Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Article | IMSEAR (South-East Asia), GHL | ID: sea-187867

ABSTRACT

Background: The research of recent decades has demonstrated the participation of nitrogen monoxide in various metabolic and regulatory intracellular cascades. However, the majority of works in this field seeks to detect the functional activity of endogenous NO. In opposite, the biological effects of the exogenous nitrogen monoxide have been insufficiently looked into. That is why the aim of the present study was a comprehensive assessment of the effect of various NO-stimulation options on the state of human erythrocytes in vitro. Methods: This study used 15 healthy subjects’s (20-45 years old) blood samples divided into five portions. The first portion was allocated as the control; the second portion was treated with a flow from the Plazon apparatus (800 ppm NO); the third portion was processed in a stream tenfold diluted with air (80 ppm NO), fourth portion – with a gas mixture containing 75 ppm NO and fifth portion was introduced with a solution of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC, 3 mM). In all blood samples we estimated the peroxide resistance of erythrocyte, levels of malonic dialdehyde and lactate, superoxide dismutase activity, activity of lactate dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. Results: We stated that blood processing with high NO dose (800 ppm) causes elevation of peroxide resistance of erythrocyte, levels of malonic dialdehyde and lactate with inhibition of activity of superoxide dismutase, lactate dehydrogenase (in forward reaction) and aldehyde dehydrogenase. In opposite, low NO dose (75 ppm) and DNIC induced the decreasing of peroxide resistance of erythrocyte and stimulation of enzymes catalytic activity. Conclusion: The study has revealed that low doses of gaseous NO and a solution of DNIC produce the most favorable effect on the oxidative and energy metabolism, as well as on the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase of erythrocytes.

2.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 47(5): 411-418, 02/05/2014. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: lil-709437

ABSTRACT

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a type of therapy used primarily for analgesia, but also presents changes in the cardiovascular system responses; its effects are dependent upon application parameters. Alterations to the cardiovascular system suggest that TENS may modify venous vascular response. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of TENS at different frequencies (10 and 100 Hz) on venous vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. Twenty-nine healthy male volunteers were randomized into three groups: placebo (n=10), low-frequency TENS (10 Hz, n=9) and high-frequency TENS (100 Hz, n=10). TENS was applied for 30 min in the nervous plexus trajectory from the superior member (from cervical to dorsal region of the fist) at low (10 Hz/200 μs) and high frequency (100 Hz/200 μs) with its intensity adjusted below the motor threshold and intensified every 5 min, intending to avoid accommodation. Venous vascular reactivity in response to phenylephrine, acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent) and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent) was assessed by the dorsal hand vein technique. The phenylephrine effective dose to achieve 70% vasoconstriction was reduced 53% (P<0.01) using low-frequency TENS (10 Hz), while in high-frequency stimulation (100 Hz), a 47% increased dose was needed (P<0.01). The endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine) and independent (sodium nitroprusside) responses were not modified by TENS, which modifies venous responsiveness, and increases the low-frequency sensitivity of α1-adrenergic receptors and shows high-frequency opposite effects. These changes represent an important vascular effect caused by TENS with implications for hemodynamics, inflammation and analgesia.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Male , Acetylcholine/pharmacology , Cardiovascular Agents/pharmacology , Hand/blood supply , Nitroprusside/pharmacology , Phenylephrine/pharmacology , Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation/methods , Analysis of Variance , Blood Glucose , Cholesterol/blood , Erythrocyte Count , Leukocyte Count , Lipoproteins, HDL/blood , Triglycerides/blood , Urea/blood , Vasoconstriction/drug effects , Vasoconstrictor Agents/pharmacology , Vasodilation/drug effects , Vasodilator Agents/pharmacology , Veins/drug effects
3.
Egyptian Rheumatologist [The]. 2012; 34 (4): 153-157
in English | IMEMR (Eastern Mediterranean) | ID: emr-170374

ABSTRACT

The study included 30 patients with RA diagnosed according to the 2010 ACR-EULAR classification criteria for RA and 15 healthy controls. Patients were included if they were above 18 years and fulfilled a score >/=6 over 10 of the 2010 ACR-EULAR classification criteria for RA. Disease activity was assessed using 28 joint disease activity score [DAS28], erythrocytes sedimentation rate [ESR], C-reactive protein [CRP]. Fatigue was assessed with the Bristol Rheumatoid Arthritis Fatigue Multidimensional Questionnaire [BRAF-MDQ] and serum IL-6 level was measured in patients and controls. The BRAF-MDQ was significantly higher among patients [mean = 50.6 +/- 15.2] than controls [mean = 7.8 +/- 3.7] [p < 0.001]. Patients' mean IL-6 serum level was 35.05 +/- 21.23 pg/ml and 4.72 +/- 3.09 pg/ml among control subjects [p < 0.001]. DAS 28 ranged between 4.33 and 7.67, mean 1st hour ESR was 43.57 mm and CRP was positive in 76.7% of patients. Significant correlations were found between BRAF-MDQ score and serum IL-6 level [r = 0.947, p < 0.001], ESR [r = 0.509, p < 0.001] as well as CRP positivity [r = 0.411, p = 0.005] in RA patients. Serum IL-6 level correlated with ESR [r = 0.463, p < 0.001] and CRP [r = 0.376, p = 0.01] among patients. Fatigue is a common symptom and scores higher among RA patients than healthy controls and should be measured in all RA patients with simple fatigue questionnaires matching with different cultures. Fatigue becomes more prominent as serum IL-6 level increases independently of the disease duration and activity


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Interleukin-6/blood , Fatigue , Surveys and Questionnaires , Disease Progression
4.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 89(Suppl.2): 111-114, 1994.
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: lil-319962

ABSTRACT

Chimpanzees are being used in the study of immune response to Plasmodium falciparum malaria pre-erythrocytic stages (MPES). Responses induced by immunisation with recombinant/synthetic antigens and by irradiated sporozoites are being evaluated in a model system that is phylogenetically close to humans and that is amenable to limited manipulation not possible in humans. The value of chimpanzees for the in-depth study of immunological mechanisms at work in MPES-induced protection are discussed. A total number of 7 chimpanzees have been used to evaluate the immune response to recombinant antigens, and 5 have been challenged with large numbers of sporozoites, followed by surgical liver-wedge resection, in order to generate infected liver tissue for histological and immunological studies. As a complementary model, SCID mice carrying live, transplanted human and primate hepatocytes have been inoculated with sporozoites and infection of transplanted cells has been monitored by histological and immunological methods. In ongoing experiments chimpanzees are being immunised with MPES-derived lipopeptides that have been shown to overcome MHC restriction in mice, and with irradiated sporozoites.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Malaria , Pan troglodytes , Disease Models, Animal , Erythrocytes , Immunization , Plasmodium , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL