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1.
Journal of Hospital Medicine ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1712135

ABSTRACT

For the first 6 months of the novel coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) pandemic, the hospital medicine procedure service at our center was temporarily unavailable. We assessed paracentesis rates and clinical outcomes for patients admitted with cirrhosis and ascites before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Two hundred and twenty-four and 131 patients with cirrhosis and ascited were admitted to hospital before and during COVID-19 respectively. Approximately 50.9% and 49.6% of patients underwent a paracentesis within 24?h pre- and mid-pandemic, p?=?.83. No differences were observed for length-of-stay or 30-day readmissions. GI consultation was associated with higher rates of paracentesis in both eras (p?<?.001 pre-COVID-19, and p?=?.01 COVID-19). Changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic did not result in changes to rates of timely paracentesis in patients admitted with cirrhosis and ascites. While involvement of gastroenterology may increase rates of paracentesis, further efforts are needed to optimize rates of timely paracentesis to positively impact clinical outcomes.

2.
Clin Liver Dis (Hoboken) ; 18(5): 225-229, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536141
11.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1153): 706-715, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889925

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine how self-reported level of exposure to patients with novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) affected the perceived safety, training and well-being of residents and fellows. METHODS: We administered an anonymous, voluntary, web-based survey to a convenience sample of trainees worldwide. The survey was distributed by email and social media posts from April 20th to May 11th, 2020. Respondents were asked to estimate the number of patients with COVID-19 they cared for in March and April 2020 (0, 1-30, 31-60, >60). Survey questions addressed (1) safety and access to personal protective equipment (PPE), (2) training and professional development and (3) well-being and burnout. RESULTS: Surveys were completed by 1420 trainees (73% residents, 27% fellows), most commonly from the USA (n=670), China (n=150), Saudi Arabia (n=76) and Taiwan (n=75). Trainees who cared for a greater number of patients with COVID-19 were more likely to report limited access to PPE and COVID-19 testing and more likely to test positive for COVID-19. Compared with trainees who did not take care of patients with COVID-19 , those who took care of 1-30 patients (adjusted OR [AOR] 1.80, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.51), 31-60 patients (AOR 3.30, 95% CI 1.86 to 5.88) and >60 patients (AOR 4.03, 95% CI 2.12 to 7.63) were increasingly more likely to report burnout. Trainees were very concerned about the negative effects on training opportunities and professional development irrespective of the number of patients with COVID-19 they cared for. CONCLUSION: Exposure to patients with COVID-19 is significantly associated with higher burnout rates in physician trainees.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Safety , Self Report , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Young Adult
14.
Hepatology ; 72(6): 1900-1911, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-784251

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with liver injury, but the prevalence and patterns of liver injury in liver transplantation (LT) recipients with COVID-19 are open for study. APPROACH AND RESULTS: We conducted a multicenter study in the United States of 112 adult LT recipients with COVID-19. Median age was 61 years (interquartile range, 20), 54.5% (n = 61) were male, and 39.3% (n = 44) Hispanic. Mortality rate was 22.3% (n = 25); 72.3% (n = 81) were hospitalized and 26.8% (n = 30) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Analysis of peak values of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) during COVID-19 showed moderate liver injury (ALT 2-5× upper limit of normal [ULN]) in 22.2% (n = 18) and severe liver injury (ALT > 5× ULN) in 12.3% (n = 10). Compared to age- and sex-matched nontransplant patients with chronic liver disease and COVID-19 (n = 375), incidence of acute liver injury was lower in LT recipients (47.5% vs. 34.6%; P = 0.037). Variables associated with liver injury in LT recipients were younger age (P = 0.009; odds ratio [OR], 2.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-3.54), Hispanic ethnicity (P = 0.011; OR, 6.01; 95% CI, 1.51-23.9), metabolic syndrome (P = 0.016; OR, 5.87; 95% CI, 1.38-24.99), vasopressor use (P = 0.018; OR, 7.34; 95% CI, 1.39-38.52), and antibiotic use (P = 0.046; OR, 6.93; 95% CI, 1.04-46.26). Reduction in immunosuppression (49.4%) was not associated with liver injury (P = 0.156) or mortality (P = 0.084). Liver injury during COVID-19 was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.007; OR, 6.91; 95% CI, 1.68-28.48) and ICU admission (P = 0.007; OR, 7.93; 95% CI, 1.75-35.69) in LT recipients. CONCLUSIONS: Liver injury is associated with higher mortality and ICU admission in LT recipients with COVID-19. Hence, monitoring liver enzymes closely can help in early identification of patients at risk for adverse outcomes. Reduction of immunosuppression during COVID-19 did not increase risk for mortality or graft failure.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Liver Transplantation/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Lung Injury/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alanine Transaminase/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged
15.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 19(7): 1469-1479.e19, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-773811

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Chronic liver disease (CLD) represents a major global health burden. We undertook this study to identify the factors associated with adverse outcomes in patients with CLD who acquire the novel coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We conducted a multi-center, observational cohort study across 21 institutions in the United States (US) of adult patients with CLD and laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 between March 1, 2020 and May 30, 2020. We performed survival analysis to identify independent predictors of all-cause mortality and COVID-19 related mortality, and multivariate logistic regression to determine the risk of severe COVID-19 in patients with CLD. RESULTS: Of the 978 patients in our cohort, 867 patients (mean age 56.9 ± 14.5 years, 55% male) met inclusion criteria. The overall all-cause mortality was 14.0% (n = 121), and 61.7% (n = 535) had severe COVID-19. Patients presenting with diarrhea or nausea/vomiting were more likely to have severe COVID-19. The liver-specific factors associated with independent risk of higher overall mortality were alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) (hazard ratio [HR] 2.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-4.55), decompensated cirrhosis (HR 2.91 [1.70-5.00]) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (HR 3.31 [1.53-7.16]). Other factors were increasing age, diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and current smoker. Hispanic ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 2.33 [1.47-3.70]) and decompensated cirrhosis (OR 2.50 [1.20-5.21]) were independently associated with risk for severe COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The risk factors which predict higher overall mortality among patients with CLD and COVID-19 are ALD, decompensated cirrhosis and HCC. Hispanic ethnicity and decompensated cirrhosis are associated with severe COVID-19. Our results will enable risk stratification and personalization of the management of patients with CLD and COVID-19. Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT04439084.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Cirrhosis , Liver Neoplasms , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19 Testing , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , United States
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