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1.
iScience ; 25(1): 103722, 2022 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587457

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a newly identified coronavirus that causes the respiratory disease called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). With an urgent need for therapeutics, we lack a full understanding of the molecular basis of SARS-CoV-2-induced cellular damage and disease progression. Here, we conducted transcriptomic analysis of human PBMCs, identified significant changes in mitochondrial, ion channel, and protein quality-control gene products. SARS-CoV-2 proteins selectively target cellular organelle compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. M-protein, NSP6, ORF3A, ORF9C, and ORF10 bind to mitochondrial PTP complex components cyclophilin D, SPG-7, ANT, ATP synthase, and a previously undescribed CCDC58 (coiled-coil domain containing protein 58). Knockdown of CCDC58 or mPTP blocker cyclosporin A pretreatment enhances mitochondrial Ca2+ retention capacity and bioenergetics. SARS-CoV-2 infection exacerbates cardiomyocyte autophagy and promotes cell death that was suppressed by cyclosporin A treatment. Our findings reveal that SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins suppress cardiomyocyte mitochondrial function that disrupts cardiomyocyte Ca2+ cycling and cell viability.

2.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526851

ABSTRACT

There have been more than 150 million confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 since the beginning of the pandemic in 2019. By June 2021, the mortality from such infections approached 3.9 million people. Despite the availability of a number of vaccines which provide protection against this virus, the evolution of new viral variants, inconsistent availability of the vaccine around the world, and vaccine hesitancy, in some countries, makes it unreasonable to rely on mass vaccination alone to combat this pandemic. Consequently, much effort is directed to identifying potential antiviral treatments. Marine brominated tyrosine alkaloids are recognized to have antiviral potential. We test here the antiviral capacity of fourteen marine brominated tyrosine alkaloids against five different target proteins from SARS-CoV-2, including main protease (Mpro) (PDB ID: 6lu7), spike glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYB), nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYO), membrane glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6M17), and non-structural protein 10 (nsp10) (PDB ID: 6W4H). These marine alkaloids, particularly the hexabrominated compound, fistularin-3, shows promising docking interactions with predicted binding affinities (S-score = -7.78, -7.65, -6.39, -6.28, -8.84 Kcal/mol) for the main protease (Mpro) (PDB ID: 6lu7), spike glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYB), nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYO), membrane glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6M17), and non-structural protein 10 (nsp10) (PDB ID: 6W4H), respectively, where it forms better interactions with the protein pockets than the native interaction. It also shows promising molecular dynamics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity profiles. As such, further exploration of the antiviral properties of fistularin-3 against SARS-CoV-2 is merited.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Alkaloids/isolation & purification , Alkaloids/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Halogenation , Humans , Isoxazoles/chemistry , Isoxazoles/metabolism , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , Tyrosine/analogs & derivatives , Tyrosine/chemistry , Tyrosine/metabolism
3.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 191: 934-955, 2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433283

ABSTRACT

The spike (S) protein is a critical determinant of the infectivity and antigenicity of SARS-CoV-2. Several mutations in the S protein of SARS-CoV-2 have already been detected, and their effect in immune system evasion and enhanced transmission as a cause of increased morbidity and mortality are being investigated. From pathogenic and epidemiological perspectives, S proteins are of prime interest to researchers. This study focused on the unique variants of S proteins from six continents: Asia, Africa, Europe, Oceania, South America, and North America. In comparison to the other five continents, Africa had the highest percentage of unique S proteins (29.1%). The phylogenetic relationship implies that unique S proteins from North America are significantly different from those of the other five continents. They are most likely to spread to the other geographic locations through international travel or naturally by emerging mutations. It is suggested that restriction of international travel should be considered, and massive vaccination as an utmost measure to combat the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. It is also further suggested that the efficacy of existing vaccines and future vaccine development must be reviewed with careful scrutiny, and if needed, further re-engineered based on requirements dictated by new emerging S protein variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Amino Acid Substitution/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Entropy , Humans , Isoelectric Point , Mutation/immunology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Phylogeny , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
4.
Autoimmun Rev ; 20(11): 102941, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401227

ABSTRACT

Although vaccination represents the most promising way to stop or contain the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and safety and effectiveness of available vaccines were proven, a small number of individuals who received anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccines developed a prothrombotic syndrome. Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) can be triggered by the adenoviral vector-based vaccine, whereas lipid nanoparticle-mRNA-based vaccines can induce rare cases of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Although the main pathogenic mechanisms behind this rare phenomenon have not yet been identified, both host and vaccine factors might be involved, with pathology at least in part being related to the vaccine-triggered autoimmune reaction. In this review, we are considering some aspects related to pathogenesis, major risk factors, as well as peculiarities of diagnosis and treatment of this rare condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS Virus , Viral Vaccines , Autoimmunity , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
5.
Biomolecules ; 11(7)2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1308294

ABSTRACT

Two adenovirus-based vaccines, ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and Ad26.COV2.S, and two mRNA-based vaccines, BNT162b2 and mRNA.1273, have been approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and are invaluable in preventing and reducing the incidence of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Recent reports have pointed to thrombosis with associated thrombocytopenia as an adverse effect occurring at a low frequency in some individuals after vaccination. The causes of such events may be related to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein interactions with different C-type lectin receptors, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and the CD147 receptor, or to different soluble splice variants of the spike protein, adenovirus vector interactions with the CD46 receptor or platelet factor 4 antibodies. Similar findings have been reported for several viral diseases after vaccine administration. In addition, immunological mechanisms elicited by viral vectors related to cellular delivery could play a relevant role in individuals with certain genetic backgrounds. Although rare, the potential COVID-19 vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) requires immediate validation, especially in risk groups, such as the elderly, chronic smokers, and individuals with pre-existing incidences of thrombocytopenia; and if necessary, a reformulation of existing vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Thrombosis/etiology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Smokers , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Thrombocytopenia/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vaccination/adverse effects
6.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 181: 801-809, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188606

ABSTRACT

The current Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) shows similar pathology to MERS and SARS-CoV, with a current estimated fatality rate of 1.4%. Open reading frame 10 (ORF10) is a unique SARS-CoV-2 accessory protein, which contains eleven cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes each of nine amino acids in length. Twenty-two unique SARS-CoV-2 ORF10 variants have been identified based on missense mutations found in sequence databases. Some of these mutations are predicted to decrease the stability of ORF10 in silico physicochemical and structural comparative analyses were carried out on SARS-CoV-2 and Pangolin-CoV ORF10 proteins, which share 97.37% amino acid (aa) homology. Though there is a high degree of ORF10 protein similarity of SARS-CoV-2 and Pangolin-CoV, there are differences of these two ORF10 proteins related to their sub-structure (loop/coil region), solubility, antigenicity and shift from strand to coil at aa position 26 (tyrosine). SARS-CoV-2 ORF10, which is apparently expressed in vivo since reactive T cell clones are found in convalescent patients should be monitored for changes which could correlate with the pathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Mutation , Open Reading Frames , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sequence Homology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Proteins/genetics
7.
Comput Biol Med ; 133: 104380, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184908

ABSTRACT

Immune evasion is one of the unique characteristics of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) attributed to its ORF8 protein. This protein modulates the adaptive host immunity through down-regulation of MHC-1 (Major Histocompatibility Complex) molecules and innate immune responses by surpassing the host's interferon-mediated antiviral response. To understand the host's immune perspective in reference to the ORF8 protein, a comprehensive study of the ORF8 protein and mutations possessed by it have been performed. Chemical and structural properties of ORF8 proteins from different hosts, such as human, bat, and pangolin, suggest that the ORF8 of SARS-CoV-2 is much closer to ORF8 of Bat RaTG13-CoV than to that of Pangolin-CoV. Eighty-seven mutations across unique variants of ORF8 in SARS-CoV-2 can be grouped into four classes based on their predicted effects (Hussain et al., 2021) [1]. Based on the geo-locations and timescale of sample collection, a possible flow of mutations was built. Furthermore, conclusive flows of amalgamation of mutations were found upon sequence similarity analyses and consideration of the amino acid conservation phylogenies. Therefore, this study seeks to highlight the uniqueness of the rapidly evolving SARS-CoV-2 through the ORF8.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Evolution, Molecular , Genome, Viral , Humans , Phylogeny
8.
ACS Nano ; 15(5): 8069-8086, 2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172013

ABSTRACT

Therapeutic options for the highly pathogenic human severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing the current pandemic coronavirus disease (COVID-19) are urgently needed. COVID-19 is associated with viral pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome causing significant morbidity and mortality. The proposed treatments for COVID-19 have shown little or no effect in the clinic so far. Additionally, bacterial and fungal pathogens contribute to the SARS-CoV-2-mediated pneumonia disease complex. The antibiotic resistance in pneumonia treatment is increasing at an alarming rate. Therefore, carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs), such as fullerene, carbon dots, graphene, and their derivatives constitute a promising alternative due to their wide-spectrum antimicrobial activity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and capacity to induce tissue regeneration. Furthermore, the antimicrobial mode of action is mainly physical (e.g., membrane distortion), characterized by a low risk of antimicrobial resistance. In this Review, we evaluated the literature on the antiviral activity and broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties of CBNs. CBNs had antiviral activity against 13 enveloped positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. CBNs with low or no toxicity to humans are promising therapeutics against the COVID-19 pneumonia complex with other viruses, bacteria, and fungi, including those that are multidrug-resistant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia, Viral , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Carbon , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Biomolecules ; 11(3)2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148287

ABSTRACT

The huge global expansion of the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel SARS-corona virus-2 is an extraordinary public health emergency. The unavailability of specific treatment against SARS-CoV-2 infection necessitates the focus of all scientists in this direction. The reported antiviral activities of guanidine alkaloids encouraged us to run a comprehensive in silico binding affinity of fifteen guanidine alkaloids against five different proteins of SARS-CoV-2, which we investigated. The investigated proteins are COVID-19 main protease (Mpro) (PDB ID: 6lu7), spike glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYB), nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYO), membrane glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6M17), and a non-structural protein (nsp10) (PDB ID: 6W4H). The binding energies for all tested compounds indicated promising binding affinities. A noticeable superiority for the pentacyclic alkaloids particularly, crambescidin 786 (5) and crambescidin 826 (13) has been observed. Compound 5 exhibited very good binding affinities against Mpro (ΔG = -8.05 kcal/mol), nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (ΔG = -6.49 kcal/mol), and nsp10 (ΔG = -9.06 kcal/mol). Compound 13 showed promising binding affinities against Mpro (ΔG = -7.99 kcal/mol), spike glycoproteins (ΔG = -6.95 kcal/mol), and nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (ΔG = -8.01 kcal/mol). Such promising activities might be attributed to the long ω-fatty acid chain, which may play a vital role in binding within the active sites. The correlation of c Log P with free binding energies has been calculated. Furthermore, the SAR of the active compounds has been clarified. The Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Toxicity (ADMET) studies were carried out in silico for the 15 compounds; most examined compounds showed optimal to good range levels of ADMET aqueous solubility, intestinal absorption and being unable to pass blood brain barrier (BBB), non-inhibitors of CYP2D6, non-hepatotoxic, and bind plasma protein with a percentage less than 90%. The toxicity of the tested compounds was screened in silico against five models (FDA rodent carcinogenicity, carcinogenic potency TD50, rat maximum tolerated dose, rat oral LD50, and rat chronic lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL)). All compounds showed expected low toxicity against the tested models. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were also carried out to confirm the stable binding interactions of the most promising compounds, 5 and 13, with their targets. In conclusion, the examined 15 alkaloids specially 5 and 13 showed promising docking, ADMET, toxicity and MD results which open the door for further investigations for them against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Porifera/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/toxicity , Blood-Brain Barrier , Crystallography, X-Ray , Ligands , Membrane Glycoproteins/chemistry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Rats , Software , Viral Proteases/chemistry
11.
Infect Genet Evol ; 83: 104327, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-72531

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses are a large group of viruses known to cause illnesses that vary between the common cold and more severe diseases to include severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). A novel coronavirus was identified in December 2019 in Wuhan city, Hubei province, China. This virus represents a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans. The virus is now known as the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the resulting disease is called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the novel coronavirus outbreak a global pandemic in March 2020. Despite rigorous global containment and quarantine efforts, the incidence of COVID-19 continues to rise, with more than 1,948,617 laboratory-confirmed cases and over 121,846 deaths worldwide. Currently, no specific medication is recommended to treat COVID-19 patients. However, governments and pharmaceutical companies are struggling to quickly find an effective drug to defeat the coronavirus. In the current review, we summarize the existing state of knowledge about COVID-19, available medications, and treatment options. Favilavir is an antiviral drug that is approved in Japan for common influenza treatment and is now approved to treat symptoms of COVID-19 in China. Moreover, Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, drugs used to treat malaria and arthritis, respectively, were recommended by the National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China for treatment of COVID-19. Presently, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are under investigation by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a treatment for COVID-19. The first COVID-19 vaccine is not expected to be ready for clinical trials before the end of the year.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Drug Development , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Animals , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Zoonoses
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