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1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319567

ABSTRACT

Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) use for severe Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients has evolved during the course of the pandemic. Early uncertainty regarding the role of ECMO during the current pandemic was based on the suboptimal initial experiences. However, more recent data suggests favorable outcomes in COVID-19 patients receiving ECMO support. We aimed to explore the epidemiology and outcomes of ECMO for COVID-19 related cardiopulmonary failure and evaluate outcomes of new centers versus established ones.Methods: This is a retrospective, multicenter international, observational study conducted in (19) ECMO centers in five countries from March 1, 2020, to September 30, 2020. We included 307 patients with COVID-19 who received ECMO for refractory hypoxemia and severe respiratory acidosis with or without circulatory failure. Data collection included Patients characteristics, demographic data, ECMO-related specific data, pre-ECMO patient condition, 24 hours post-ECMO initiation data, and outcome. The primary outcome is survival to home discharge. Secondary outcomes include mortality during ECMO, survival to decannulation, and outcomes stratified by center type in which patients were treated.Findings: Three hundred and seven COVID-19 patients received ECMO support during the study period. The median age was 45 years (37-52 IQR), and 81% were men. 178 (58%) patients survived ECMO, of whom 138 (45%) patients were discharged home, and 40 patients (13%) died post-ECMO decannulation while 128 patients (41.7%) died during ECMO. Patient outcomes in the new centers developed in response to the pandemic were similar to those of established centers.Interpretation: During pandemics, ECMO may provide favorable outcomes in highly select patients as resources allow. Outcomes in ECMO centers established during the pandemic were comparable to existing centers.Funding Statement: None.Declaration of Interests: Kiran Shekar acknowledges research support from the Metro North Hospital and Health Service and the Prince Charles Hospital Foundation. Dr. Brodie receives research support from ALung Technologies. He has been on the medical advisory boards for Baxter, Abiomed, Xenios, and Hemovent and is the President-Elect of the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO). Dr. Combes reported receiving grants and personal fees from Maquet, Xenios, and Baxter and serving as the recent past president of the EuroELSO organization. Other authors have no conflict of interest.Ethics Approval Statement: After the SWAAC ELSO steering committee's authorization, IRB approval was obtained from the coordinating center King Saud Medical City in Riyadh - Saudi Arabia. The country representatives obtained IRB approval for each participating center as well.

2.
J Egypt Public Health Assoc ; 96(1): 29, 2021 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502025

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Knowledge about the outcome of COVID-19 on pregnant women is so important. The published literature on the outcomes of pregnant women with COVID-19 is confusing. The aim of this study was to report our clinical experience about the effect of COVID-19 on pregnant women and to determine whether it was associated with increased mortality or an increase in the need for mechanical ventilation in this special category of patients. METHODS: This was a cohort study from some isolation hospitals of the Ministry of Health and Population, in eleven governorates, Egypt. The clinical data from the first 64 pregnant women with COVID-19 whose care was managed at some of the Egyptian hospitals from 14 March to 14 June 2020 as well as 114 non-pregnant women with COVID-19 was reviewed. RESULTS: The two groups did not show any significant difference regarding the main outcomes of the disease. Two cases in each group needed mechanical ventilation (p 0.617). Three cases (4.7%) died among the pregnant women and two (1.8%) died among the non-pregnant women (p 0.352). CONCLUSIONS: The main clinical outcomes of COVID-19 were not different between pregnant and non-pregnant women with COVID-19. Based on our findings, pregnancy did not exacerbate the course or mortality of COVID-19 pneumonia.

3.
Intensive Care Med ; 47(8): 887-895, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279406

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) use for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients has increased during the course of the pandemic. As uncertainty existed regarding patient's outcomes, early guidelines recommended against establishing new ECMO centers. We aimed to explore the epidemiology and outcomes of ECMO for COVID-19 related cardiopulmonary failure in five countries in the Middle East and India and to evaluate the results of ECMO in 5 new centers. METHODS: This is a retrospective, multicenter international, observational study conducted in 19 ECMO centers in five countries in the Middle East and India from March 1, 2020, to September 30, 2020. We included patients with COVID-19 who received ECMO for refractory hypoxemia and severe respiratory acidosis with or without circulatory failure. Data collection included demographic data, ECMO-related specific data, pre-ECMO patient condition, 24 h post-ECMO initiation data, and outcome. The primary outcome was survival to home discharge. Secondary outcomes included mortality during ECMO, survival to decannulation, and outcomes stratified by center type. RESULTS: Three hundred and seven COVID-19 patients received ECMO support during the study period, of whom 78 (25%) were treated in the new ECMO centers. The median age was 45 years (interquartile range IQR 37-52), and 81% were men. New center patients were younger, were less frequently male, had received higher PEEP, more frequently inotropes and prone positioning before ECMO and were less frequently retrieved from a peripheral center on ECMO. Survival to home discharge was 45%. In patients treated in new and established centers, survival was 55 and 41% (p = 0.03), respectively. Multivariable analysis retained only a SOFA score < 12 at ECMO initiation as associated with survival (odds ratio, OR 1.93 (95% CI 1.05-3.58), p = 0.034), but not treatment in a new center (OR 1.65 (95% CI 0.75-3.67)). CONCLUSIONS: During pandemics, ECMO may provide favorable outcomes in highly selected patients as resources allow. Newly formed ECMO centers with appropriate supervision of regional experts may have satisfactory results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Middle East , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Curr Med Imaging ; 17(12): 1473-1480, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221872

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: In the midst of this pandemic, planning the prioritization of hospital admissions for patients affected with COVID-19 should be of prime concern, particularly in healthcare settings with limited resources. Thus, in this study, we aimed to develop a novel approach to triage COVID-19 patients and attempt to prioritize their hospital admission using Lung Ultrasonography (LUS). The efficacy of LUS in triaging suspected COVID-19 patients and assessing the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia was evaluated; the findings were then compared with those obtained by chest computed tomography (CT). METHODS: This multicenter, cross-sectional study comprised 243 COVID-19 patients who presented to the emergency department in 3 major university hospitals in Egypt. LUS was performed by an experienced emergency or chest physician, according to the local protocol of each hospital. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were then collected from each patient. Each patient was subjected to chest CT scans and LUS. RESULTS: The mean age of the 243 patients was 46.7 ± 10.4 years. Ground-glass opacity, subpleural consolidation, translobar consolidation, and crazy paving were reported in the chest CT scans of 54.3%, 15.2%, 11.1%, and 8.6% of the patients, respectively. B-line artifacts were observed in 81.1% of the patients (confluent pattern, 18.9%). The LUS findings completely coincided with the CT findings (Kappa agreement value, 0.77) in 197 patients (81.1%) and offered a diagnostic sensitivity of 74%, diagnostic specificity of 97.9%, positive predictive value of 90.2%, and negative predictive value of 93.6% for the COVID-19 patients. Following the addition of O2 saturation to the lung imaging findings, the ultrasound method was able to demonstrate 100% sensitivity and specificity in accurately differentiating between severe and non-severe lung diseases. CONCLUSION: LUS with oxygen saturation might prove to be effective in prioritizing the hospital admission of COVID-19 patients, particularly in healthcare settings with limited resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Hospitalization , Ultrasonography , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Developing Countries , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Middle Aged
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