Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 20
Filter
2.
ERJ Open Res ; 8(1)2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765434

ABSTRACT

A specific T-cell response persists in the majority of COVID-19 patients 6 months after hospital discharge. This response is more prominent in those who required critical care during the acute COVID-19 episode but is reduced in patients with lung sequelae. https://bit.ly/3fBuVA4.

3.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 321(5): L978-L982, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736157

ABSTRACT

Early in the COVID pandemic there were concerns about the outcomes for patients with COPD who developed COVID-19. Although the pandemic has made the diagnosis and routine management of COPD more difficult, the risk of patients developing COVID or of having poor outcomes is less than anticipated and there have been some unexpected findings that may lead to significant improvements in the management of COPD in future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , Pandemics , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Respir Res ; 23(1): 37, 2022 Feb 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701068

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some COVID-19 survivors present lung function abnormalities during follow-up, particularly reduced carbon monoxide lung diffusing capacity (DLCO). To investigate risk factors and underlying pathophysiology, we compared the clinical characteristics and levels of circulating pulmonary epithelial and endothelial markers in COVID-19 survivors with normal or reduced DLCO 6 months after discharge. METHODS: Prospective, observational study. Clinical characteristics during hospitalization, and spirometry, DLCO and plasma levels of epithelial (surfactant protein (SP) A (SP-A), SP-D, Club cell secretory protein-16 (CC16) and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI)), and endothelial (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1), soluble E-selectin and Angiopoietin-2) 6 months after hospital discharge were determined in 215 COVID-19 survivors. RESULTS: DLCO was < 80% ref. in 125 (58%) of patients, who were older, more frequently smokers, had hypertension, suffered more severe COVID-19 during hospitalization and refer persistent dyspnoea 6 months after discharge. Multivariate regression analysis showed that age ≥ 60 years and severity score of the acute episode ≥ 6 were independent risk factors of reduced DLCO 6 months after discharge. Levels of epithelial (SP-A, SP-D and SLPI) and endothelial (sICAM-1 and angiopoietin-2) markers were higher in patients with reduced DLCO, particularly in those with DLCO ≤ 50% ref. Circulating SP-A levels were associated with the occurrence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), organizing pneumonia and pulmonary embolisms during hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced DLCO is common in COVID-19 survivors 6 months after hospital discharge, especially in those older than 60 years with very severe acute disease. In these individuals, elevated levels of epithelial and endothelial markers suggest persistent lung damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , Endothelial Cells , Epithelial Cells , Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity , Age Factors , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Function Tests , Risk Factors , Smokers , Spirometry , Survivors
5.
ERJ open research ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1688440

ABSTRACT

Patients infected by SARS-CoV-2 may develop pneumonia (COVID19) and require hospital admission and, eventually, critical care [1]. This has been related with a weaker innate immune response with impaired production of type I interferons [2]. In this setting, an antigen specific T-cell response is needed for the elimination of SARS-CoV-2, as well as to develop long-lasting memory to respond to potential future SARS-CoV-2 infections [3, 4]. However, this response needs to be contained once the virus is eradicated to avoid further damaging the host.

7.
ERJ Open Res ; 7(4)2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546754

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The relationship between asthma and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) risk is not clear and may be influenced by level of airway obstruction, asthma medication and known COVID-19 risk factors. We aimed to investigate COVID-19 risk in people with asthma. METHODS: We used UK Biobank data from all participants tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (n=107 412; 17 979 test positive). Questions at baseline defined ever asthma and asthma medications. Baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was categorised into quartiles. Logistic regression modelled relationships between asthma, and asthma categories (age at onset, medications, FEV1 quartiles), and risk of SARS-CoV-2 positive test. We investigated modification by sex, ethnic group, smoking and body mass index. RESULTS: There was a reduced risk of a positive test associated with early-onset asthma (<13 years) (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99). This was found for participants with early-onset asthma who were male (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.78-0.98), nonsmokers (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.78-0.98), overweight/obese (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.93) and non-Black (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.82-0.98). There was increased risk amongst early-onset individuals with asthma in the highest compared to lowest quartile of lung function (1.44, 1.05-1.72). CONCLUSION: Amongst male, nonsmoking, overweight/obese and non-Black participants, having early-onset asthma was associated with lower risk of a SARS-CoV-2 positive test. We found no evidence of a protective effect from asthma medication. Individuals with early-onset asthma of normal weight and with better lung function may have lifestyle differences placing them at higher risk. Further research is needed to elucidate the contribution of asthma pathophysiology and different health-related behaviour, across population groups, to the observed risks.

9.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 321(5): L978-L982, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506058

ABSTRACT

Early in the COVID pandemic there were concerns about the outcomes for patients with COPD who developed COVID-19. Although the pandemic has made the diagnosis and routine management of COPD more difficult, the risk of patients developing COVID or of having poor outcomes is less than anticipated and there have been some unexpected findings that may lead to significant improvements in the management of COPD in future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , Pandemics , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 321(5): L978-L982, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443660

ABSTRACT

Early in the COVID pandemic there were concerns about the outcomes for patients with COPD who developed COVID-19. Although the pandemic has made the diagnosis and routine management of COPD more difficult, the risk of patients developing COVID or of having poor outcomes is less than anticipated and there have been some unexpected findings that may lead to significant improvements in the management of COPD in future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , Pandemics , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 2909, 2021 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062773

ABSTRACT

The identification of factors predisposing to severe COVID-19 in young adults remains partially characterized. Low birth weight (LBW) alters cardiovascular and lung development and predisposes to adult disease. We hypothesized that LBW is a risk factor for severe COVID-19 in non-elderly subjects. We analyzed a prospective cohort of 397 patients (18-70 years) with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection attended in a tertiary hospital, where 15% required admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Perinatal and current potentially predictive variables were obtained from all patients and LBW was defined as birth weight ≤ 2.500 g. Age (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.04 [1-1.07], P = 0.012), male sex (aOR 3.39 [1.72-6.67], P < 0.001), hypertension (aOR 3.37 [1.69-6.72], P = 0.001), and LBW (aOR 3.61 [1.55-8.43], P = 0.003) independently predicted admission to ICU. The area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUC) of this model was 0.79 [95% CI, 0.74-0.85], with positive and negative predictive values of 29.1% and 97.6% respectively. Results were reproduced in an independent cohort, from a web-based survey in 1822 subjects who self-reported laboratory-positive SARS-CoV-2 infection, where 46 patients (2.5%) needed ICU admission (AUC 0.74 [95% CI 0.68-0.81]). LBW seems to be an independent risk factor for severe COVID-19 in non-elderly adults and might improve the performance of risk stratification algorithms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Infant, Low Birth Weight , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Self Report , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
19.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 203(1): 24-36, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060510

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has raised many questions about the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and whether modifications of their therapy are required. It has raised questions about recognizing and differentiating coronavirus disease (COVID-19) from COPD given the similarity of the symptoms. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) Science Committee used established methods for literature review to present an overview of the management of patients with COPD during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is unclear whether patients with COPD are at increased risk of becoming infected with SARS-CoV-2. During periods of high community prevalence of COVID-19, spirometry should only be used when it is essential for COPD diagnosis and/or to assess lung function status for interventional procedures or surgery. Patients with COPD should follow basic infection control measures, including social distancing, hand washing, and wearing a mask or face covering. Patients should remain up to date with appropriate vaccinations, particularly annual influenza vaccination. Although data are limited, inhaled corticosteroids, long-acting bronchodilators, roflumilast, or chronic macrolides should continue to be used as indicated for stable COPD management. Systemic steroids and antibiotics should be used in COPD exacerbations according to the usual indications. Differentiating symptoms of COVID-19 infection from chronic underlying symptoms or those of an acute COPD exacerbation may be challenging. If there is suspicion for COVID-19, testing for SARS-CoV-2 should be considered. Patients who developed moderate-to-severe COVID-19, including hospitalization and pneumonia, should be treated with evolving pharmacotherapeutic approaches as appropriate, including remdesivir, dexamethasone, and anticoagulation. Managing acute respiratory failure should include appropriate oxygen supplementation, prone positioning, noninvasive ventilation, and protective lung strategy in patients with COPD and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Patients who developed asymptomatic or mild COVID-19 should be followed with the usual COPD protocols. Patients who developed moderate or worse COVID-19 should be monitored more frequently and accurately than the usual patients with COPD, with particular attention to the need for oxygen therapy.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Disease Management , Lung/physiopathology , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/prevention & control , Societies, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL