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1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0266175, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833649

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 is a multisystem disease, and some patients suffer from physical or psychological symptoms for weeks or even months after infection, which is described as post-COVID syndrome. The goal of this study is evaluating the prevalence of post-COVID-19 symptoms among Egyptian patients and detecting the factors associated with the presence of these symptoms. METHODS: An on-line cross-sectional survey using Google Forms was used to conduct the present study, which took place between June and August 2021. RESULTS: Three hundred and ninety-six participants filled in the survey. The mean age of participants was 41.4 years. Most participants had mild to moderate COVID-19 (81.31%). The prevalence of post-COVID-19 symptoms was 87.63%, where the most frequent symptom was fatigue (60.86%). Female sex, the presence of comorbidities, lower degree of education, longer disease duration, as well as severe and critical forms of the disease were significantly associated with the presence of post-COVID symptoms. Using regression analysis, the predictors of post-COVID symptoms were severe and critical forms of the disease and intake of antibiotics and corticosteroids for treatment of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 is followed by high prevalence of post-COVID symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report the relationship between the use of antibiotics and the development of post-COVID symptoms. We recommend further studies to understand this relationship. We also recommend restricting the use of these drugs to indicated cases according to the international guidelines. More studies are needed to gain better understanding of post-COVID symptoms especially in females.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Hum Immunol ; 83(1): 10-16, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719803

ABSTRACT

Genetic differences among individuals could affect the clinical presentations and outcomes of COVID-19. Human Leukocyte Antigens are associated with COVID-19 susceptibility, severity, and prognosis. This study aimed to identify HLA-B and -C genotypes among 69 Egyptian patients with COVID-19 and correlate them with disease outcomes and other clinical and laboratory data. HLA-B and -C typing was performed using Luminex-based HLA typing kits. Forty patients (58%) had severe COVID-19; 55% of these patients died, without reported mortality in the moderate group. The alleles associated with severe COVID-19 were HLA-B*41, -B*42, -C*16, and -C*17, whereas HLA-B*15, -C*7, and -C*12 were significantly associated with protection against mortality. Regression analysis showed that HLA-B*15 was the only allele associated with predicted protection against mortality, where the likelihood of survival increased with HLA-B*15 (P < 0.001). Patient survival was less likely to occur with higher total leukocytic count, ferritin, and creatinine levels. This study provides interesting insights into the association between HLA class I alleles and protection from or severity of COVID-19 through immune response modulation. This is the first study to investigate this relationship in Egyptian patients. More studies are needed to understand how HLA class I alleles interact and affect Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cell function.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , HLA-B15 Antigen/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Egypt , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , HLA-B15 Antigen/immunology , Haplotypes , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Protective Factors , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
3.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 15: 1275, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369660

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had ramifications for most healthcare activities, including medical education and communication aspects. Virtual educational meetings and activities (VEMAs) have been utilised tremendously in the pandemic era, reflecting a transition to new horizons of cyberspace. This creates the need to explore possible challenges for the implementation of such services in the rapidly evolving field of oncology. The aim of our study is to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on VEMAs in the oncology community in Egypt. It focused on the evaluation of current attitudes, satisfaction and expectations of Egyptian oncologists during and beyond the COVID-19 era. The study is a cross-sectional study using a survey that was distributed through social media. It targeted Egyptian oncologists during the months of May and June 2020. A total of 118 participants completed the survey and most of them were younger than 35 years (71%). Most participants (93.2%) agreed that COVID-19 affected the stream of live medical educational meetings. About three-quarters of them attended VEMAs during the COVID-19 period compared to 50% prior to the pandemic. The majority reported that evening hours after 8 PM was the best time to attend VEMAs and 1 hour is the optimal duration for a virtual meeting. Although the COVID-19 pandemic appeared as an unprecedented challenge for medical education, it can be a catalyst for VEMAs, especially in a rapidly evolving field such as oncology. Further research is needed to assess whether learners are ready and willing to make greater use of online educational platforms and investigate the possible barriers and strategies to enhance their use.

4.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 608959, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133920

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the World Health Organization has characterized COVID-19, a disease caused by infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, as a pandemic. Although a few vaccines and drugs have been approved to, respectively, prevent or treat the disease, several clinical trials are still ongoing to test new vaccines or drugs to mitigate the burden of the pandemic. Few studies have shown the role of host genetics in disease prognosis and drug response highlighting the importance of diverse participation in COVID-19 clinical trials. The goal of this study is to assess public attitudes in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Jordan toward participating in COVID-19 clinical trials and to identify the factors that may influence their attitude. An online questionnaire was developed and distributed among the target group through social media platforms. The number of responses was 1,576. Three quarters (74.9%) of participants heard about clinical trials before, 57.6% of them had a positive attitude toward participation in COVID-19 clinical trials. The conduct of clinical trials in accordance with the scientific, research, and ethical guidelines was a strong predictor of willingness to participate in clinical trials. Other positive factors also included protection of family from COVID-19 and contributing to the return to normal community life as well as receiving additional healthcare benefit was the fourth significant predictor. On the other hand, the thought that clinical trials can have a negative impact on the health of participants strongly predicted the unwillingness of individuals to participate in such trials. This was followed by having limited information about the novel coronavirus and COVID-19 and the lack of trust in physicians and hospitals. In general, Arab citizens are accepting the concept and have a positive attitude toward COVID-19 clinical trials. Increasing awareness of COVID-19 and clinical trials, enforcing the concept of altruism, and placing clear policies in conducting clinical trials are needed to increase participation in clinical trials among Arabs.

5.
Front Public Health ; 8: 590190, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-993478

ABSTRACT

Objectives: COVID-19 has been recognized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization, and physicians are at the frontline to confront the disease. Burnout syndrome (BOS) is a syndrome resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed. The objective of this study is to evaluate the frequency and associated risk factors of BOS among a sample of Egyptian physicians during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Using Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services Survey, a cross-sectional electronic survey was conducted to assess BOS among the target group. Results: Two hundred and twenty physicians participated in the study. The frequency of BOS among the research group was 36.36%. The possibility of development of BOS increased two times with the need to buy personal protective equipment (PPE) from participants' own money, with harassment by patients' families, and was less likely to develop in doctors with older age. While male gender was a predictor of depersonalization (DP), female gender showed a significant association with higher emotional exhaustion (EE). Infection or death from COVID-19 among colleagues or relatives showed significant association with elevated EE and lowered personal achievement (PA), respectively. Conclusion: COVID-19 pandemic added new factors to the development of BOS in our research group. Several measures should be taken to support physicians at this stage. These measures include psychological support, organizing work hours, adjusting salaries, and providing personal protective equipment and training on safety measures.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , Workload/psychology , Adult , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Prevalence , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Front Public Health ; 8: 429, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-800436

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 infection has been recognized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization. Efforts to prevent the spread of the disease are threatened by the appearance of disease-associated social stigma in society. In Egypt, a small wave of stigma directed at different groups started to appear. Here we report the features of COVID-19-associated stigma in Egypt and suggest recommendations to overcome this stigma before it grows and have physical and psychological impacts on society.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Durable Medical Equipment , Egypt/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Stigma
7.
J Community Health ; 45(5): 881-890, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-97441

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been recognized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization. Global efforts have been exerted to prevent the spreading of the disease through political decisions together with personal behaviors, which depend on awareness of the public. The goal of this study is to assess the knowledge, perceptions and attitude of the Egyptian public towards the COVID-19 disease. We conducted a cross-sectional survey about these points, which was distributed among adult Egyptians. Five hundred and fifty nine persons completed the survey. The mean knowledge score was 16.39 out of 23, gained mainly though social media (66.9%), and the internet (58.3%). Knowledge was significantly lower among older, less educated, lower income participants, and rural residents. Most participants (86.9%) were concerned about the risk of infection. While 37.6% thought that their salary will be continued if they become isolated, 68.5% believed that it should be continued during this period. About 73.0% were looking forward to get the vaccine when available. In general, participants had a good knowledge about the disease and a positive attitude towards protective measures. This knowledge is gained mainly through novel media channels, which have pros and cons. Although the government has taken major steps to educate the public and limit the spread of the disease, more effort is needed to educate and support the lower economic strata. If a vaccine or a treatment is approved, we recommend a government control over its use to preserve the rights of the vulnerable and needy groups.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Media , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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