Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol ; 2022: 7497500, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2138246

ABSTRACT

Background: Cocirculation of influenza (Flu) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (SARS-CoV-2/Flu) represent a public health concern as it may worsen the severity and increase fatality from coronavirus disease 2019. An increase in the number of patients with coinfection was recently reported. We studied epidemiology, severity, and outcome of patients with SARS-CoV-2/Flu coinfection seen at Egypt's integrated acute respiratory infections surveillance to better describe disease impact and guide effective preventive measures. Methods: The first two outpatients were seen daily, and every fifth patient admitted to 19 sentinel hospitals with respiratory symptoms was enrolled. Patients were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire and provided nasopharyngeal swabs to be tested for SARS-CoV-2 and influenza by real-time polymerase chain reaction at the central laboratory. Data from all patients with coinfection were obtained, and descriptive data analysis was performed for patients' demographics, clinical course, and outcome. Results: The total number of patients enrolled between January 2020 and April 2022 was 18,160 and 6,453 (35.5%) tested positive for viruses, including 52 (0.8%) coinfection. Of them, 36 (69.2%) were coinfected with Flu A/H3, 9 (17.3%) Flu-B, and 7 (13.5%) Flu A/H1. Patients' mean age was 33.2 ± 21, 55.8% were males, and 20 (38.5%) were hospitalized, with mean hospital days 6.7 ± 6. At the hospital, 14 (70.0%) developed pneumonia, 6 (30.0%) ICU admitted, and 4 (20.0%) died. The hospitalization rate among patients coinfected with Flu-B and Flu A/H3 was 55.6 and 41.7%, with mean hospital days (8.0 ± 6 and 6.4 ± 6), pneumonia infection (40.0 and 80.0%), ICU admission (40.0 and 26.7%), and death (20.0% for both), while no patients hospitalized with A/H1. Conclusions: The recent increase in the number of SARS-CoV-2/Flu coinfections was identified in Egypt. The disease could have a severe course and high fatality, especially in those coinfected with Flu-B and Flu A/H3. Monitoring disease severity and impact is required to guide preventive strategy.

2.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(4): e27433, 2021 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141323

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sentinel surveillance of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Egypt started in 2000 at 8 sentinel sites geographically distributed all over the country. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 was added to the panel of viral testing by polymerase chain reaction for the first 2 patients with ILI seen at one of the sentinel sites. We report the first SARS-CoV-2 and influenza A(H1N1) virus co-infection with mild symptoms detected through routine ILI surveillance in Egypt. OBJECTIVE: This report aims to describe how the case was identified and the demographic and clinical characteristics and outcomes of the patient. METHODS: The case was identified by Central Public Health Laboratory staff, who contacted the ILI sentinel surveillance officer at the Ministry of Health. The case patient was contacted through a telephone call. Detailed information about the patient's clinical picture, course of disease, and outcome was obtained. The contacts of the patient were investigated for acute respiratory symptoms, disease confirmation, and outcomes. RESULTS: Among 510 specimens collected from patients with ILI symptoms from October 2019 to August 2020, 61 (12.0%) were COVID-19-positive and 29 (5.7%) tested positive for influenza, including 15 (51.7%) A(H1N1), 11 (38.0%) A(H3N2), and 3 (10.3%) influenza B specimens. A 21-year-old woman was confirmed to have SARS-CoV-2 and influenza A(H1N1) virus coinfection. She had a high fever of 40.2 °C and mild respiratory symptoms that resolved within 2 days with symptomatic treatment. All five of her family contacts had mild respiratory symptoms 2-3 days after exposure to the confirmed case, and their symptoms resolved without treatment or investigation. CONCLUSIONS: This case highlights the possible occurrence of SARS-CoV-2/influenza A(H1N1) coinfection in younger and healthy people, who may resolve the infection rapidly. We emphasize the usefulness of the surveillance system for detection of viral causative agents of ILI and recommend broadening of the testing panel, especially if it can guide case management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Coinfection , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sentinel Surveillance , COVID-19/epidemiology , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Young Adult
3.
J Infect Public Health ; 15(11): 1290-1296, 2022 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086451

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ramadan Umrah is the second largest Islamic pilgrimage with 2.75 million pilgrims allowed in 2022. This report presents the results of a survey among Egyptian pilgrims returning from Ramadan Umrah to monitor SARS-CoV-2 and influenza activity and identify prevalent SARS-CoV-2 variants after this mass gathering. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey conducted at Cairo airport from 30th April 2022-5 th May 2022. Pilgrims were invited to participate voluntarily. After consenting, participants interviewed using questionnaire including demographics, health status, and vaccination information and asked to provide NP/OP swabs for SARS-CoV-2 and influenza testing by RT-PCR. Whole-genome sequencing performed for 29 SARS-CoV-2 isolates. Incidence calculated, descriptive data analysis performed, and SARS-CoV-2 patients were compared to negatively tested participants using chi2 and p value< 0.05. RESULTS: Overall, 1003 subjects participated, their mean age 50.9 ± 13 years, 594 (59.2%) were males. Of them, 76(7.6%) tested positive including 67(6.7%) SARS-CoV-2, 7(0.7%) influenza and 2(0.2%) SARS-CoV-2/influenza coinfection. Omicron sublineage BA.2 was the prevalent variant with no difference in severity identified between BA.1 and BA.2. No difference was identified between COVID-19 incidence among receivers of different vaccine types or between fully vaccinated and booster dose receivers. CONCLUSIONS: Survey indicated a low incidence of SARs-CoV-2 and influenza among Egyptian pilgrims returning from Ramadan Umrah. Patients had mild or no symptoms with no hospitalization or deaths reported. Full vaccination and booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines proved equally effective. Enhancing COVID-19 and influenza vaccination before mass gatherings and close monitoring of respiratory viruses among pilgrims returning from Hajj and Umrah are crucial for outbreak early detection and mitigation.

4.
BMJ Glob Health ; 7(Suppl 3)2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1950114

ABSTRACT

WHO informed Egypt health authorities of individuals of different nationalities who proved positive for COVID-19 after returning from Egypt. Patients were among touristic group who visited Cairo and spent 1-week onboard Nile cruise ship. Investigation performed to confirm outbreak, detect source, and implement containment measures. Active case finding and contact tracing performed among contacts of the index cases and their contacts. Contacts defined as anyone within 6 feet from confirmed or suspected COVID-19 case for ≥15 min. Overall, 331 contacts, including 201 ship boarders and 130 hotel guests, were listed and interviewed using semistructured questionnaire and tested for COVID-19 by PCR. Among them, 136 (41.1%) were close contacts of index cases and 195 (58.9%) contacted secondary cases. Their mean age was 34.6±11.5 years, 251 (75.8%) were males and 126 (38.1%) non-Egyptians. Of them, 67 (20.2%) tested positive for COVID-19, including 57 (28.4%) ship boarders and 10 (7.7%) hotel guests. Per cent positive was significantly higher in: contacts of index cases, Egyptians, ship boarders and in males than corresponding categories (35.3% vs 9.7%, 22.9% vs 15.9%, 27.4% vs 7.7%, 24.7% vs 6.3%), respectively. Of all positive cases, 40 (59.7%) were asymptomatic where ship boarders, non-Egyptians, >50 years old and females were more likely to be asymptomatic than corresponding categories (85.0 vs 48.9%, 72.7 vs 54.5%, 100.0 vs 56.5%), respectively. COVID-19 patients among group of tourists triggered an outbreak onboard Nile ship and hotel in Egypt. Outbreak quickly contained through lab testing, case isolation, strict infection control measures and contact tracing which proved effective in reducing COVID-19 transmission early in pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Contact Tracing , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Ships , Young Adult
5.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(Suppl 3): iii1-iii11, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607646

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to compare knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) regarding COVID-19 between public health workers (PHWs) attended field epidemiology training program (FETP-trained) and those who did not attend FETP (non-FETP trained). METHODS: Multi-country cross-sectional survey was conducted among PHWs who participated in COVID-19 pandemic in 10 countries at EMR. Online questionnaire that included demographic information, KAP regarding COVID-19 pandemic was distributed among HCWs. Scoring system was used to quantify the answers, bivariate and Multivariate analysis performed to compare FETP-trained with non-FETP trained PHWs. RESULTS: Overall, 1337 PHWs participated, with 835 (62.4%) < 40 years of age, and 851 (63.6%) males. Of them, 423 (31.6%) had FETP, including that 189 (44.7%) had advanced level, 155 (36.6%) intermediate and 79 (18.7%) basic level training. Compared with non-FETP trained, FETP trained were older, having higher KAP scores. FETP participation was low in infection control, and PH laboratories. KAP mean scores for intermediate level attendees are comparable to advanced level. CONCLUSIONS: FETP-trained are having better KAP than non-FETP PHWs. Expanding the intermediate level, maintain the Rapid Response training and introduce the laboratory component are recommended to maximize the benefit from FETP. Infection control, antimicrobial resistance and coordination are areas where training should include.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(Suppl 3): iii12-iii18, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605198

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To describe demographic, clinical and epidemiological characteristics of pregnant and nonpregnant women with confirmed COVID-19 at reproductive age and determine risk factors of COVID-19 severe outcomes during pregnancy. METHODS: A retrospective study for females aged 18-49 with confirmed COVID-19 by RT-PCR in Egypt, February-July 2020. Data were obtained from Egypt National Surveillance, bivariate and multivariate analysis for demographic and clinical characteristics and outcomes of COVID-19 between pregnant and nonpregnant women including ICU admission, need for ventilator and death was performed. RESULTS: A total of 23 095 females were identified, with mean (SD) age of 35.1 (8.1) year. Of those, 408 (1.8%) were pregnant, with mean (SD) age of 29.3 (8.1) years. Compared to nonpregnant, pregnant patients were more likely to be admitted to hospital (OR = 1.7 CI = 1.4-2.1), ICU (OR = 2.4, CI = 1.3-4.3), need ventilator (OR = 3.9, CI = 2.1-7.4) and have severe outcome (OR = 3.0, CI = 1.9-4.7). Factors associated with severe outcome included: pregnancy, age > 30 years, underlying medical conditions, and living in rural areas. CONCLUSION: Pregnant women with COVID-19 are at higher risk of severe symptoms and outcome including ICU admission, requiring ventilator and death. To reduce risk of severe outcome, counseling about for seeking medical care and health education about COVID-19 preventive measures should be performed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adult , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(Suppl 3): iii34-iii42, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605007

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic are under incredible pressure, which puts them at risk of developing mental health problems. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress among HCWs responding to COVID-19 and its associated factors. METHODS: A multi-country cross-sectional study was conducted during July-August 2020 among HCWs responding to COVID-19 in nine Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) countries. Data were collected using an online questionnaire administered using KoBo Toolbox. Mental problems were assessed using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21). RESULTS: A total of 1448 HCWs from nine EMR countries participated in this study. About 51.2% were male and 52.7% aged ≤ 30 years. Of all HCWs, 57.5% had depression, 42.0% had stress, and 59.1% had anxiety. Considering the severity, 19.2%, 16.1%, 26.6% of patients had severe to extremely severe depression, stress, and anxiety, respectively. Depression, stress, anxiety, and distress scores were significantly associated with participants' residency, having children, preexisting psychiatric illness, and being isolated for COVID-19. Furthermore, females, those working in a teaching hospital, and specialists had significantly higher depression and stress scores. Married status, current smoking, diabetes mellitus, having a friend who died with COVID-19, and high COVID-19 worry scores were significantly associated with higher distress scores. CONCLUSIONS: Mental problems were prevalent among HCWs responding to COVID-19 in EMR. Therefore, special interventions to promote mental well-being among HCWs responding to COVID-19 need to be immediately implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 8(3): e32831, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The establishment of empirical evidence in the Eastern Mediterranean Region necessitates the implementation of wide-scale studies to describe the demographic, clinical features, and severity profile of patients with COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the patterns of COVID-19 severity and mortality in seven countries, and to determine the risk factors of COVID-19 severity and mortality. METHODS: This multicountry study was based on a retrospective review of medical records of hospitalized patients confirmed to have COVID-19. This study includes data from Iraq, Pakistan, Sudan, Somalia, Morocco, Egypt, and Yemen. All demographic and clinical data were extracted from hospital records (paper files) by trained data collectors. RESULTS: A total of 4141 patients were included in this study from seven countries. Comorbidities were reported by nearly half of the patients, with hypertension (n=1021, 24.7%) and diabetes (n=939, 22.7%) being the most common. Older age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart diseases were significantly associated with COVID-19 severity and mortality. Ever smoking and renal diseases were significantly associated with severity but not mortality, while male gender, respiratory diseases, and malignancy were significantly associated with mortality but not severity. CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms the role of comorbidities and demographic features on the severity and mortality of COVID-19. Understanding the contributing factors ensures attentive care and informs clinical management of patients with poorer prognoses in the early stages of diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Egypt , Humans , Male , Mediterranean Region , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
9.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(5): e27412, 2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218859

ABSTRACT

This article briefly describes Egypt's acute respiratory infection (ARI) epidemic preparedness and containment plan and illustrates the impact of implementation of the plan on combating the early stage of the COVID-19 epidemic in Egypt. Pillars of the plan include crisis management, enhancing surveillance systems and contact tracing, case and hospital management, raising community awareness, and quarantine and entry points. To identify the impact of the implementation of the plan on epidemic mitigation, a literature review was performed of studies published from Egypt in the early stage of the pandemic. In addition, data for patients with COVID-19 from February to July 2020 were obtained from the National Egyptian Surveillance system and studied to describe the situation in the early stage of the epidemic in Egypt. The lessons learned indicated that the single most important key to success in early-stage epidemic containment is the commitment of all partners to a predeveloped and agreed-upon preparedness plan. This information could be useful for other countries in the region and worldwide in mitigating future anticipated ARI epidemics and pandemics. Postepidemic evaluation is needed to better assess Egypt's national response to the COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Acute Disease , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Child, Preschool , Contact Tracing , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Public Health Surveillance , Quarantine , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL