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Fendler, Annika, Shepherd, Scott, Au, Lewis, Wilkinson, Katalin, Wu, Mary, Byrne, Fiona, Cerrone, Maddalena, Schmitt, Andreas, Joharatnam-Hogan, Nalinie, Shum, Ben, Tippu, Zayd, Rzeniewicz, Karolina, Boos, Laura, Harvey, Ruth, Carlyle, Eleanor, Edmonds, Kim, Rosario, Lyra Del, Sarker, Sarah, Lingard, Karla, Mangwende, Mary, Holt, Lucy, Ahmod, Hamid, Koreweg, Justine, Foley, Tara, Bazin, Jessica, Gordon, William, Barber, Taja, Emslie-Henry, Andrea, Xie, Wenyi, Gerard, Camille, Deng, Daqi, Wall, Emma, Agua-Doce, Ana, Namjou, Sina, Caidan, Simon, Gavrielides, Mike, MacRae, James, Kelly, Gavin, Peat, Kema, Kelly, Denise, Murra, Aida, Kelly, Kayleigh, O'Flaherty, Molly, Dowdie, Lauren, Ash, Natalie, Grounthoud, Firza, Shea, Robyn, Gardner, Gail, Murray, Darren, Kinnaird, Fiona, Cui, Wanyuan, Pascual, Javier, Rodney, Simon, Mencel, Justin, Curtis, Olivia, Stephenson, Clemency, Robinson, Anna, Oza, Bhavna, Farag, Sheima, Leslie, Isla, Rogiers, Aljosja, Lyengar, Sunil, Ethell, Mark, Messiou, Christina, Cunningham, David, Chau, Ian, Starling, Naureen, Turner, Nicholas, Welsh, Liam, As, Nicholas van, Jones, Robin, Droney, Joanne, Banerjee, Susana, Tatham, Kate, O'Brien, Mary, Harrington, Kevin, Bhide, Shreerang, Okines, Alicia, Reid, Alison, Young, Kate, Furness, Andrew, Pickering, Lisa, Swanton, Charles, Gandhi, Sonia, Gamblin, Steve, Bauer, David, Kassiotis, George, Kumar, Sacheen, Yousaf, Nadia, Jhanji, Shaman, Nicholson, Emma, Howell, Michael, Walker, Susanna, Wilkinson, Robert, Larkin, James, Turajlic, Samra.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-310349

ABSTRACT

CAPTURE (NCT03226886) is a prospective cohort study of COVID-19 immunity in patients with cancer. Here we evaluated 585 patients following administration of two doses of BNT162b2 or AZD1222 vaccines, administered 12 weeks apart. Seroconversion rates after two doses were 85% and 59% in patients with solid and hematological malignancies, respectively. A lower proportion of patients had detectable neutralizing antibody titers (NAbT) against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) vs wild-type (WT). Patients with hematological malignancies were more likely to have undetectable NAbT and had lower median NAbT vs solid cancers against both WT and VOCs. In comparison with individuals without cancer, patients with haematological, but not solid, malignancies had reduced NAb responses. Seroconversion showed poor concordance with NAbT against VOCs. Prior SARS-CoV-2 infection boosted NAb response including against VOCs, and anti-CD20 treatment was associated with undetectable NAbT. Vaccine-induced T-cell responses were detected in 80% of patients, and were comparable between vaccines or cancer types. Our results have implications for the management of cancer patients during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
Nat Cancer ; 2(12): 1321-1337, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510628

ABSTRACT

Patients with cancer have higher COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. Here we present the prospective CAPTURE study, integrating longitudinal immune profiling with clinical annotation. Of 357 patients with cancer, 118 were SARS-CoV-2 positive, 94 were symptomatic and 2 died of COVID-19. In this cohort, 83% patients had S1-reactive antibodies and 82% had neutralizing antibodies against wild type SARS-CoV-2, whereas neutralizing antibody titers against the Alpha, Beta and Delta variants were substantially reduced. S1-reactive antibody levels decreased in 13% of patients, whereas neutralizing antibody titers remained stable for up to 329 days. Patients also had detectable SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells and CD4+ responses correlating with S1-reactive antibody levels, although patients with hematological malignancies had impaired immune responses that were disease and treatment specific, but presented compensatory cellular responses, further supported by clinical recovery in all but one patient. Overall, these findings advance the understanding of the nature and duration of the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 in patients with cancer.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Neoplasms/complications , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/blood , Neoplasms/immunology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Young Adult
3.
Nat Cancer ; 2(12): 1305-1320, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510627

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) antiviral response in a pan-tumor immune monitoring (CAPTURE) ( NCT03226886 ) is a prospective cohort study of COVID-19 immunity in patients with cancer. Here we evaluated 585 patients following administration of two doses of BNT162b2 or AZD1222 vaccines, administered 12 weeks apart. Seroconversion rates after two doses were 85% and 59% in patients with solid and hematological malignancies, respectively. A lower proportion of patients had detectable titers of neutralizing antibodies (NAbT) against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern (VOC) versus wild-type (WT) SARS-CoV-2. Patients with hematological malignancies were more likely to have undetectable NAbT and had lower median NAbT than those with solid cancers against both SARS-CoV-2 WT and VOC. By comparison with individuals without cancer, patients with hematological, but not solid, malignancies had reduced neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses. Seroconversion showed poor concordance with NAbT against VOC. Previous SARS-CoV-2 infection boosted the NAb response including against VOC, and anti-CD20 treatment was associated with undetectable NAbT. Vaccine-induced T cell responses were detected in 80% of patients and were comparable between vaccines or cancer types. Our results have implications for the management of patients with cancer during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/blood , Neoplasms/complications , Prospective Studies , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
4.
Cytometry A ; 99(1): 90-99, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1086336

ABSTRACT

In March 2020, with lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic underway, the Francis Crick Institute (the Crick) regeared its research laboratories into clinical testing facilities. Two pipelines were established, one for polymerase chain reaction and the other for Serology. This article discusses the Cricks Flow Cytometry Science Technology Platform (Flow STP) role in setting up the Serology pipeline. Pipeline here referring to the overarching processes in place to facilitate the receipt of human sera through to a SARs-CoV-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay result. We examine the challenges that had to be overcome by a research laboratory to incorporate clinical diagnostics and the processes by which this was achieved. It describes the governance required to run the service, the design of the standard operating procedures (SOPs) and pipeline, the setting up of the assay, the validation required to show the robustness of the pipeline and reporting the results of the assay. Finally, as the lockdown started to ease in June 2020, it examines how this new service affects the daily running of the Flow STP. © 2020 The Authors. Cytometry Part A published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/diagnosis , Flow Cytometry/standards , Laboratories/standards , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/standards , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/trends , Flow Cytometry/trends , Humans , Laboratories/trends , Reproducibility of Results
5.
Science ; 370(6522): 1339-1343, 2020 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-913669

ABSTRACT

Zoonotic introduction of novel coronaviruses may encounter preexisting immunity in humans. Using diverse assays for antibodies recognizing SARS-CoV-2 proteins, we detected preexisting humoral immunity. SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (S)-reactive antibodies were detectable using a flow cytometry-based method in SARS-CoV-2-uninfected individuals and were particularly prevalent in children and adolescents. They were predominantly of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class and targeted the S2 subunit. By contrast, SARS-CoV-2 infection induced higher titers of SARS-CoV-2 S-reactive IgG antibodies targeting both the S1 and S2 subunits, and concomitant IgM and IgA antibodies, lasting throughout the observation period. SARS-CoV-2-uninfected donor sera exhibited specific neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV-2 S pseudotypes. Distinguishing preexisting and de novo immunity will be critical for our understanding of susceptibility to and the natural course of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , COVID-19/blood , Epitope Mapping , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Viral Zoonoses/blood , Viral Zoonoses/immunology , Young Adult
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