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Inflammatory response of human dental pulp to at-home and in-office tooth bleaching
Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Cardoso, Paula Carvalho; Souza, João Batista de; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Costa, Nádia Lago; Torres, Érica Miranda; Estrela, Carlos.
  • Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Universidade Federal de Goiás. Goiânia. BR
  • Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Universidade Federal de Goiás. Goiânia. BR
  • Cardoso, Paula Carvalho; Universidade Federal de Goiás. Goiânia. BR
  • Souza, João Batista de; Universidade Federal de Goiás. Goiânia. BR
  • Batista, Aline Carvalho; Universidade Federal de Goiás. Goiânia. BR
  • Costa, Nádia Lago; Universidade Federal de Goiás. Goiânia. BR
  • Torres, Érica Miranda; Universidade Federal de Goiás. Goiânia. BR
  • Estrela, Carlos; Universidade Federal de Goiás. Goiânia. BR
J. appl. oral sci ; 24(5): 509-517, Sept.-Oct. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, BBO | ID: lil-797983
Responsible library: BR1.1
ABSTRACT
ABSTRACT Tooth bleaching is a technique of choice to obtain a harmonious smile, but bleaching agents may damage the dental pulp.

Objective:

This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Material and

Methods:

Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups control - no tooth bleaching (CG) (n=7); at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH) (n = 10), and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO) (n=12). Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+), blood vessels (CD31+), and macrophages (CD68+). Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p<.05.

Results:

The inflammation intensity and the number of macrophages were significantly greater in IO than in AH and CG (p<0.05). The results of CD31+ (blood vessels per mm2) were similar in CG (61.39±20.03), AH (52.29±27.62), and IO (57.43±8.69) groups (p>0.05). No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed.

Conclusion:

In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels.
Subject(s)


Full text: Available Index: LILACS (Americas) Main subject: Pulpitis / Tooth Bleaching / Dental Pulp / Tooth Bleaching Agents Type of study: Controlled clinical trial / Evaluation studies Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: J. appl. oral sci Journal subject: Dentistry Year: 2016 Type: Article Affiliation country: Brazil Institution/Affiliation country: Universidade Federal de Goiás/BR

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Full text: Available Index: LILACS (Americas) Main subject: Pulpitis / Tooth Bleaching / Dental Pulp / Tooth Bleaching Agents Type of study: Controlled clinical trial / Evaluation studies Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: J. appl. oral sci Journal subject: Dentistry Year: 2016 Type: Article Affiliation country: Brazil Institution/Affiliation country: Universidade Federal de Goiás/BR