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1.
International Journal of Infectious Diseases ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2031346

ABSTRACT

Objectives : To estimate the real-world effectiveness of sotrovimab against severe, critical, or fatal coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Qatar at a time in which most severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) incidence occurred due to the BA.2 Omicron subvariant. Methods : We conducted a matched case-control study among all individuals eligible for sotrovimab treatment per US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines in the resident population of Qatar. Odds of progression to severe forms of COVID-19 were compared in cases (treatment group) versus controls (eligible patients who opted not to receive the treatment). Subgroup analyses were conducted. Results : A total of 3,364 individuals were eligible for sotrovimab treatment during the study period, of whom 519 individuals received the treatment while the remaining 2,845 constituted the controls. Adjusted odds ratio of progression to severe, critical, or fatal COVID-19 comparing the treatment group to the control group was 2.67 (95% CI: 0.60-11.91). In the analysis including only the subgroup of patients at higher risk of severe forms of COVID-19, the adjusted odds ratio was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.17-2.48). Conclusions : There was no evidence for a protective effect of sotrovimab in reducing COVID-19 severity in a setting dominated by the BA.2 subvariant.

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-336237

ABSTRACT

Effectiveness of sotrovimab against severe, critical, or fatal COVID-19 was investigated in Qatar using a case-control study design at a time when BA.2 Omicron subvariant dominated incidence. Adjusted odds ratio of progression to severe, critical, or fatal COVID-19, comparing those sotrovimab-treated to those untreated, was 2.67-fold higher (95% CI: 0.60-11.91).

3.
Scand J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Psychol ; 9: 187-195, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Children are particularly vulnerable to the psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The disruption in daily life has impacted children significantly. Moreover, the increased worrying associated with the probability of getting infected or becoming seriously unwell due to infection can potentially precipitate anxiety disorders among children. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine rates of elevated anxiety symptoms in children with COVID-19 infection. It also explored whether there were any differences in terms of age, gender, and residency status. METHOD: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study with 88 participants (children aged 7-13 years, 54.5% males, 45.5% females) from two institutional quarantine centers. The Spence Children's Anxiety Scale and its validated Arabic version (self-reported questionnaires) were used to measure anxiety symptoms. RESULTS: 36.3% children reported elevated anxiety symptoms. A lower rate of 32.8% was reported in younger children (7-11 years) compared to 45.8% in older children (12 and 13 years). 70.4% and 57.9% children reported physical injury fears and separation anxiety respectively. A higher prevalence of overall anxiety was reported in children from expatriate families (40.6%) compared to native children (25%). The difference in the mean scores between the expatriate and native group of children was found statistically significant for obsessive-compulsive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of elevated anxiety symptoms among children in quarantine with COVID-19 infection can be much higher than that reported in the general population. Older children can have elevated anxiety symptoms more commonly than their younger counterparts can. Expatriate children are likely to be more vulnerable to the psychological impact of the pandemic compared to children from local families. Our results suggest the crucial need of focusing on the psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic on children. The prioritization and effective management of the mental health needs of children should be a vital component of the overall, global response to the pandemic.

4.
Int J Infect Dis ; 108: 116-118, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351690

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the initial impact of a national BNT162b2 vaccine rollout on SARS-CoV-2 infections in Qatar. METHODS: All individuals who had completed ≥14 days of follow-up by 16 March 2021 after receiving the BNT162b2 vaccine were included. This study calculated incidence rates (IR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) during days 1-7, 8-14, 15-21, 22-28, and >28 days post-vaccination. Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rate ratios (IRR) relative to the first 7-day post-vaccination period. RESULTS: A total of 199,219 individuals with 6,521,124 person-days of follow-up were included. SARS-CoV-2 infection was confirmed in 1877 (0.9%), of which 489 (26.1%) were asymptomatic and 123 (6.6%) required oxygen support. The median time from first vaccination to SARS-CoV-2 confirmation was 11.9 days (IQR 7.7-18.2). Compared with the first 7-day post-vaccination period, SARS-CoV-2 infections were lower by 65.8-84.7% during 15-21, 22-28, and >28 days (P < 0.001 for each). For severe COVID-19, the incidence rates were 75.7-93.3% lower during the corresponding time periods (P < 0.001 for each). CONCLUSION: The results were consistent with an early protective effect of BNT162b2 vaccine against all degrees of SARS-CoV-2 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr ; 96: 104457, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252461

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) quarantine has been associated with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. We hypothesize these symptoms might even be more pronounced in the elderly, who may be particularly sensitive to social isolation. However, certain individuals might be more resilient than others due to their coping mechanisms, including religious coping. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to examine the levels of perceived stress, depressive, and anxiety symptoms in older adults under COVID-19 quarantine in Qatar; and to identify the sociodemographic, psychological, and clinical factors associated with mental health outcomes, with a focus on the role of resilience, and religiosity. METHODS: A cross-sectional study assessing depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms as well as resilience, and religiosity through a phone survey in adults aged 60 years or more under COVID-19 quarantine in the State of Qatar, in comparison to age and gender-matched controls. RESULTS: The prevalence of depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms in elderly subjects under COVID-19 quarantine in Qatar was not significantly different from the prevalence in gender and age-matched controls. In the quarantined group, higher depressive, anxiety, and stress scores were associated with the female gender and with lower resilience scores but were not linked to age, psychiatric history, medical history, duration of quarantine, or religiosity. CONCLUSION: The elderly population does not seem to develop significant COVID-19 quarantine-related psychological distress, possibly thanks to high resilience and effective coping strategies developed through the years.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Qatar/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 777, 2020 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes at a national level, and none after 60 days of follow up. The aim of this study was to describe national, 60-day all-cause mortality associated with COVID-19, and to identify risk factors associated with admission to an intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study including the first consecutive 5000 patients with COVID-19 in Qatar who completed 60 days of follow up by June 17, 2020. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 60 days after COVID-19 diagnosis. In addition, we explored risk factors for admission to ICU. RESULTS: Included patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 between February 28 and April 17, 2020. The majority (4436, 88.7%) were males and the median age was 35 years [interquartile range (IQR) 28-43]. By 60 days after COVID-19 diagnosis, 14 patients (0.28%) had died, 10 (0.2%) were still in hospital, and two (0.04%) were still in ICU. Fatal COVID-19 cases had a median age of 59.5 years (IQR 55.8-68), and were mostly males (13, 92.9%). All included pregnant women (26, 0.5%), children (131, 2.6%), and healthcare workers (135, 2.7%) were alive and not hospitalized at the end of follow up. A total of 1424 patients (28.5%) required hospitalization, out of which 108 (7.6%) were admitted to ICU. Most frequent co-morbidities in hospitalized adults were diabetes (23.2%), and hypertension (20.7%). Multivariable logistic regression showed that older age [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.041, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.022-1.061 per year increase; P < 0.001], male sex (aOR 4.375, 95% CI 1.964-9.744; P < 0.001), diabetes (aOR 1.698, 95% CI 1.050-2.746; P 0.031), chronic kidney disease (aOR 3.590, 95% CI 1.596-8.079, P 0.002), and higher BMI (aOR 1.067, 95% CI 1.027-1.108 per unit increase; P 0.001), were all independently associated with increased risk of ICU admission. CONCLUSIONS: In a relatively younger national cohort with a low co-morbidity burden, COVID-19 was associated with low all-cause mortality. Independent risk factors for ICU admission included older age, male sex, higher BMI, and co-existing diabetes or chronic kidney disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Qatar/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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