mouth , Neisseria mucosa , Neisseria sicca , Periodontal Diseases , Porphyromonas gingivalis , Prevalence , Streptococcus , Streptococcus mutans , Sweetening Agents , Treponema denticola , Veillonella , Xylitol
11.
Indian J Med Microbiol ; 2012 Oct-Dec; 30(4): 462-466
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-144011

ABSTRACT

To address the question if an altered oral microbiota is associated with atherosclerosis. Twenty patients suffering from atherosclerosis and 10 controls were recruited. Clinical oral, medical and laboratory investigations were performed. Oral bacteria were collected and 16S rDNA was sequenced following Single strand conformation polymorphism.(SSCP) Probing pocket depths in patients were significantly elevated. The oral microbiota of patients and controls were dominated by Fusobacterium (16%/17%), Streptococcus (21%/14%), Prevotella (10%/12%), Enterococcus (12%/12%), Porphyromonas (8%/7%), TM7 (0%/7%) and Veillonella (6%/7%). Differences in diversity were not significant between groups. The pathology of atherosclerosis may not be related to significant qualitative changes of the oral microbiota.


Subject(s)
Control Groups , Dental Plaque/analysis , Dental Plaque/microbiology , DNA, Bacterial/analysis , Fusobacterium/analysis , Fusobacterium/isolation & purification , Humans , Metagenomics/methods , Mouth/microbiology , Patients , Prevotella/isolation & purification , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/analysis , Streptococcus/analysis , Streptococcus/isolation & purification , Veillonella/analysis , Veillonella/isolation & purification
12.
Braz. dent. j ; 23(4): 409-416, 2012. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-658019

ABSTRACT

The objective of the present study was to evaluate the bacterial diversity in the saliva of patients with different oral hygiene indexes using of two 16S rRNA gene libraries. Each library was composed of samples from patients with different averages of the differentiated Silness-Löe biofilm index: the first library (A) with an index between 1.0 and 3.0 (considered a high index) and the second library (B) between 0 and 0.5 (considered a low index). Saliva DNA was extracted and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and cloned. The obtained sequences were compared with those stored at NCBI and RDP GenBank. The saliva of patients with high index presented five known genera - Streptococcus, Granulicatella, Gemella, Veillonella and Peptostreptococcus - and 33.3% of nonculturable bacteria grouped into 23 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The saliva of patients with low index differed significantly from the first library (p=0.000) and was composed of 42 OTUs distributed into 11 known genera - Streptococcus, Granulicatella, Gemella, Veillonella, Oribacterium, Haemophilus, Escherichia, Neisseria, Prevotella, Capnocytophaga, Actinomyces - including 24.87% of nonculturable bacteria. It was possible to conclude that there is greater bacterial diversity in the saliva of patients with low dental plaque in relation to patients with high dental plaque.


O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a diversidade bacteriana da saliva de pacientes com diferentes índices de higiene bucal através da construção de duas bibliotecas do gene 16S rRNA. Cada biblioteca foi composta por amostras de saliva de pacientes com índice de biofilme dental de Silness-Löe diferenciado, sendo a primeira (A) com índice de 1,0 a 3,0 (denominada de alto índice) e a segunda (B), entre 0 a 0,5 (denominada de baixo índice). O DNA da saliva foi extraído e o gene 16S rRNA foi amplificado, clonado e sequenciado. As sequências obtidas foram comparadas com aquelas armazenadas no GenBank do NCBI e RDP. A saliva de pacientes com alto índice de biofilme dental apresentou cinco gêneros conhecidos: Streptococcus, Granulicatella, Gemella, Veillonella e Peptostreptococcus e 33,3% de bactérias não-cultivadas, agrupados em 23 unidades taxonômicas operacionais (UTOs). A saliva de pacientes com baixo índice de biofilme dental, foi diferente significativamente da primeira (p=0,000) e foi composta de 42 UTOs, distribuídas em 11 gêneros conhecidos: Streptococcus, Granulicatella, Gemella, Veillonella, Oribacterium, Haemophilus, Escherichia, Neisseria, Prevotella, Capnocytophaga, Actinomyces, além de 24,87% de bactérias não-cultivadas. Pode-se concluir que existe maior diversidade bacteriana na saliva de pacientes com baixo índice de biofilme dental em relação a pacientes com alto índice de biofilme dental.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Bacteria/classification , Biofilms/classification , Oral Hygiene Index , Saliva/microbiology , Actinomyces/classification , Capnocytophaga/classification , Carnobacteriaceae/classification , Escherichia/classification , Gene Library , Gemella/classification , Haemophilus/classification , Microbiota , Neisseria/classification , Periodontal Index , Peptostreptococcus/classification , Prevotella/classification , RNA, Bacterial/analysis , /analysis , Streptococcus/classification , Veillonella/classification
13.
Chinese Journal of Stomatology ; (12): 590-594, 2011.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-306381

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To analyze the community in dental plaque of elder people with root caries.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Total DNAs were extracted from the root caries dental plaques of nine elders over 60 years of age. Polymerase chaid reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to analyze the microbial composition, DGGE bands were excised from the gels for sequencing and identification.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The dominant genus in root caries dental plaque of elder people were: Acinetobacte [0.9% (1/114)], Actinobaculum [1.8% (2/114)], Actinomyces [15.8% (18/114)], Aggregatibacter [0.9% (1/114)], Capnocytophaga [14.0% (16/114)], Corynebacterium [0.9% (1/114)], Haemophilus [0.9% (1/114)], Mobiluncus [0.9% (1/114)], Naxibacter [0.9% (1/114)], Neisseriaceae [10.5% (12/114)], Porphyromonas [0.9% (1/114)], Prevotella [12.3% (14/114)], Selenomonas [6.1% (7/114)], Staphylococcus [1.8% (2/114)], Oralis streptococcus [6.1% (7/114)], Mutans streptococcu [7.9% (9/114)], Tannerella [0.9% (1/114)], Treponema [1.8% (2/114)], Veillonella [10.5% (12/114)] and two uncultured unknown genus [1.8% (2/114)]. Uncultred genotypes accounted for 19.30% of the total. Gram-positive bacteria genotype accounted for 31.6% (36/114), and Gram-negative bacteria genotype accounted for 66.7% (76/114).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>There were many bacteria genotypes in root caries dental plaque in the elderly, which were widely distributed. Gram-negative bacteria accounted for the majority. Genotype-specific pathogenic bacteria were not found.</p>


Subject(s)
Aged , Humans , Middle Aged , Age Factors , Capnocytophaga , Genetics , DNA, Bacterial , Genetics , Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis , Dental Plaque , Microbiology , Genotype , Gram-Negative Bacteria , Genetics , Gram-Positive Bacteria , Genetics , Neisseriaceae , Genetics , Prevotella , Genetics , Root Caries , Microbiology , Selenomonas , Genetics , Streptococcus mutans , Genetics , Streptococcus oralis , Genetics , Veillonella , Genetics
14.
International Journal of Oral Science ; (4): 49-54, 2011.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-269676

ABSTRACT

Human oral bacteria live in multispecies communities in the biofilm called dental plaque. This review focuses on the interactions of seven species and the ability of each species individually and together with other species to grow on saliva as the sole source of nutrient. Community formation in biofilms in flow cells is monitored using species-specific fluorophore-conjugated immunoglobulin G, and images are captured by confocal microscopy. Early colonizing veillonellae emerge from this review of interspecies interactions in saliva as a critical genus that guides the development of multispecies communities. Highly selective interspecies recognition is evident as initial colonizers pair with early and middle colonizers to form multispecies communities that grow on saliva.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Actinomyces , Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans , Biofilms , Dental Enamel , Microbiology , Dental Plaque , Metabolism , Microbiology , Fluorescent Dyes , Metabolism , Fusobacterium nucleatum , Microbial Consortia , Physiology , Microbial Interactions , Physiology , Microscopy, Confocal , Polysaccharides, Bacterial , Chemistry , Saliva , Metabolism , Microbiology , Streptococcus oralis , Veillonella
15.
Journal of Southern Medical University ; (12): 986-989, 2009.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-268792

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the correlation between the changes in oral microflora and recurrent oral ulcers (ROU).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Salivary sample were collected from ROU patients with oral ulcers (group T) and those with ulcer healing (group C) as well as from ROU-free individuals (group N). The quantity of 3 common bacteria (Streptococcus sp., Veillonella sp., and Neisseria sp.) in the salivary samples was detected and compared between the 3 groups.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The quantities of Streptococcus sp. (7.30-/+0.89 copies/ml) and Veillonella sp. (8.29-/+0.77 copies/ml) in group T were significantly lower than those in group N (8.15-/+0.55 and 8.93-/+0.76 copies/ml, respectively, P<0.01), but similar with those in group C. The quantity of Streptococcus sp. (7.51-/+0.81 copies/ml) in group C was significantly lower than that in group N (8.15-/+0.55 copies/ml, P<0.01), but the quantity of Veillonella sp. was similar between the two groups. No significant difference were found in the quantity of Neisseria sp. between the 3 groups.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The quantity of oral microflora differs significantly between patients with recurrent oral ulcers and normal individuals, suggesting a possible correlation between oral microfora and recurrent oral ulcers.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Colony Count, Microbial , Mouth Mucosa , Microbiology , Neisseria , Saliva , Microbiology , Stomatitis, Aphthous , Microbiology , Streptococcus , Veillonella
17.
Braz. dent. j ; 19(2): 119-123, 2008. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-484948

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of local tetracycline on the occurrence of alveolar osteitis in rats, and on the microbiota associated to this infection. Forty Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=10): I - the rats had the maxillary right incisor extracted and the alveolar wound did not receive any treatment; II - adrenaline and Ringer-PRAS were introduced into the alveolar wound; III - the alveolar wound was irrigated with sterile saline; and IV - the alveolar wound was irrigated with an aqueous solution of tetracycline. Microbial samples from the alveolar wounds were collected 2 days after surgery and inoculated on blood agar (with and without 8 µg/mL of tetracycline) and other selective media, and were incubated in either aerobiosis or anaerobiosis at 37ºC, for 2 to 14 days. It was verified that tetracycline reduced the occurrence of alveolar osteitis in the rats and caused significant changes in the microbiota of the surgical sites, decreasing the number of anaerobes and increasing the participation of tetracycline-resistant and multi-resistant microorganisms.


O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar os efeitos do uso tópico de tetraciclina sobre a ocorrência de alveolite em ratos e sobre a microbiota a ela associada. Quarenta ratos foram divididos, ao acaso, em 4 grupos (n=10): grupo I, realizou-se somente a extração do incisivo superior direito e a ferida alveolar não recebeu nenhum tratamento; grupo II, além da extração dental, soluções de adrenalina e Ringer-PRAS foram introduzidas no interior do alvéolo; grupo III, a ferida alveolar foi irrigada com solução salina estéril; grupo IV, a ferida alveolar foi irrigada com solução aquosa de cloridrato de tetraciclina a 10 por cento. As amostras dos alvéolos para processamento microbiológico foram coletadas dois dias após a realização das cirurgias e foram inoculadas em ágar sangue com ou sem 8 µg/mL de tetraciclina e em outros meios de cultura seletivos, incubadas em aerobiose ou anaerobiose, a 37ºC, de 2 a 14 dias. Verificou-se que a tetraciclina reduziu a ocorrência de alveolite e provocou uma modificação significativa na microbiota do sítio cirúrgico, levando a uma redução nas proporções ocupadas pelos microrganismos anaeróbios e uma elevação da participação de microrganismos resistentes à tetraciclina e outros antimicrobianos.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Dry Socket/microbiology , Tetracycline/therapeutic use , Actinomyces/drug effects , Bacteroides/drug effects , Colony Count, Microbial , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Dry Socket/prevention & control , Enterobacteriaceae/drug effects , Enterococcus/drug effects , Epinephrine/therapeutic use , Eubacterium/drug effects , Fusobacterium/drug effects , Isotonic Solutions , Incisor/surgery , Peptostreptococcus/drug effects , Random Allocation , Rats, Wistar , Suppuration , Tetracycline Resistance , Therapeutic Irrigation , Tooth Extraction , Tooth Socket/drug effects , Tooth Socket/microbiology , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Veillonella/drug effects
18.
Korean Journal of Orthodontics ; : 251-262, 2006.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-651924

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the bacterial flora at the peri-implant sulcus of the orthodontic mini-implant placed in the alveolar mucosa with the bacterial flora at the adjacent healthy gingival sulcus. METHODS: Two plaque samples from 7 patients were collected by inserting paper points into the sulcus between the mini-implant and ligature wire connected to the mini-implant head and inflamed alveolar mucosa, and from the gingival sulcus of a healthy tooth adjacent to the mini-implant. RESULTS: Using 16S rDNA clone library, the 24 kinds of bacteria including Haemophilus aphrophilus, Sphingomonas species, Capnocytophaga species, Prevotella melaninogenica, Lachnospiraceae species, Porphyromonas species, Neisseria flava were identified only from the sulcus around the mini-implant. These bacteria constituted only 9.2% of total clones, and the bacteria identified from both the sulcus around mini-implants and the gingival sulcus constituted 80.4% of total clones. Of these bacteria, clones of Prevotella species, Atopobium rimae, Veillonella species, Streptococcus intermedius/constellatus, Streptococcus salivarius were more frequently isolated from the peri-implant sulcus. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that a broad epidemiological study is needed to find causative bacteria which induce inflammation from the peri-implant sulcus.


Subject(s)
Humans , Aggregatibacter aphrophilus , Bacteria , Capnocytophaga , Clone Cells , DNA, Ribosomal , Head , Inflammation , Ligation , Mucous Membrane , Neisseria , Porphyromonas , Prevotella , Prevotella melaninogenica , Sphingomonas , Streptococcus , Tooth , Veillonella
19.
West China Journal of Stomatology ; (6): 126-128, 2004.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-319039

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To observe the dynamic changes of oral microflora early colonized in infants.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>The oral swab samples for the study were taken in 1 day, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 months after birth from 12 healthy neonates. By choosing suitable diluted concentration, the samples were incubated aerobically, facultative anaerobically and anaerobically. The strains were identified by observing colony characteristics, Gram staining and biochemical tests.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>S. salivarius was the most frequent microflora, followed by S. mitis, S. sanguis, S. gordonii and S. mutans occurred in oral cavity after tooth eruption. Veillonella spp. can be detected in oral cavity of 1-month-old babies, A. odontolyticus was isolated from 8.3% infants of more than 3 months old. L. acidophilus maintained the lower prevalence in oral cavity of babies. Leptotrichia buccalis and Capnocytophaga spp. occurred in oral cavity of some dentate infants.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>S. solivarius and S. mitis are predominant species in oral cavity of the infants, Veillonella spp. is the first and the most anaerobic species appeared in oral cavity of healthy babies. A. odontolyticus is the first actinomyces detected in oral cavity. With the increasing months, kind and amount of microflora increase dramatically.</p>


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Actinomyces , Colony Count, Microbial , Longitudinal Studies , Mouth , Microbiology , Mouth Mucosa , Microbiology , Saliva , Microbiology , Streptococcus , Classification , Streptococcus mitis , Streptococcus mutans , Streptococcus sanguis , Veillonella
20.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-51723

ABSTRACT

The present study was conducted to isolate aerobic as well as anaerobic microbes from patients of gingivitis and adult periodontitis and to study the susceptibility patterns of these isolates to different antibiotics. In our study all the samples belonging to the control as well as the study groups yielded microbes. Aerobes and facultative anaerobes were isolated from 100 percent and 96 percent cases of normal gingiva and orodental infections respectively. Anaerobes were isolated from 80 percent of the normal gingival samples and 97 percent of the cases of orodental infections. Metronidazole was found to be the best for the anaerobes while the aerobes and facultative anaerobes showed good susceptibility to cefazolin and cefotaxime.


Subject(s)
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans/drug effects , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria, Aerobic/drug effects , Bacteria, Anaerobic/drug effects , Cefazolin/pharmacology , Cefotaxime/pharmacology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Gingiva/microbiology , Gingivitis/microbiology , Humans , Metronidazole/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Peptostreptococcus/drug effects , Periodontitis/microbiology , Staphylococcus/drug effects , Veillonella/drug effects
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