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1.
SAGE Open Med ; 10: 20503121221094208, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862067

ABSTRACT

Objectives: COVID-19 pandemic brought mortalities, morbidities, fear, and financial despair among people around the world. As it advanced, misinformation and myths about it caught wildfire, contributing to misbelief among the already shocked population. Medical students are the building blocks of the medical community and can provide a pivotal role in combating COVID-19 misinformation by delivering correct knowledge and awareness to the non-medical population of the country. Hence, it is important to assess their knowledge and perception of COVID-19 myths. Therefore, this study evaluates medical student's knowledge regarding myths and misinformation related to COVID-19 infection and its vaccine. The study also assesses the belief of medical students on various conspiracy theories of COVID-19. Methods: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted among 401 undergraduate medical students of Karachi in June-August 2021. A validated, structured, and self-administrated questionnaire was used for data collection. The data were entered on an open EPI version 3.01 and Statistical Package of Social Science version 26 for analysis. A chi-square test was performed to identify determinant factors. All p-values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Overall knowledge score of participants about myths and misinformation related to COVID-19 and its vaccine was as follows: 166 (28.9) participants possess good knowledge, while 167 (41.6) and 118 (29.4) had moderate to poor knowledge, respectively. Senior students, vaccinated, and participants infected by COVID-19 had good to moderate knowledge. Overall, 139 (34.7) participants strongly disagree and 103 (25.7) participants somewhat disagree with conspiracy theories related to COVID-19. Absence of belief in the conspiracies is associated with vaccinated participants. Conclusion: The study shows that most medical students possess adequate knowledge of misinformation about COVID-19 and its vaccines, and have low belief in conspiracy theories of COVID-19.

2.
Health Sci Rep ; 5(3): e542, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1858806

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims: Clinical characteristics and factors associated with mortality in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in countries with low case fatality rates (CFR) are unknown. We sought to determine these in a large cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients in Qatar and explore the early mortality predictors. Methods: We retrospectively studied the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients admitted to the ICU at the national referral hospital for COVID-19 patients in Qatar. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with mortality. Results: Between March 7 and July 16, 2020, a total of 1079 patients with COVID-19 were admitted to the ICU. The median (IQR) age of patients was 50 (41-59) years. Diabetes (47.3%) and hypertension (42.6%) were the most common comorbidities. In-hospital mortality was 12.6% overall and 25.9% among those requiring mechanical ventilation. Factors independently associated with mortality included older age ([OR]; 2.3 [95% CI; 1.92-2.75] for each 10-year increase in age, p < 0.001), chronic kidney disease (OR; 1.9 [95% CI; 1.02-3.54], p = 0.04), active malignancy (OR; 6.15 [95% CI; 1.79-21.12], p = 0.004), lower platelet count at ICU admission (OR; 1.41 [95% CI; 1.13-1.75] for each 100 × 103/µl decrease, p = 0.002), higher neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio at admission (OR; 1.01 [95% CI; 1-1.02] for each 1- point increase, p = 0.016), higher serum ferritin level at admission (OR; 1.05 [(95% CI; 1.02-1.08] for each 500 µg/L increase, p = 0.002), and higher serum bilirubin level at admission (OR; 1.19 [95% CI; 1.04-1.36] for each 10 µmol/L increase, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The mortality rate among critically ill COVID-19 patients is low in Qatar compared to other countries. Older age, chronic kidney disease, active malignancy, higher neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, lower platelet counts, higher serum ferritin levels, and higher serum bilirubin levels are independent predictors of in-hospital mortality.

3.
Health Sci Rep ; 5(2): e525, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705401

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Mortality rates and clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) vary significantly. OBJECTIVES: To describe the data of patients with pulmonary comorbidities who were admitted to the ICU with COVID-19 in Qatar in terms of demographic characteristics, coexisting conditions, imaging findings, and outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of the outcomes with regard to mortality and requirement of invasive ventilation, demographic characteristics, coexisting conditions, secondary infections, and imaging findings for critical care patients with COVID-19 in Qatar who had pulmonary comorbidities between March and June 2020. RESULTS: A total of 923 patients were included, 29 (3.14%) were found to have pulmonary disease. All these 29 patients' respiratory disease was noted to be asthma. Among these, three patients (10.3%) died in the ICU within 28 days of ICU admission. They were all above 50 years old. Nineteen (66%) patients required intubation and mechanical ventilation. Twenty-one (72.4%) patients were males. The most common comorbidities included diabetes mellitus (55.1%) and hypertension (62%). Eighteen (62%) patients developed secondary infections in the ICU. Five (17.24%) patients developed renal impairment. Twenty (69%) patients received tocilizumab as part of their COVID-19 management, and out of these 16 (80%) patients developed a coinfection. CONCLUSION: Patients with pulmonary disorders had higher mortality rates than other patients admitted to ICU during the same time frame with similar comorbidities; these patients require extra consideration and care to avoid disease progression and death.

4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-317701

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite previous exposure to coronavirus epidemics a few years ago, limited clinical and epidemiological information is available from the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The UAE is the second most affected country amongst the Gulf Cooperation Council Countries by Covid19. Distinctly, the UAE has a population of almost 9.2 million, with fewer than 12% UAE nationals, and the rest immigrants, mainly unskilled labourers. The disparate socio-economic structure, crowded housing conditions, multi-ethnic, multicultural population offers a unique set of challenges in Covid19 disease management. Methods In order to assess patient characteristics and survival for patients infected with Covid19, electronic patient data was retrospectively abstracted from the medical records of two designated public Covid19 referral hospitals, and subjected to statistical analysis. Results From, the total of 3072 patients, less than one-fifth were females, the Asian population (71.2%), followed by Middle Eastern Arabs (23.3%) were the most infected by the virus. Mortality was low among the Asian population. Diabetes Mellitus (26.8%, p < 0.001), hypertension (25.7%, p < 0.001), and heart disease (9.6%, p < 0.01) were the most prevalent comorbidities observed and decreased survival by 2–3 fold. Kidney disease escalated mortality rate by almost eight-fold high (19.4%, p < 0.001), as compared to patients without kidney disease. Higher age of patients between 51 and 65 years, significantly decreased the odds for survival (Crude OR 14.1, p<,0.001) and (Adjusted OR 12.3, p < 0.001), and patient age beyond 66 years, further significantly decreased the odds for survival (Crude OR 36.1, p < 0.001) and (Adjusted OR 26.6,p < 0.001). Kidney disease as comorbidity significantly diminished the survival rates (Crude OR 9.6,p < 0.001) and (Adjusted OR 5.7, p < 0.001), as compared to those without kidney dysfunction. Conclusion Although Asian population was the highest infected by Covd19, their mortality rate was low (2.6%), compared to other nationalities. Older ages above 51 years decreased the odds of survival significantly. Despite other comorbidity risks, kidney dysfunction contributed to enhanced mortality by over eight-fold and reduced the odds of survival (Adjusted OR 26.6), compared to those patients without kidney dysfunction. Our findings are important in the management of the Covid19 disease in the region with similar economic, social, cultural and ethnic background.

5.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 1115, 2021 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486554

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Studies indicate that ethnicity and socioeconomic disparity are significant facilitators for COVID-19 mortality. The United Arab Emirates, distinctly has a population of almost 12% citizens and the rest, immigrants, are mainly unskilled labourers. The disparate socio-economic structure, crowded housing conditions, and multi-ethnic population offer a unique set of challenges in COVID-19 management. METHODS: Patient characteristics, comorbidities, and clinical outcomes data from the electronic patient medical records were retrospectively extracted from the hospital information system of the two designated public COVID-19 referral hospitals. Chi-square test, logistic regression, and odds ratio were used to analyse the variables. RESULTS: From, the total of 3072 patients, less than one-fifth were females; the Asian population (71.2%);followed by Middle Eastern Arabs (23.3%) were the most infected by the virus. Diabetes Mellitus (26.8%), hypertension (25.7%) and heart disease (9.6%) were the most prevalent comorbidities observed among COVID-19 patients. Kidney disease as comorbidity significantly diminished the survival rates (Crude OR 9.6, 95% CI (5.6-16.6), p < 0.001) and (Adjusted OR 5.7 95% CI (3.0 - 10.8), p < 0.001), as compared to those patients without kidney disease. Similarly, the higher age of patients between 51 and 65 years, significantly decreased the odds for survival (Crude OR 14.1 95% CI (3.4-58.4), p < 0.001) and (Adjusted OR 12.3 95% CI (2.9 - 52.4), p < 0.001). Patient age beyond 66 years, further significantly decreased the odds for survival (Crude OR 36.1 95% CI (8.5-154.1), p < 0.001), and (Adjusted OR 26.6 95% CI (5.7 - 123.8), p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that older ages above 51 years and kidney disease increased mortality significantly in COVID-19 patients. Ethnicity was not significantly associated with mortality in the UAE population. Our findings are important in the management of the COVID-19 disease in the region with similar economic, social, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Comorbidity , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Clin Case Rep ; 9(4): 2285-2288, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1130470

ABSTRACT

This case highlights an atypical presentation of a patient with unknown history of mental disease who has been diagnosed with a bipolar disorder associated with severe COVID-19 symptoms. Neuroimaging was only positive for subtle white matter changes; he was treated with antipsychotics and mood-stabilizing agents until he reached partial remission. The authors urge clinicians to consider the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with mental illness and the urgent need for vigilant monitoring of presenting signs and symptoms.

7.
Clin Case Rep ; 9(2): 853-855, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-985978

ABSTRACT

The authors urge clinicians to balance the use of Immunosuppressant drugs and tocilizumab for COVID-19 patients to avoid the development of infections like Cryptococcemia, leading to death within 30 days.

8.
Clin Case Rep ; 9(1): 148-152, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919869

ABSTRACT

The authors urge clinicians to observe for early signs of CMV reactivation in patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding and intestinal perforation after receiving tocilizumab or other immunosuppressive therapy as a treatment for COVID 19. Early recognition of CMV infection and treatment will prevent life-threatening bleeding and mortality.

9.
Med Educ Online ; 25(1): 1791467, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640317
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