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1.
Int J Equity Health ; 21(1):174, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2153594

ABSTRACT

Over the years, the Nigerian healthcare workforce, including doctors, nurses, and pharmacists have always been known to emigrate to developed countries to practice. However, the recent dramatic increase in this trend is worrisome. There has been a mass emigration of Nigerian healthcare workers to developed countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. While the push factors have been found to include the inadequate provision of personal protective equipment, low monthly hazard allowance, and inconsistent payment of COVID-19 inducement allowance on top of worsening insecurity, the pull factors are higher salaries as well as a safe and healthy working environment. We also discuss how healthcare workers can be retained in Nigeria through increment in remunerations and prompt payment of allowances, and how the brain drain can be turned into a brain gain via the use of electronic data collection tools for Nigerian health workers abroad, implementation of the Bhagwati's tax system, and establishment of a global skill partnership with developed countries.

2.
Ethics Med Public Health ; 24: 100802, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1991151

ABSTRACT

Background: The economic crisis in Lebanon, a middle-income eastern Mediterranean country, has been threatening the health of the local population. This review will look at the impact of the economic crisis and COVID-19 on health and healthcare in the country, discussing food insecurity and water shortages, and the hospital crisis for what concerns medications, electricity shortages and workforce issues. Methodology: Peer Reviewed Literature produced between 2015 and 2021, indexed in Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar was used to compile this short report. News and governmental reports, alongside reports of NGOs like Médicins sans frontières were also collected; these were analysed for the production of this short report. Results: The challenges and public health consequences caused by the economic crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic in Lebanon were identified and commented upon. From food insecurity and water shortages, to the Beirut port explosion and the 2021 lack of fuel and electricity, it was found that the health and well-being of the Lebanese population is currently being threatened from many points of view. With food inflation rates rapidly escalating in 2020 and peaking at 441% in October, new-born and infant milk being non-existent and 20 hour power cuts daily, the situation in Lebanon does not seem to be improving. The country needs to receive international help to relief the population from these synergetic crises. Conclusion: Long-term economic reforms with an emphasis on employment should be at the forefront of the government's priority list. International help should also be provided to prevent disasters like food insecurity and electricity shortages from posing threats to the lives and the wellbeing of the people in Lebanon again.

3.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine ; 15(2):95-96, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1760920
4.
Ethics Med Public Health ; 19: 100727, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446832
5.
Ethics Med Public Health ; 19: 100714, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379138
6.
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene ; 104(1):30-31, 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1187291

ABSTRACT

WATERLIT Abstract: The WHO recently expressed concern at the potential impact of COVID-19 on hunger, which is likely to exacerbate the already considerable burden of malnutrition of Africa. The impact of the disease is expected to be greater among those grappling with malnutrition, whereas widespread hunger and malnutrition will likely increase because of movement restrictions. COVID-19 is unfolding in Africa against a backdrop of worrying levels of hunger and undernourishment which could worsen as the virus threatens livelihoods and household economies. The perspective piece addresses the crisis within crisis of COVID-19 and hunger on the well-being of children in Africa

7.
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene ; 104(1):26-29, 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1187290

ABSTRACT

WATERLIT Abstract: Malaria remains a major global health burden, killing hundreds of thousands annually, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In December 2019, a novel illness termed COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, was reported in China. This disease soon spread around the world and was declared a pandemic by the WHO on March 11, 2020. Considering that the malaria burden is high in many low-income tropical countries with little capacity to fund malaria control and eradication programs, the fight against malaria in these regions is likely to be hindered by COVID-19. Indeed, access to health care has generally been limited during the pandemic, whereas malaria interventions, such as seasonal malaria chemoprevention, and distribution of long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets, have been suspended because of lockdowns. Likewise, the repurposing of antimalarials for the treatment of COVID-19 and a shift in focus from the production of malaria rapid diagnostic tests to COVID-19 rapid diagnostic tests are causes for concern in malaria-endemic regions. COVID-19 has disproportionately affected developed countries, threatening their capacity to aid in malaria control efforts. Here, we address impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the management and control of malaria in Africa

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