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1.
Health Sci Rep ; 5(3): e542, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1858806

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims: Clinical characteristics and factors associated with mortality in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in countries with low case fatality rates (CFR) are unknown. We sought to determine these in a large cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients in Qatar and explore the early mortality predictors. Methods: We retrospectively studied the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients admitted to the ICU at the national referral hospital for COVID-19 patients in Qatar. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with mortality. Results: Between March 7 and July 16, 2020, a total of 1079 patients with COVID-19 were admitted to the ICU. The median (IQR) age of patients was 50 (41-59) years. Diabetes (47.3%) and hypertension (42.6%) were the most common comorbidities. In-hospital mortality was 12.6% overall and 25.9% among those requiring mechanical ventilation. Factors independently associated with mortality included older age ([OR]; 2.3 [95% CI; 1.92-2.75] for each 10-year increase in age, p < 0.001), chronic kidney disease (OR; 1.9 [95% CI; 1.02-3.54], p = 0.04), active malignancy (OR; 6.15 [95% CI; 1.79-21.12], p = 0.004), lower platelet count at ICU admission (OR; 1.41 [95% CI; 1.13-1.75] for each 100 × 103/µl decrease, p = 0.002), higher neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio at admission (OR; 1.01 [95% CI; 1-1.02] for each 1- point increase, p = 0.016), higher serum ferritin level at admission (OR; 1.05 [(95% CI; 1.02-1.08] for each 500 µg/L increase, p = 0.002), and higher serum bilirubin level at admission (OR; 1.19 [95% CI; 1.04-1.36] for each 10 µmol/L increase, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The mortality rate among critically ill COVID-19 patients is low in Qatar compared to other countries. Older age, chronic kidney disease, active malignancy, higher neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, lower platelet counts, higher serum ferritin levels, and higher serum bilirubin levels are independent predictors of in-hospital mortality.

2.
J Pers Med ; 12(2)2022 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650400

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify the impact of dealing with COVID-19 patients in clinical areas on nurses' professional self-concept and self-confidence. BACKGROUND: Professional self-concept is considered a critical factor in the recruitment/retention process in nursing, nursing shortage, career satisfaction, and academic achievements. Professional self-confidence is also a crucial determinant in staff satisfaction, reducing turnover, and increasing work engagement. DESIGN: Descriptive, comparative study. METHODS: The study was conducted between February to May 2021 by utilizing a convenience sampling technique. A total of 170 nurses from two facilities were recruited from two COVID-19- and non-COVID-19-designated facilities. The level of professional self-concept and self-confidence was assessed by utilizing the Nurses' Self-Concept Instrument and Self-Confidence Scale. RESULTS: The professional self-concept level among the group exposed to COVID-19 patients was lower than the comparison group, while the professional self-confidence level among the exposed group to COVID-19 patients was similar to the comparison group. On the other hand, the satisfied staff and those who received professional training in dealing with COVID-19 patients reported a higher level of professional self-concept. CONCLUSIONS: Dealing with COVID-19 patients has an impact on professional self-concept; the exposure group was lower than those who did not deal with COVID-19 patients, while the professional self-confidence level among the exposed group was similar to the comparison group. Getting professional training in dealing with COVID-19 patients and being satisfied at work were significant factors in improving professional self-concept. Policymakers should create strategies that target the improvement of professional training in dealing with COVID-19 patients.

3.
Ann Med ; 54(1): 310-313, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1642146

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 patients presenting with ocular manifestations are from 0.8% to 32% of patients seen in the ED. The available literature is scarce regarding COVID-19 patients presenting with ocular manifestations from the Middle Eastern region. PURPOSE: This study aims to report the incidence of ocular signs and symptoms in COVID-19 patients and find any correlation between the occurrence of ocular manifestations and patients' comorbidities. METHODS: All patients having the primary diagnosis of COVID-19 infection and concurrent ocular manifestations on admission to our tertiary COVID-19 health care centre were included in the study. The patient's demographic data, comorbidities, and type of ocular manifestations were recorded from the patients' health records retrospectively. RESULTS: In our study, 39 (7.8%) patients presented with ocular manifestations. The majority of COVID-19 patients were male, and 200 (20%) patients had a history of other comorbidities. The majority of our patients had hyperaemia (13 [33.3%]), followed by eye pain (9 [23.1%]), epiphora (8 [20.5%]), burning sensation (4 [10.3%]), and photophobia (2 [5.1%]) patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of ocular manifestations and patients' gender or comorbidities (p > .05). CONCLUSION: The occurrence of ocular manifestations was lower compared to the present literature. There was no significant association between the occurrence of ocular manifestations and the patient's gender or comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
4.
J Pers Med ; 11(9)2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410096

ABSTRACT

There have been numerous concerns regarding the physical and mental health of nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Stress, sleep deprivation, anxiety, and depression potentiated nurses' vulnerability to poor eating habits. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to explore the differences between nurses' characteristics with COVID-19 facility designation, and sleep quality, depression, anxiety, stress, eating habits, social bonds, and quality of life. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, comparative study. METHODS: An online survey was sent using the corporation's email to nurses working in three hospitals in Qatar from September to December 2020. One of them is a designated COVID-19 facility. The sleep quality, depression, eating habits, social bonds, and quality of life were measured using The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 (DASS-21), Emotional Eater Questionnaire (EEQ), Oslo Social Support Scale (OSSS-3), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. RESULTS: A total of 200 nurses participated in the study (RR: 13.3%). No statistically significant association was found between designated facility (COVID-19 vs. not COVID-19) or nurses' characteristics and ISI categories (OR 1.15; 95% CI 0.54, 2.44). Nurses working in COVID-19 facilities had increased odds of having higher EEQ categories by 2.62 times (95% CI 1.18, 5.83). Similarly, no statistically significant associations were found between any of the nurses' characteristics and OSSS-3 categories. On the other hand, no statistically significant associations were found between any of the nurses' characteristics and QOL domains except for the gender and social relationships' domain. CONCLUSION: Overall, the quality of life of nurses in Qatar is on a positive level whether they are assigned to a COVID-19 facility or not. Although no significant difference was found with regard to the sleep quality, stress, anxiety, depression, and eating habits between nurses in a COVID-19 facility and in a non-COVID-19 facility, special interventions to diminish stressors need to be implemented and maintained.

5.
J Pers Med ; 11(6)2021 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244057

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although several studies examining nurses' turnover intentions have been conducted, few studies have been conducted to explore how COVID-19 contributes to nurses' turnover intentions. This study aims to compare nurses' turnover (TO) intentions before and during COVID-19. METHODS: The cross-sectional study was conducted using the Turnover Intention Scale (TIS-6) and a convenience sample of participants from the largest healthcare provider in Qatar between August and September 2020. RESULTS: A total of 512 nurses were included in the final analysis. The majority were between 31 and 40 years of age (61.5%), 67.6% were females, 76.4% were married, 79.7% had a BSN, 43% had less than 5 years of experience, and 60.4% had worked in COVID-19 designated facilities. The turnover intentions were higher compared with before COVID-19 (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Nurses in Qatar have higher TO intentions during COVID-19. The participants' characteristics and stress levels are playing a major role in nurses' decision to leave during COVID-19. Understanding the factors that contribute to turnover intentions is crucial for workforce planning, especially during pandemics.

6.
Nurs Open ; 8(6): 3516-3526, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216199

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aims to explore the lived experiences of frontline nurses providing nursing care for COVID-19 patients in Qatar. DESIGN: Qualitative, Phenomenological. METHODS: Nurses were recruited from a designated COVID-19 facility using purposive and snowball sampling. The participants were interviewed face-to-face using semi-structured interview questions from 6 September-10 October 2020. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. RESULT: A total of 30 nurses were interviewed; (76.7%) were deployed for >6 months. Three major themes were drawn from the analysis: (a) Challenges of working in a COVID-19 facility (subthemes: working in a new context and new working environment, worn out by the workload, the struggle of wearing protective gear, fear of COVID-19, witnessing suffering); (b) Surviving COVID-19 (subthemes: keeping it safe with extra measures, change in eating habits, teamwork and camaraderie, social support); and (c) Resilience of Nurses (subthemes: a true calling, a sense of purpose).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Humans , Pandemics , Qatar/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Nurs Open ; 8(2): 695-701, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-953722

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aims to assess the role of nurses' knowledge and attitude in relation to their willingness to work with patients diagnosed with COVID-19 in Qatar. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. METHODS: A self-administered, 35-item online survey was circulated to the Registered Nurses working in Hamad Medical Corporation, the principal healthcare provider in Qatar. RESULTS: A total of 580 attempts to complete the survey. Of them, 377 completed surveys with a response rate of 65%. Logistic regression was used to predict nurses' willingness to work with patients with COVID-19. Nurses' knowledge level and monetary compensation that is associated with the work-environment risk category were found to have a significant positive relationship with the nurses' willingness to care for patients with COVID-19 (p < .05). The findings of this study may help nursing leaders design educational programmes and remuneration models that may help boost nurses' willingness to work with high-risk patient groups, especially during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Primary Health Care , Qatar , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace/psychology
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