Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 65
Filter
3.
J Travel Med ; 2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758786

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 recovered individuals with one or two dose of Sputnik vaccine had relatively higher antibody response in comparison to the naïve individuals received either one or two doses of Sputnik vaccine. The study demonstrated the robust humoral immune response among vaccinees.

4.
J Travel Med ; 2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758785

ABSTRACT

The neutralizing antibody responses were significantly elevated after 3rd dose of BBV152/Covaxin against the B.1 (19.11 fold)variant including Delta (16.51 fold), Beta (14.70 fold) and Omicron (18.53 fold) Variants of concern in comparison with two dose vaccine, providing assurance of a protective immune response of booster in recipients.

6.
Viruses ; 14(3)2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1737033

ABSTRACT

Due to the failure of virus isolation of the Omicron variant in Vero CCL-81 from the clinical specimens of COVID-19 cases, an initial in vivo and subsequent in vitro approach was utilized for the isolation of the virus. A total of 74 oropharyngeal/nasopharyngeal specimens were collected from SARS-CoV-2 positive international travellers and a contact case at Delhi and Mumbai, India. All the specimens were sequenced using next-generation sequencing and simultaneously inoculated onto Vero CCL-81 cells for virus isolation. Subsequently, two omicron positive specimens were inoculated into Syrian hamsters for two passages. The initial passage of the positive hamster specimens was inoculated onto Vero CCL-81 cells. The clinical specimens, hamster specimens, and Vero CCL-81 passages were sequenced to assess the mutational changes in different host species. The replication of the Omicron variant in hamsters was confirmed with the presence of a high viral load in nasal turbinate and lung specimens of both passages. The successful isolation of the virus from hamster specimens with Vero CCL-81 was observed with cytopathic effect in infected cells and high viral load in the cell suspension. The genome analysis revealed the presence of L212C mutation, Tyrosine 69 deletion, and C25000T nucleotide change in spike gene of hamster passage sequences and an absence of V17I mutation in E gene in hamster passage sequences, unlike human clinical specimen and Vero CCL-81 passages. No change was observed in the furin cleavage site in any of the specimen sequences, suggesting intact pathogenicity of the virus isolate. Our data demonstrated successful isolation of the Omicron variant with the in vivo method first followed by in vitro method. The virus isolate could be used in the future to explore different aspects of the Omicron variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetinae , Genomics , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 818545, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731870

ABSTRACT

We report here a Nipah virus (NiV) outbreak in Kozhikode district of Kerala state, India, which had caused fatal encephalitis in a 12-year-old boy and the outbreak response, which led to the successful containment of the disease and the related investigations. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, ELISA-based antibody detection, and whole genome sequencing (WGS) were performed to confirm the NiV infection. Contacts of the index case were traced and isolated based on risk categorization. Bats from the areas near the epicenter of the outbreak were sampled for throat swabs, rectal swabs, and blood samples for NiV screening by real-time RT-PCR and anti-NiV bat immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISA. A plaque reduction neutralization test was performed for the detection of neutralizing antibodies. Nipah viral RNA could be detected from blood, bronchial wash, endotracheal (ET) secretion, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and anti-NiV immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies from the serum sample of the index case. Rapid establishment of an onsite NiV diagnostic facility and contact tracing helped in quick containment of the outbreak. NiV sequences retrieved from the clinical specimen of the index case formed a sub-cluster with the earlier reported Nipah I genotype sequences from India with more than 95% similarity. Anti-NiV IgG positivity could be detected in 21% of Pteropus medius (P. medius) and 37.73% of Rousettus leschenaultia (R. leschenaultia). Neutralizing antibodies against NiV could be detected in P. medius. Stringent surveillance and awareness campaigns need to be implemented in the area to reduce human-bat interactions and minimize spillover events, which can lead to sporadic outbreaks of NiV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nipah Virus , Child , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Male , Nipah Virus/genetics , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Indian J Med Res ; 151(2 & 3): 200-209, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726321

ABSTRACT

Background & objectives: Since December 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has globally affected 195 countries. In India, suspected cases were screened for SARS-CoV-2 as per the advisory of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. The objective of this study was to characterize SARS-CoV-2 sequences from three identified positive cases as on February 29, 2020. Methods: Throat swab/nasal swab specimens for a total of 881 suspected cases were screened by E gene and confirmed by RdRp (1), RdRp (2) and N gene real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis, molecular characterization and prediction of B- and T-cell epitopes for Indian SARS-CoV-2 sequences were undertaken. Results: Three cases with a travel history from Wuhan, China, were confirmed positive for SARS-CoV-2. Almost complete (29,851 nucleotides) genomes of case 1, case 3 and a fragmented genome for case 2 were obtained. The sequences of Indian SARS-CoV-2 though not identical showed high (~99.98%) identity with Wuhan seafood market pneumonia virus (accession number: NC 045512). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Indian sequences belonged to different clusters. Predicted linear B-cell epitopes were found to be concentrated in the S1 domain of spike protein, and a conformational epitope was identified in the receptor-binding domain. The predicted T-cell epitopes showed broad human leucocyte antigen allele coverage of A and B supertypes predominant in the Indian population. Interpretation & conclusions: The two SARS-CoV-2 sequences obtained from India represent two different introductions into the country. The genetic heterogeneity is as noted globally. The identified B- and T-cell epitopes may be considered suitable for future experiments towards the design of vaccines and diagnostics. Continuous monitoring and analysis of the sequences of new cases from India and the other affected countries would be vital to understand the genetic evolution and rates of substitution of the SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Genome, Viral , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/genetics , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/genetics , Humans , India , Models, Molecular , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral , Protein Structure, Tertiary , RNA, Viral/genetics , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
10.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324369

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global health crisis that has severely affected mankind and posed a great challenge to the public health system of affected countries. The availability of a safe and effective vaccine is the need of the hour to overcome this crisis. Here, we have developed and assessed the protective efficacy and immunogenicity of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine (BBV152) in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulata). Twenty macaques were divided into four groups of five animals each. One group was administered a placebo while three groups were immunized with three different vaccine candidates at 0 and 14 days. All the macaques were challenged with SARS-CoV-2 fourteen days after the second dose. The protective response was observed with increasing SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG and neutralizing antibody titers from 3rd-week post-immunization. Viral clearance was observed from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, nasal swab, throat swab, and lung tissues at 7 days post-infection in the vaccinated groups. No evidence of pneumonia was observed by histopathological examination in vaccinated groups, unlike the placebo group which showed features of interstitial pneumonia and localization of viral antigen in the alveolar epithelium and macrophages by immunohistochemistry. Data from this study substantiate the immunogenicity of the vaccine candidates and BBV152 is being evaluated in Phase I clinical trials in India (NCT04471519).

11.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-317246

ABSTRACT

The availability of a safe and effective vaccine would be the eventual measure to deal with SARS-CoV-2 threat. Here, we have developed and assessed the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine (BBV152) in hamsters. Three dose vaccination regime with three formulations of BBV152 induced significant titres of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies. The formulation with imidazoquinoline adsorbed on alum adjuvant remarkably generated a quick and robust immune response. Th 1 biased immune response was demonstrated by the detection of IgG2 antibodies. Post-SARS-CoV-2 infection, vaccinated hamsters did not show any histopathological changes in the lungs. The protection of the hamsters was evident by the rapid clearance of the virus from lower respiratory tract, reduced virus load in upper respiratory tract, absence of lung pathology and robust humoral immune response. These findings confirm the immunogenic potential of BBV152 and further protection of hamsters challenged with SARS-CoV-2.

13.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263736, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674020

ABSTRACT

Sudden emergence and rapid spread of COVID-19 created an inevitable need for expansion of the COVID-19 laboratory testing network across the world. The strategy to test-track-treat was advocated for quick detection and containment of the disease. Being the second most populous country in the world, India was challenged to make COVID-19 testing available and accessible in all parts of the country. The molecular laboratory testing network was augmented expeditiously, and number of laboratories was increased from one in January 2020 to 2951 till mid-September, 2021. This rapid expansion warranted the need to have inbuilt systems of quality control/ quality assurance. In addition to the ongoing inter-laboratory quality control (ILQC), India implemented an External Quality Assurance Program (EQAP) with assistance from World Health Organization (WHO) and Royal College of Pathologists, Australasia. Out of the 953 open system rRTPCR laboratories in both public and private sector who participated in the first round of EQAP, 891(93.4%) laboratories obtained a passing score of > = 80%. The satisfactory performance of Indian COVID-19 testing laboratories has boosted the confidence of the public and policy makers in the quality of testing. ILQC and EQAP need to continue to ensure adherence of the testing laboratories to the desired quality standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Laboratories/standards , Mass Screening/standards , Quality Assurance, Health Care/standards , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Humans , India/epidemiology , Quality Control , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Specimen Handling/methods
15.
Int J Infect Dis ; 112: 103-110, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654539

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Monitoring the antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection and its correlation to clinical spectrum of disease is critical in understanding the disease progression and protection against re-infection. We assessed the nucleocapsid (N) and receptor-binding-domain of spike (SRBD) protein specific IgG and neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses in COVID-19 patients up to 8 months and its correlation with diverse disease spectrum. METHODS: During the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, from 284 COVID-19 patients, 608 samples were collected up to 8 months post infection. The patients were categorized as asymptomatic, symptomatic and severe. The N and SRBD IgG and NAb titers were evaluated and correlated with clinical data. RESULTS: A steep increase in antigen specific antibody titers was observed till 40 days post onset of the disease (POD), followed by a partial decline till 240 days. Severe disease was associated with a stronger SRBD IgG response and higher NAb titers. The persistence of antibody response was observed in 76% against N, 80% against SRBD and 80% for NAbs of cases up to 8 months POD. CONCLUSION: RBD and N protein specific IgG persisted till 240 days POD which correlated with NAb response, irrespective of individual`s symptomatic status indicating overall robust protection against re-infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Nucleocapsid , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Travel Med ; 2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592815

ABSTRACT

Highlight-. The Delta variant lead to the resurgence of the second wave in India. A 1.51-fold increase in neutralizing antibody response was observed in the second wave compared to first wave, indicating the second wave dominated by the Delta elicited a robust immune response.

17.
J Infect Public Health ; 15(2): 164-171, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587224

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Considering the potential threat from emerging Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Corona Virus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants and the rising COVID-19 cases, SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance is ongoing in India. We report herewith the isolation of the P.2 variant (B.1.1.28.2) from international travelers and further its pathogenicity evaluation and comparison with D614G variant (B.1) in hamster model. METHODS: Virus isolation was performed in Vero CCL81 cells and genomic characterization by next generation sequencing. The pathogenicity and host immune response of the isolate was assessed in Syrian hamster model and compared with B.1 variant. RESULTS: B.1.1.28.2 variant was isolated from nasal/throat swabs of international travelers returned to India from United Kingdom and Brazil. The B.1.1.28.2 variant induced body weight loss, viral replication in the respiratory tract and caused severe lung pathology in infected Syrian hamster model in comparison, with B.1 variant infected hamsters. The sera from B.1.1.28.2 infected hamsters efficiently neutralized the D614G variant virus whereas 6-fold reduction in the neutralization was seen in case of D614G variant infected hamsters' sera with the B.1.1.28.2 variant. CONCLUSIONS: B.1.1.28.2 lineage variant could be successfully isolated and characterization could be performed. Pathogenicity of the isolate was demonstrated in Syrian hamster model and the findings of neutralization reduction is of great concern and point towards the need for screening the vaccines for efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Lung , Virulence
18.
Lancet ; 398(10317): 2173-2184, 2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586227

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We report the clinical efficacy against COVID-19 infection of BBV152, a whole virion inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine formulated with a toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist molecule adsorbed to alum (Algel-IMDG) in Indian adults. METHODS: We did a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre, phase 3 clinical trial in 25 Indian hospitals or medical clinics to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and immunological lot consistency of BBV152. Adults (age ≥18 years) who were healthy or had stable chronic medical conditions (not an immunocompromising condition or requiring treatment with immunosuppressive therapy) were randomised 1:1 with a computer-generated randomisation scheme (stratified for the presence or absence of chronic conditions) to receive two intramuscular doses of vaccine or placebo administered 4 weeks apart. Participants, investigators, study coordinators, study-related personnel, the sponsor, and nurses who administered the vaccines were masked to treatment group allocation; an unmasked contract research organisation and a masked expert adjudication panel assessed outcomes. The primary outcome was the efficacy of the BBV152 vaccine in preventing a first occurrence of laboratory-confirmed (RT-PCR-positive) symptomatic COVID-19 (any severity), occurring at least 14 days after the second dose in the per-protocol population. We also assessed safety and reactogenicity throughout the duration of the study in all participants who had received at least one dose of vaccine or placebo. This report contains interim results (data cutoff May 17, 2021) regarding immunogenicity and safety outcomes (captured on days 0 to 56) and efficacy results with a median of 99 days for the study population. The trial was registered on the Indian Clinical Trials Registry India, CTRI/2020/11/028976, and ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04641481 (active, not recruiting). FINDINGS: Between Nov 16, 2020, and Jan 7, 2021, we recruited 25 798 participants who were randomly assigned to receive BBV152 or placebo; 24 419 received two doses of BBV152 (n=12 221) or placebo (n=12 198). Efficacy analysis was dependent on having 130 cases of symptomatic COVID-19, which occurred when 16 973 initially seronegative participants had at least 14 days follow-up after the second dose. 24 (0·3%) cases occurred among 8471 vaccine recipients and 106 (1·2%) among 8502 placebo recipients, giving an overall estimated vaccine efficacy of 77·8% (95% CI 65·2-86·4). In the safety population (n=25 753), 5959 adverse events occurred in 3194 participants. BBV152 was well tolerated; the same proportion of participants reported adverse events in the vaccine group (1597 [12·4%] of 12 879) and placebo group (1597 [12·4%] of 12 874), with no clinically significant differences in the distributions of solicited, unsolicited, or serious adverse events between the groups, and no cases of anaphylaxis or vaccine-related deaths. INTERPRETATION: BBV152 was highly efficacious against laboratory-confirmed symptomatic COVID-19 disease in adults. Vaccination was well tolerated with no safety concerns raised in this interim analysis. FUNDING: Bharat Biotech International and Indian Council of Medical Research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Adult , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , India , Male
19.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-297087

ABSTRACT

Background We report here a Nipah virus (NiV) outbreak in Kozhikode district of Kerala state, India which had caused fatal encephalitis in an adolescent male and the outbreak response which led to the successful containment of the disease and the related investigations. Methods Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, ELISA based antibody detection and whole genome sequencing were performed to confirm the Nipah virus infection. Contacts of the index case were traced and isolated based on risk categorization. Bats from the areas near the epicenter of the outbreak were sampled for throat swabs, rectal swabs and blood samples for Nipah virus screening by real time RT-PCR and anti-Nipah virus bat IgG ELISA. Plaque reduction neutralization test was performed for the detection of neutralizing antibodies. Results Nipah viral RNA and anti-NiV IgG antibodies were detected in the serum of the index case. Rapid establishment of an onsite NiV diagnostic facility and contact tracing helped in quick containment of the outbreak. NiV sequences retrieved from the clinical specimen of the index case formed a sub-cluster with the earlier reported Nipah I genotype sequences from India with more than 95% similarity. Anti-NiV IgG positivity could be detected in 21% of Pteropus medius and 37.73% of Rousettus leschenaultia . Neutralizing antibodies against NiV could be detected in P . medius . Conclusions Stringent surveillance and awareness campaigns needs to be implemented in the area to reduce human-bat interactions and minimize spill over events which can lead to sporadic outbreaks of NiV.

20.
Arch Virol ; 166(12): 3301-3310, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575784

ABSTRACT

Currently, the world is witnessing the pandemic of COVID-19, a disease caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Reported differences in clinical manifestations and outcomes in SARS-CoV-2 infection could be attributed to factors such as virus replication, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and altered cytokine production. Virus-induced aberrant and excessive cytokine production has been linked to the morbidity and mortality of several viral infections. Using a Luminex platform, we investigated plasma cytokine and chemokine levels of 27 analytes from hospitalized asymptomatic (n = 39) and mildly symptomatic (n = 35) SARS-CoV-2-infected patients (in the early phase of infection), recovered individuals (45-60 days postinfection) (n = 40), and uninfected controls (n = 36) from the city of Pune located in the state of Maharashtra in India. Levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α and the chemokine CXCL-10 were significantly higher, while those of the antiviral cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12 p70 were significantly lower in both asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic patients than in controls. Comparison among the patient categories revealed no difference in the levels of the cytokines/chemokines except for CXCL-10 being significantly higher and IL-17, IL-4, and VEGF being significantly lower in the mildly symptomatic patients. Interestingly, levels of all key analytes were significantly lower in recovered individuals than in those in both patient categories. Nevertheless, the level of CXCL10 was significantly higher in the recovered patients than in the controls, indicating that the immune system of SARS-CoV-2 patients may take a longer time to normalize. Our data suggest that IL-6, IL-1ß, TNF-α, CXCL-10, and reduced antiviral cytokines could be used as biomarkers of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chemokines/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Chemokine CXCL10 , Humans , India/epidemiology , Interleukin-1beta , Interleukin-6 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL